Skip to main content

tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  September 4, 2009 6:00am-9:00am EDT

6:00 am
you know what, kids under 30 don't even know what that means. >> we got it. >> and this is actually making coffee. i've got to say something about jim greer. he's the republican chairman of my home state, florida, and he put out a statement. my republican party, in my home state of florida, put out a statement that barack obama wanted to use this speech where he tells kids, hey, i hope you do well in school, work hard, nose to the grindstone and all that, and they're accusing him of trying to indoctrinate kids into socialism. >> yeah. >> here's the deal. we want the president to encourage this sort of thing, and we have enough things to worry about as conservatives, who believe in a small government, to be distracted by these silly little side notes.
6:01 am
let's put this up full screen. i know this is unusual. but i'm calling on mitt romney, newt gingrich, sarah palin, mike huckabee, anybody else, tim pawlenty, who wants to run for president of the united states as a republican, to take control of your party and start calling people out for the reckless things they are saying and have them focus on ideas and what we believe in, that small government and liberty and personal freedom is much better than a centralized state, and we can argue the issues. this is what the chairman for the republican party from the state of florida says. "as the father of four children, i am absolutely appalled that taxpayer dollars are being used to spread president obama's socialist ideology." we'll read the rest of that later on. >> i've got another one for you where president obama is compared to kim jong-il and saddam hussein because of this school broadcast.
6:02 am
>> here's the thing. we, believers in small government, are winning in the polls right now. it's kind of like running down the field -- like let's say alabama this weekend is going to be running down the field scoring lots of touchdowns. that's like stopping on the 10 yard line, turning around and sucker punching one of those poor virginia but when's the sleeping part of this hour? >> that's after you get your check. >> we're going to get you the warm milk and crackers pretty soon, mort.
6:03 am
do you agree with me that republicans should focus on issues? >> i agree with you. it makes the republicans look silly. if they are leaders in the silly season, not the serious season, and we're in, in many ways, a serious season in this country. >> we're going to talk more about that. >> one more name to call out, my friend charlie crist, running for the u.s. senate, governor of the state of florida, who's very close to jim greer, who put him in. charlie crist needs to come out and aggressively condemn this kind of talk. >> just say stop it. it's time to stop. >> let's talk about the issues. >> also, afghanistan, big story today. big story in "the new york times," obama advisers split on the size of force. great op-eds coming up. time for a look at today's top stories. officials are blaming arson for the massive wildfire burning north of los angeles. a homicide investigation is now under way after two firefighters died on sunday when their truck careens off a mountain road. the fire is 38% contained, but
6:04 am
thousands of homes remain under threat at this hour. a cemetery in glendale, california, is the final resting place for michael jackson. members of jackson's family along with celebrity friends macaulay culkin and elizabeth taylor gathered for the funeral. the estate is paying for the burial space. we're learning new details into the resilience of jaycee dugard, who police say was kidnapped at age 11, raped, and held captive for nearly 20 years. according to her recently reunited family, dugard managed to educate the two daughters fathered by her accused kidnapper despite the shocking conditions. >> they are clever, articulate, curious girls who have a bright future ahead of them. although they have no formal education, they are certainly educated. jaycee did a truly amazing job with the limited resources and
6:05 am
education that she herself had, and we are so proud of her. >> defense secretary robert gates is indicating for the first time that he's open to increasing the numbers of u.s. troops in afghanistan. it follows a new assessment by top u.s. commanders there that calls for a revised strategy to fighting the war. >> i take seriously general mcchrystal's point that the size of the imprint -- of the footprint depends perhaps -- depends in significant measure on the nature of the footprint and the behavior of those troops and their attitudes and their interactions with the afghans. >> mort zuckerman, many foreign policy experts fear we're being pulled into a long-term quagmire in afghanistan. should the president listen to his generals and send more
6:06 am
troops or start pulling back? >> i think that's the real concern, that there are so many different people -- the russians, the british, everybody -- who's tried to tame the afghans. it's an almost impossible task, given the terrain, given the nature of the tribal structure. nevertheless, when you bring in a new general, you cannot stop supporting him. that's the dilemma they have. when obama said we're going to withdraw from iraq, he said i'm going to shift 30,000 troops to afghanistan. in a sense, this is where he said he was going to go. >> mort, with our money, our finances as terrible as they are at home, we can't afford a long-term war in afghanistan anymore, can we sth >> we can afford it on one level. if we thought there was a chance we would win, quote, unquote, whatever victory within a reasonable period of time. i don't see that. i'm not an expert on this subject, but we've had a much tougher row in iraq than we ever
6:07 am
thought. afghanistan is many times harder, and the purpose of it, it seems to me, is to protect pakist pakistan. that's where we ought to put our resources. >> the cost of a stalemate is just too high. i yet to hear a general say we can win this war. >> another $20 billion annually flowing into afghanistan. >> we just don't have the money. >> vice president joe biden says the government's massive economic stimulus program is exceeding its goals. it follows sharp objections from some in congress who say the program is creating too few jobs and lacks a clear focus. >> the recovery act still has its critics, and one of the criticisms is that it's a grab bag of too many different programs. but the fact is the recovery act is a multi-facetted piece of legislation. it doesn't reflect a lack of design. that was the design. >> i thought he was going to say a multi-facetted grab bag of steaming piles of garbage. >> wait a minute. doesn't it take some time? whether you like the spending or
6:08 am
not, you can't expect it to work. >> i'm not criticizing joe biden. we do not do that here. he was forced to go out and say everything he to say. >> right. >> but the obama administration is trying to have its way. they're trying to say we have saved the economy. they're saying that this week. last week they were saying, oh, hey, too early. >> it is too early. >> it is too early. whatever's happening right now is not happening because of the stimulus package. judge the stimulus package over the course of the year. >> i agree. what has happened -- and in a sense, ben bernanke at the fed has really done a job is to save the financial system. but we're still in a decline. it's like losing weight. you lose a lot of pounds at the beginning and you don't lose as much weight when you're a year into it. i see that in your case. >> i started losing lots of weight in '74, and it started to slow down after that. >> down to about an ounce a
6:09 am
month, right? >> the level of workers out of work in middle age to later in life, highly educated people with lots of experience, are the ones that are looking for jobs. those numbers are higher than ever. i'm not sure the stimulus package does help them. i hope it does. i hope the programs are not just highway programs. >> some have called it a ste steaming pile of garbage. >> a new pew poll suggests the recession has many putting retirement on the back burner. 6 in 10 americans are working still. >> just like mort. >> i'm here for the big bucks. >> you have come to the wrong place. >> many say they might have to push back their expected retirement because of the economy. of those already at retirement age, 54% say they're still working because they want to while 17% say they need the money. that's at this point they're
6:10 am
lucky to have jobs. >> can i just say -- >> because this is a man session. >> don't want that gloria steinem stuff. burn the bras outside. when we started telling americans they're going to retire at 65, life expectancy was around 62, 63. i'm serious. >> it's far different today. >> we've got people living into their late 70s. a 65-year-old today, god, it's like a 45-year-old was, i'm serious, 20, 30 years ago. >> it's true. >> it seems to me we want -- and i'm not saying you get the federal government doing it, but we need to start encouraging our young kids to work harder in school. that's not socialism, republicans. or indoctrination. and we need to encourage our seniors that have all of this experience to stay in the work force.
6:11 am
mort zuckerman, i went to people like pat buchanan, who's, i think, 72. your dad's 82. they work hard every day. look at you. you're 59 years old. i bet you're going to work for another 20, 30 years. >> with that introduction, i'm working on arithmetic for the right age. there is something very serious here, which is that a lot of people in their later years have lost a large part of their net worth because their home values have gone down. their 401(k)s have gone down. they did a serious poll. 5,000 american families. they thought they were going to work an average of 3 1/2 years longer to rebuild their retirement savings. that is a very serious part of what we're doing. >> i've got a lot of friends who are doing that. i'm certainly not contesting. that's not a terrible, terrible thing. it is, especially if you've been planning for 20 years to retire. i'm just saying a lot of times people retire, go home, and wither on the vine.
6:12 am
>> there's two different states there. >> people need to keep working hard. there's one guy, though, i wish would retire really, really quickly. >> find a way out. >> we could pay him. >> if he withers on the vine, so be it. i will pay him, a buyout is what they call it. >> bill karins. >> what's the offer? >> we will not beat the hell out of you if you retire. >> joe won't punch you in the nose talking about his wife. >> don't bring in my wife. stay away from my wife, bill karins. she's very nervous. zl don't talk about her. >> talk about the weather, my man. >> i'll stay away if she will. >> good lord, he did not help himself. >> that's the final line, folks. >> unfortunately, this only has one exit. >> we will be waiting for you.
6:13 am
last night erika dissipated, just like i will after the show. no longer a problem down there around the florida area or the bahamas. talking about today's forecast -- beautiful shot behind me, by the way, t.j., of sunshine over manhattan. another gorgeous day today. no problems for your getaway friday. let's quickly take you through the forecast. travel trouble spots through dallas, miami. looking very nice in many locations. we are in for an ideal weekend, as long as i make it out of here in one piece. >> you so are not going to. anyhow, bill, good luck coming down the stairs there. >> have a good weekend. we've got a big show this weekend. "hardball's" chris matthews will be here. the moderator of "meet the press," david gregory will join us. and bbc's katty kay will have more on why women outnumber men in the work force. and eugene robinson. plus a look at the top stories politico is working on this morning.
6:14 am
♪ bicycle, what are we waiting for? the flowers are blooming.
6:15 am
the air is sweet. and zyrtec® starts... relieving my allergies... 2 hours faster than claritin®. my worst symptoms feel better, indoors and outdoors. with zyrtec®, the fastest... 24-hour allergy medicine, i promise not to wait as long to go for our ride. zyrtec® works fast, so i can love the air™. or sit on her bed and talk about her day. but she's ready. thanks to walmart's unbeatable prices, i was able to get her everything she needed. as well as what she wanted. letting go? mom! (mom) that's the hard part. set them up for success, for less.
6:16 am
6:17 am
to prevent the spread of swine flu, people are being advised to sneeze into their elbows. unfortunately, this practice seems to have an unforeseen consequence as the cdc is now reporting a virulent new strain of elbow flu. the cdc, we're all going to die. >> have you ever heard that before? >> elmo and the president told us that. >> i never heard that either. >> i'd rather take my chances than going like this all the time. >> did you not see the president and elmo? indoctrination. another example of
6:18 am
indoctrination. >> oh, my god, you're right. you know what, like three times this morning, i did that, and i didn't know why. i'm indoctrinated. >> i don't know if you've heard miley cyrus' new album, but if you play it backwards, you have barack obama saying, i am in charge. they're indoctrinating our kids in school, on sesame street. it's frightening. i have a chalkboard that i'm going to use, and i've got a tree that's going to show how the roots are going to strangle -- >> let's go to politico. >> let's go to mike allen, the chief political correspondent for politico. he's got a look at the morning playbook. good morning, mike. >> happy getaway friday, willie. >> it is. we're powering through here. let's talk about next week. president obama with the
6:19 am
primetime speech to the joint session of congress on wednesday. what's the game plan here for the white house? >> the white house is showing the arguments it thinks are strongest with some polling that has been sent up to democrats on the hill to talk about joel bennenson, one of the longtime democratic pollsters has put together a memo, making the case that the more people know about healthcare reform, and specifically about the president's ideas, the more they like it. and they've assembled numbers to show that their argument against insurance companies is, surprise, we powerful. so you can expect to hear much more bashing of insurance companies. and they say, as they hear about the president's individual items, people like it better than they like the idea of healthcare. so this is setting up a very high dive that the president is about to jump off of because, when he speaks at 8:00 p.m. eastern on wednesday -- they were debating between 8:00 and 9:00. i guess the networks prefer 8:00.
6:20 am
he needs to show a change in the numbers. if there's not a change in the numbers, it's going to be clear the problem is not with the packaging, the problem is with the product. >> a lot of people are saying, mike, this is his last best chance, or his last best hope. >> like that book. >> you should get it at amazon.com, barnes and noble. paperback and audio. >> there's an audio version. >> mike allen, actually. he reads the audio. >> okay. stop interrupting. >> mike, i was talking to mike murphy a couple of days ago, and he predicted 24 seats picked up by republicans in 2010. what are you hearing? how worried are democrats? >> very possible, believe it or not. republicans would have to get 41 to change who's the boss in the speaker's office. carly cook, who's the most respected watcher of house
6:21 am
seats, sent out another alert, the second in two weeks, to his clients yesterday warning that democrats were in a bad slide. he was saying they could lose 20 seats. charlie's always pretty conservative. so it's right in line with what mike murphy told you. here's the surprise. democrats thought everything about next year would depend on the economy. now there's a new "x" factor, and that is how people feel about the healthcare plan and the obama agenda. >> this is going to be bad in 2010, joe? >> 20 seats is not bad for democrats. the reason why, there have been two elections that have realigned congress. remember, this is the amazing thing. this congress, the democrats have a 79-seat advantage in right now, was set up -- this was gerrymander mainly by republican legislatures in 2001. so the democrats have been gaining these seats against them. when they pick up 30, 31, and
6:22 am
now 6. usually what happens after that is you have a realignment. they picked up another 20, 21 seats in '08. you never have that. that's historic, having back to back hunl pickups like the democrats had. so if the democrats lose 20 seats, historically, if i'm a historian, i would just say, oh, this is to be expected. watch realignment coming up in 2011 if democrats are still sweeping forward, though. do you agree with me, mike? >> that's why there's quite a gap between 24 and 41. when the president's in power, you always expect them to lose. the question is do they set the table for a tough re-election race? that's what one of the big effects would be. >> mike, real quick before we go, curt schilling, he's not going to get the senate seat in massachusetts, is he? >> of course he's not. but it's blowing up sports talk radio in boston, the very
6:23 am
possibility of curt schilling running for the kennedy seat. but there's a problem. curt schilling has said he's an independent. in massachusetts, you have to be registered in the party farther before the filing deadline of november 3rd than he has been. it sounds like it's a good topic for talk radio. probably not going to see him on the mound here in d.c. >> and he wasn't going to get elected anyway. >> there's that. >> mike allen, thank you so much. have a great labor day weekend. we'll be checking you out at politico.com. >> he's very conservative, too conservative for a state like massachusetts. >> mitt romney, they can swallow. curt schilling, i don't think so. just wave the bloody sock. >> you're still on this story about women doing well, aren't you? >> i'm glad women are doing well. i'm tired of you whining about it. you all are succeeding. you've taken over the economy and the world. we'll sit back and smile. don't try to make us feel guilty about you enjoying a good thing. >> it's not a good thing. we get paid so much less.
6:24 am
it's not a good result. it's just reality. >> just say yes. >> here's ann thompson. >> reporter: in this recession, men and women are not equal. >> men have lost three out of four jobs. women have been left holding the basket in the workplace because so many men have lost their jobs. >> reporter: particularly in manufacturing and construction. men lost 3 million jobs in those two sectors alone. while women may soon make up most of the work force, what isn't changing is they still take home less pay. >> there's more women at the top in organizations, and women have seen a narrowing in the wage gap. but we haven't seen full equality by any stretch of the imagination. >> reporter: in high profile fields, the progress is mixed. soon two of the three evening newscasts will be anchored by women, but government remains a man's world. women are distinct minorities on the supreme court, on congress, and in state houses nationwide. not only is the gender balance
6:25 am
shifting, but so is the age of the workforce. a study out by the pew research center finds 4 in 10 adults working past the median retirement age of 62 have delayed their retirement because of the recession. and the majority of workers ages 50 to 61 think they might have to push back their retirement because of the economy. the unintended consequence of 401(k)s, say analysts, originally designed to supplement retirement instead of being most of it. >> many things come up where you need to tap into your savings. it's almost impossible to tell people not to touch their retirement savings when they have these other important things to spend. >> reporter: that's why peggy mcgiveney is working and plans to work as long as she can. >> i've experienced two personal tragedy that's have drained my 401(k)s and other things that i had, and it's just not there. so i will be working, barring me winning the lottery, i'll be working.
6:26 am
>> so men are fired three out of four -- men are fired, and we're hearing women saying they're left holding the bag. men are being fired. >> that's right. >> women, oh, men are being fired. poor us. we're left holding the bag. >> it's because we're paid so much less that we're in there. >> you get paid more than everybody on this set. >> we'll be right back. i'm here on this tiny little plane, and guess what...
6:27 am
i've still got room for the internet. with my new netbook from at&t. with its built-in 3g network, it's fast and small, so it goes places other laptops can't. anything before takeoff mr. kurtis? prime rib, medium rare. i'm bill kurtis, and i've got plenty of room for the internet. and the nation's fastest 3g network. (announcer) sign up today and get a netbook for $199.99 after mail-in rebate. with built-in access to the nation's fastest 3g network. only from at&t. without my makeup. now, it's no problem. (announcer) neutrogena tone correcting night serum with high performance soy to even skin tone and active retinol to speed cell turn over. clinically shown to visibly fade brown spots in 14 nights. i even out my skin at night
6:28 am
so it looks younger, flawless in the morning. (announcer) neutrogena tone correcting now you can fade and prevent discolorations all day. new tone correcting spf 30.
6:29 am
6:30 am
welcome back to "morning joe." >> is this too much heavy lifting for you? are you not paid enough to do this? i'll be glad to do this if you like. willie? >> she makes more than all of us. >> you and i combined. >> she's got the job. >> we're left holding the bag. >> it's 6:30 on the east coast. here's a look at today's top stories. i said bring it on a single. >> the director is on our side. >> i guess because i'm not a man, pete, you're not going to listen to me. mort, could you ask them to put it on a single. >> i don't know how to say this. i'm not getting involved in this one. >> hey, pete -- >> i'm going to punch him. >> i've got the pabst blue ribbon for you. i'm going to the fight tonight with willie. raw steaks, pabst blue ribbon, otb after that. investigating reports from
6:31 am
an afghan official that includes 90 people, including 40 civilians, killed by a nato air strike. aircraft were targeting two fuel tankers hijacked by taliban militants. let's go straight to nbc's chief foreign correspondent richard engel joining us live from kabul this morning. richard, what's the latest? >> reporter: mika, these fuel tankers were tie jacked in northern afghanistan in the kunduz province last night. nato officials were looking for them, and located these fuel tankers this morning. they were taken by the taliban. as the taliban militants were trying to cross a river into a more safe taliban area, the tankers got stuck in the mud. that's when the militants decided to have an impromptu hearts and minds campaign to lighten the load. they were giving out some of this diesel fuel to other taliban members and also to civilians in the area. it was during this hearts and
6:32 am
minds campaign, the fuel distribution, that the nato air strike occurred. according to the local governor in the area, at least 50 taliban were killed, 40 civilians who were also collecting fuel were killed as well. mika? >> all right. rich engel, thank you very much. we'll follow that story. let's take a moment now to take a look at the morning papers. >> "washington post" stimulus credit. the white house is saying that the stimulus package has lifted the economy of worries about unemployment persist. >> "washington times," cia asks justice to probe leaks of secret. >> "new york times," obama advisers split on the size of afghan forces, worried that exclusion will be seen as occupation. >> open to sending in more troops. the defense chief backs a plan to increase u.s. force ins afghanistan. >> and "the wall street journal," states shut down to save cash. maine, maryland, michigan,
6:33 am
california slash services. >> we'll be right back. more papers soon. everything yo. to strengthen teeth, help prevent cavities, and kill germs. introducing 6 in 1 listerine total care. the most complete mouthwash. it was tough news to hear. everything changed. i didn't know what to do. right about then, our doctor mentioned the exelon patch. he said it releases medicine continuously for 24 hours. he said it could help with her cognition which includes things like memory, reasoning, communicating and understanding. (announcer) the most common side effects of exelon patch are nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.
6:34 am
the likelihood and severity of these side effects may increase as the dose increases. patients may experience loss of appetite or weight. patients who weigh less than 110 pounds may experience more side effects. people at risk for stomach ulcers or who take certain other medicine should talk to their doctor because serious stomach problems, such as bleeding may worsen. mom's diagnosis was hard to hear, but there's something i can do. (announcer) visit exelonpatch.com for free caregiving resources.
6:35 am
6:36 am
welcome back. a beautiful, beautiful shot. sunshine rising over red square. hi, i'm joe scarborough live from 30 rock. with us now, editorial writer for "the washington post." did you see that? >> willie was just telling me about that. >> glenn beck saying that 30 rock is a communist -- >> it's just like the art history class. he went through the architecture and looked -- >> hold on. where's the lenin statue? who took down the lenin statue? >> he pointed out specific architecture, things you see over doorways. here's a hammer and a guy with a sickle. where have we seen the hammer and sickle before? they're all communists.
6:37 am
we're all communists. you're a communist. mort, you might be a communist. >> it's alphabetical, i'll tell you that. >> mika may be a capitalist with all the dough she's making. i'm for income redistribution. >> you're going to push me too far, and i'm not going to be able to hold back the truth. >> income redistribution is in the mail. >> can i fly on your g-5? >> you're going to be in trouble. >> i'm sorry. we're sold out. >> with us now from "the washington post," jonathan capehart. he's also an msnbc political analyst. jonath jonathan, thanks for being with us. >> good morning. thank you. hello, everyone. >> jonathan, good editorial a couple of days ago about charlie rangel. >> yeah, yesterday actually. how time flies. you guys have been talking about it all week. i'm glad to see mort back.
6:38 am
i guess it was earlier in the week where you were talking about what we did in the daily news and the charlie rangel theater. these revelations make the apollo theater stuff where there was no sort of legal wrongdoing but ethical wrongdoing. two bank accounts up to $50,000 that he forgot to disclose, i think, is pretty outrageous. and how he will be able to hang on at chairman of ways and means is beyond me. mort, what do you think? you're there in new york. you talk to the business community all the time. you are part of the business community. what would it do to new york if charlie rangel were to step aside? >> let me just say, for those that don't know, your paper won a pulitzer prize investigating this back when jonathan capehart worked there. jonathan won a pulitzer for this
6:39 am
scam at the apollo theater that charlie was in the middle of. >> it's sort of a drip, drip, drip. there have been so many revelations about the financial inaccuracy for charlie rangel. for somebody who's sitting in a key position, chairman of the house ways and means, it's almost impossible to imagine that he continues in that post. but let's all be realistic. there's no doubt that he in that position has really helped new york. it's just the way the system works. i don't know if he has the capacity to remain in that position, but it certainly will be a loss to new york. >> politicians are tone deaf. we'll see how tone deaf nancy pelosi is. whether she understands that it's time for charlie to step down. >> i totally agree with you on both levels. we've got two op-eds we want to get to this morning. >> george will has written another one. >> let's start with the george will one. >> this is one of the most important conservative writers, he and charles krauthammer, and the message he's delivering is a
6:40 am
message of constraint in foreign policy that the republicans haven't delivered since the 1990s. >> this is an ofgs. he says the inexrabble logic of iraq. after almost 6 1/2 years and 4,327 american dead and 31,483 wounded, with a war spiraling downward in afghanistan, it would be indefensible for the u.s. military overextended and in need of material repair and mental recuperation, to loiter in iraq to improve the instincts of corrupt elites. if there is a worse use of the u.s. military than nation building, it is adult supervision and behavior modification of other people's politicians. >> george will says it's time to get out of iraq. strong words from a very powerful conservative voice. >> coming on the heels of what he wrote in afghanistan, i never thought of george will as a pacifist, but this is pretty big and pretty important. as you've talked on the show and
6:41 am
as we all know, how logical, how likely is it that the united states would pull up stakes in iraq and afghanistan knowing full well that, if we did that, particularly in afghanistan, the whole place would fall apart. and we would end up making the situation a whole lot worse. with afghanistan, you can't take any action in afghanistan and not take into account pakistan, what would happen there. >> where were these guys a couple of years ago? what's happened? what's the term? why now are certainly other conservatives feeling this way. >> george will at several stages of the war supported it. he became a skeptic sooner than most. and there's a long history of conservatives. certainly those of us back in the 1990s, mort zuckerman, when we ran congress, we were constantly urging restraint, restrai restraint, restraint. we lost our ideological bearings in 2002 and 2003 because of 9/11.
6:42 am
it sounds like george will is one of the first to find his back and argue forcibly we have got to start showing restraint. plus post-september 15th of last year, we don't have the resources to fight ten-year wars anymore, mort. >> clearly, the 9/11 events had a huge impact on the country, and we had to do something. that, in a sense, is what compelled us, particularly given the fact we had faulty intelligence in iraq. but at this stage of the game where everything is laid out for us, it's much more difficult to justify staying in iraq and much more difficult to figure out what we do in afghanistan. >> and, mika, of course, as we've said here before, this is a no win situation for the president. if the president follows people like george will, and many on his own left, and doesn't listen to the generals, big problems. >> these aren't his -- i'm just saying he didn't walk into this. >> no, he didn't. again, i'm not -- we're not
6:43 am
blaming president obama for being in iraq or afghanistan. just saying he's got some very tough choices to make. i don't see a winning scenario regardless. >> pretty amazing piece by charles krauthammer as well in the post. we'll get that later. up next, an ugly end to a night of college football. a lot of people are talking about this cheap shot between oregon and boise state. also ahead, willie's summer in review. uh-oh. be right pack. most for headaches. for arthritis pain... in your hands... knees... and back. for little bodies with fevers.. and big bodies on high blood pressure medicine. tylenol works with your body... in a way other pain relievers don't... so you feel better... knowing doctors recommend tylenol...
6:44 am
more than any other brand of pain reliever.
6:45 am
when i really liked to be outside, i did not like suffering from nasal allergy symptoms like congestion. but nasonex relief may i say... bee-utiful! prescription nasonex is proven to help relieve indoor and outdoor nasal allergy symptoms like congestion, runny and itchy nose and sneezing. (announcer) side effects were generally mild and included headache. viral infection, sore throat, nosebleeds and coughing. ask your doctor about symptom relief with nasonex.
6:46 am
and save up to $15 off your refills. go to nasonex.com for details, terms and conditions. when morning comes in the middle of the night... rooster crow. ...it affects your entire day. to get a good night's sleep, try 2-layer ambien cr. the first layer dissolves quickly to help you fall asleep. and unlike other sleep aids, a second dissolves slowly to help you stay asleep. when taking ambien cr, don't drive or operate machinery. sleepwalking, and eating or driving while not fully awake with memory loss for the event as well as abnormal behaviors such as being more outgoing or aggressive than normal, confusion, agitation and halluciations may occur. don't take it with alcohol as it may increase these behaviors. allergic reactions such as shortness of breath, swelling of your tongue or throat may occur and in rare cases may be fatal. side effects may include next-day drowsiness, dizziness, and headache. in patients with depression, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide may occur. if you experience any of these behaviors or
6:47 am
reactions contact your doctor immediately. wake up ready for your day-ask your healthcare provider for 2-layer ambien cr. welcome back to "morning joe." a view of los angeles airport at 3:48 in the morning. certainly hope you're not up watching us at this hour. a late college football last night. oregon and boise state set up to be a great game. but all that's remembered is what happened after the game, a really ugly incident. fred roggin has it for us. no better way to kick off the college football season than a matchup between top 20 teams. 15th ranked boise state hosted number 16 oregon. second quarter, kellen ward scrambled and found austin pettes in the end zone for six. they won it 19-8. ugly scene at the end of the
6:48 am
game, legarrett blount sucker punched byron howell. a classless act by blount. don't be surprised if he gets sus penned by oregon and the ncaa. if i could suspend him, i'd do it. preseason finale between the eagles and jets. michael vick had more playing time, but it didn't hit. hit from behind and coughed up the ball. vick looked like he'll need a couple more weeks to get up to speed. he'll get that time. commissioner reinstated vick, but he'll be eligible to play week three of the regular season. baseball, pedro martinez got his first start for the phill s phillies. that pitch was gone. taken to deep right. san francisco up 1-0. that was the only mistake martinez made in the game. tim lincecum was too dominant. he fanned 11. this rbi double by ryan howard in the sixth proved to be the difference. phillies beat the giants 2-1. colorado also lost. rockies remain one game up in the n.l. wild card. toronto, yankees and blue
6:49 am
jays. lyle overbay a high fly. alex rodriguez tried to make the play and in the process ran into a female police officer. look out, she's got a gun. the fans didn't like it. they booed rodriguez for his efforts. a-rod blasted his 24th homer of the year over the wall. yankees won 7-5. a man proposed to his cheerleader girlfriend. she took one look at the size of that rock and said okay. we all know baseball fans left to enjoy a beer or two when taking in the game. what if the players were drunk? a pair of florida marlins were given goggles to simulate the effects of being under the influence. trying to walk the line. that's just foul. how would a pitcher would excellent control fare? not very well. ryan sanchez missed his mark by several feet and almost hit the cameraman. talk about a wasted pitch. finally, carson palmer gets
6:50 am
the accolades for being the starting quarterback for the bengals. his younger brother jordan is getting the attention. he's part of a software team that developed an iphone app called run-p, which sounds exactly what it would do. it's designed to pinpoint the most opportune time to relieve yourself during a movie and even has a timer so you know how long you've been gone. jordan talked about it last night on the hbo series "hard knocks." it sells for $1.99 which is cheap because as you all know, when you've got to go, you've got to go. >> if there's a story about pee, fred roggin will get it in there. one more thing about the sucker punch. right after he punched the guy, they're leading him off the field. he's being taunted by the boise state fans, tries to go up into the crowd and go after the fans. this is legrett blount, the oregon running back. he apologized profusely after the game and said he's ready to accept whatever punishment is handed down. coming up next, not just the
6:51 am
week in review, the entire summer in review. the last three months in four short minutes coming up next. i'm racing cross country in this small sidecar,
6:52 am
but i've still got room for the internet. with my new netbook from at&t. with its built-in 3g network, it's fast and small, so it goes places other laptops can't. i'm bill kurtis, and i've got plenty of room for the internet. and the nation's fastest 3g network. gun it, mick. (announcer) sign up today and get a netbook for $199.99 after mail-in rebate. with built-in access to the nation's fastest 3g network. only from at&t. you weren't always my favorite day. with all the pet hair in the air, i'd spend class preoccupied, bothered by itchy eyes. but now i have new zyrtec® itchy eye drops. it works fast, with just one drop, to relieve my itchy eyes from allergies for up to 12 hours. no other allergy itchy eye drop works faster or longer. which is good, 'cause there's a lotta paws to shake. with new zyrtec® itchy eye drops i can love the air™. (announcer) find it in the allergy aisle next to other zyrtec® products.
6:53 am
6:54 am
let's hear jonathan say it. >> is it time? willie. >> oh, my gosh. >> wherever it comes from, i'll take it. >> no, don't do that. >> i'm sorry. >> mika, you do it now. >> oh, yes, is it time? >> there we go.
6:55 am
summer in review. it's been a long summer. i didn't realize how long a summer until yesterday, when we were sitting down going through all these stories. wait until you see all this stuff. i give you the summer in review. >> some still are choosing not to hear why i made the decision to chart a new course to advance the state. it should be so obvious to you. >> the summer of sarah has governor palin leaving office but certainly not going away. she fought with david letterman. her daughter was knocked up by alex rodriguez. >> she fought with her daughter's 129-year-old ex-boyfriend. >> i think we can work things out. >> and she fought with reality when she helped dream up the infamous death panels. >> a governor who probably should have left office did not. >> i developed a relationship which started as a dear, dear friend from argentina. >> we gained a historic supreme court justice this summer. >> congratulations and welcome
6:56 am
to the court. >> but we lost a historically insane judge as well. >> you all have the best delusional people. >> in other reality tv news, jon and kate divided a nation with their public separation. >> what planet do you live on? >> blago was banned from appearing on "i'm a celebrity, get me out of here," so he sent his wife to the jungle instead. and a former congressional leader signed up to wear dance shoes on "dapsing with the stars." >> it is a little problem with high heels. >> we marked the 40th anniversary this summer of the moon landing and woodstock. we also marked the first time in our nation's history that a man had his private parts super glued to himself by his three mistresses. >> had private body parts super glued to his body. >> a 72-year-old granny was
6:57 am
tased in texas. and a 16-year-old tween idol jolted the country with a public pole dance. ♪ >> miss california achieved martyrdom when she was stripped of her crown. >> this should not happen in america. >> we also sent gidget, the taco bell chihuahua, off to that great fast food restaurant in the sky. and an innocent fly achieved fame when it was stripped of its life. >> nice. >> there were, of course, much greater losses this summer. the last of the kennedy brothers was laid to rest at arlington national cemetery. >> although it hasn't been easy at times to live with this name, i've never been more proud of it than i am today. >> we said good-bye to pioneers of television and film. and to the biggest star in the world. revolution broke out this summer in the streets of iran.
6:58 am
in north korea, bill clinton charmed the back to school sized pants off kim jong-il and brought two americans home as souvenirs. >> they were delightful on the plane trip home. >> secretary of state hillary clinton was in a less cheery mood in africa. >> i'm not going to be channelling my husband. >> president obama's first summer in the white house was a busy one. he did some sightseeing and gave a little speech in cairo. >> the people of the world can live together in peace. >> he fought with the former vice president. >> i wasn't a fan of his when he got elected. >> he fought a racially charged national controversy with beer. >> mm, beer. >> he fought questions about the legitimacy of his own birth. >> i'm showing you his birth certificate. >> i'm looking at a camera right now. >> and he fought citizens, who judging by their loaded weapons, seem not to like his healthcare plan. >> and you're carrying a gun at a presidential event.
6:59 am
>> the town hall meeting made a very loud comeback this summer. >> you are talking down to the american people. >> how dare you! >> i don't understand this rudeness. what is this sth >> as outrage exploded across the country, barney frank asked the question that could have been asked just as easily of mark sanford, paula abdul, and the other stars of the summer's headlines. >> on what planet do you spend most of your time? >> excellent. that was great. >> wow, all that in one summer. >> whoa, i'm tired. >> isn't that tiring? >> we didn't get a break, did we? >> i want to go to bed. >> that's all i can think about. good stuff, willie. >> more to come. >> i'm with you, mort. i'm tired now. >> i'm just beginning to wake up. just relax, and we'll take over. >> welcome back to "morning joe."
7:00 am
mort zuckerman feeling a little lonely. we should get to news. >> a lot to talk about today. you've got the white house coming out and crediting the stimulus package with the economy turning around. you've got debates inside the obama administration about troop levels in afghanistan. an awful lot to talk about. the head of the republican party in florida accusing the president of indoctrination of children, turning them all into socialists, just absolutely ridiculous. and also van jones, the already embattled green star of the white house, may be a truther. he signed a petition. willie will tell us more about it. just some outrageous claims. i've got to believe van jones, if not a truther, comes awfully close. could be in trouble. >> and we'll talk more about afghanistan, front page of "the new york times," whether or not to send more troops. the administration is trying to figure that out. time for a look at some of the day's top stories. officials are blaming arson
7:01 am
for the massive wildfire burning north of los angeles. a homicide investigation is now under way after two firefighters died on sunday when their truck careened off a mountain road. the fire is 38% contained, but thousands of homes remain under threat. a cemetery in glendale, california, is the final resting place for michael jackson. members of jackson's family, along with celebrity friends maccaulay culkin and elizabeth taylor gathered for a private funeral. jackson's estate is paying for the service and a dozen burial spaces in the cemetery's great mausoleum. we're learning new details into the resilience of jaycee dugard, who police say was kidnapped at age 11, raped, and held captive for nearly 20 years. according to her recently reunited family, dugard managed to educate the two daughters fathered by her accused kidnapper despite the shocking conditions. >> they are clever, articulate, curious girls who have a bright future ahead of them.
7:02 am
although they have no formal education, they are certainly educated. jaycee did a truly amazing job with the limited resources and education that she herself had, and we are so proud of her. >> that's incredible. >> astounding. moving on now, defense secretary robert gates is indicating for the first time that he's open to increasing the number of u.s. troops in afghanistan. it follows a new investment by the top u.s. commander there that calls for a revised strategy to fighting the war. >> i take seriously general mcchrystal's point that the size of the imprint -- of footprint depends perhaps -- depends in significant measure on the nature of the footprint. and the behavior of those troops and their attitudes and their interactions with the afghans.
7:03 am
>> this is going to be the debate, i think. >> it is a debate. healthcare now is all we're talking about, but afghanistan is an issue that's going to follow the president for the rest of his presidency regardless of what he does. >> however it looks now, whatever you think it's going to be over the next three or four years, it's going to be a serious burden for the president. i don't think the country has any interest in being involved in afghanistan. whatever credibility that kind of intervention has, that credibility was eroded dramatically with iraq. it's very hard to imagine how we're going to be more effective in an even more difficult terrain with a more difficult population with a tribal structure that can outwait us. they know they can outwait us. i don't see how it's going to work. it doesn't mean we can walk, but it's just a horrible position for the president to be in and for us to be in as a country. >> now, the approval ratings for the afghanistan operation have already slipped. americans don't want to stay
7:04 am
there. barack obama finds himself in a difficult position where actually he's depending on conservatives to keep those numbers up. you have george will now saying we've got to move away from afghanistan. we've got to move away from iraq. when that conservative support starts eroding, suddenly you're going to see maybe only 30% of americans supporting a stay in afghanistan. >> and the conservatives, not all of them, but the conservatives are going to look at it and say, we don't see an exit strategy here. >> the only thing i have a problem with that is that these countries and the landscape and the terrain of the fighting has not changed. why now are they changing? >> mika, we're looking at the situation as it is today. >> and the situation as it is today is no different than it was a year or two ago in terms of the challenges. >> but you're talking about the past. the american people voted on the way republicans handled themselves from 2001 to 2008. and they voted republicans out of power.
7:05 am
looking back and blaming republicans may be fine to do -- >> i'm not blaming republicans. >> no, you are. it may be fine to do and make democrats feel better. but democrats run washington, d.c., and they're going to have to make the choices. >> i think it's a convenient thing for a conservative to write now maybe iraq and afghanistan we shouldn't be there. seems a little inconvenient. >> things have changed in afghanistan. >> certainly the president took afghanistan as his issue. he said we've got to get out of iraq and put the troops in afghanistan. it's going to be his war, like it or not. >> and by the way, none other than your father was saying at the beginning of this administration that barack obama better not ramp up in afghanistan or the war becomes his own. we have all of these foreign policy experts. listen, i'm not saying republicans didn't mess things up terribly across the globe over the past eight years. what i am saying, though, is president barack obama runs affairs now.
7:06 am
these are his choices that he has to make. and, if conservatives look at it and they're finally showing some restraint in foreign policy, i think that's something we should applaud. >> okay. i'm just saying in some ways it seems a little convenient. i hear you. i also think it is on president obama at this point with afghanistan because he put the line in the sand about what he thinks he needs to do there. >> that's right. >> it is going to be a tremendous challenge. couple more news stories. >> let's get your dad on the show. >> okay. we'll call him. north korea is announcing the final stages of enriching uranium. it comes despite international calls for a halt to the nuclear program. according to experts, the process could provide the regime a second way to make nuclear bombs along with its plutonium based program. good morning, everybody. >> willie, your dad knows how to make nuclear bombs. let's get your dad on the program. >> he makes them in the garage out on the beach. >> that's great. would he come on for our show? >> for this story, yes.
7:07 am
>> is that the garage with the hammer and sickle in front of it? >> it's our communist garage. >> do we have the glenn beck clip yet? >> we're working on it. >> where beck says that we're all communists. and from this morning's "usa today," the obama administration has plans to change the longstanding policy by releasing the names of thousands of visitors to the white house. it follows a lengthy review after watchdog groups called for more transparency into who may be influencing administration's policies. >> can i show -- i want to show a story here that i've been looking at for some time. paul mccartney and ringo starr, my heroes. september 9th is going to be a huge day for the beatles, and they're relaunching -- this is beatles 2.0. they're going to be releasing all of their remastered cds along with rock band. a new generation of beatles fans will certainly grow from this.
7:08 am
it's a big day for us beatles fans on september 9th. mort, you're invited to call on our radio show on september 9th, wabc and station as cross america. providence, if you're up in providence. >> joe has issued a challenge that so far no one has been able to stop him. >> if you can stump me in beatles trivia, i'm going to buy the entire beatles remastered set of cds. i know, mort, that you are going to work extra hard in september to be able to afford it yourself. >> i'm going to warn you about this because i don't want to spring this on you. the beatles were my great musical heroes, and in some crazy way i was having dinner in london with ringo starr. so the question i'm going to ask you is what did he say to me? i just want to put it in those terms because that's a very important exchange he had. changed his whole life. >> he said to you, mort, do you remember -- >> no, he didn't know my name.
7:09 am
>> hey, buddy -- >> dude, you remember that night at the warwick hotel. how did we get those goats into the room? that's what he said to you. >> what he said was, hey, dude, are you going to pick up the check? i'm just telling you what he said. >> seriously, you are -- i've never seen anyone more -- >> it scares her actually. >> beatles passion. >> no one could trick him. >> i can't didn't get out of my room for like five years. i just read beatles trivia and listened to beatles songs. >> i thought you were kidding. >> it has had an effect. i just want you to know that. >> that's why i look pasty and a little fat. >> we talk about it when you're not in the room. >> i know a disturbing amount of information about the beatles. >> can i read the charles krauthammer piece this morning? >> by the way, you know anything about the jonas brothers? >> willie is the jonas brothers fan. >> i went to hear them with my
7:10 am
daughter, my 12-year-old daughter. >> my daughters. blame it on them, that's fine. >> i know everything about the jonas brothers, including their sister. >> willie's summer in review. this is charles krauthammer's summer in review. it's a little different. "after a disastrous summer, mistaking his mandate, believing his press, centralizing power, governing left, disdaining citizens for, of all things, organizing, obama is in trouble. let's be clear. this is a fall, not a collapse. he's not been repudiated or even defeated. he will likely regroup and pass some version of health insurance reform that will restore some of his clout and popularity. but what has occurred, irreversibly, is this. he's become ordinary. the spell has been broken. the charismatic conjurer of 2008 has shed his magic. he's regressed to the mean,
7:11 am
tellingly expressed in poll numbers hovering at 50%." >> i think charles krauthammer makes the point his approval ratings will go back up. the daily gallup poll is back up to 45%, 55%, but at the same time, the events of this summer have brought him down to earth, right? >> sure, without question. the american people have made it clear in the town hall forums and in other forums that they don't -- they're a little uncomfortable and fearful really of what might come out of health insurance reform or healthcare reform. let's put charles krauthammer's column into some context. that was a really hard-hitting column. i mean, but charles krauthammer has a litany of these hard-hitting columns against barack obama. and you know, i would read charles krauthammer during the campaign to see just what the right was thinking and what the
7:12 am
hard right was thinking about barack obama. and charles krauthammer in every column, most columns, i should say, during the campaign and continuing through its presidency, has sought to pull the president down to the ground, to bring him off his perch, off his pedestal, pull him down from 35,000 feet, and pull him down to earth to make him and his administration and the american people who are reading him realize that he is a mere mortal, as he says in today's column, i believe with be and that he is just a man. he should stop believing his own press. that's been a mantra of krauthammer's all the way through. >> i think it's a good mantra. he is just a man, not a god. there has been a cult of personality around him the last couple of years. god bless krauthammer for pointing that out. >> let us also be aware. if you're looking at 10% or 11% unemployment next year, it's going to be an obama recession. he's not going to be able to blame it on his predecessor, bush. if the war in afghanistan, as we
7:13 am
were talking before, gets to be even more problematic than it is now, that's going to be an obama war. he's got a lot of very serious issues that are on his table. i don't see how -- this is not going to change easily. >> at the same time, though, jonathan capehart, if unemployment goes down, let's say, to 7.5%, 8% -- i'm not suggesting it will, but you never know. recessions end when recessions end. nobody can predict exactly when that's going to happen. if unemployment rates go down, his approval ratings will go back up. he may shoot back up into the 60s. this is just as i've been saying for a very long time. one season in many seasons for this presidency. >> right. right. absolutely right. this is a moment in time. but it's a very significant moment in time for a whole lot of issues. >> i take it that you and charles don't hang out in "the washington post" commissary together? >> no. actually, mr. krauthammer, i've not seen him at the paper in the 2 1/2 years that i've been there. i don't think he actually works
7:14 am
at the paper, you know, in the building. >> i wouldn't either if the people that wrote for the paper said such mean things about me. >> jonathan capehart, thank you so much. >> i can only imagine what he says about me. >> jonathan, thank you. it's always great to have you. when are you coming back up on set? >> i've got to figure out a time when it get up there. i'd love to come back. >> bring your prada pants. >> i'll bring a different pair of pants next time. you thought those were craze country. >> pulitzer prize-winning, prada pants-wearing columnist, editorialist for "the washington post," jonathan capehart, thanks for being with us. coming up next, "hardball's" chris matthews will be here. also bbc's katty kay takes a look at the new trend in the workplace. and eugene robinson. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. does your mouthwash work in six different ways?
7:15 am
introducing listerine total care. everything you need... to strengthen teeth, help prevent cavities, and kill germs. introducing 6 in 1 listerine total care. the most complete mouthwash.
7:16 am
7:17 am
the recovery act still has its critics, and one of the
7:18 am
criticisms is that it's a grab bag of too many different programs. the fact is the recovery act is a multifacetted piece of legislation. it doesn't reflect a lack of design. that was the design. >> welcome back to "morning joe." with us now, we've got the moderator of "meet the press," david gregory. david, thanks for being with us. we just read a krauthammer column talking about barack obama's long hot summer. i saw you talking about it on another morning show this morning. talk about barack obama's long hot summer and how he turns that into a better fall. >> i think what they would admit inside the white house, joe, is they lost control of the healthcare debate. they allowed this level of toxicity to be injected into it to the point where they were losing some of the economic argument. they were losing some of the key facts not only of healthcare reform but what they've already been able to achieve. some very important things, namely this insurance reform where they've got an agreement
7:19 am
that insurance would be guaranteed, that people with preexisting conditions wouldn't be cut off. it all sort of boils down to this issue of the public option, the big government plan to drive down healthcare costs alongside private insurance companies. i think this is a point where the president recognizes that once you've gotten to this stage, he has to now drive the process by saying particularly, specifically what he's for and how he's going to get there. he's got to have a message for liberals too, which is it's time to be good soldiers. i'm telling you what he will say, which means he needs to focus on the fact he's still for the public option. that can't get in the way of other reforms they're poised to achieve, and he's likely to remind them how social security was achieved as well. you start with something that you can add on to later. >> and just to explain, david, i'm starting to learn how much progressives/liberals are compromising on this issue because we talk about a public option, and the white house has
7:20 am
been saying from the beginning that that's just one option. people can still have private insurance. and that sounds very, very liberal to conservatives. but to progressives, that's already a compromise. i saw jan shakowski last night on "hardball," she admitted last night she wants a single payer. she wants insurance companies out of there. chris said, you don't want single payer. she said, yes, actually, i do. anthony weiner came on last week, and i sat here stunned because he kept trying to get me to justify free enterprise and said, we need to get rid of all insurance companies. i guess liberals already think they've compromised because a lot of them in congress really want a single payer system, want the federal government to take over the entire pay structure of
7:21 am
the healthcare system. >> i do think there are some liberals who want that. there's no question they'd like a single payer system because they think ultimately it's the best thing for the country, the best thing in terms of guaranteeing universal healthcare and that access is so important. but there are others who believe you don't have to go to that extreme. if you can introduce enough competition in the marketplace, you can ultimately contain costs. that's what this is all about. you can have a debate about insurance and say, should insurance really be covering all of these medical procedures? does that make sense? it's only driving up the cost. but the cost is still the central issue. so many families have a hard time affording insurance because healthcare premiums are so high, because the cost of procedures is so high. but, again, i go back to what the president is likely to say to congress, to his allies, which is to say some of the things that are on the table now, that we can achieve in terms of reimbursement rates, in terms of money prevention, more access for people who don't have insurance, and making sure you don't lose your insurance.
7:22 am
look, those are things that people like ted kennedy fought for for years and could never achieve in previous efforts. we ought to take that and build on it. i think, while this debate rages on, the president, i'm told, is less concerned about the liberals of his party, saying ultimately they'll come on board. it's going to require some leadership on his part now to bring people along because i think a lot of them are pretty disappointed. >> again, i think these liberals that he's going to have a hard time bringing on board are the one, they believe single payers are the way to go. they're just not going to get it. are you sensing right now, from what you're hearing from david axelrod, what you're hearing from the white house, are you sensing that this speech next week is going to be a tough love speech to the left instead of the tough love speech to the right? >> well, i'm told that he's not quite ready for a sister soulja moment from the left because
7:23 am
he's not quite prepared for that. what you're going to hear is something different. he's still for the public option, but that can't be the only thing that defines reform. that here a list of things are that are now possible that we can do this year and that liberals and other democrats should rally around those points. he's already set the stage for that by arguing about he wants competition but the public option is only a sliver of the reform. look at the congressional budget office report. indicating that only 10 million people would go into a public plan and private insurance enrollment would actually go up. think about it. if you've got close to 50 million people buying insurance out there and they're going to get federal subsidies to do it, they would avail themselves of private plans. this is a big point of debate. again, his focus will be on what can be achieved. look, he's still got to look at the numbers here and see where his votes are. and the one thing he's always been trying to protect, i'm
7:24 am
told, he's always been afraid of losing the blue dogs, losing conservative democrats, which is why he started to back off that public option to begin with. >> david, on "meet the press" this sunday, tom brokaw, harold ford jr., tom friedman, rudy giuliani just to name a few. looks like a big show. if it's sunday, it's "meet the press." we'll talk to you on the radio this morning. >> i've got to say quickly -- i know we've got to go. but my point was, if you really dig down and most people don't force liberals who come on shows to answer tough questions. chris was beating up chris smith. >> right. >> and chris smith, the congressman from new jersey, said, well, you know, these democrats want single payer. chris said, no, no, that's not the truth. and he asked the democratic congresswoman, and she said, what i want doesn't matter. chris said, it matters to me because i asked the question. she said, yes, i want single payer. that's the thing. i'm not saying that to bash
7:25 am
democrats. i'm saying these democrats feel like they've already met the president halfway because they want single payer. like anthony weiner, they don't believe in free enterprise when it comes to health insurance. they want the federal government to take over the entire pay structure. so they feel like they've met the president halfway, and now he's going to tell them, we've got to go cluster the blue dogs. mort zuckerman, that's going to be a hard sell for a lot of very, very liberal house of representatives. >> i agree. it will be a hard sell. he's got to focus on one thing which has the widest political base, which is cost containment. for him to say revenue neutral in my judgment is not enough. >> we'll be right back with more "morning joe" in just a moment. show and tell
7:26 am
you weren't always my favorite day. with all the pet hair in the air, i'd spend class preoccupied, bothered by itchy eyes.
7:27 am
but now i have new zyrtec® itchy eye drops. it works fast, with just one drop, to relieve my itchy eyes from allergies for up to 12 hours. no other allergy itchy eye drop works faster or longer. which is good, 'cause there's a lotta paws to shake. with new zyrtec® itchy eye drops i can love the air™. (announcer) find it in the allergy aisle next to other zyrtec® products.
7:28 am
are working from the road using a mifi-- a mobile hotspot that provides up to five shared wi-fi connections. two are downloading the final final revised final presentation. - one just got an email. - woman: what?! hmph. it's being revised again. the copilot is on mapquest. and tom is streaming meeting psych-up music - from meltedmetal.com. - ( heavy metal music playing ) that's happening now with the new mifi from sprint-- the mobile hotspot that fits in your pocket. sprint. the now network. deaf, hard-of-hearing, and people with speech disabilities access www.sprintrelay.com.
7:29 am
i don't believe the war is slipping through the administration's fingers. i think it's important for us to be able to show over the months to come that the president's strategy is succeeding. and that is what general mcchrystal is putting in front of us. how we can best, at least from the military standpoint, ensure that we can show signs of progress along those lines.
7:30 am
>> this is the president -- this is not just for this president. you can go back to kennedy. this is such a nightmare for any democratic president to be caught between his generals pulling one way and his base pulling the other. now you've got george will and other conservatives saying, wait a second. maybe this wasn't so great after all. healthcare in the end will look like a walk through the park compared to afghanistan. >> that is very possible. >> the tough choices that this president is going to have to make on that. >> and he's going to have to make them soon as you can see on the headlines. here with us now, investigative journalist and contributor to the nation, jeremy scahill. he's the author of a new book, "blackwater, the rise of the world's most powerful mercenary army." very timely considering the pictures we've seen lately happening in kabul at the embassy that we actually, i
7:31 am
think, will end up being a pretty big story and also because who these guys are paid for by. it's not necessarily in our spending budget, but it should be. >> can you explain? we've privatized such a large part of our military operations and our state department operations. just put it in perspective. give us numbers. conservatives, liberals, everybody can agree on. >> i don't think this is a right or left story. i think all americans should be extremely concerned about this. what we have now is the most radical privatization agenda in the history of the u.s. national security apparatus. right now in afghanistan, you have 58,000 to 62,000 u.s. troops in uniform, american flag on the side of their shoulder. you have 74,000 private contractors. that means that you have more private sector corporate forces than you have actual u.s. soldiers. >> why is it? somebody said that it cuts costs in the long run because you don't have to basically get them in the army and pay them for
7:32 am
life. >> remember, the u.s. taxpayers in many cases paid for the training of these individuals. if they worked for blackwater or other armed contractors, they were navy s.e.a.l.s. they spent millions of dollars training these individuals. they leave the active military, go to a corporation, and the corporation sells them to u.s. taxpayers. essentially, we're getting double billed for their services. you can't talk about competition and give out no bid contracts. they're the least competitive contracts on the market. >> i don't know all the details of blackwater and their operations, but in a sense, what is the argument that they make that has made them this critical player? >> dick cheney was a major player in this when he was secretary of defense under george h.w. bush. one of the last things he did as secretary of defense was commission a study for halliburton, a company he went on to lead in the 1990s. how much can we privatize? is he essentially created halliburton to create a market for itself. the idea is, if you have soldiers peeling potatoes, they're not going to do the gun in hand fighting.
7:33 am
so you'll have the private sector do everything except the actual combat functions. the issue, though, that arose under bush and continues under obama unabated pretty much is they've now outsourced large portions of the armed combat, you have blackwater, dynacorp. they're in the war zone, not under the panel of military justice. >> are they fighting or doing the security for foreign policy? >> you tell me where the line is drawn in a place like afghanistan or iraq. we're only engamged in defensive operations, yet we've seen time after time over the eight years these contractors engage in all-out combat. blackwater forces have been engaged in gun battles against the mehdi army in iraq. they were engaged in the shooting of civilians, unprovoked, according to the u.s. military. it's very serious. >> what's the justification? obviously, the bush administration believed this is the best approach. the obama administration believes this is the best approach. what's their argument inside the white house, inside the pentagon? >> i interviewed some of obama's
7:34 am
senior policy advisers, foreign policy advisers before he became president, and despite the fact obama was very critical of these companies, his advisers would not rule out he would use them. obama is increasing the use. >> what is the reason behind that? >> the cold reality is they have become the american express card of u.s. military operations. they do not leave home without them. we have 250,000 troops fighting the wars in iraq and afghanistan. 250,000 contractors. those two wars would be untenable. that's not my opinion. that's the opinion of the top generals prosecuting this war right now. there's no way obama could justify or implement his surge policy in afghanistan without contractors. he simply could not do that. even with the contractors, as you pointed out earlier on the show, this is turning into a massive quagmire in afghanistan. the taliban aren losing some ground, but that doesn't mean the u.s. is winning. >> you mention the word
7:35 am
accountability. who do these guys answer to when they shoot up a civilian? what happens? >> the fact is that, despite the reality that about half the force is made up of these private contractors, you've got only a handful of prosecutions. they're prosecuted under a little known law on the books in the united states. the military extraterritorial jurisdiction agent. it's a mouthful. basically, contractors working for the d.o.d. abroad can be prosecuted for their crimes in the u.s. the issue is that state department contractors for most of the time have fallen outside. you really have only a handful of prosecutions. they're not held to military standards. >> what i don't understand is we have the blackwater incident. i don't want to get into a debate about exactly what happened, but they shoot up an intersection in iraq. and then we start hearing they need to be held to the same standards that our army is held to. that seems like a very, very logical thing. if you're going to give americans guns in an armed conflict, you say, these are the rules that americans in foreign countries in war zones have to live by. we're still not there yet, are
7:36 am
we? >> five guys were indicted. >> but why don't we apply it moving forward? not even looking back. we've learned these lessons from iraq. let's apply them moving forward. >> one of the top commanders in iraq, brigadier general carl horace said a few years ago, these guys are responsible for blow back against u.s. forces. iraqis and afghanistans don't see it as these are the contractors and these are the soldiers. contractors go up, shoot a bunch of iraqis, fire at cars on the road, and soldiers are blamed for it. this is a national security issue. >> thank you. great book. >> we're going to get you back here. i want to keep talking about this. thank you. (mom) i'm not going to be able to see her every day. or sit on her bed and talk about her day. but she's ready. thanks to walmart's unbeatable prices, i was able to get her everything she needed. as well as what she wanted. letting go? mom! (mom) that's the hard part. set them up for success, for less.
7:37 am
save money. live better. walmart. your hair mixes with pollen and dust in the air. i get congested. my eyes itch. i have to banish you to the garden. but now with zyrtec-d®, i have the proven allergy relief of zyrtec®, plus a powerful decongestant. i can breathe freer with zyrtec-d®. so, i'll race you to our favorite chair. i might even let you win. zyrtec-d® lets me breathe easier, so i can love the air™. zyrtec-d®. behind the pharmacy counter. no prescription needed.
7:38 am
7:39 am
welcome back to "morning joe." here with us now -- that's a shot of washington. is that the kennedy center? that's nice. here with us now bbc washington correspondent katty kay, who is
7:40 am
co-author of "women-nomics, write your own rules for success." perfect time to have you in, katty. i don't know what to say. >> you've already said it. >> i'm going to say it again. i make joe tired. give us a sense as to why women seem to be making a bit of a surge in the employment world in the work force. >> i've also heard it called the he session as well. that was a good one too, mika. partly it's that women are in industries that haven't been as badly affected by this recession. you find us in healthcare, women in education in large numbers. those sectors haven't been so hit by layoffs as some of the more manufacturing industries. but i think something else is also going on. i think that women are prepared to work in flexible, you can call it, creative ways that perhaps men traditionally haven't been. so they're taking four-day
7:41 am
weeks, 40 hours a week. they're easier to keep on the work force. easier to keep on your payroll than some of the higher paying stars. women clearly still aren't being paid the same kind of salaries often for doing the same jobs that men are. if you look at the numbers in this recession, we are losing jobs at a lot slower rate than men are. >> we're losing jobs at a slower rate than men are for another reason, don't you think? i mean -- >> it's discrimination against men. >> don't you this i, katty, women aren't paid as much. so in a recession when you need to get rid of the highest paid employees because you need to save money, it doesn't happen to be the women. >> when you look at wall street, where were women at the very top? there weren't many of them. if there had been more women at the top, would we have made those rash risk-taking decisions that were made? >> i love her. >> you're going to love that one. >> i think your first point was
7:42 am
critical. if you look at the last decade literally, almost all of the new jobs were createded in healthcare. if you take out -- scrub out all the numbers, virtually all the jobs were created in healthcare and some in education. it's those areas where the jobs have been growing, not in the other areas. if you look at manufacturing, you have a huge amount of automation and manufacturing. it's not just a function of man versus woman. it's what is going on in those two areas. much less automation in either education or healthcare. >> here's also what i think is really interesting about this. it's not in a sense the argument of how we got into this recession, which is going to be worth studying, and historians are going to look at this. maybe if there had been more lehman sisters, there wouldn't have been the collapse of lehman brothers. but there's a strong case to be made that women are going to be essential to getting us out of this recession in ways we haven't been seen as before. there's a whole lot of business data out there looking at the diverse area. groups of men and women, diverse
7:43 am
groups will always make a better business decision than a homogeneous group. companies that employ more women at senior levels are finding, you know what, this improves their business line. this is a sound business strategy. >> it is, and your book touches on this topic. you're right. we think outside the box in terms of how we want to bring something to the table, and it involves being flexible and trying to balance different things, which makes you ultimately more useful to a company. >> on this, i totally agree. i have felt, for example, with joe that you have added so much to his thinking, without that, we wouldn't be able to deal with him. >> i don't know. sometimes i don't know how i get through the day. willie, the same thing here. seriously, enough of this. >> how do you do it? >> men of the world unite. willie geist and i are going to be all up and down fifth avenue today. we're going to be having protests. remember, okay, men, we're stronger bonded together. >> cracks in the glass ceiling
7:44 am
right here. >> we've hit a raw nerve and this makes you very anxious. but you don't have to worry because we're not saying we want all women. remember, it was a diversity the theorem. we've got space for you too, joe. >> katty, i know we were going to have coffee. let's make it a vodka. seriously, i'm glad you're back. stay with us. >> now i know why i watch "madmen" every week. it's back when men were men and women were secretaries. >> oh, my god. >> peggy olson is my favorite. >> i publicly disassociate myself. just because i'm sitting here does not mean i am with you, joe. >> peggy olson is my favorite. she's wanted an office, smoking pot. there was some liberation. i'm just joking, people. katty, stay there. or go. i'm not in charge, actually. mika is. really liked to be outside, i did not like suffering
7:45 am
from nasal allergy symptoms like congestion. but nasonex relief may i say... bee-utiful! prescription nasonex is proven to help relieve indoor and outdoor nasal allergy symptoms like congestion, runny and itchy nose and sneezing. (announcer) side effects were generally mild and included headache. viral infection, sore throat, nosebleeds and coughing. ask your doctor about symptom relief with nasonex. and save up to $15 off your refills. go to nasonex.com for details, terms and conditions.
7:46 am
(tucci) only at&t has the best selection of full keyboard phones. like the lg neon, just $29.99 after mail-in rebate. without my makeup.
7:47 am
now, it's no problem. (announcer) neutrogena tone correcting night serum with high performance soy to even skin tone and active retinol to speed cell turn over. clinically shown to visibly fade brown spots in 14 nights. i even out my skin at night so it looks younger, flawless in the morning. (announcer) neutrogena tone correcting now you can fade and prevent discolorations all day. new tone correcting spf 30. and then there's the twin-turbocharging, 365-horsepower-generating, ecoboost™ engine in the all-new ford taurus sho that has the thirst of a v6 with the thrust of a v8. we speak car. we speak innovation. introducing the all-new taurus sho from ford. drive one.
7:48 am
welcome back. sam tanenhaus is with us. he is the author of the new book "changing the way the world thinks." the death of conservatism. sam, how is it going?
7:49 am
>> i don't know if this has changed football, really. >> not going to be a win season because of the book? >> maybe the quarterback. the studly new quarterback, maybe. >> remember the picture of the new jets' quarterback? >> oh, mark sanchez. >> yeah. >> let's talk about the book review. >> we have a book review by robert rice, remember him? it's a historical look at it. what you see for the better part of half century, there have been two approaches to health care. one goes back to fdr, which is a nationalized health care, and the other was eisenhower had the idea that employers should
7:50 am
provide health care. they have been going back and fourth and here we are doing it all over again. >> the book review? >> the age of reagan. it's a big biography that wants to do for the reagan presidency what they did -- this guy is a conservative. it's an interesting book. >> yeah, i have went through the book and it's good. we had a world view. a lot of facts and information. >> detail is always the key in books like this. >> yeah, he even got pat buchanan's quotes correct. >> some could have too much detail. >> we were troubled by that.
7:51 am
>> yeah, we were flipping through it -- >> yeah, he was like, i said it and i am proud of it. >> we do the bush league that we can review. >> the political editor for the "new york times" in washington does an interesting thing. he compares obama's struggle to push through a big policy with another huge policy issue the last pride tried to do which is to add private social security accounts, and he met the same kind of opposition. the same thing happened, lobbying groups got to them and the elderly stopped it. he asked the question whether the pegilum got swung back a
7:52 am
little bit. we are trying to look at private enterprise in the market. >> what else are you looking at in the week in review? >> well, an interesting piece of work. this is a graphic thing. a miniature graphic novel about disney taking over marvel comic. disney was the all-american vision of the cartoon, and marvel comics was the even guy. dark, nightmarish and violent. bring the two together and it's a $4 billion deal. >> the book is "the death of
7:53 am
co conservatives." everybody is reading it. >> and it's short, too. >> it is. we'll be right back with "hardball"'s chris matthews. you are watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. i'm here on this tiny little plane, and guess what... i've still got room for the internet. with my new netbook from at&t. with its built-in 3g network,
7:54 am
it's fast and small, so it goes places other laptops can't. anything before takeoff mr. kurtis? prime rib, medium rare. i'm bill kurtis, and i've got plenty of room for the internet. and the nation's fastest 3g network. (announcer) sign up today and get a netbook for $199.99 after mail-in rebate. with built-in access to the nation's fastest 3g network. only from at&t. you weren't always my favorite day. with all the pet hair in the air, i'd spend class preoccupied, bothered by itchy eyes.
7:55 am
but now i have new zyrtec® itchy eye drops. it works fast, with just one drop, to relieve my itchy eyes from allergies for up to 12 hours. no other allergy itchy eye drop works faster or longer. which is good, 'cause there's a lotta paws to shake. with new zyrtec® itchy eye drops i can love the air™.
7:56 am
welcome back to "morning joe." it's almost 8:00 in the morning. we start the trip across the
7:57 am
great nation in l.a. where it's coming up on 5:00 a.m. beautiful picture. there is las vegas. >> that's wrong. >> dallas. how about the big d? st. louis, taking you through. and then let's see washington, d.c. and then we bring it on home to the top of the communist temple we call 30-rock. >> indoctrinated. >> there it is. peoples' square. you will see the top of the tod"today" "today"'s showed building. that's where -- well, we call it the bullet bureau, where they go
7:58 am
out, griffin, and they go out and wave to the crowds. >> yeah, it's three letters away from being a great man, zu krch zuccerman. so do we have the glenn beck clip yet? do the punch first. >> let's do the punch quick. >> the one where i punch him? there was a reason for that. >> there was a college football game last night. boise state beats oregon, and after the game, watch this, they get -- well, trust me, it was great.
7:59 am
here is another replay of it. the running back was a bit frustrated. here he is, leaving the field being taunt. boy, this is nice. could we stay on the video? is everything -- now, here is some game action. >> he goes into the stands, and this guy -- is he going to get kicked out. he should not play another game this season. >> there is another punch. as you stay with him, he tries to choice boise fans, and he just plane lost it. the coaches had to pull him back all the way in the tunnel. >> he should not play another college football game this year. when something like this
8:00 am
happens, you don't know what happened, you will have another year to think about it. if he does not know what happened last night, it could happen again next week. we are going to show after the news, this clip of glenn beck. also, speaking of crazy stuff, we have two other stories on the other side, as well as all the other big, heavy news. first, you have jones, and it ends up signeding a truth document, and worked -- this morning he works at the white house. he apologized for it. and the second one is jim greer, the republican leader of florida gop saying barack obama wants to
8:01 am
do dock trau nate your kids. that sort of deviant talk, that's the sort of thing that made this country what it is today. >> that's just tur rerrific. >> what is this guy doing? this is crazy. as a result of the man session, we have willie mort with us. we are becoming out numbered. and time now for a look at today's top stories. and police are blaming arson for the fire in l.a. and a homicide investigation is
8:02 am
under way after two firefighters died when their truck kareemed off a mountain road. and michael jackson was laid to rest. they showed jackson's estate as paying for the service. we are learning new details into the resilience of jaycee dugard who was kidnapped for 18 years. she managed to educate the two daughters fathered by her accused kidnapper despite the shocking conditions. >> they are clever, articulate curious girls that have a future ahead of them. although they have no formal education, they are certainly
8:03 am
educated. she did an amazing job with the resources she had, and we are so proud of her. a quick look at the news. >> willie, what are you looking at today? >> the green jobs czar got himself in trouble. so now people are doing digging on this guy, and it turns out he signed a 9/11 truth statement with a bunch of other people. we ha
8:04 am
he did say yesterday, though, that he did not know exactly what was on it. he doesn't endorse what was on it. but his name is on the petition. >> it's an extremist group, and they have been an extremist group, and the document clearly states these people believe it should be investigated that george w. bush and dick cheney killed 3,000 people so they could go to war. >> that's the kind of conspiracy theory that has been part of all kinds of countries. this is astounding. >> speaking of ridiculous, the leader of the republican party, i saw him on "hardball" last night, but willie, do you have his statement, jim greer's statement. >> well, here is what we are talking about. president obama on tuesday proposed to -- he will put up a
8:05 am
feed for the white house website and up on c-span where he addresses children. it's not mandatory. schools can take the feed and listen to the message about hard work and staying in school. some people see it as a kultive personality. that's from gym greer, the gop florida chairman. >> let's bring in chris matthews from "hardball." this is charlie crist's guy in
8:06 am
florida. i have been asking a couple guys, when are the sarah palin, and mitt romneys, all of the people that want to be national republican leaders, when are they going to come out and criticize this sort of talk. >> jim greer was on, and i asked him where he got the pipe piper talk. he did not admit that he wrote it, and he said somebody wrote it and he signed off on it. it sounds like the guy and the staffer -- i am just guessing. the way he talked on my show and the way that read, they are two different people. >> i know jim, and jim doesn't usual talk this way. this is silly season.
8:07 am
catty, they are wanting to accuse barack obama of trying to indock trau nating. >> yeah, the idea that they think he would go in a school and give a political speech on health care reform or afghanistan, of course he is not going to do that. george bush senior did it, went to school and gave a speech. the crime would be if he went and gave a speech and said don't work hard. i think greer is responding to angry voices on right wing talk radio, and parents who are up in arms about this. what we are really looking at is the split and any chance there is to come up and slam the other side. i know when george bush sr gave his sketch, some democrats came
8:08 am
and slammed him and criticized him. more of what i find bizarre are the parents coming out and saying we don't want our president coming out and listening to the presidents that they should work hard. >> conservatives and republicans have so many things to talk about right now, about how the president is overreached or how he has gone too far left or how he followed nancy pelosi, and we are talking about death panels and indoctrination. come on, grow up! >> yeah, people say the ridiculous things, and get on the media and it becomes an issue. do you remember president bush was in a schoolroom when 9/11 -- when that information is conveyed to him. it's proper for a president to inspire, we hope, for children
8:09 am
to do well. >> i would be excited if any president gave a message stay in school to my 6-year-old daughter. what don't these leaders understand? this turns off voters. >> well, all i can say, they have one little string to grab on to here. some bureaucrat included in the teachers' packet, the advisory about how to use the material and the president if they want to, a line, have your students write an essay on how they can help the president. i don't know what clown put that in. >> we all agree that was a terrible thing, chris, and thank you for bringing that up. that was terrible and they took that out. and george bush talked about
8:10 am
kids in schools raising a dollar and sending it to afghanistan. a good thing and other presidents have done it before. why is it we don't have leaders. i will call up barack obama, when nancy pelosi talks about different things, and why don't you have some of the gop leaders standing up and saying guys, calm down, this is no way to conduct a debate. >> well, sam tanenhaus has a book out and his point is that conservatism is about conserving what is good and correcting what is wrong.
8:11 am
you have a regular political process that goes on. century after century you keep it going. that's what a conservative is, somebody that keeps it going and holds on to the best in society. and some like the craziness of bringing a gun to a meeting or the craziness of calling the president a foreigner. there is something in the psychy today out there that is excited by the idea of insirection. watch this show and don't turn it off, because if you turn it off, it will get worse is the message sometimes. >> and also, joe, your call to members of the right to tone down the rhetoric and not use language like this, you are going to get -- >> and members of the left.
8:12 am
>> i have said that people on the far right and people on the far left have been so irresponsible, and not only this summer, but over the past 20, 25 years. it does go back to what chris says about conservatives conserve, and they conserve the social order. there is nothing conservative about the left saying george bush is a nazi, and nothing conservative about the right saying barack obama is a nazi. regardless of who is in there, tearing down the republican is not a conservative approach. >> well, for the last 200 years the intelligent dialogue produced a good thing. and now it's the radicals, the bomb-throwers on both sides that take over too much of the public dialogue. it has been impossible to eliminate it. >> i think, though, it's turning
8:13 am
off more and more americans in the middle. i see that wherever i go. people write nasty things on the internet to me, but everywhere i go, democrats and republicans and independents come up to me and say thank you guys for having a reasonable discussion. catty, you wrote something that i dug up while i was writing my back. it was wonderful where you said, hey, i am from britain, and i understand what socialists are like. you americans don't have it in your jeans to be socialists, you are all crazy about work. you are all crazy about working hard. ain't no way nobody will turn a way into a socialists state. explain that. >> i am not sure i would say that brittin was socialists. there have been periods where it has been more of a welfare
8:14 am
state. the gene that pushed people across europe to make a free life are the same gene that americans still have, it's entrepreneurial. there is a job's worth attitude, and it's not worth my job to find you the pair of shoes in the right side, or god forbid you ask for an extra bit of service, and that attitude does not exist in america. there is a desire to take risks, and to be independent, and to be entrepreneurial. and even on health care, this idea you are going to have a socialized health care system. it's not going to happen. you will never have the nhs we have in britain. you will never have the risk of america becoming a socialist country and depending on the government for your business.
8:15 am
it's not the way you are made. >> it's not going to happen. i am not suggesting britain was socialist at all. it's not going to happen. i see it when i am in cabs, and a lot of cab drivers watch the show, and they will start talking and go, you know, i am driving a cab today and i will make enough money and i will buy a car and then i will start a car service, and i will have a fleet of cars, and then i will be the most successful guy on my block. that's imbread in us. >> thank you. stay with us. >> the job report is up next as well. to even skin tone and active retinol to speed cell turn over. clinically shown to visibly fade brown spots in 14 nights. i even out my skin at night so it looks younger, flawless in the morning. (announcer) neutrogena tone correcting now you can fade and prevent discolorations all day.
8:16 am
new tone correcting spf 30.
8:17 am
8:18 am
they even enlisted elmo to
8:19 am
educate kids about the swine flu. >> another swine flu prevention kid. hello, piggie. elmo loves you. shoot it! and don't forget to wash your hands. bye. >> i am thinking we should not have shown that in the morning. >> that's tough. >> if my daughter is watching right now, seriously? it would freak her out. >> let's bring in -- we will bring in eugene robinson. and also we have chris matthews with us. chris, i want to talk about what we were talking about and get mort's input and hear from gene. you hear from immigrants, don't
8:20 am
you, it's in our genes to work hard, and we don't have the socialism gene in us, do we? >> i love what catty said about how we are in this country. the other brother's concern, this is not good enough, i will take my chances in america. i believe you see the immigrants in the country today from south asia, for example, and they are cowboy spirited people. i worry about the president, him maybe being in the wrong mold here the way he sold health care so far. we are a cowboy country that would rather drive your own car than taking a train or whatever.
8:21 am
we want to get in the car and be our own person. we want our own doctor, and we know him, and we hangout with his kids. there is a lot of things we are comfortable with in the medical care system today that we don't want to see invaded. >> we are a bottom-up society. all of the growth and everything comes from the bottom up. europe is a top down society. they are figuring we are giving the bread crumbs off the table they decide to give us. and there are so many people that do succeed, it's an inspiration for everybody in the country. that's what makes the united states different from europe and canada, where i came from. >> we got ahead of ourselves in the past few years, and greed over took. >> no doubt. and we are talking about greer suggesting he wants to indoctrinate children into his
8:22 am
socialists ways by talking about hard work. what is going on out there? >> well, that is crazy. that's a crazy allegation. of course, it doesn't sound crazy where you are sitting in headquarters, the communist building. >> yeah, we wish the children could be indoctrinated to the thoughts of marx. that is absurd. this thing about what is in america's jeans. if you ask the question, you know, you can ask americans and polls, everything is terrible, and it's, you know, the government is doing everything wrong, and we're in a bad place, but ask them how optimistic they are about their future, and,
8:23 am
well, you know, my situation is going to get better. my children are going to have a better life. and, interestingly, minorities poll much higher on that question these days, actually, if you ask african-americans or latinos, if your child's life going to be better and more fulfilled than yours and have better education and be more afflue affluent, and minorities score very high on that question, 60%, 70%. and it's just an indication, yes. this is a bottom-up society. even at times when social and economic mobility is not what it has been in the past, but we still have the perception that it is, and we expect that it will be. we ain't socialists. >> chris matthews.
8:24 am
let's turn the corner here and talk about the health care debate that seems to have inspired the crazy talk on both sides. i continue to say both sides even though it makes my liberal friends angry. what does he do as he moves towards the speech next week? do you think he will give a tough love speech to conservatives or tell progressives to get out of the way? >> well, i think he has to win this in the center and on the left. he has to win the center and then hold the left. i think his first job is to get the center. he has to convince people there is something that needs fixing and he will fix it. >> chris, first, if you are the president you go for the center and tell people on the left, you guys will have to work with me. >> yeah, i think if he can unite the democratic party and get 60
8:25 am
votes in the senate and 218 in the house he has won. >> a question for chris and joe. what does he have to do on wednesday for your coverage after, for our coverage the next morning to be like, wow, he turned the corner, and the message have been sharped and people get it and now we understand why this is going to happen. what is it that he could do at this point? >> well, chris, let's list the names. i am not listening to what the president says, i am listening to what claire mccaskill, and ben nelson say after the speech. if they say i can support it, it will pass, right? >> yeah, that list of 10 above the 50 mark are critical in him winning the election. it's a party vote. the only way he will get party unity is if he basically concludes a deal within the democratic party. i don't understand this. why don't they say what can all
8:26 am
democrats in the city buy and then sell it. it ain't complicated. >> and the president needs to stop talking in front of cameras and start talking quietly with the six, seven, eight democrats from max bacchus, claire mccaskill, and say, what do you need and how do we get there? >> yeah, i agree with chris. you are not going to get the republicans and they are not going to vote for anything, and the democrats have to come out with all they can live with. they are supposed to be a political party, and they come together at a convention every four years and they pretends to believe in the same principles and ideas, and they should all have a stake in this going through, because they are all going to suffer if nothing happens on health care, and the republicans can portray them as disorganized and not able to get this one basic thing done.
8:27 am
>> the problem is, on the democrats, they are not all going to suffer, because a lot come from the moderate states. they will be careful about how far they go. they are not moderate by accident. they represent those kinds of states. >> here is my question. who will lose? here is in the precarious position when the next election rolls around? it's not in the liberals in the safe states and districts. it's precisely those democrats who are in those swing states and swing districts, and who can least afford, i think, for the conservatives or democrats to be seen as incompetent. >> yeah, they need to make the deal in the center for the two democrats in arkansas, where george bush won twice, and mccain won, and same thing with missouri and louisiana.
8:28 am
they have to make the deal. thank you. coming up, a jobs report. we'll be right back. (announcer) time brings new wisdom new aches and pains, ...and new questions about which pain reliever is right for your body. tylenol 8 hour works with your body, with one layer that dissolves quickly... ...one layer that lasts all day ...and no layers that irritate your stomach the way that ibuprofen can. it's tough on your body pain. not on your body. it was tough news to hear. everything changed.
8:29 am
i didn't know what to do. right about then, our doctor mentioned the exelon patch. he said it releases medicine continuously for 24 hours. he said it could help with her cognition which includes things like memory, reasoning, communicating and understanding. (announcer) the most common side effects of exelon patch are nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. the likelihood and severity of these side effects may increase as the dose increases. patients may experience loss of appetite or weight. patients who weigh less than 110 pounds may experience more side effects. people at risk for stomach ulcers or who take certain other medicine should talk to their doctor because serious stomach problems, such as bleeding may worsen. mom's diagnosis was hard to hear, but there's something i can do. (announcer) visit exelonpatch.com for free caregiving resources. are working from the road using a mifi-- a mobile hotspot that provides up to five shared wi-fi connections. two are downloading the final final revised final presentation.
8:30 am
- one just got an email. - woman: what?! hmph. it's being revised again. the copilot is on mapquest. and tom is streaming meeting psych-up music - from meltedmetal.com. - ( heavy metal music playing ) that's happening now with the new mifi from sprint-- the mobile hotspot that fits in your pocket. sprint. the now network. deaf, hard-of-hearing, and people with speech disabilities access www.sprintrelay.com.
8:31 am
the labor depositment is let's get a check with superstar, erin burnett. the big question, what is the unemployment rate going up to? >> 9.7%. that's more than had been
8:32 am
expected. we were at 9.4% in july, and analysts were expecting it to go up to 9.5%. and it's what real people are saying about whether they are employed or not. the other survey, based on the employer survey, big companies, shows also a decline. that's the payrolls number. now, that's bad. it's the smallest decline in jobs, though, in a year. but the way i would look at it is this. if you look over the past few months, what we just learned this morning is 49,000 more jobs were lost than we thought in june and july. even though the payroll number today was better than expected, the net results is more jobs have been lost this summer than the market expected. >> how will the market respond to that today? >> the market has been taking
8:33 am
the job's numbers in tried. the market ended higher. that came even back in february when we were losing more than 500,000 a month. the market looked through this and bought into the idea that jobs will be the last thing to recover, and focus more on the economy and jobs will come later. that unemployment number in terms of the rate, which gets so much attention around the country which is the highest in 26 years. and one final thing, the labor force increased in august. we talked about how people gave up and stopped looking for jobs? well, because of some of the headlines, maybe clash for clunkers, things seemed better, and you saw people saying i was not counted as unemployed, but i'm unemployed and i will come
8:34 am
back and look for a job. now that will increase your unemployment rate. >> all right. >> international superstar, erin burne burnett, and give the king our best and have a great day. when we come back, 9.7%? we have our political round table. i will ask chris matthews and mort about that when we come back. we will have a look at the stories that changed your life forever. what is that smirk about? this is news! you know you're gonna need it. why not stock up now? get everything you need for fall cleaning and fall allergies at an unbeatable price. save money. live better. walmart. introducing listerine total care. everything you need...
8:35 am
to strengthen teeth, help prevent cavities, and kill germs. introducing 6 in 1 listerine total care. the most complete mouthwash. how many washes did it take cheer brightclean to get this from dingy to bright? one might be surprised. twelve. no. uh, excuse me! four? one... would think it would take that many washes. ten? man & woman: okay, we got it this time. yes? it's six. seven. why? why is...
8:36 am
one-derfully bright, hmm? oh, one... yes, yes! hundred. cheer brightclean.
8:37 am
welcome back to "morning joe." time for a political round table. let's go to chris matthews in washington. chris, the highest unemployment rate in 26 years. we remember 1983 and you were
8:38 am
there on the ground. that destroyed ronald reagan's approval rating for sometime. >> yeah, but that recession was sharp, up and down, quickly. he did go up to 11% eventually in 1983. but we got down quickly. he was back to 7% by-election time and was in good shape. and the question is will obama be able to have that. >> it's a different kind of recession. the recession under reagan was forced upon the country to blake inflation, and they did break inflation. this time it was caused by a financial crisis and they last twice as long. it's a very, very serious number. have you to think about the fact that if you were on a diet and you lost five pounds three or four months, and you are in to it and you are trying to lose
8:39 am
five pounds, but two pounds is a lot. this is very serious for him. if this goes to 10.5% to 11%. it will impact on the congressional election next year. >> chris matthews? >> you know, the oddity here, unemployment response to responding, consumer spending and business spending investment, and the difference of how much the government spends or takes in, that would be driving the unemployment rate down. because we are spending all the stimulus money. but people see this news today, and the unemployment rate is spiking. they will save more. and consumption will go down. that's the weirdest thing in the word, and we would say we wish people would save more, and they are doing it now because they are scared. >> yeah, and at the same time,
8:40 am
does that impact the positive effects the stimulus plan was supposed to have if people are not going out there? >> well, the new spending in the stimulus program. what you are having now is a situation in which you look at the drop in the consumer spending and the drop in international trade, it's $750 billion to a trillion dollars. and so that is going to run out. and the state government is going to run huge deficits which is going to go against the very idea of a fiscal problems. if you look at the so-called household unemployment rate, it's 16.5%. >> chris matthews, will there be another stimulus package? >> well, if you look at the boxcar numbers, clearly, you
8:41 am
know, biden was out last night campaigning on the idea that it's working. clearly, he is saying we are nine miles into a marathon race, here 40% into it. it doesn't feel that way to most people because of the news today. politically, people will feel the stimulus is not doing the job. there is no doubt when the government runs almost a $2 trillion deficit this year, clearly that's a dramatic offset to the decline in consumption of business investment. but we need more. it's a question, politically, are people willing to double down here? >> i think it will be more difficult here than the first time. he had one chance to bite at the apple. and that was his one chance to do it in the right way. i think it will be much more difficult next year. >> and the sentiment, chris matthews, people are being concerned about not just their
8:42 am
own spending, but government spending. >> you know, my father lived in the great depression. when he died a couple years ago, he gave me and my brothers these mason jars of half dollars and silver dollars. he held them because he was afraid at some point there would be something like the crash, and there had to be hard currency. what you know what is doing well? gold is doing well. people hedge against what they see as complete uncertainty. people are buying gold right now. it's a time of great fear. one of the things the president will have to address is that. do you feel like taking a risk on your health care plan in the middle of the fear. my brother called me up and said there is five things going on right now that make it hard for him to sell health care. one, loss and equity.
8:43 am
loss in our property values. if you are lucky to own one value. loss in the income. worried about your health care sxrk you used to say, at least we have our health. not necessarily. and this is what is going on today. it's not a time for risk taking. >> chris matthews, thank you very much. >> good to see you, mort zuckerman. >> that was a good little round table. >> yeah, great. >> we cannot predict what is going to happen to unemployment or the president's approval rating, but we can predict the barack obama will not be able to have big-spending programs for the next 3 1/2 years. americans have said enough. it started with president george bush with his spending, and americans are exhausted. i'm racing cross country in this small sidecar,
8:44 am
but i've still got room for the internet. with my new netbook from at&t. with its built-in 3g network, it's fast and small, so it goes places other laptops can't. i'm bill kurtis, and i've got plenty of room for the internet. and the nation's fastest 3g network. gun it, mick. (announcer) sign up today and get a netbook for $199.99 after mail-in rebate. with built-in access to the nation's fastest 3g network.
8:45 am
only from at&t. you weren't always my favorite day. with all the pet hair in the air, i'd spend class preoccupied, bothered by itchy eyes. but now i have new zyrtec® itchy eye drops. it works fast, with just one drop, to relieve my itchy eyes from allergies for up to 12 hours. no other allergy itchy eye drop works faster or longer. which is good, 'cause there's a lotta paws to shake. with new zyrtec® itchy eye drops i can love the air™. (announcer) find it in the allergy aisle next to other zyrtec® products. and then there are the indicator-light warning, radar-sensor-linking, blind-spot-penetrating side mirrors of the all-new ford taurus.
8:46 am
so what doesn't show up in your mirror, can still show up on your mirror. we speak car. we speak innovation. introducing the all-new taurus from ford. drive one.
8:47 am
a beautiful shot of east berlin. what was that? new york. i don't know. it's friday. so for all intends and purposes, when we get back on tuesday summer will be over. we thought it was a good time to pause and review the summer that was. >> some still are choosing not to hear why i made the decision
8:48 am
to chart a new course to advance the state. it should be so obvious to you. >> the summer of area, had sarah palin leaving office, but not going away. she fought with letterman, and her daughter's 19-year-old ex-boyfriend. she fought with reality, when she helped dream up the infamous death panel. and a governor who probably should have left office did not. >> i developed a relationship. we started out as dear friends, from argentina. >> we gained a historic supreme court justice this myrrh, and lost a historically insane judge. and other reality news, jon and kate divided a nation with their
8:49 am
separation. blago was banned from appearing on "i'm a celebrity, get me out of here," so he sent his wife to the jungle instead. >> and then a political leader has dance shoes on "dancing with the stars." we marked the 40th anniversary of the moon landing and woodstock, and marked the first time in the nation's history that a man had his private body parts super glued to his body by his three mistresses. >> and a granny was tased in texas. and a 16-year-old tween idol jolted the country with a poll dance. and miss california was stripped of her crown. and we also sent the taco bell
8:50 am
chihuahua auto the great taco bl in the side. and a fly was gained fame when it was stripped of its life. and there were greater losses this summer. the last of the kennedy brothers was laid to rest at arlington national cemetery. although it has not been easy at times to live with this name, i have never been more proud of it than i am today. >> we said good by to the biggest star in the world. and the revolution broke out in the streets of iran. in north korea, bill clinton charmed the pants of the man and got the journalists released.
8:51 am
president's obama's first summer in the white house was a biddy one. he did sightseeing and gave a speech in cairo. he fought with the former vice president. >> i was not a fan of his when he got elected. >> he fought controversy with beer. he fought questions about the legitimacy about his own birth. and he fought citizens, who judging by their loaded weapons, seem not to like the health care. the town hall meeting made a very loud comeback this season. >> how dare you! >> i don't understand this rudeness. what is this? >> as outrage exploded across the country, barney frank asked
8:52 am
the question that could have been asked as easily of other stars. >> on what planet do you spend most of your time? >> coming up next, what, if anything, did we learn today. there was a time i wouldn't step out of the house
8:53 am
without my makeup. now, it's no problem. (announcer) neutrogena tone correcting night serum with high performance soy to even skin tone and active retinol to speed cell turn over. clinically shown to visibly fade brown spots in 14 nights. i even out my skin at night so it looks younger, flawless in the morning. (announcer) neutrogena tone correcting now you can fade and prevent discolorations all day. new tone correcting spf 30. when i really liked to be outside, i did not like suffering from nasal allergy symptoms like congestion. but nasonex relief may i say... bee-utiful! prescription nasonex is proven to help relieve indoor and outdoor nasal allergy symptoms like congestion, runny and itchy nose and sneezing. (announcer) side effects were generally mild and included headache. viral infection, sore throat, nosebleeds and coughing. ask your doctor about symptom relief with nasonex. and save up to $15 off your refills. go to nasonex.com for details, terms and conditions.
8:54 am
are working from the road using a mifi-- a mobile hotspot that provides up to five shared wi-fi connections. two are downloading the final final revised final presentation. - one just got an email. - woman: what?! hmph. it's being revised again. the copilot is on mapquest. and tom is streaming meeting psych-up music - from meltedmetal.com. - ( heavy metal music playing ) that's happening now with the new mifi from sprint-- the mobile hotspot that fits in your pocket. sprint. the now network.
8:55 am
8:56 am
kids, it's the time to talk about what we learned today. >> i learned the d.c. exterior of mort zuckerman is a man that -- >> mort has a helicopter he is taking out to the hamptons for labor day weekend. you are driving on -- >> it's a bus. >> mort won't give you a lift. >> he said he will throw rose petals at you. >> i think you are all underpaid. >> and mort is making a big check out for me today.
8:57 am
thank you very much. >> willie, have a great labor day weekend. >> plans, mika? family time. alex and contessa are coming up next, willie. >> they are waiting patiently. >> i am doing charity work this weekend, and i will bring back pictures. >> joe, ask me if it's way too early what happens. >> if it's way too early? >> it's "morning joe." have a great labor day weekend. we turn it over to alex and contessa. this hour can the president pull the trigger on health care reform. we are breaking it down with mike viqueira at the white house. conservatives attacking the president for his plans to address your kids. you know what they say, sticks
8:58 am
and stones may break your bones -- >> you referred to him as the that i had piper obama. and somebody intentionally ignited one of the worse wildfires in the california history, and this may turn into a homicide investigation. and some names turn out that you might not expect to say good by to the king of pop. >> it's a holiday weekend, right? >> yeah. dylan ratigan is finishing up vacation this week. let's begin this morning with breaking news we are getting on the job market. >> moments ago the labor department reported the unemployment rate is back on the rise, the highest in 26 years. the august rate climbed to 9.7%, up from 9.4% last month. it's worse than what the economists were expecting.
8:59 am
216,000 jobs were slashed last month. august was the 20th month in a row for job losses, the longest losing streak since the great depression. since the recession started, 7.4 million jobs have been lost. so the fact we are working on the holiday weekend, that's good news. and health care is weighing heavily on president obama. his idea may hinge on weather he can win over olympia snow from maine. she is talking with the white house about a bill that would not include the public insurance option at first, but it would include a trigger for this option down the line. say, if private insurance don't offer an affordable insurance option, then it would trigger a ic

233 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on