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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  November 7, 2017 3:00am-6:00am PST

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makes sense for north korea to come to the table and to make a deal that's good for the people of north korea and the people of the world. i do see certain movement, yes. but let's see what happens. >> overnight, president trump pivots back to diplomacy after telling his secretary of state last month to stop wasting his time. we have more on the trip and brand-new poll numbers, bob mueller crossing a white house red line and a governor's race in virginia that may be the democrat's to lose. good morning, everyone, it is tuesday, november 7th. welcome to morning joe. we have editor for the washington post david ignacious with us on set. david out with the new thriller, "the quantity item spy," we we will get to this morning. also with us, national correspondent for nbc news and
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msnbc steve kornacki. >> where is your book? everybody has to come with their book. >> next year i will hold to you that. >> and nbc host of casey d.c. . >> show us, c'mon. m msnbc sunday night. you were going to get willie, joe and me a casey d.c. shirt. i was going to where a tank with a jacket over it. where is it? >> they're in the mail. i will send advocate an e-mail today. >> a fedex truck went by my house, i watched it ride by. >> i will put it in the mail after this. >> you know, we will be hammering that jek for three years, four years, five years down the road. >> the lightning bolt you will love. i'd like to you wear it every day. >> every morning donny deutsche says coming out with chuck's
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show, whatever. gets old after four years, he kept going. this is case ki d.c casey d.c. >> i have to stop you, we have major news. >> i want to start, because there is so much noise out there every day, we actually may have some news breaking through the clouds, just a sort of a ray arc little bit maybe a little bit of news that isn't involved with russian investigations or tweets. what the president said actually is significant and maybe suggests that hess secretary of state and general mattis and others have been slog behind the skeents, day i scenes, day in, . this could all evaporate when the sun comes out, with a mid-morning tweet. but if we are moving towards a
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deal that is very significant. >> it certainly makes the world on edge a little bit calmer. joe, you and i and mika have been talking on this show now for months about the diplomatic strategy that lay behind these comments about little rocketman seeming to take the edge of nuclear war. all that time, there has been an effort to set the table for diplomacy. trump is telling us now the last fork has been laid down. we'll have to see what he's really got. >> how do you gauge the optimistic behind the scenes from people in the administration and people have been hammering this out do they believe they can get a deal? >> when we say a deal, i think we should correct that to say the beginning of talks. it will take a long time. >> can we have a start toward a frame that helps us step back from a missile being launched
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over japan in weeks? >> here's the heart of the matter, kim jong-un the non-rational leader of north korea would like to get all the way to demonstrate he could drop a nuclear weapon on any state in marc. that's his goal that will take am year. the u.s. is saying we want to freeze your program right now. we are not insisting you instantly denuclearize, we want you to freeze it. sit dun for talks t. u.s. already laid out many of the positions it will take in those talks. kim has to died he doesn't want that last little bit of achievement before he goes into the talks. we'll see. >> all right. >> we will get to remark l rackable news from carter panel from last night i mean seriously, it was far better than any script he red from mad men. we will get there in a second. you don't want to overstate it.
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you got to believe the virginia race today is as important a race than we seen a year ago when donald trump beat hillary clinton. if the democrats can't when this race with donald trump with record low approval ratings and the gop congress with record low approval ratings in a blue state that hillary clinton won easily, boy, there will be blood on the floor with democrats. how is this race going? >> yeah. i think so much this is about psychology, it's about the psychology the democratic party. if they're unable to win today. it's also about the psychology of the democratic party coming out what happened a yeemplth here's the situation. we had about a dozen polls taken in the last week in this race in virginia. basically all but one of them have had north and the democrat in the lead. now. it's a small lead. you are looking at a consistent and steady lead.
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it would be more surprising at this point if gillespie would win than northam, democrats are psychologically how abouted by the last election. i know a lot have all been on republican turf. all these special house elections this year, they have not put a win on the board, they want that win tonight. >> you can go back, willie, to the 2009 race in massachusetts, replaced ted kennedy and the voters are usual i older, wiseer and more conservative than in special elections, the democrats are going uphill. in the state of virginia, you can look at six of the major ratess over the past four or if cycles. democrats always seem to under perform. you can look at dplespy was supposed to lose big in the senate race, earned up barely losing. can you go down the line in race after race after race, democrats under performed.
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that's why they're on edge. >> it's a state barack obama won twice and harrisburg won a year ago. he's the ultimate insider, establishment figure. he ran the rnc. he worked in the george w. bush white house, he ran mitt romney's campaign in 2016. yet he's working on the nflers knowling, he sent a model out four republicans to run using what they think is the best of from ump to get votes, it's maintaining who they are? >> reporter: it's certainly a test case, willie. it's been the challenge for dplespy. he clearly is a little bit personally comfortable with all of this. vaughan hilliard, our nbc reporter tried to get him to answer questions about the president days ago on the trail. he literally ran from the cameras.
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he says i'm airing all kind of other ads, ads about education. anyone that lives in this area knows you are seeing ads they are are fear mongering. i think one piece of the story as well is the northam campaign. i think there are going to be questions, mainly for democrats if helesss this race. there has been this sense in the ether that that may actual ply a risk. he has not necessarily top in the views of many democrats i've talked to, they are frustrated with how northam approached the democratic coles in virginia. they need african-american votes. there was a big mistake within they left the african-american governor off a flyer. progressives not necessarily excited. all of these dynamics we saw in '16 are at stake. >> the democrats, i know you will agree with me, have to get tough. i saw northal pushing back
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against ed dplespy, saying he is for keeping gang members out of jail, you know, it was factually correct. but, democrats need to come out and say ed gillespie is lying. you know why he's lying? he's a washington insider. he will do average nything to w. now he is telling you i will let gang members wander around your street. let me tell you, if they break the law, they're going to jail. you need to send ed gillespie back to washington. they're always leak that you know, if you look at the campaign ads the democrats got to 11 to roll up their sleeves and fight. >> i know, it's unbelievable. >> oh my god, how do you make this race close? >> i don't know. but we've fixed it out. so that's a major political story of parties belowing up, not coming back together. that's a major foreign policy story of major diplomacy with
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north korea. now to this, we follow along. will you need some, a member of president trump another foreign policy advisory committee said he told several trump campaign officials, including members of the inner circle, he was heading to moscow in july of 2016, carter page testified before the house intelligence committee last week, in an exchange with trey gowdy, trey said he e-mailed former trump campaign manager cory lewandowski, current white house communication director hope hicks and j.d. gone, said he was on his way there page also said he told attorney general jeff sessions. >> again, here's another russian contact that jeff sessions allegedly knew about. >> and campaign co-chair sam clovis before he left. >> by the way, gordon told him, don't do it and he went around
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to figure out a way to get to russia. >> payment said he told him he could go. he told you in march he did not say page should travel to russia on his own. though he also said he couldn't remember but quote i'm very clear about this, i granted nobody permission to do. that page had not provided the e-mails to the house spell jens committee when he testified on thursday but said that he would. the testimonials contradicted page's earlier comment that he only exchanged greetings with russia's deputy prime minister d dvorkorich in a raft raj of problems, if you remember, shortly after returning, he congratulated members-of-a policy team for their quote
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excellent work on the ukraine amendment. a reference to the trump campaign decision to intervene, water down a proposed amendment the gop's ukraine platform. page told the committee, he was expre expressing what i feel. >> let's stop right there. david ignacious, despite the fact that carter page is all over the place and many times people are looking at his testimony, his performs art, there are lines out of that testimony that are so damming that actually start to stitch together what was happening and when he guess over there and actually has official meetings with the russians that i think the attorney general knew about and oughts knew about, and then they go to that ukraine amendment, people are starting to suggest perhaps a quid pro quo. you give us dirt on hillary, we'll remove the ukraine amendment from the gop platform.
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>> it was bizarre testimony. it sounded as if he was making it up as he went along, one minute he was invoking the fifth. another minute he wasn't. documents kept emerging, oh, i'm happy to give you those e-mails and when you add this up, you see now, three strat instances in which trump campaign associates papadopoulos in his plea agreement page now in his descriptions of meeting with the professor, the july famous july 9 meting with don trump jr. with the russian lawyer n. each of those three instances the issue is what are the russians going to do to help the trump campaign? the everyday now is coming from them. and you gen to see something hard. this has been a difficult investigation with so many thing in the air. those are the hard pieces, they
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show the russians working to supply information to the trump company that will be helpful. >> and the trump campaign actively seeking contact itself with and help from the cell len. >> you see when jeff sessions testified three times he was not aware of any russian contacts. he clearly was told about this meeting by carter page and others we have learned about since, did he think it wasn't going to come out, somehow people weren't getting to the bottom of it t. journalists inside those committees looking into it. how can he sit up there saying knowing what he knew, he didn't know of any russian contacts in the campaign, even if they were innocuous, why would you say you didn't know anything, you clearly knew. >> what happened donald trump and mike pence and jeff session saying that nobody on their campaign talked to rugs. mike pence said we just talk to
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americans. no, they talked to russians. they talked to russians a lot then they've spent the last nine months lying no talking with russians. >> you sorted through seven hours of carter page spilling it in front of the house intel in the. interesting note to president trump, the idea from carter page's point of view, for president trump to go to russia and make a grand speech he said would have been like president obama going to germany in 2008 that would have launched his campaign and presidency on the world. what else jumped out at you as you looked at this testimony? >> reporter: willie, i think what you were just referring to earlier is kind of the key over arching question here. obviously, we are learning new information about what top trump officials now about russian contacts between people who were working for them inside the organization and russians. the question i think is whether
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there was intentionally or actual discussion or whether this was a situation where they were kind of accidentally running around with people who had deep russian ties. what i took away from the transcript is, carter page, this wasn't a one off, oh, hey, i took a trip to moscow. he had longstanding deep business ties with people in russia. if you dig down into the details of this transcript. a very odd picture of this man emerges. and he is somebody who went from at the beginning of these investigations, my source were describing him as essentially falling all over himself to tell them everything they knew. it was almost as though they felt they were receiving his resume in the mail. then more information about this steele dossier, including that he met with a top businessman during this trip, had a secret meeting. >> that still hasn't been corroborated in this transcript. now the committee was pressing him on where are you living at
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night? he insisted i'm not living at a russian's house. they redacted that information. how are you making your money? i'm living on my savings. >> where did that money come from? did it come from russia? there are so many unanswered request es in this transcript. it gave us a window into what this committee is looking into, the questions they are asking i think will yield a lot more reporting in the press over the next few weeks. >> if you look at testimony before the committee. if you look at all the testimony so far that the information bob mueller is getting, we are getting, it's dribbling out. mueller knows so much more there are all these contacts that first they denied and then they said were incidental contacts. now it's very clear. there is a pattern and it is an expansive pat were and time and time again, these key members
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have lied about their contacts, including the president of the united states, who drafted up a statement on air force one, while his lawyers were stranded on the ground that was a grand lie that may have involved one of the most important meetings. >> what we are seeing i think is the way in which russian trade craft works. somebody is initially contacted by a professor. you know somebody they would get to know in their normal point of business. that's what carter page says, then that professor is able introduce them to a senior fimpblt page said i wasn't meeting anybody than on the street. it turned out he was meeting the deputy prime minister and passing back to the campaign the words from this senior official how russia wanted to work with the new team. so you see how they were
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building their relationship with a lot of anticipation things will be different with trump. we now see long after how a prosecutor builds his case, how he starts with these little people. who had ever heard of jp morgan papadopoulos before and carter page. >> what was he doing there? >> you build these structures of influence brick by brick, board by board, that's what we're watching the prosecutors explain to us, eventually it leads up to the senior people. we're not there yet. which is why this is such a food investigation. >> wow. >> you got to go back and look at points in time if you want to understand how far we've gone, how far down the road we've moved, mika, if you go back, for instance, to the washington post editorial meeting donald trump had when he spoke about the size of his hands or a great deal of the time. when the washington post finally
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got him to talk about foreign policy, the first two people he named were carter page and papadopoulos. so go back. by the way, that wasn't in june of 2015. that was after the guy was on his way to winning, i think it was may or june. >> it was only then getting this list together, people nobody had ever heard of from those were his first to people and they already had contacts with russia. >> we will go back in time and look at the other people that former presidents have named at the top of their foreign policy people. those people women are they? >> those two names were given to the washington post. they had already met with mugs agents. >> that's incredible. still ahead on "morning ving jo"
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>> he would name another agent paul manafort in the summer of 2016. >> incredible. that's what we know. >> he was flying around the country with michael flynn. >> psychologically foley calm. you saw a member of the senate intelligence, senator opening cuss king and jim himes on the house intel committee which questioned carter page and david ignacious is going to tell us what is going on in saudi arabia. we will explain, just ahead. you are watching morning joe. we'll be right back. zplmpblths
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. >> president trump is responding to the rapid moving tweets in saudi arabia. he endorsed the crown britain
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tweeting quote i have great confidence in king salman and the crown prince of saudi arabia and they know exactly what they are doing. some of those they are harshly treating have been milking their country for years. >> since the millingman. >> american officials say as many as 500 people have been arrested in the crackdown, including 11 princes, trump's tweets come as the situation between saudi arabia and neighboring countries have rapidly deteriorated. saudi arabia is now accusing iran of conducting an act of war after a ballistic missile was fired from yemen towards riyadh's airport over the weekend. the missile was intercepted and destroyed. the saudi foreign minster says the missile was smuggled into yemen by iran and the spokeman says the missile could not have been fired without iranian support, adding saudi arabia
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will quote directly respond to iran in the appropriate time and manner. >> let's get david ignacious there i'm boring you. >> no, let's get to saudi arabia. what's happening in saudi arabia? >> we are watching a powerful, power-hungry current prince of saudi arabia mohammed salman shatter the way saudi arabia has been governed and install this new system. saudi arabia was a country governed by the consensus of the princes. the princes would meet, it would take forever, it infuriated outsiders, he's gone boom with a meat cleaver. >> also, religious hard liners have been put on notice the clerics have been put on notice, your ways are going to change. >> he began reducing the power of the religious police about six months ago. that was a significant move. he said women will drive in this country. his bet, joe, is young sud days
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sick of living in this conservative society will say, you know this guy may be impulsive, by golly, this is a new country. we're excited about being in it. i think the danger for him is he is so ambitious that he is fighting more wars than he can win. >> somebody suggested yesterday, he was way over -- from if you look at the people he has arrested. these are some of the most prominent business leaders in the country. some of them are you grow older, they're your eyes, of course they have him. some of them are people who have been a part of the story of the king's mod werization, he has to be careful not to isolate himself. he's got now as enemies, senior princes, you know, second, become nairs running saudi companies and finally some of the religious leadership that doesn't like what he's doing. you get too many enemies, i don't know how many u how many young people say are you great.
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you have a problem. i'd love to see saudi arabia more modern, a less corrupt place. the things he talks about are the right things. everybody should understand that. i just don't want him to get into a situation where he becomes an autocrat, an authoritarian king, striking at everybody, because i think that will hurt him. there so saudi arabia intercepted the missile that was coming from yemen. saudi arabia says it was an iranian missile. it plams hezbollah for this as an active war for iran war. are the implications for the united states as a close allie of saudi arabia saying, iran has declared war on the kingdom of saudi arabia? >> willie, a head strong young king who wants this sense of accomplishment with iran to consolidate his power internally is pushing us towards greater confrontation. we need the make sure we are in control of that caselation process, not him. i worry most what happens next for lebanon. if the saudis cut off lebanon,
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financially. they've stayed out of the syria civil war. hasn't fallen apart as predicted. lebanon could go over the lip of the waterfall, too. >> that would be unfortunate. that's something where u.s. power should be saying, slow down, we like what you are doing. slow down. >> let's turn back to today's governor's races in virginia. also the one in new jersey, joining us now, pulitzer prize columnist and associate editor eugene robinson, we have been talking about virginia this morning, how close it has become, if you look at the polls, it's two, three, four points a. marginal lead for the democrat ralph northam there. what would a loss by the democrat or a two or three-point win in a state that barack obama won twice, hillary clinton won a year ago, mean to democrats, what would it mean to donald trump? >> well, a two or three-point win would be a when. democrats would take that and i
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think i do believe the polls in. have a. it's good. i think that's the most likely outcome is that democrats, that northam pulse this out. it can be five votes. democrats want to win. need a win and if they get one, i think they'll be happy. if they don't get a win, it will be, you know, a real proceed to the democratic party. and there will be talk about what kind of candidate northam was and how awful and negative the campaign was and by the way, everybody in the washington, d.c. tv market will be really flood that this race is over, because the intelligence and advertising has been atrocious and ugly and you feel, you know, it's like walking through a sewer. but a loss would be a blow. a real proceed to the democratic party that expects and needs to
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win this race. >> you know. >> incredible. >> steve kornacki, i second what gene said a. win is a win. if you win by one 1r0e9. >> that itself a win. donald trump lost by over 3 million votes. he wasn't. when you start talking about margins, oh, but we only lost -- losers talk about margins, a win is a win is a win. how important is this race to democrats as they move towards 2018? >> i agree we that, too. i think there is a tendency, virginia is definitely trending from red to blue. we are watching that play out. there is a tendency to state how blue it has become. hillary clinton won with a virginian on the ticket t. margin was six points. 2014, mark warner was reelected by a fraction-of-a point. this is still a competitive state. >> by the way, when the polls show warper up seven, nine points. >> when you look at this issue of polling and they will be off today and that's every democrat's worst nightmare in 2014, there weren't that many
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polls taken overall, there was an assumption mark warner will win. we had a dozen in the last week. this would be a case we had all the polling autopsies after last november what went wrong? you can isolate last november to a few of the states in the rust belt, but boy if you were to wake up tomorrow and ed gillespie is the governor elected of virginia that is a different kind of polling failure. there will be different kind of questions. >> one thing to watch for too as we rauch whwatch the returns, q common in virginia the democratic vote to come in fairly late. gillespie could appear to be ahead for a good part of the evening and still lose this race. so as you watch the rurps, keep that in mind -- rurps, keowe re that in mind. >> democrats stay on the ledge in the results come in. democrats break late in more than virginia.
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new jersey. this takes on iyad allawi significance because bob menendez trial is going to jury and the next governor is going to decide who the next senator may be depending on what this jury says in new jersey. >> that's an interesting sneer, the lt. gov. of the republicans, she's running, she has three things going against her. they look insurmountable. eighth blue state, donald trump's approval rating is 30, 35% in new jersey. so the good news for democrats they're not worried about losing this race. the bad news is they've had this date circled on this colin far for a long time. chris christie won two times and they looked at the poll numbers, not only will we win? we will get swept into every office in this state. they seen the polls tighten. now there is a fear this might come down to single digits. that's a good problem to have. in terms of menendez, if he gets
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convicted, first of all he will appeal. we know from a former virginia governor, there is a precedent they could succeed. he is up for re-election next year, if he is convicted, a, do democrats in the senate stand behind him while he afeels? that could play out for months? b, does hemenendez, does he pus forward and try to run for re-election in 2018 in that's the question. that's what will put democrats in a real jam. do they stand behind him then or move against him? coming up, for more than a decade, examiners secretary wilbur ross has been telling reques requests forbe's" magazine he is a billionaire. it seems that might not be true. we will follow the money next on morning joe..
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>> i don't know if willie told you, he is a billionaire. >> it's probably in there. should have told you earlier. >> say it, envision it.
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be it. >> oh, like trump, it's the trump way. last month, we told you about "forbe's" looking into commerce secretary wilbur ross' quiet transfer of assets after the election. he left more than 2 billion office transfer disclosure. it raised questions whether or not he violated federal rules or created conflicts of interest. now "forbe's" is back with a new report about his missing billions t. bottom line, that money never existed. and the commerce secretary has apparently been lying about his net worth for years. >> once again the author, so let me ask, how many of these guys and i'm sure it's giets, mainly guys, make light of you guys. >> definitely guys. about how much money they're worth there you got to assume 80
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or 90% of the people we talk to are pushing us up or down. it's our job to see how they have to push and go the other way. maybe 20% are honest. this, though, an egeneralious case. >> so he's telling you guys for years he's worth how much, 2, 3 billion? >> it starts in 2004. we call him up and say it looks like you are worth a billion dollars. he says, that's fine. puts us on. he sends us lists of the company his firm has inappropriate vested in and their values as if they're all his own money, it's not. it's outside inappropriate advisors. he apparently starts making up numbers about what the assets are and sending those over. >> but maybe there is so many numbers involved, his conflict is a little off. is that possible? >> it is complicated. i'll give him that. we talked with ten people who used to work with him. the resounding explanation was
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wilbur ross is not an honest guy. this fit not only what he has been doing with forbe's for years and what he has been doing in other aspects for years. >> i go es the motive here, is this ego, he wants people to think he's rich. does this have a business benefit if he's seen as having more assets? >> it's both. but what's interesting here is if you are perceived to be rich and you are an investment manager, you go out and raise money. if you go out and raise money and say, hey, i'm worth there are 3 billion. are you more likely to inappropriate vest with a buy the that's worth $300 million? they're both wore atmosphere lot of money. we are able turn fake numbers into real assets. >> so, dan, you write about a missing $2 million.
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wilbur ross is missing $2 billion. what if that $2 billion and why is it significant? >> the $2 billion is the discrepancy between what he told us previously and what is listed on his disclosure. so when we reached out, we said, hey, can you explain to us what's gentleman on? that was a number that cam from him. the original story was based on an interview with him. he said the reason there was that discrep paeps, that theft $2 billion off his disclosure report. >> is there a threat to his position or is this sort of interesting and he's a guy that inflated his own net worth, it doesn't matter ego. >> i think it's more than a trivial lynn to a magazine thing. as you pointed out, there are real business implications here bharks is more troubling, there is a harmer pattern that seems to reflect. this is a buy the in ongoing lawsuits with two of his former top people in his firm.
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obviously, can you tell by the number of people we talked to, there are plenty of people that used to work with him, that had grievances both in the firm and on their way out. so it seems like it just is another example of, ap overall pattern of dishonesty. >> david ignacious, this having been a good week about wilbur ross. regarding ties to putp's circle? >> wilbur ross is one of the most interesting peep. another examining of secret networks that accounts in the care beep, many of them. what's alleged in these papers is ross had substantial efforts, investments in a company doing transports of energy, natural gas with people close to putin and did not disclose those
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investments. >> is there up with of those, a putin son if law? >> there was a putin direct relative a part of this group. what's astonishing, apart from the amounts of money, which were substantial. there was no discussion of this direct link, it seems, to somebody that wilbur ross, the secretary of commerce would be in direct, important negotiation with. i was, it takes a lot to shop these days. i was disclosed what he left off the disclosure report. >> thank you once again. >> thank you. >> next month he's gentleman to come back and find that $2 billion. >> it's somewhere. we thought about it. >> coming up, this is video from president trump, moments ago, toasting the state dinner in seoul, calming south korea quote a loyal allie. we also have his message to the
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north amid the current nuclear standoff. that's straight ahead, morning joe is coming right back.
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i'm still not sure if the election were tomorrow and went up against unnamed democrat, we wouldn't have -- >> look at virginia. >> like virginia. i'm not so sure he's not exactly where he was in june of 2016. and once donald trump versus unnamed democratic candidate, he's got a 50/50 shot of
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winning, and -- because if it were so bad, democrats would be winning by 10 points in virginia right now. >> well, look, you can't beat somebody with nobody. right? so as long as you're running unnamed democrat against donald trump, yeah, it would certainly be a dog fight. so the question in terms of reelection is who emerges to carry the democratic banner, and does the party unite with enthusiasm about -- around that person, and with all its constituencies enthusiastic and ready to come out to vote? i find that poll really fascinating, because i think what you see is the people -- people who voted for obama and then for trump, which seems like quite a contradiction, right, but i think those are people who in both elections were looking for something new, something
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different. remember barack obama, there are no red states, there are no blue states, there are the united states of america. he was not a traditional politician in his campaign, and i think there are just a lot of people looking for that, and some of those people thought they saw that in donald trump. the people who thought they saw that, i think, are the ones who are falling off, and that hard core 32% is still with trump. >> yes. steve, it's always important to remember when we look at the polls where donald trump's at 35% or 5636 -- 36%, that's where he was when he got the nomination. it's so hard. >> my biggest question when i look at the polls, and this is a question. i don't have the answer. i think we're almost living through many things right now. one thing is a political science experiment. my question when i look at the polls of the approval rating at
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35%, the temptation and what we've always done in the past is say 35% now approval rating. you got 46 % in the election. therefore, he's lost 11%. they've turned against him. the problem is when you asked people what kind of a president he would be, they said he would be incompetent and untrustworthy. he had lower scores on every critical measure of a president's performance than hillary clinton, and he won. that means people who thought he would be a bad president voted for him. >> it remind me of the simpson when homer was fired. he slept on the job and stole from me. there goes the best employee i ever had. >> well, it's an interesting question of how long is the leash. maybe they were voting against hillary clinton and willing to blow up the system, but they did want their lives to get better. they wanted obamacare repealed and ri plaeplaced.
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steve, you have a new place this morning. in it steve argues we may need a different framework for understanding trump's presidency by culture. that gets to what i was talking act. >> it's an open question. what were people voting on last year and looking for? i think the traditionally we understand president through legislation through the tax cuts or health care. this is a president who hasn't himself seemed that interested in it. he seems interested in culture war issues. the nfl, it has no legislative component. this is not something going through congress, but it engages not just the political sector but all of culture in a heated way, in a divisive way. i wonder if that creates the space i'm thinking about here where people who don't like donald trump on the traditional measures rally around him because there's just this cultural divide down the middle of the country. >> all right. thank you for being on, gene. coming up, we knew about
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trump foreign policy adviser carter page's trip to moscow during the campaign. what we didn't know until now is that he told several campaign officials before he left. we'll discuss what it means for the mueller investigation with lawrence o'donnell. plus the pentagon launches an investigation on how the air force failed to report a domestic violence conviction that should have prevented him from buying weapons. we'll talk about it. we're back in a moment. when i first got on ancestry i was really surprised that i wasn't finding all of these germans in my tree. i decided to have my dna tested through ancestry dna. the big surprise was we're not german at all. 52% of my dna comes from scotland and ireland. so, i traded in my lederhosen for a kilt. ancestry has many paths to discovering your story. get started for free at ancestry.com.
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were you guys on e-mail chains together, you and papadopoulos? >> there's a lot of e-mails all over the place when you're in a campaign. >> yes or no. were you in e-mail chains with papadopoulos? >> probably a few. >> were you in e-mail chains with him about russia? >> it may have come up with from time to time. >> you travel over the sum tore moscow. are you the person they're talking act? >> i don't think so, and if you listen to the audio of the transcripts of everything i said, i was always there just as a private citizen. i've spoken at universities in moscow and russia and asia and europe. many times. it's separate from the campaign. >> all right. that's the art of having a conversation with carter page. welcome back to "morning joe." it's tuesday, november 7th. with us, we have associate
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editor for the associated press, david ignatius. >> and i'm loving this. we're going to be talking about -- >> makes a great gift. i'm going to have you sign this. >> that was funny. >> also the rage, steve cover knack can i. >> he did not bring a book. >> also kasie dc. >> also joining the conversation, the also mark us o'donnell, he's out with a new book -- lawrence o'donnell. makes a great gift. we're supposed to get to this in a moment. this is one of the -- it is one of the most divisive years. every time students talk about how this is the worst it's ever been, mika and i were at a harvard event the other night we said no, actually, in 1968 the
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year began with the soviets rolling tanks into czechoslovakia. then you had the assassination of martin luther king and then bobby, chicago on fire, the protests. then you have an extraordinary -- i mean, the backdrop. i mean, mexico city 1968, you had the protests there. it was just -- i was a young guy, but i could even look into my parent's and grandparent's eyes, they were scared as hell. it was like the world was coming apart, and yet an extraordinary campaign played out amidst the backdrop of perhaps the most chaotic year in america since 186. >> yes. and every one of the things you mentioned happening in every other presidential campaign would have been the biggest thing that happened in that presidential campaign. and they were happening monthly at this point. and we saw a realignment of the
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parties that began there and has become permanent. literally the last liberal st d standing on a republican convention state, john lindsey, who was humiliated, forced to second the nomination offing a knew for vice president. and then you see this insurgent left of the democratic party, mccarthy from out of nowhere, decides to challenge a sitting incumbent for the president. it's never been done. that set up the lane that's existed since which bernie sanders used. which is insurgent left against the overwhelmingly establishment. >> on the republican side, you had trump democrats now. they were called reagan democrats before. but you had so many yanked from
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the democratic party by none other george wallace who posed a huge challenge to richard nixon, because they were after bobby's death. they went to wallace, and nixon couldn't get them from there, but that, of course, set up republican politics from 1968 to today where a republican candidate who is a creature of washington d.c. is finishing his campaign with confederate statues. >> and george wallace's campaign told me he was hearing wallace. it was all the same stuff including this unique feature of those two campaigns that no other campaign has decided to use, which is to use the protester in the audience to show how tough the candidate is. we always saw trump slam down the protesters. i'd like to punch him in the mouth. that's straight from wallace. >> the most extraordinary flip was during the debates when he
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would be booed by all the republicans in the audience, and he would turn that into an advantage. >> yes. yes. and it's -- >> you insiders. >> and collusion, anyone? we now have it absolutely do you wanted that richard nixon was in direct communication through different channels to the south vietnamese government saying don't cooperate with lbg. lbg was moving toward a peace process in paris. nixon needed the war to be going and needed the country to see no progress on the war on election day. he got that by getting the south vietnamese to not negotiate in paris and that was an absolute case of collusion. >> by the way, i overlooked when i was listening to the events, david,y think it was march 30th, lbj announced he's not going to
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run for reelection, despite he won by one of the largest landslides four years earlier. >> the country felt like it was pulling apart. i remember as an 18-year-old college student, i thought what on earth is happening to the country? but there was an idealism. it feels that way sometimes these days. there was an idealism back then that you could make something different which every student i know felt, and that crazy year, we can do something different. >> speaking of crazy, let's get to the top story this morning. a member of the foreign policy advisory committee said he told several trump campaign officials including members of the president's inner circle he was heading to moscow in july of 2016. carter page testified before the house intelligence committee last week, and in exchange with republican congressman tray goud di, page said he e-mailed corey lewandowski, current white house
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communications director, hope hicks, campaign foreign policy adviser, j.d. gordan, that he was on his way to moscow. page also said he told the attorney general jeff sessions and campaign co-share sam clove us before he left. he said corey lewandowski told him he could go, but the trip was not associated with the campaign. lewandowski said he didn't say that, but he said he couldn't remember, i granted nobody permission to do that. >> we talked about jeff sessions before. here's a guy that said no contact with russia, nobody in our campaign has had any contact with russia. he said, in fact, i'm -- i consider myself to be part of the campaign. i've never had any contact with russia. he had to rescind that several times as to himself. here we have in the past week information that's now come out that the two top people that donald trump named as his
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foreign policy advisers to the washington post editorial board in late spring 2016 at the heart of the campaign after he locked up the rnc nomination, that he had information that both of them were going to russia. the attorney general of the united states knew that donald trump at the time top two foreign policy advisers had told him directly they were going to russia. >> what's disturbing is that those contacts weren't disclosed, but to me even more disturbing is that as we learn about the visits, in each of the key contacts, papadopoulos, page, manafort and the group donald trump junior, there was an effort to get from russia, dirt about hillary clinton, to get russian help in this political campaign. that's the part that's coming into sharper focus. >> and with this information from last night that we get from
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the testimony, it looks like for possibly a quid pro quo. you changed the language in the gop platform. we get you dirt on hillary. >> you know how things come into focus and it takes a while when you got the binoculars. the two lenses aren't quite right. it finally begins to come into focus. >> do you know who probably already has it in focus? mueller. >> well. >> we're learning what a good prosecuter mueller is. i've heard many times people say this guy's the best. he sets up the investigation carefully, knows the pressure points and does it. we're watching that happen. >> even based on what we know with each passing day this looks like t getting further and further away from the trump campaign. when people come out saying they had no knowledge being proouen as a liar saying they didn't know somebody, i didn't have a meeting with a russian, yes, you said, senator sessions with
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kislyak a couple of times. carter page let you know he was traveling to russia. don junior, it was a meeting about adoption. no, actually, it was to float dirt about hillary clinton. the question i asked last hour, i'll ask again, is it simple arrogance, or how did they think they were going to get away with it in a world where journalists are looking into everything and intel committees are looking into everything, where bob mueller is looking into everything. how could you testify before congress about things you knew not to be true. >> most of what i've seen has been a careful threading to the needle. jeff sessions was asked publicly questions like did you know of any contact with the russians. his answer would be, i don't know of any contacts with the russians about interfering with the election. wait. that's a little bit more than what was in the question what was more basic. this carter page information is actually the one where i don't see how jeff sessions' previous answers on this thread this
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particular needle. this is the one thing where if he was being very careful about those words, he wasn't being quite careful enough. >> kasie, democrats were already upset about jeff sessions' testimony before the committee believing that he had not been truthful. how does the information in the past several days from carter page and papadopoulos, how does that increase the pressure on the attorney general? >> i think it adds to -- it's another piece of the same story we've been hearing over and over again. i think that point is well taken here. and i do think that jeff sessions is under more pressure than we maybe continually focus on. i mean, he has on the one hand people have jumped to his defense because the president had seemed to potentially threaten to fire him in the context of all of this. so i think the jeopardy that he is now in as these details kind
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of trickle out, it's possible we're understating it. >> the testimony also contradicted page's earlier comment that he only exchanged greetings with russia's deputy prime minister. in an e-mail sent after the trip he expressed strong support for mr. trump and a desire to work together toward devising better solutions for a vast range of current international -- >> okay. so a vast range. >> what exactly -- >> green teas. it's more than that. >> and are there any other country that discussions like this are happening? >> no. absolutely not. >> further more, shortly after returning, page congratulated members of the trump foreign policy team on july 14th, 2016,. further, quote, excellent work on the ukraine amendment. a reference to the trump campaign's decision to intervene to water down a proposed amendment to the gop's ukraine
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platform. page told the committee he was, quote, just expressing what i feel. this guy. i mean -- >> chris hayes's co-host is in trouble. >> i know. seriously. >> chris hayes, you're going to be on your own. >> page also -- >> it seems like he's enjoying being on chris's show and just spouting off with wild abandon. >> and nobody else -- >> and a slight smile on his face. >> that's what i'm struck by when the revelations come on. every time he's been sitting there on chris's show, he knows this stuff is in his e-mail. >> does he? >> he has to know this stuff was in his e-mail. >> why is he so happy about it? >> this is the inexplicable part. >> what's up with him? >> he is winging it. >> steve -- >> the moment just ended when he -- you can't wing it the way he did before that committee. >> you're looking to me? >> yes.
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explain. >> here's what i can explain. i was as shocked or surprised or caught off guard as i think everybody at the table was a few weeks ago when bob mueller introduced us to the name of george papadopoulos and the fact there was a plea agreement and all this stuff was happening. that was a reminder to me that there is so much more going on behind the scenes in this investigation with bob mule who are probably has a lot more dots connected than we can do with the information out there. there's more going on and there's no way to know what it is until he tells us. >> let's go back to playing with fire. the transformation of american politics. i think one of the more distressing transformations was when bobby kennedy was assassinated, the lingering heart breaking image with people saluting on the sides of the tracks. whites on one side of the tracks. blacks on the other side of the
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tracks. and there was an image in the book about bobby's campaign that as the train moved on, the whites turned around, went back to their homes. african americans turned around and went back to their homes. and that author correctly said no politician since bobby's death on june 6th, 1968, has brought working class whites and blacks back together like they were that day. >> i think bill clinton came close. i think barack obama came close to that. but what's easy to miss in all of that, especially in the aftermath of the assassination, is just how much the kennedys, as they were called, were hated, and hated in the south in particular after steam rolling george wallace to integrate university of alabama, sending the deputy attorney general down there. there are sections of the
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country that were very pro kennedy, but he had just lost just almost a week earlier. had just lost the first election a kennedy had ever lost, the oregon primary, and he went in there and lost to mccarthy. then came down to california a week later and won, and that should have solidified a coalition between mccarthy and robert kennedy for robert kennedy to go forward and get the nomination. but it was going to be very, very difficult for bobby kennedy to wrestle that nomination away from humphrey because of the amount of enemies bobby kennedy had within the democratic party. >> let's talk about that relationship. one of the more fascinating and sad relationships. mccarthy hated bobby. bobby hated mccarthy. they went after each other, and you would think -- >> i would say -- my impression is mccarthy did hate bobby, and bobby was perplexed by mccarthy and didn't really have the energy to hate him.
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>> okay. but after -- >> teddy was the peacemaker between them. >> after bobby was assassinated, you would think mccarthy would have stepped forward and occupied that space and don't better, but by all accounts i've read, it was a broken man after the assassination. >> yes. he was lost. he felt horrible about some of the things he'd said about bobby during the campaign, and it really stopped his life completely. no one knew how to campaign, first. there was just an assassination in the middle of the campaign. all campaigns had to suspend. hubert humphrey couldn't get started publicly because of this. mccarthy was thrown for a loop. the phrase midlife crisis had not been publicly coined, but you watch a midlife crisis the mccarthy during that campaign starting really when bobby entered it, because he didn't know how to deal with that, and then to his personal, i think, shock, it was even more difficult for him when bobby was
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out. he was completely lost. >> the country today is obviously divided culturally and politically. there have been comparisons to 2016, 2017 and 1968. do you see parallels not in the way the race was run. in the way our culture sits right now? >> the biggest difference between now and 1968 is when david at 18 years old had something in his pocket that could get him killed at any moment. and he had to have it in his pocket by the law, his draft card. so the entire male population of the country, 18 and older was threatened by this. that meant your boyfriend was threatened. your brother was threatened, your son, your grandson. there was no one who wasn't threatened. i went to my first vietnam funeral in 1968, my cousin johnny got killed there in 90 days trying to follow in his father's footsteps. >> it's something today people won't realize. i was very young, but i sort of
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started being conscience of things during vietnam. we all knew. everybody knew somebody that went to vietnam and got killed. >> yeah. it was not unusual. now if you went up and tried to find someone who has been to a military funeral in the last 17 years, it's hard to find. the numbers are much lower than -- 16,000 just in 1968 alone. 16,000 military funerals in the united states. a total of 6,000, 6,500 in the last few years in iraq and afghanistan. you see with a volunteer army, this is not equally distributed. >> when you look back at this, do you think our country is ever fully healed itself from this year of division? >> no. because this is where the divisions got locked into cement. for example, the beginning of 1968, if you say to me, you're a democrat, i don't know if you're a liberal or conservative.
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if you say you're a republican, i don't know if you're a liberal or conservative. one of the front runners was a liberal, george romney. that was the last time anybody with the word liberal was even thinking about a republican presidential nomination. so once we kind of removed that possibility of common ground of there are no liberal republicans, there are no conservative democrats, then when i hear that you're a democrat, i know that you're a liberal, and i don't like liberals, and that's gotten worse every day since 1968. >> you talk about steve. he talks about those divisions. i remember in 1994 didn't have money, so i knocked on a lot of doors and i told this store before, but it's so relevant here. after my first day of knocking on doors, my parents and i -- go, and i said i found out after
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the third door that you're either on the side of john wayne or jane fonda. i was serious. here's how sad it is. you're right. we're still stuck in cement. that was a product of 1968. i found that after knocking on three doors in 1994, and it's even more true today. >> and another -- this is in the book too, i think chicago and the chaos at the convention, but the media's role in this, dan rather famously on cbs at the '68 convention, he gets beat up. police are there and all the accusations against them in the media became a big part of that. >> lawrence o'donnell, thank you so much. >> thank you very much. >> amazing. we'll see you tonight on "the last word" at 10:00 eastern time on msnbc. we posted an excerpt from your book "playing with fire" on our website.
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>> we're going to give equal time to the quantum spy. this does not seem fair, david. >> it does make a great gift. it is -- it's set in the present future. >> we're not going to do it this block. i'm just telling you, we're going to do a make good, because we have to talk about "the quantum spy". >> absolutely. >> they both make a great gift. now available at your local independent bookstore. >> still ahead on "morning joe." before he met with the house, carter page sat down with investigators from the senate intel committee last month for five hours. that must have been fun. we'll compare notes with that committee member next on "morning joe."
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i think we're showing great strength. i think they you said we have
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unparallel strength. there has never been strength like it. you know we sent three of the largest aircraft carriers in the world and they're right now positioned. we have a nuclear submarine also positioned. we have many things happening that we hope, we hope, in fact, i'll go a step further. we hope to good god we never have to use. with that being said, i really believe that it makes sense for north korea to come to the table and to make a deal that's good for the people of north korea and the people of the world. i do see the certain movement, yes. but let's see what happens. >> that was the president yesterday traveling abroad. it's his trip continues to asia, five countries there. joining us now from capitol hill, a member of the armed services and intelligence committees independent senator angus king.
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thank you for being with us. you sit on armed services. do you share the president's optimism that there's some kind of a deal on the horizon that would perhaps scale back north korea's nuclear program? >> well, i don't know what he knows in terms of the imminence of any kind of discussions. i think we're not necessarily close to a deal. what i hope we're close to is talking, so some discussions, some kind of effort toward resolution, because a military action, we've heard all kinds of data in the last few weeks about how difficult that would be, and i think he's playing it tough, and indicating to them there will be consequences if they do something aggressive toward us, but -- and the other piece this has to involve is china. china is the only country that really has any true power over north korea. so hopefully what we're seeing is the beginning of the dance of diplomacy of getting to the point where there are some
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discussions, and a freeze in their program at the current time and then talking about denuclearization, and we don't know what that means for the rest of the peninsula, but i'm re reminded of the cuban missile crisis where an agreement not to invade, was the key to the deal to get the russian missiles out of cuba. >> do you believe the discussions have begun to take place? in other words, is there progress, and would you concede the president's approach has maybe made the progress, tough public talk and then working behind the scenes to get from chie no na to north korea? >> i think that's the right path. and the problem is, and the difficulty is if you're indicating strength and you're talking act resolve and nuclear submarines and aircraft carriers, at what point is that misunderstood on the north
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korean side as an imminent threat? that's the danger of this game. but i do think you've got to demonstrate to the north koreans that they're facing overwhelming strength as the president said, and that it's in their interest to try to make some kind of discussion. ultimately, the reason the north koreans have wanted to develop nuclear weapons is as a kind of insurance policy for kim jong-un to keep his job. and to the extent we can transfer that fear, that par know know ya, that's the ultimate end. the president is in a delicate situation. he has to demonstrate strength and also have rex tillerson or others involved in some discussions. that's where it has to go, and i think it has to start in china. >> david ? >> senator king, you've been a careful observer of the investigation of russia, russia's activity during our campaign. i'm curious what you made of
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carter page's testimony that was released yesterday before the house committee, and in particular, weather you're beginning to see a pattern of trump campaign officials having conversations with the russians that look an awful lot like we'll give you this piece of information hoping for bter registrations down the road. did you have any of that feeling as you looked at the transcript? >> it's a similar kind of feeling you have this papadopoulos, and i think you've talked about this morning the ukrainian amendment, if you will, and the republican party platform. the june 9th meeting with donald trump junior and the higher people in the campaign. there clearly were these kind of discussions. i think one of the disturbing things is the fact of these kind of contact and discussions and trips have had to be dragged out. they weren't volunteered. they weren't brought forth promptly. and that raises questions if they weren't telling us why is
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that? but i've been thinking about this. this is a tortoise and a hare kind of thing. you're rushing and wanting to get to conclusions. we're the tortoise. we're interviewing 100 witnesses and working slowly, director mueller is working slowly bit by bit, and that's the way an investigation like this works. compare it with water gate where you had four guys in a two-hour event. we're talking about something that stretched over 18 months according to "the wall street journal," it may have gone back to 2015 when the russians started tweeting on behalf of donald trump, and it's a long process. hundreds, perhaps thousands of people involved. and another country. and so it's complex and slow, and i know it's frustrating for us and for the american people, but that's the way these things have to proceed. >> senator, on another topic, we're learning new information about sunday's massacre in a small town church in texas that killed 26 people, injure 20d
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more. the gunman may have been targeting his mobile who attends that church but was not at the service when the man opened fire sunday morning. meanwhile the military is investigating how the air force failed to enter the gunman's domestic violence into a federal database. that would have prevented him from owning a gun. we're also learning more about the extent of the violence. according to air force records while stationed in new mexico in 2012, he fractured his baby stepson's skull, and repeatedly hitted, kicked, and choked his ex-wife. he pleaded guilty to cruelty to animals, and still able to purchase guns in colorado and texas. my question is how troubled are you by the fact that the air force did not alert the fbi and get this man's name into the federal database that should have prevented him from purchasing the weapons he used to kill 26 people in texas? >> i'm very troubled. our main defense against things
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like this is background checks, trying to keep guns out of the hands of people who shouldn't have them. and clearly that was the case, and i don't know whether it was an administrative error or somebody deliberately decided this isn't important enough, and you get into distinctions between what type of discharge did he get? was it dishonorable? no, it wasn't. was it administrative. all those things. clearly we have to get to the bottom of this, and the entire defense department in my view has to review policies to be sure that this information gets into databases. i'm interested in apparently he had a variety of guns in the car. where did they come from and how did he get them? did he buy them legitimately at gun stores? what was the background on that. yes, if we have a background check that means anything, the data has to get in there. >> as we look at solutions and how to prevent these from happening again, we have the
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conversations after shootings that come up too often. background checks always come up. there's a system in place that failed those people in texas. a lot of people, too, gun control advocates saying there's no reason for a private citizen to own a military style weapon, the type he used in that church. do you think it's time for those to be banned, senator? >> no. i think we've got to look at that carefully. here's the problem. i'm from a state where we have one of the highest gun ownership rates in the country, and yet, we have one of the lowest rates of gun crime. an assault weapon -- it's called an assault weapon, but it's simply a semi automatic rifle in costume with a different kind of stock. but the functionality of the weapon is the same as thousands of them in maine and alaska, all over the united states that are used by legitimate hunters. so i have a problem with banning a weapon because of its appearance. one of the problems that we had
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when they did it before was they changed the appearance a little bit and the ban doesn't apply. i think there are other issues. for example, magazine size that maybe we do need to have a discussion about. because a lot of times in these situations, apparently, it's when the fellow, it's always a fellow, starts to reload, that's when you might have a chance to stop the tragedy, and so magazine size, i think is something we need to talk about. but i've never been one to say, let's get rid of the semi automatic weapons. >> do the hunters in maine say they need an ar 15 to hunt deer? >> of course they don't. it's the same gun. it just looks different. and they don't. and they use a more conventional semi automatic rifle. but it's the size of the magazine, in maine i think the limit is you can only have a magazine that holds five bullets when you're hunting.
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the question is do you need these magazines that hold 30 or more? >> so what's a constructive solution here, senator? if you don't believe the weapons should be banned, if the background system was in place and failed the people in texas, what's something you can offer this morning as we try to have a conversation about how to prevent these things? >> well, i think there are a couple of things. one, we can continue to refine and improve the background check. we found a gap in it in this case. let's fix that with the military. secondly, we need to fix the loopholes in the background check system such as gun show, the so-called gun show loophole or buying guns online. the trafficking in guns across state lines i think are all things we can talk about. this is the amendment we voted on and passed but not by quite enough votes in 2013. bump stocks. this thing that converts a semi automatic to essentially an automatic, ought to be banned. should have been.
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the atf should not have allowed them back in 2012, i think. so that we can take care of. i think we need to talk about magazine sizes. i think there are things we can do, and we also need to talk about mental health issues. somebody that goes in and shoots 26 people, i think, clearly has something going on. and this guy's history indicates that. but to me, the key is background checks. the old saying of the nra for so long was guns don't kill people. people kill people. well, if that's the case, let's keep guns out of the hands of people who shouldn't have them. we couldn't even pass a bill last year to keep people on the terrorist no fly list from buying guns. we ought to be making steps like that to keep them out of the hands of irresponsible and dangerous people. >> and this gunman obviously should have been swept up in the background check and now 26 people are dead because he wasn't. senator king of maine, thank you for your time this morning.
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coming up, more on the carter page testimony. one of the members called carter page the most invasive bizarre witness he'd ever encountered. we'll discuss it next on "morning joe." can you fit in there? i got this... that's the new man, huh? yup. getting kinda' close to my ride. wow... now, that's how you make a first impression. they're going to love you... that's ford, america's best-selling brand. hurry in today for 0% financing for 72 months across the full line of ford cars, trucks and suvs! and just announced...get 0% apr for 72 months plus $1000 cash back! take advantage of these exclusive holiday offers
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joining us now, democratic congressman jim himes of connecticut. >> you know every once in a while we like to play word association games. we're going to play it with you this morning starting right now. it seems to be a great time. >> sure. >> ready? carter page. go. >> loopy. >> okay. >> that's the word. what's going on? >> no. so as we were talking about earlier, david and myself, loopy, but at the same time damning would be another word and shocking, some of the revelations -- >> brazen. >> that have come out. talk about thing is kae signifi his testimony on the larger investigation.
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>> i have to tell you, i've been doing this for a while. it was one of the weirder depositions i've sat through. seven hours of eccentric behavior. i think lincoln who said he who represents himself has a fool for a client. joe, to answer your question, the reason is as you see from reading the transcript, there were any number of fairly important contradictions in his testimony. actually, on the day of his testimony. probably the big one was and i don't want to make too much of this. we're in the investigation. you don't want to draw conclusions from one particular testimony, but he tells the media, he tells us first, that he's had no contact, no meetings, no greetings. you'll see there's that whole argument there with senior russianofficials, but the ranking member is reported back to the trump campaign that he got all these incredible incites from serious senior people in
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russia. that's one more example after sessions after don junior and four or five other people in the campaign of people hiding contacts that they had with the russians. if nothing else -- >> congressman, what about donald trump and the attorney general saying they had not met with any russians during the campaign or didn't have any information of people in their staff meeting with russians? and the president as well? >> that was kind of my point. you just have this repeated pattern of behavior of denying contacts with russians when those occurred. and if nothing else, that does not make you look innocent, and it probably drags out the investigation because not all of those things will necessarily be nefarious. p boy, they sure raise questions about why nobody in the administration seems to remember any contacts of russians even though there was lots of contacts with russians. >> obviously this carter page testimony is getting a lot of attention today and in the work your committee is doing, it's causing -- getting quite a bit of attention.
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we've talked so much about the work that mueller is doing, the special counsel is doing and the investigative power he has. realistically, what can a committee like yours learn about this that bob mueller isn't going to learn? >> that's a great question. i think as you look at the last couple of months you're welcome get a sense of what's going to happen here. bob mueller has the ability, first of all, he has resources and the ability to get people to wear wires to cooperate. he's going to do a more comprehensive job when it comes to the question of whether any crimes were committed. we're not really prepared to do that. we don't have the resources. that's not what we do. we're going to be about what did the russians do. how did they do it? how can we prevent that in the future? bob mueller is going to be about what you saw happen in bomb shell fashion two weeks ago, indictment, guilty pleas, koorngs, that whole thing in the criminal realm. >> all right. congressman, thank you so much. great to see you. >> still ahead, new reporting
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with a dispute that left rand paul with broken bones wasn't about politics but plantings. >> compost and pumpkins. >> how a neighborhood turf war over property may have triggered the violence. "morning joe" will be right back. another day at the office. why do you put up with it? believe it or not you actually like what you do. even love it. and today, you can do things you never could before. you're working in millions of places at once with iot sensors. analyzing social data on the cloud to create new designs.
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no one else lets you do that. see how much you can save. choose by the gig or unlimited. xfinity mobile. a new kind of network designed to save you money. call, visit or go to xfinitymobile.com. the attack that left senator rand paul with ribs and a produced lung has not been charged. senator paul and boucher have been next door neighbors for 17 years. also prominent members of the medical community and worked together when practicing physicians. the unfortunate currency has nothing to do with politics or political agendas. it was a very regrettable dispute between two neighbors over a matter that most people would regard as trivial. we hope snaurt paenator paul is
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well. an unnamed source says friday's attack may have stemmed from a disagreement over a property line. and "new york times" reporter jonathan martin says some sort of, quote, issue around the properties caused the neighborhood. >> paul is still recovering from injuries. unclear when he will return to congress. due to new information about the extent of senator paul's injuries, boucher's charges could be upgraded to a felony. the fbi and capitol police investigating the incident. assaulting the member of congress is a federal crime. the account we heard there is just from the neighbors attorney. >> neighbor's attorney. we also heard from i saw an interview of some neighbors last night on nightly news. where thiese two going at it fo
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years. tell jonathan martin it's not surprised. sounds like a property line dispute except for the fact this man has also posted pretty tough things on facebook. i wonder if it's a little above. >> the tensions must have come from different sources. good neighbors. little separation. it's clear that these two looked at the matrix political issues before the country in very different ways. we're not angry country. we don't want to speculate about it. >> day in subordinate where it really matters how many can travel to washington on any given day to vote. going to be a while before senator paul is able to travel. >> significant injuries and could lead to more serious complications. we certainly hope not.
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we're going to talk about your book. next hour, but right now, there are a lot of people with their fingers on the key boards wanting to order this. tell us about this. >> this book, the spy is a novel about two big things. china, and its intelligence service, and china's race to dominate the united states and the world of technology. so if there are two things that this piece of fiction tells you that are a matter in terms of the real life visit by our president to china to take up the rest of the week. chinese want to dominate the most powerful computers that are built. they've announced that as their goal. in the background of this relationship, however much you hear about great friends they are, new allies is a spy war between.
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not able to put nonfiction books. they are every a look at into state craft. intelligence committee. background in a lot of ties that appears. what's up with these books. >> you were saying you do encourage people to buy in bulk. bulk is just as a useful gift. it's easier really to have -- >> rolled down to ten. >> all right. we'll talk more about this in our next hour. still ahead today marks one year since the election that launched donald trump into the white house. 52 weeks anyway on this election day. effect the presidency is having on elections happening today in virginia and elsewhere.
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good for the people of north korea and the people of the world. i do see certain movement, yes. let's see what happens. >> over night. president trump telling his secretary of state to stop waiting his time. full coverage of the trip to asia this morning and new poll numbers. bob mueller crossing a white house red line and a governor's race in virginia that may be the democrats to lose. good morning. everyone. it's tuesday, november 7. welcome to morning joe. with us we have columnist and associate editor for "the washington post," david with us. also with us, national political correspondent for nbc news and msnbc steve kornacki. >> where's your book, steve. >> everybody wants to come with their book. >> next year i'm going to hold
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you to that. >> and nbc news capitol hill correspondent. cas casey d.kasiedc kasiedcmented joe long sleeved shirt. where is it. they're in the mail. i will send advocate an e-mail today. so the fedex truck came by my house a few times. i looked ate it hopefully and it drove right by. >> to kasiedc dc. >> we're going to be hammering that joke for three years, four years, five years down the road. we designed it with a lightning bolt you're going to love. >> every morning, donny deutsche would keep saying coming up with chuck whatever. got old after four years. he just kept going.
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>> this is not getting old. this is kasie dc. i have to stop you. we have major use. >> in one second. i want to start because there's so much noise out there every day. and we actually may have some news breaking through the clouds. just sort of a ray, a little bit. >> just a little bit of news that isn't involved with russian investigation or tweets. what the president said actually significant and may be suggests that his secretary of state and general mattis. this could evaporate when the sun comes up with a midmorning tweet. if we're moving towards a deal that is very significant. >> it certainly makes the world
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that's on edge a little bit calmer. joe, you and i and mika have been talking on this show. now for months about the diplomatic strategy that laid behind all these comments about little rocket man and seeming to take the world to the edge of nuclear war and all that time, there has been an effort to set the table for diplomacy. trump is tells us now the last fork has been laid down. we'll have to see what he's really got. >> how do you gauge the optimism behind the scenes from people in the administration and people have been hammering this out. do they believe they can get a deal. >> when we say a deal, i think we should correct that to say the beginning of talks. it's going to take a long time. >> can we have a start towards a framework that helps us step back from a missile being launched over japan. >> yes, here's the heart of the matter. kim jong-un, the tough some say
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irrational leader of north korea, would like to get all it will way in terms of ability to demonstrate he can drop a nuclear weapon on any state in america. that's his goal to have that in hind. that hand. that's going take him maybe another year. the u.s. wants to freeze the program where it is now. not going to insist that you instantly denuclear rise, but we want do you freeze it and sit down for talks. laid out many of the positions it will take in talks. kim has to decide he doesn't want that last little bit of achievement. >> told several trump campaign officials including members of the president's inner circle that will he was heading to moscow in july of 2016. carter page testified before the house intelligence last week. republican trey gowdy, page said
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he e-mailed former campaign manager corey lewandowski. current white house director. and campaign foreign policy adviser jd gordon that he was on his way there. page also said that he told attorney general jeff sessions. >> again, here's another russian contact that jeff sessions allegedly knew about. >> and campaign co-chair before he left he went around to figure out a way to get to russia. >> page said lieu when dough and told him he could go. lewandowski. did not say page should travel to russia on his own. said he couldn't remember. he said i'm very clear about this. i granted nobody permission to do that. page had not provided the e-mails to the house intelligence committee when he testified on thursday, but said that he would. the testimony also contradicted
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pages earlier comment that he only exchanged greetings with russia's deputy prime minster. in an e-mail sent after the trip page wrote that he had, quote, expressed strong support for mr. trump and a desire to work together devising better solutions and response to a vast range of current international problems. furthermore, just shortly after returning, page congratulated members oef the trump foreign policy team. excellent work on the ukraine amendment. reference to the trump's campaign decision to intervene to water down a proposed amendment to the gop's ukraine platform. page told the committee he was, quote, just expressing what i feel. >> let's just stop right there. >> david ig nashs, sdiet the fact carter page is all over the
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place and many times people are looking at testimony as performance art, people are starting to suggest perhaps a quid pro quo. you give us dirt on higry. we'll remove the ukraine amendment from the gop platform. >> it was bizarre testimony. he sounded as if he was making it up as he went along. one minute invoking the fifth. another minute he wasn't. documents don s kepts emerginge told the committee about. you add this up. see now three separate instances in which trump campaign
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associates papadopoulos in his plea agreement, page now in descriptions of meeting with the professor. the july 9 meeting with don trump junior. each of those instances is what are they going to do the help the trump campaign. you see something really hard. this has been a difficult investigation with so many things in the year. those are the hard pieces because they show the russians working directly to supply information to the trump campaign that will be helpful. >> and willie, the trump campaign actively seeking contacts with and help from vladimir putin and the kremlin. >> and, again, you wonder when jeff sessions testifies before congress, three times that he was not aware of any russian contacts and he clearly was told about this meeting by carter page and others we've learned
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about since. did he think it wasn't going to come out? did he think somehow people weren't going to get to the bottom of it? whether it was the journalist investigating it or inside one of those committees looking into it? how could he sit up there and saying what he knew that he didn't know of any russian contacts in the campaign, even if they were innocuous. why would you say you didn't know anything when you clearly knew you had been talked to. >> and what about donald trump and mike pence and jeff sessions saying that nobody in their campaign talked to russians as mike pence. no, they talked to russians. they talked to russians a lot and then they've spent the last nine months lying. about all of their contacts with russians. >> >> so casey, you poured through pages and pages of testimony. almost seven hours of carter page spilling in front of the intel committee. from carter pages poij of
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violent. to go to russia and make a grand speech like president obama going to germany in 2008 that would have launched his campaign and his presidency. on the world. what else jumped out at you when you looked at the testimony. >> what you were referring to earlier is the key overarching question here. obviously learning new information about what top trump officials knew about russian contacts between people who were working for them inside the organization. the question i think is whether there was intentionality or actual discussions or whether this was a situation where they were accidentally running around with people who had deep russian ties. what i took away from the transcript, carterer page, this wasn't just a one off, i took a trip to moscow. he had long standing deep business ties with people in russia that if you dig down into the details of this transcript,
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a very odd picture of this man emerges and he is somebody who went from at the beginning of these investigations, my sources describing him as essentially falling all over himself to tell them everything they knew. it was almost they felt they were receiving his resume in the mail. then more information about this dossier came out including allegation that he met with top russian businessman during this trip. had a secret meeting. that hasn't been corroborated in this transcript. now, the committee was pressing him on where are you living at night. he insisted well, i'm not living or sleeping at a russians house, but they redacted that information. how are you making your money. he said i have past investments. i haven't been working. i'm living on savings. where did that money come from. did it come from russia. there are so many unanswered questions in this transcript. it gave us a very interesting window into what the committee is looking into. the questions they're asking that are going to yield a lot more reporting in the press over
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the next few weeks. still ahead, president trump dives in saudi arabia's political turmoil. david explains what's really going on inside the kingdom and what it means for the balance of power in the region, but first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. before we get to election day forecast, we did get confirmation out of ohio about the tornado outbreak that we had on sunday. officially nine tornados. one on the ground for almost 40 minutes. that was a dollar general store that was tore apart there. ohio. this is where we did have nine injuries. some significant damage. look at that. was done by those twisters. the one on the ground for 40 minutes. get to today's forecast. election day forecast. in your way, it's heading your way in new jersey later on today. timing of all of this. take this as 9:00 a.m. this morning.
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take this out to lunch hour. people trying to head to the polls. still okay. jersey is dry. northern virginia in the suburb of d.c. the rain picks up 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. then by 5:00 p.m., all of the state of new jersey is in a pretty steady rain. that's when everyone is driving home from work or school. trying to get to the polls. pretty heavy rainfall. moving out as we go through the evening. other story out there today. cold air plunging down through the middle of the country. in the 90s last week in dallas. today down into the 60s. finally feeling like fall. areas like denver with snow showers. important election in utah. your weather looks fine, but chilly. temperature around 46 degrees. no approximaprox problems on th whatsoever. new york city get the umbrellas ready. rain will move in. you're watching morning joe. we'll be right back. we're on a mission to show drip coffee drinkers,
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president trump is responding to the rapidly moving developments in saudi arabia. in two tweets, trump endorsed crowned prince new corruption crack down tweeting, quote, i have great confidence in king sal man and the crowned prince of saudi arabia. they know what they're doing. some have been tweeting and milking their country for years. >> says the milk man. >> american officials say as many as 500 people have been arrested in the crack down. including 11 princes. trump's tweets come as the situation between saudi arabia and neighboring countries has rapidly deteriorated. saudi arabia now accusing iran of conducting act of war after a ballistic missile was fired over the weekend. the missile was interaccepted and destroyed.
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the saudi foreign minister said it was smuggled in and launched by iran backed. destroyed. the saudi foreign minister said it was smuggled in and launched by iran backed. adding saudi arabia will directly respond to iran. all right. that's good. let's get to david ig nashsnati >> we are watching a powerful. pourer hungry young pour power traditional end saudi arabia has been governed and install his new system. saudi arabia was a country governored by the consensus of theed by the consensus of the princes. it was corrupt. he's gone boom. with a meat cleaver. >> they've been put on notice. clerics have been put on notice. your ways are going to change. >> he began reducing the power
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of the religious police about six months ago. that was a significant move. said women are going to drive in this country. that's a significant move. his bet, joe, is that young saudis who are sick of living in this conservative, slow moving society will say, you know, this guy may be impulsive, but this is a new country and we're excited about being in it. the danger for him is that he's so ambitious that he is fighting more wars than he can win. >> is he -- somebody scheduled he was way over his skies. >> if you look at the people he arrested. some of the most prominent business leaders in the country. some of them you roll the eyes and say of course they have him. some of them are people who have been part of the story of the kingdoms modernization and he has to be careful not to isolate himself. he's got as enemies senior princes. second billionaires running
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saudi companies. so many people sigh you have a problem. i would love to see saudi arabia a more modern less corrupt place. the things he talks about are the right things. everybody should understand that. i just don't want him to get in a situation where he becomes an autocrat. authoritarian cringe striking at everybody because that could hurt him. >> saudi arabia intercepted the missile coming from yemen. saudi arabia says it was an iranian minuscle. what are the implications for the united states as a close ally of saudi arabia, of saudi arabia saying iran has declared war on the kingdom of saudi arabia. >> head strong young king who wants this sense of conflict with iran to consolidate power internally is pushing us towards greater confrontation.
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we need to make sure we're in control of that escalation process, not him. i worry most about what happens next for lebanon. if the saudis decide to cut off lebanon financially, lebanon which is miraculously stayed out of the syrian civil war. hasn't fallen apart. predicted over the lip of the water fall too. that would be unfrnortunate. that's something u.s. power should be saying slow down. we like what you're doing. slow down. coming up on morning joe, we recently taped an interview with dennis leery and it's a good thing it didn't air live because that was a mess. i mean, there were so many curse words. >> it was unbelievable. >> he doesn't have a filter. he's a lot like you. >> by the way -- no, no. >> oh, yeah. i've grown. >> willie, those fake tweets. >> oh, my gosh. >> okay. that conversation is straight ahead. it's nasty. but first, dan rather and john me doris join the political
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round table. morning joe is back in a moment. whether it's connecting one of the world's most innovative campuses.
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and of violating the constitution by taking money from foreign governments and threatening to shut down news organizations that report the truth. if that isn't a case for impeaching and removing a dangerous president, then what has our government become? i'm tom steyer, and like you, i'm a citizen who knows it's up to us to do something. it's why i'm funding this effort to raise our voices together and demand that elected officials take a stand on impeachment. a republican congress once impeached a president for far less. yet today people in congress and his own administration know that this president is a clear and present danger who's mentally unstable and armed with nuclear weapons. and they do nothing. join us and tell your member of congress that they have a moral responsibility to stop doing what's political and start doing what's right. our country depends on it.
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this is like the greatest book ever day. makes a great gift. joining us now the editor of new york post and contributing editor of the weekly standard. and big interview dan rather. dan is out today with a new book, what unites us. reflections on patriotism and i see a fabulous producer. with you on this book. >> you and i know him well. he's from cbs and has been since. >> i want to ask you both about carter page, but what unites us at this point. >> what unites us is remembering the values that have held us together all these times and nurturing these values. that's what holds us together. i'm very optimistic. i think it's important to have hope during this time. very dangerous time for the country. you know, we americans, we're
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not good at some things. we're very good at holding steady. steady is the by word of the moment. we'll get through this and come together. it might take a while. i'm hopeful we'll come out stronger. >> we have ongoing debate about what patriotism is and the latest flash point has been in the nfl. some say it's patriotic to stand for the national anthem. i think most people believe that's patriotic. it's patriotic to decent. that's what it means to be an american. when you're an american and you think something is unjust, you ought to decent. how do we define what patriotism is today. >> that's one of the things i wanted to discuss in what unites us. what is patriotism. in the second decade of the 21st century. as far as the anthem is concerned. i stand for the national anthem. i put my hand to the heart without apology. that's what is inside me. that's what i feel. dissent as an american or
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revolutionary war. american as apple pie. i think it's very important we listen to one another when it's peaceful decent. while it's not my way of believing, some stand, some kneel. having respect for those who kneel and even though you say yourself as i say to myself, it's not what i would do, i want to listen to what they have to say. because as i understand what they're saying, it's not disrespect for the country. it's not disrespect certainly for the military. it's about calling attention to injustice and we're not a perfect union. the constitution says, in order to create a more perfect union. it's always the north star is out there. we want a a perfect union. realize we can't be perfect, but we can keep improving. important to listen to one another. and lower voices. we need an injection of stability with one another. respect for the other person's
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point of view. doesn't mean we don't stand up for our principles. the clue clux can. take one example. you can be true to your principles and still respect the right of people to decent. a and the need for the dissent. it's not unpatriotic. as time goes along, history justifies their decent. women's right to vote. can you believe we spent almost the first fifth of the 20th century and still didn't give women the right to vote. those women we're talking about women's right to vote back in the 19th century. we're seen as radically dissenters and some people saw them unpatriotic. we need to keep them in mind. >> let's look now. the bigger picture and the given what dan said. some of the incredible questions. that are on the table just pertaining to let's say the russia investigation.
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your tweets are something i look forward to. here's one about carter page. everyone thinks carter page is insane. seems to be answering every question truthfully is a pretty good strategy to save himself. >> i'm serious when i say this. he is adopting a strategy that no lawyer or would recommend. which is he's just answering any and every question that is put to him and he said in one of his testimony, look, i can't answer this because, you know, maybe you're going to discover later that i got the timeline wrong. or i forgot some part of my meeting or something like that. so he's playing some kind of weird holy innocent game i said before. it's like a combination of gardener from being there and the wondered around greenwich
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village in a bathrobe trying to convince everybody he was a crazy person. on the one hand. he sounds like an idiot. on the other hand he's behaving like a crazy person. it's an interesting strategy in the second decade of the 21st century rather than to be unbelievably cautious, it's being uncautious and saying come at me. what are you going to do? look at me. >> it was almost fawn like with no lawyer to protect him. what are the consequences. i went to mos can you. to the trump campaign. doesn't that do him real damage. part of the question is naive. >> i think it can indeed do him real damage. unless when his claim is to make yet another pop culture analogy.
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he's playing himself. he's wondering around and look, there's the deputy prime minster. yeah, i forgot. i forgot i met with him. you can sort of see it's a little hard to believe watching this guy unless he is the greatest actor in the world that he was somehow a deep senior official, you know, with his hands on the tiller of the trump campaign. he just seems too much of a flake. even that weird campaign to have been something that anybody was going to take or send to moscow to be a emissary for the campaign. he's not somebody you would trust with such a delicate job. >> your name came up an hour or so. we're talking to lawrence o'donnell about his new book. talking about russia and everything that's happening right now. everything that happened in 2016. and sort of the visions and this country.
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do you see parallels in culturals the way the country is divided right now to that time. >> yes, certainly similarities. it it's worth reminding ourselves. one of the things i tried to do in what unites us is point out this is a very difficult time. we've been through very difficult times before. in the 1960s, this country very much divided. we had assassinations. races. we have divisions over the vietnam war. there were a lot of people in the 1960s who thought center can't hold. country can't hold itself together, but we came out the other end of that. and don't forget the civil war. cat if i of the civil warasropt
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the right to vote and everyone through and courage. for those who say woe is me now. i agree. perilous time for the country. we've been through these times before. it's reason i'm very optimistic. we're going to be okay. we're going to be okay. if we address our deep problems. race being on my list number one. we make great progress with civil rights. we have a long way to go. >> we have not gotten there. >> i do think a lot of americans who are not alive during the 1960s and others who were not of the age have forgotten. that was a very divisive time. similar to the time we're in now. >> dan rather. thank you so much. it's great to see you and hear your voice. >> so proud of you. >> you just go from one triumph to another. >> is that what we call it these days? the book is what unites us. thank you so much. the book is out now. we posted an excerpt on our
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morning joe website so you can take a look at that. the great dan rather. thank you. john, stay with us if you can. on tomorrow's show, we're going to have former dnc chair donna brazil joining us onset. much more still ahead on this hour. we're back in just a moment. e much more still ahead on this hour. we're back in just a moment. paying less for my medicare? i'm open to that. lower premiums? extra benefits? it's open enrollment. time to open the laptop... ...and compare medicare health plans. why? because plans change, so can your health needs.
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i read one. northam is closing like he's a new york jet. >> did you read that. >> no. >> now if northam loses he'll have the worst final two weeks of any campaign ever. that's pretty significant. >> it's a rough time. speaking of virginia, first family is -- >> race. >> in part because of the help from the first family. they're hoping to turn out the vote in virginia's election for governor today, but they don't really have all the facts yet, but they're trying. president trump tweeted from south korea, ralph northam will allow crime to be rampant in virginia.
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he's weak on crime. weak on our great vets. the president trump might not know that ralph northam is a vet. a graduate of the virginia military institute, has served on active duty for eight years. army doctor at walter reed. minutes ago president trump's adult son, donald junior tweeted this. let's take ed gillespie across the finish line tomorrow. . so the election is today. >> why is it tomorrow? >> because it was not -- it wasn't barren. >> polls close at 7:00 today. getting the date wrong wouldn't be the first thing for trump. in september. >> i'm bored with this already. >> john, what is wrong with the democratic party. why can't they win a race where they've got a president with historically low approval ratings. the a republican congress that is clueless and hapless.
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>> i mean really. could they get a longer bigger run way. >> this is the big question about tonight. it won't mean all that much if ralph northam the democratic wins in virginia. it will mean an enormous amount if ed gillespie wins in a state that has -- that pushed three democrats, you know, in a row over the finish line. has had three statewide elections in which democrats have won since 2010. if this is going to be the case the democratic party is going to have to look long and hard at itself and say all the previous races, special election races is not special. the one in so you recollectuth the one in georgia. this is a race they should have won. northam should have had this put away in september. >> absolutely. >> two events happening to shake american politics forever.
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sort of a collision of two stars. one is the virginia race, the other is commentaries roast of jonah goldberg. that's right. commentary magazine has eighth annual roast of jonah goldberg. contributor of ours. friend of ours. works for national review. >> great writer. >> we've done dick cheney. we've done charles. we've done bill crystal. we've done my parents. we've done dan see mother, a friend of yores on this --. jonah is the eighth round draft pick. >> so the roast begins already. >> the roast begins early. just to give you a sense of what we do. it is off the record. off the record, but we will -- if joe, if it's okay, we'll release some bits and pieces, exerts of it. if you go on youtube and search
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dick cheney behind the music. you will see one of the high jinx that we do at the roast. video we made in 2013. with dick cheney. it's one of the proudest help i was helped along. writing that by the great internet humorous iowa hawk. so this is just to give you a sense that even ponderous nico conservative monthlies can have fun. >> david ignatius, third thing colliding with history is his great new book, the quantum spy. david, go. >> it is colliding with history. i write to columns a week. 750 words here. i wanted a chance to write on a bigger canvas about the issues that interest me and in particular about the intelligence issues that interest me. a book about the race between the united states and china to build the world's fastest most dominant computer. and the bitter battle behind the
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scenes of their agents trying to recruit ci officers and our agents trying to recruit them. and it's just in this world where you know i can say news is too much with us. it's fun to be a novelist and get outside of that and try to tell a story that has a little bit larger scope. characters. >> very well grounded. >> how do you compete with reality. >> you don't compete with reality. reality is just too crazy. you couldn't invent a character like donald trump. it's not possible. these plot details. in a novel, you can take characters and go deep with them. the readers is with you on that journey. imagining that story and that battle. it is a fact now that the united states and china are locked in a spy war that is bigger than anything we've seen since kgb and the cia. nobody knows about it. that was the final. >> and it makes a great gift.
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>> makes a great christmas gift. >> do you skrhave a book, john,r a christmas gift. >> the three little -- and there are a lot of over a billion chinese also need to give gifts. >> exactly. >> over 1 billion. might be a billionaire. >> if every person in china as we said in 1972 would buy a pencil. >> and your book. >> on our website, john, thank you so much. >> can't wait. up next, maybe the happiest place had on earth, unless you're the la times. why just hammered the paper with a temporary ban on access. keep it right here on morning joe. dad: molly, can you please take out the trash? (sigh) ( ♪ )
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those journalists are going to write about disney films but only after they've been released to the general public. so a very big brewing battle there over at least editorial content. speaking of disney, at one point, pretty recently, it was looking to get a lot bigger. according to a report. 21st century fox has been holding talks to sell most of its folks to disney. the two sides aren't currently engaged in talks but they'd been reportedly focused on fox's tv and movie production studios as well as broadcast outlets both here in the u.s. but not, this is key, not the u.s. fox broadcast network or fox business or fox sports 1 channels or any of the sports networks so pretty big deal. even bigger deal now is public. wireless broadcom wants to buy competitor qualcomm. it's going to offer to pay around $105 billion in cash and stock. the reason why this is important, the deal has
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political ties to it. broadcom ceo just last week stood right next to president trump and said he was moving his company's headquarters to the united states from singapore so maybe an interesting development there on political and business sized things. if you're a netflix user, be on guard here. there's an e-mail scam out there targeting the company's 110 million subscribers. the scam e-mail tells users their billing info needs to be updated, it's not current. and then of course links them to a fake netflix site for users to get asked for their log-in and credit card information. if it is, be on guard, don't give any of that information to a suspicious website. >> that's the proshgs thblem, te hacked or somebody was. thank you very much. up next -- >> -- said they were trapped over there, they needed a plane ticket out. >> joe. >> prince, and they said they'd give me like ten times the amount of my money. >> what would lincoln tweet? >> what? >> do you know?
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>> oh, yeah, this is denis leary. >> actor and author denis leary reimagines history if the white house had wifi for the past few centuries.
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if be a lincoln goes after the failing gettysburg -- >> yes, leaking out two-thirds of his address. >> that's sick. look at this one.
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>> all right, so the book is -- denis leary is. the book is "why we don't suck." thank you so much for being here. this is not about the red sox. we had a pretty good year this year. >> yes, we did. when did you write the book? it happens in -- >> i'll tell you why -- >> thomas jefferson, oh, my god. >> you're bad, you're bad. >> i am bad. >> does your wife approve of this? i don't think she does. has she read this? >> yeah, my wife has read it. that's the first person that reads anything i write. >> does she say no? that's a big no. >> she laughed her ass off. >> why did you write the book? >> i'm going to throw in another plug. every year i do two stand-up concerts. one in boston at td garden in november for the cancer foundation -- >> that's awesome. >> this year's november 8th. me, jimmy fallon, it's always a great -- >> so awesome. >> but the show last year was four days after the election and i don't do material. i'm the host and i open with 30 minutes so i just vented about
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the election. i didn't vote for trump. i voted for hillary. but i didn't like hillary. so i went up on stage and i did anti-trump, anti-hillary, and i had 15,000 people and they were laughing at all the jokes. i realized, the trump people and the hillary people are laughing. everybody kind of understands how divisive and stupid and messy this election was. so i had six weeks off without shooting anything. i said, you know what, i came up with a fake tweet idea. i sat down, started writing some tweets. i'm writing and writing. i think i'm writing a book. because i have two kids, 27 and 25. they were very emotionally affected by the election. >> yeah. >> my democratic friends lost their sense of humor. they're so rapidly anti-trump. >> yeah. >> my republican friends lost their sense of humor because they're trying to defend trump which is pretty much hopeless. >> impossible. >> so nothing's getting done. even out in the real world, you can't have dinner with people without them arguing. >> no. >> i got to write something that makes everybody laugh their ass off again and understand we
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are -- all this stuff we've been talking, racism, sexism, you know, all these issues, we got to find common ground. >> it's an interesting moment to talk about comedy in the age of trump. >> yeah. >> because it's seen through late night, where you've had colbert do really well and jimmy kimmel found his thing when he starts talking about health care and jimmy fallon's been criticized for not doing enough of it. he says, i've got to be me, i've got to be true to myself. what do you think about everyone having to be on the record and anti-trump in the world of comedy? >> listen, i think -- and this book is not about the politicians. it starts off talking about -- it's anti-all politicians. then i just talk about us and all the issues that have been bubbling up and we're all arguing over. i think -- it becomes an easy target after a while. you know, certain people are making sort of a living off of it. which that's fine. the thing we have to face -- i keep telling my democratic friends. they keep saying, you know, stop tweeting about how you want to
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impeach trump. that's not going to happen. even if it does happen, it takes two years to impeach somebody. when they did it to bill clinton, his approval rating went up 65%. all you're doing is improving base support by trying to impeach him. find somebody to beat him if you're anti-trump. the problem is, i think it has to be a celebrity. i have a chapter called "america's got leaders." i think we get rid of the election process which is a complete waste of money and time, takes two years. we don't learn anything. people bloviate their way through. i talked to howard stern about this. we vote by text. the final episode. that person is elected by text to be the president. i'm saying -- in the book, i have a list of the top ten most trusted people in america. not my list. from studies. you know who they are? >> who? >> the top three, tom hank, sandra bullock and denzel.
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that's who americans trust the most. so i'm going sandra bullock 2020. >> sandra bullock? >> remember the morning after the election we had michael moore on and he said oprah or tom hanks. he wasn't kidding that day. >> i want oprah because at least we'll get free stuff every couple -- >> and look under your chair. who knows what could be under your chair. >> can i just say something? >> yeah. >> willie. >> come on. you president. >> this dark past, denis, i'll tell you about. >> what dark past? >> we'll talk offline. >> how can you have a darker past than any people that have been running? like trump? hillary and bill? i mean, you know. that's unbelievable. you have a worst past than bill clinton you're telling me? really? >> seriously? >> all right, the book is "why we don't suck." >> denis leary, thank you so much. >> guys, thank you. >> for more, check it out at joe.msnbc.com. that does it for us this morning. stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage right now. >> thank you, joe, thank you,
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mika. good morning. i'm stephanie ruhle with a lot of news to cover today. starting with a major mistake by the air force which gave devin kelley access to guns. now 26 people are dead. how could this happen and for the first time the hero who engaged the shooter breaks his silence. >> every time i heard a shot, i knew that that probably represented a life. i was scared to death. >> that's a hero. >> and the bodyguard faces questions today. shocking russian connections with administration officials revealed and testimony from a former campaign adviser released. >> this is the most evasive bizarre witness i have ever had the -- i guess the displeasure of coming across. >> well, that's a description. it's election day. for the first time since trump's victory. virginia shaping up

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