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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  December 31, 2009 6:00am-9:00am EST

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and it went to the supreme court. that in a way was the template for what happened for the next ten years, because all of the old rules went by the boards. we no longer did things the way we had become accustomed to doing them. we were caught in an unawarist fashion by almost everything else. 2001 was a perfect example of that. 9/11. even though there were attacks on american warships and american embassies and american barracks, we sat back fat, dumb and happy and said it will never
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happen here and it did. and suddenly we're not at war against another nation, but against a stateless rage rooted in a faith. so that's one more example of how the wheels came off and the rules changed and all that we had been led to believe all of our lives, we suddenly had to reorder our thinking about how we would deal with it tiger woods is the most extreme example of what happens to celebrities. there was a time not so long ago when celebrities got a pass. mickey mantle, a lot of other well-known golfers that could go off and have nocturnal activities and nobody paid attention to them. as a result of the i.t. world we live in, everything goes viral instantly. >> let's talk new york. joe namath. can you imagine if the rules that now apply to tiger woods applied to joe namath or babe ruth or some of the other sports figures who we've idolized for
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decades. >> frankly, i'm surprised given what we know about the level of activity that he got away with it for as long as he did. >> it's kind of stunning, actually. and it is -- there is not a function that people are different today this is a function of 24/7 media world we live in. to pick up where tom was, what is so interesting to start with the contested election. clearly it shows democracy works. the tanks did notroll out and 9/11 to me more than anything showed that it was -- i don't want to say it was the beginning of really us understanding our vulnerability in the world and that we are not necessarily or going to be the superpower going forward. our inalienable right, we were always safe, always protected. and you combine that with the emergence of china, and we are
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no longer the kick-ass s.o.b.s of the world. and we have to adopt our psyche that we're further along in our empire, if you will, but we are vulnerable. there is part of america that understand that and the tea party part of america doesn't necessarily understand it. >> there is no doubt, america stood alone in the world as the lone superpower at the start of the decade. it's not a bipolar world, and we're still the dominant force. but ten years from now, mike barnacle, we may not have peers, but china, india, brazil, the eu, they will get a lot closefer trends continue. >> you know, tom is here. during the course of this year, thomas burns had a tremendous documentary that focused on veteran from five towns.
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la crosse, wisconsin, sheboygan, wisconsin, sacramento, california and a couple of others. and to look at those cities and reflect upon the world war ii generation and their children who grew up in the '50s and '60s and what those towns represented to them, the manufacturing base, employment base, the roots of family and to think of what has happened over the course of this last decade, what has disappeared? the manufacturing base, the security of the family, the questions raised by people. what about my children? will they be able to find jobs? >> a financial sensibility. people don't save money anymore. they took irresponsible risks as consumers, and the people who were lending the money to them were taking the same kinds of irresponsible risks so the wheels came off. >> how much of a function is the after greatest generation, my generation, joe's generation, the entitled boomers. where we're soft. everything was handed to us, we
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did not know adversity and we keep borrowing. how much of the wheels coming off is a function of this baby boomer generation coming of age as grownups, but yet having not gone through some of the hard knocks that you really need to be -- >> we're coming to terms right now. >> that chapter, i'm not sure, tom if that condition with the death of jfk or when the beatles came to america, but i'm pretty sure it ended on september 15th. the "me" generation, the self-indulgence of the baby boomers, wall street greed in the 1980s, that ended on september 15, 2008, didn't it? >> well, you know, it's hard to make a general judgment, but i've been thinking about this generation. the generation i wrote about had tough times at the beginning of their lives, but when they were
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teenagers and early 20s, that imprinted them for the rest of their lives. the boomers thought the good times would go on forever and now they are having tough times. >> the character is built, wires are built already. it's a big difference when you start with the bad times. >> let me say, mika and i talk about this all the time. we are so glad after our children -- i'm sure your children and your children, spent the last ten years walking into best buy with their parents saying can i have this dvd? sure. can i have this video game? sure. going in buying big-screen tvs. we're glad this friday night in pensacola, florida, or in westchester county, kids are not mindlessly going to the mall to shop as a pastime. >> there's a lot of empty stores at those malls, but you're right. this is a decade to touch on your words, we always felt safe, always felt protected and always
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felt we could afford it, even when we koochbcouldn't. >> america's national savings rate, zero. even in the worst of times. ist jumped up to 7%. americans do self-correct and who knows? maybe this is a good re-set. >> that's what i'm finding. people at the high-end community, car dealers and people about to lose homes due to foreclosure, they are looking at how they spends and how they manage their personal finances in a wholly different fashion. the people at the low end of the food chain when it comes to income, they said, you know, we discovered we can get along without all of the cable channels. we don't have to go to the movies every friday night and then out to dinner just because my husband came home with a little bit of overtime there are those who believe we will return
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to our old patterns once this comes to an end. the toll brothers, they build mcmansions, they were the boomers -- the builders for the boomers. they build beautifully constructed homes, primarily in the northeast but had cond why mind yums in new york and other developments, they think it will go back to where it was before. >> i don't think so. the american psyche changed. >> my grandmother lived to be 94. never left anything on her plate, because she had four kids from 1922 to 1934, and she had to carry them through the great depression this is not the great depression, but this is a great reset. i don't think people will be going out buying big screens for the next year, the next decade. >> a couple of things haven't occurred in this country for the past few years.
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one has occurred to people in the age range 48 to 60 who have lost jobs, those jobs will any come back to them. you have another group of people, younger, put them at 22 to 28 years of age, out in the job market, when we were starting on the job market, we'd want to know how much we were going to get paid. how much will the job pay us? a great many people, employers, perspective employers tell me this, young people go in for the interview if they are lucky enough to get the interview, they want to know one thing above all, do you have health coverage? >> yeah. >> and then they get to the salary. >> i'll tell you something else, though, beyond that. a couple of years ago, i would think i would be generous to somebody, hey, if you want to come up to nbc or congress and want an internship. i'm not so sure. i've got some options and some opportunities. now you get a stack of letters.
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you got anything. i'm serious. i'll work for free for six months. i just need the experience. it is tough out there. >> that's the good news. i ran a business with young people, the advertising business. and these people who grew up coming up out of the dot-com, when am i making my first million? the most est obnoxious, entitle soul. the downside, we'll have a rough economy for the next ten years. >> something else that is going on that affects business. the congress of the united states. with the growth of the internet, i think more so now than ever, have you a bunch of freelancers in congress. they are not afraid of the president. they have their own careers, they can be toppled by a series of e-mails to them. the courage disappears -- oh, we have 100 e-mails. oh, my goodness.
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>> you have with the internet, something that makes the parties less important. the type of money that ron paul raised in '08. the time of money that barack obama raised on the internet. tom, what was the first convention you covered? >> '68. >> the party bosses still had a firm hand in 1968. >> richard daley, by the end of the week he didn't have chicago. >> he didn't have chicago. but the parties seem to be getting weaker and weaker by the year, and you talk about the internet, it means that one person with a good message, on the internet. can raise millions. >> the biggest people are those who aren't identified with the democratic or republican party. it's a little like nato. it's an illusion. it's a title primarily. >> what it really shows is that we as a nation in so many forms
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are not restrained by the traditional barriers. there are two ways of thinking. so really there's a tremendous, healthy -- wonderful thing, this disintegration of parties. >> tom, you've had quite a year. traveled around quite a lot. not only on highway 50, but still talking about boom. >> i have been doing a two-hour documentary on cnbc on boomers, what next? and i've been in europe and south africa, italy, the south of france, normandy for the 65th anniversary. i've had a good year, and i've been in canada in pursuit of the elusive steelhead. >> we loved having your analysis this year. and coming up, chris matthews will join our panel. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. [ female announcer ] there's sick...
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is this too much of a job for you to step back for a second and say, my god, we're experiencing something here that just doesn't happen very often? >> you know, joe, i think it will all hit us sometime today, i'm not exactly sure when. i think we're a little close to this. not used to being spectators at these events. i was driving in d.c. yesterday and drove past the american red cross and they had a big banner up for their honorary chair, president obama. and it was the first time i had seen -- really seen those two words together and it began to hit me. wow this is really going to
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happen. >> welcome back to "morning joe." joining us now from washington, msnbc chief washington correspondent norah o'donnell. thank you for joining us. stand by one second. i've been waiting a long time to talk to donny about -- >> i'm sorry you have to see this. >> i want you to say this out loud, if you could. turn to the camera and say i am sorry. i am an addict to the old cliche of men always get a pass when they act in a way that is completely, ridiculously, ridiculously -- >> i he is going to say that to the camera. >> disdainful. >> i'm going to stand by what i said. one infidelity, not a big deal to his endorsements. when it became serial
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infidelity, accenture, they have to bail. but nike, nonevent. they are not going anywhere. is he big business for them. he did not break any laws. >> even now? even now, donny? donny, come on. >> i'm not saying what he did was right or wrong. if you are phil knight, and he's a billion-dollar business, people are not going to stop buying golf clubs and golf hats. grow up, that's reality. fast forward a year from now. he's in his first tournament. highest watched tournament of all time. he wins if his wife has left him, he's on his own, suffered. if his wife is there, she's crying in the gallery, she hugged this story has a different ending. >> norah o'donnell, i just got chills this is like a movie. >> mika, you have to grow up a little bit. >> donny you could not have
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predicted he would take an indefinite leave from golf to get things back together. all of the advertisers are going to sit and wait for an indefinite period of time? you bet. a lot of them are coming up from renewal. >> as a guy that comes out from that world -- say that it comes out there's an underagewoman or violence, that changes things. but if not, nike isn't going anywhere. >> mike barnacle, what do you think? >> i think having nothing to do with tiger's transgressions, i fidelity, guys buy nike stuff. >> and video games. >> they are going to buy the stuff. >> women buy nike stuff too. i think you forget that women are athletes too.
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a/k/a mika and myself. we don't just sit and paint our nails. we also work out. >> you buy sensibly. guys are morons. >> of course we buy sensibly. donny, women are the market force in this country. we buy more books, more cars. we are the force in this country when it comes to buying products. the women make a majority of the decisions. is it going to have -- >> moms who have teenage boys will think twice about their boys whether they wanted a nike product. >> if your husband wants a nike driver and it's the best one out there, would you buy it? >> with all due to respect to nike, they don't have the best driver. i'm not going to buy it because tiger woods endorses it. i know it's the still and that
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nike doesn't have the best driver. >> would you ever ask your wife to buy a tiger woods' driver this christmas? >> i would if i thought it would do my golf game any good. it will take a lot more than a tiger woods driver. >> in all seriousness, i think there is a change in tone in terms of -- there are businesses that have pulled back on advertising. >> and there will be. >> and there has been an impact. and our initial out of the box thinking when you were on set, he'll be just fine, he'll be even better. >> when there was one infidelity. fidelities, some affect. beer advertisers, maybe he is still a little racier than more squeaky clean. is he still an aspirational figure to a lot of american males.
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guys, jump in any time. >> i actually think he might be all done. because of the sport he plays, psychically, it's such a fragile sport. he's going to be on the 18th green at augusta, and someone is going to yell cheater. it's going to happen. >> norah, do you agree with that? you're the athlete here. >> that's an interesting point. i think it would be rude to do that, certainly in the game of golf, but you can't rule out what people are going to do. >> if you do that augusta, it's 20 years to life. >> all right. norah, thank you very much. coming up, chris matthews joins the party for a look back at the decade that was. we go over the top choices of the story for the past ten years. we'll be right back. tough call. well, during the volkswagen sign then drive event,
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good morning. i'm chris jansing, a quick look at today's top stories. the nation's spy agencies are sending a report outlining intelligence failures. it's part of the administration's effort to streamline information sharing between agencies. u.s. officials say eight american civilians were killed yesterday when a suicide bomber
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snuck on to a c.i.a. base in the eastern part of the country. taliban is claiming responsibility for the attack and says the bomber entered the compound wearing a military uniform. and mother teresa, katharine hepburn, and gene autry may soon be coming to your mailbox on ch commemorative stamps. i'll see you back in a half an hour. - ( whirring ) - oh, you know what? let me call you back. announcer: you don't drink every time you smoke. yet you smoke every time you drink. drinking and smoking don't have to go together. re-learn life without cigarettes, free, at becomeanex.org. a new way to think about quitting. re-learn life without cigarettes, free, you look beautiful tonight. allow me.
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it goes without saying, this is the most serious attack on the united states in 100 years. not since the war of 1812 or the damage we've done to ourselves during the civil war has this country suffered damage to its interior. >> that was tom brokaw reporting on september 11th when it happens. and you were down there cover ring it. >> yes. my first week on the job for cbs. what a defining moment. welcome back to "morning joe." tom brokaw with us. donny deutsch still us with. mike barnacle on the set as well and joining us now from washington -- >> made us all pretty uncomfortable. let's go to washington and talk to "hardball's" chris matthews.
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the images of 9/11, the defining moment of the decade. did everything we saw across the country flow from that image? >> we were so proud and were for so long. i remember when the fire trucks would go by, and outdoor restaurants, people would stand up and applaud. the wonderful serenity on subways like on the "j" train. people were better with each other, people would say hello. the strange tranquility and unity. i felt for months through the next st. patrick's day, and it was a good thing. and the success of that attack, the ability of one horrible attack, as horrible as it was to engage us in a new look at the world where we're really part of this islamic struggle against the west and we're playing our
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part in it. unfortunately, i don't know how we get out of it. in a way, we're playing a part and continuing the struggle by simply being defensive, and it's something we have to be. a horrible conundrum. every time we take a step to defend ourselves, we may be enranging the struggle and igniting more strug ill. it's a very difficult path we're on, and the people who attacked us on 9/11 succeeded. they got us engaged in the east/west struggle. made us a belligerent power in a way. it's a win for them that they got us involved in the struggle, and it's a very difficult thing to get out of now. >> chris, we certainly were you n united after september 11th. do we end more divided than ever? >> we think about it all the time, what's going on in terms of trend.
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one obvious trend inside the country is between you could call them liberals, progressives, whatever label they use. they want to change things, more government, more social programs, perhaps individual liberty in a certain kind of way in terms of people of different sexual orientation, more rights for them. other people would look at that as something they don't want to see. and you have people who see change very upsetting. it goes back to certainly the civil war, and the big immigration, the golden door of more than 100 years ago with new people coming to the country. the forces of change, and people are not too happy about the change. that's not new wh, whether theye called birthers or progressives, that's not new. and what's really disturbing over the ten years began with the recount. the fight over getting 60 votes in the senate. a real frustration where we don't quite have a democracy and
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people are waking up to the built-in checks and balances which we always liked to have, but they have become frustrating to people who want to see something more like the popular will. we saw it with the long recount. i loved covering it, but it was disturbing to a lot of people that we don't pick the guy who gets most votes and it's up to the supreme court in the end and local supreme courts like in florida, which is very liberal, pro-democrat. the national supreme court, which is very republican. people are seeing those kinds of frustrations and obstructions to democracy. the 60 votes in the senate thing is very disturbing to liberals. and it's going to remain there. >> hey, tom, tom brokaw, i can't remember how many months ago it was. maybe in august. but and you pat buchanan had a fascinating conversation on our set. he talks about in '68 calling nixon, the chaos out there you think of 1968 as that crack in
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time. but you two talking said that the anger, the rage, the animus in washington, d.c. in the summer of 2009 was the worst partisanship you had ever seen. that blew me away. even worse than watergate you said? >> i think it has been. i think in part, however, it is that there are more instruments to fan the flames now than there were then it goes on all day long, because bloggers weigh, cable television has part of it going on all day long. examining everything, in many instances blowing it out of proportion. the networks have divided themselves along various partisan lines, and they are putting the flag in the ground although some point about it. all of that feeds it. and it is a much more radioactive agreena as a result of that.
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and everything is electrified now in a way it wasn't then. during watergate, i remember, even as a white house correspondent, to say nothing of what was going on on the hill. i went on and did the nightly news and then i worked the phones and got ready for the "today" show the next morning. one of the things i was most proud about was the white house press corps. we were documenting what was going on day by day by day. everybody had a pretty temper rate attitude. i would go to the hill at his invitation twice a month and sit with senator byrd of west virginia, and he would say to me what's going on down there. and i would tell him as best i could. and i would say what's going on up here? and he would tell me what the thinking of the senate was in the byrd way. and it was very useful.
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i took my perspective back. he had a feel for what was going on at the white house. i didn't rush out to the camera, he didn't rush out to the camera. >> in 2009, at the time half the country, the health care and tea bag movement, was that an undercurrent that there is still so much racist rage that there is an african-american commander in chief? >> i don't think so. i think one of the huge, seminal events in in country that's gone unreported is the fact that there is no more fringe in this country. nobody feels isolated with their anger, their frustration, their rage, their sense of what doesn't work, what does work, because they are all joined together by the internet, by
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cell phones, by e-mail, twitter. you don't think i must be a nut for feeling this way, because you have allies. >> every constituency has a constituen constituency. >> yes. >> moving to donny's question about race, you and i were around. i was on capitol hill and you were reporting, when bill clinton was president. and that guy was hated by republicans every bit as much as barack obama or even more. i don't buy into the race thing, only because i remember how much my people loathed bill clinton at the time. >> i think if you look at something like the birther thing, though, you have to think of the tribal aspect of it. it's not about somebody like barry goldwater who may have been born in arizona territory and that's a technical point or join john mccain was born in a canal zone.
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this is more fundamental, that this guy is not one of us. >> on capitol hill on '94 or '95, it wasn't that bill clinton may have been born somewhere else. it was that he was a murderer. it was harsh, dude. it was harsh. >> i want my constitution back, i want my country back. were they saying that about clinton? >> they were saying that about bush, my god and yes, about bill clinton. remember waco. it was so ugly. >> progressive vs. reaction ear. black versus white, have versus have nots. >> this country will be engaged in race for the rest of our lives. it's a matter of preparation. i was just in alabama. and i was doing a story about -- as part of the boomer documentary about the bombing at the birmingham church, so i was in birmingham. they have a wonderful civil
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rights institute there now. everybody in alabama was talking about? people at the airport, people driving their cars, people at the civil rights institute, the waitresses, they were talking about -- >> alabama football. >> more important than that. that was first. but more important than that was their first heisman trophy winner from alabama is an african-american. and the whole state has real pride in that, an african-american. the pride was much higher in the african-american community and what happened in alabama for the more moderate community, but almost everyone acknowledged this is a big deal for the state this is what we care about. >> and speaking of alabama, i was talking about riley, i had lunch with him a couple of weeks ago, the governor of alabama. and chris matthews, bob riley say barack obama is extremely popular in my state. they don't like his policies,
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but about 70%, 75% of people like him as a person and bob rileyly to me that obama on a personal level rated better than any other politician, white, black, republican, democrat. that at the end of this year in 2009, pretty damn remarkable. >> it's interesting in terms of the president's temperament. it's always fun to have a minute or two with him with your spouse and enjoy that frivolity of christmas. the funny thing about president obama when you do encounter him face to face, in a country as tom points out is highly burglarizburglar burglarize polarized, and so heated, the president is so calm. he's incredibly debonair.
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he was in "dial in for murder." the husband trying to have his wife, grace kelly, killed. and when he gets arrested and caught for murder one of his wife, grace kelly, he says, well, i guess you caught me. i guess it's one of those mason type characters. the president is like that. >> chris, i've seen you do a lot for? yo -- >> you know what tom did, though, as only tom did. the heisman trophy weather, barack obama, very popular personally. why? because he represents a dream. this country is founded on a
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dream. we'll all do better here than our grandparents did he represents a dream. >> chris matthews, will he do better next year than he did this year in the polls? >> i hope he find rs a topic th american people share. next year, he has to get on our page. that's what i think. >> chris, thank you so much. >> happy new year. >> i'm going to watch "dial m for murder." >> it's a classic. >> great movie. >> when we come back, the year from the white house to new orleans to willie starting his own show. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. >> it gives me great pleasure to be here, because i know it will make a difference to make a
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it's been quite a year. here is a look back. in washington, d.c., people flooding to the mall right now. getting ready for the inauguration of the 44th president of the united states. barack obama. >> they are braving the freezing cold out here. lined up around the block. waiting to get a glimpse of you and mika. >> should we fire him?
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>> go take care of your beer. >> mika. >> mike barnicle, doing what he did best, creeping out young women. >> i've waited all day to see mike barn. >> is that what call him now? obviously huge fans. >> they don't know when to stop talking. >> this is the white house briefing room. >> crisis! economic crisis! >> the dow jones hit a low it hasn't seen since may 1997. >> if it's way too early and freezing cold. >> a delivery in morning. >> cupcakes. you seemed a little cranky. ♪ >> our guest today is from m msnbc's "morning joe," mika
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brzezinski. >> i love "morning joe". >> thank you so much. >> we're mostly making fun of ourselves. >> you look even better. >> oh, shut up. live from the reagan library in simi valley, california. >> the "morning joe" road trip on which mike and i weren't invited. >> brewing together in our new green room. a little starbucks. >> look, ma, on top of the world. >> $125,000. >> i'm going to challenge this company in cincinnati, robins sports services, to rebuild this floor so you can be state champions when you're a senior. >> if you watch long enough, you too may be called out by digger phelps to do something. >> what's the problem? get over here and get the roof fixed so kids don't have to use umbrellas. it's leaking. get it done! >> you know i have to do this.
quote
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>> we're on the air. don't come to work with a sweater and food all over your stomach. this is how you get ready for work in the morning. >> we can say, mika abuses ambien and vodka. >> let's just make it a vodka. >> i'm not in charge actually, mika is. just because i'm sitting here does not -- >> i love yourist shtik. >> you guys are relatively harmless. here with us jim webb. >> mika what's going on? >> i hear willie is getting his own show. >> willie is an amazing talent. >> are you going to call it "morning willie?"
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. >> oh, my goodness. >> this is the strangest program on television. >> it really is. >> willie, thank you, first, for this opportunity. >> funny, i got a new co-host, but the same rules apply. i'm still kind of scared of him and i'm not allowed to speak. >> we're joined in the studio by vice president joe biden. >> good to be with you. >> this would be a shock to a lot of people watching that two joes would dominate the conversation like this. >> exactly. >> it's my favorite show. >> i want to tell you how delighted i am to be on the show. i watch the show every morning. >> best show on the morning. >> super bowl, olympics, but today this is my single greatest thrill of my life. >> oh, this show! ♪
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we're all back in the game thanks to nutrystem. [ cheering ] good morning. i'm chris jansing. a quick look at today's top stories. officials continue to connect the dots on an attempted bombing of a u.s.-bound passenger jet on christmas day, president obama is looking at what led to the security breach. he called the condition "totally unacceptable." new york times square was emptied a day before the new year's eve celebration as swarms of police investigated an unoccupied van with no license plates and tinted windows. nothing harmful was found. and the final finishes put
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on the ball in times square it will drop at midnight. that's a look at news for now. now back to a special edition of "morning joe." ♪ welcome to "morning joe." this is just a huge show. >> humongous. >> i don't think we can contain the whole year. >> it's mammoth. >> a led zeppelin sure to collapse and catch on fire. stick around. you will want to be here when it all goes up in flames. on set, lighting the match, mike barnicle, harold ford, jr., arianna huffington and the great david gregory. very fesstive.
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>> i'm dressed for the holidays here and joe looks like he's going to a board meeting. >> i don't know. >> you guys have switched roles. >> you look like you are dressed for a night out with donny deutsch. >> i love how david tries to dress down, and he's still dressy. >> he's perfect. >> i dress like this so i don't look like an absolute wreck. >> is there anything wrong with you? he's perfect. >> i interviewed rick warren, and he said in life all you need is a good t-shirt, a pair of jeans and a pickup truck. and that's what i believe. >> i went to mika's closet before the show and i took her sweater. she said pick anything you want. i highly recommend it to any woman who comes on the show.
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>> david looks like ralph lauren's illegitimate son. >> he does. we're all happy. it's the holidays. woo-hoo, exactly right. the white house, not so happy. things getting tougher. numbers dropping. david gregory, let's look where the president started the year and ended the year. gallup positively, 68% approval, 12% disapproval. you can't hold those numbers through the year. down to 49% approval. 41% disapproval. gallup said the biggest drop by any president and the lowest numbers at the end of the first year. and also this is what's so surprising, david gregory, the most divisive president. we've come a long way from the
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joy of iowa in 2008. what's gone wrong? >> it's a tough job is what's gone wrong. tough to be president when the country is going through so much turmoil. and the very change that barack obama tapped into as a candidate that desired to change the course of the country to move this big ship in a different direction after eight years of george w. bush, all of that angst and anxiety and problems are still with the new president. so a year, he has ownership of them, but they are not fundamentally changing. that is compounded by one of the reasons i think he is more polarizing, he is attempting to do big things. george bush did big things that proved to be very unpopular. an antiestablishment vibe throughout the country. it applies to media, it applies to wall street, businesses, corporations and government as well. he is getting caught up in an angry country. where are the jobs, what is
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happening with the economy? and can government really do what it's supposed to do, which is to fix a lot of things. >> the question, mike, is how did he offend anyone? i can't think of any president who lost not only his base, but independents in the middle and opponents. have you all side of the spectru spectrum disenchanted. >> right now, we're undergoing epic changes. the change in health care. the change in our economy. also, a fundamental changes going on. barak obama, he was elected as a mood. an emotion. >> change. hope. >> a direction. think of it this way. america went to see a really feel-good movie last november and we had smiles on our face and came out of the movie feeling really good and our car
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was towed. that's reality. >> that's a great way to put it. >> the reality, a couple of wars and an economy that is literally changing the foundation of this country. we live in a disposable society. we throw away mcdonald's wrappers and now an entire class of people. they don't make it in this country anymore and people are fearful. >> let me ask you, this comes down to leadership in the end. there were several times where i've asked you, jane harmon, other democrats what do you think about the obama health care plan? and i get the same answer. what is it? what's he stand for? i've never seen the president hold his positions closer to the vest and defer more to capitol hill than this president. that's not leadership, is it? >> it's certainly a unique kind of leadership. the one area where they decided to lead on was education. they laid out a plan on the campaign that they followed through since he's been in office. health care, climate change, and
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as early as the stimulus. you have seen an outsourcing of the work given to congress. we have a great respect for congress. he was elected president, people want him to do that. i think mike is spot on. i think the white house has miscalculated the fact that a lot of americans, a lot of independents went to the polls and voted against george bush. there was a theme to his campaign. there was as much anti-bush in a lot of ways as pro-obama. >> mike, you very eloquently nailed the mood of this country, but arianna, are we a product of our own dog or a product of obama? >> i don't think it's just the election. he also painted a very dark picture of what was happening, of special interests dominating
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everything, and he said, yes, we can change that, and he said, remember, the greatest would be to same the same political game and expect different results, and then he went into the white house and did exactly that. he surrounded himself with the same political people, rahm emanuel, he played the same political game and he expected a different result, and he didn't get it. in the middle of all of that, he basically decided that he was for wall street rather than main street and that's really the anger. the anger is very clearly about that. >> david gregory if you're the president of the united states and you're looking forward politically, you always look at that right track, wrong track direction. i want to show you what came out last week in the nbc/wall street journal poll. right track, 33%. wrong track 55%. terrible numbers, but what makes
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it even worse for this president? that is almost 10 points worse than what it was like at the end of eight years of george w. bush. why? >> exactly right and we know that independent number is really a barometer of where independent voters are as well. they really track pretty closely to that. barack obama is not up for re-election in the year 2010, but his party is, and it's a referendum on his leadership it will be argued that way. and that's significant. because president obama comes in with a coalition of voters that are disaffected republicans. that are upstale voters, college educated voters typically voting for republicans, including young people and the traditional elements of the base. and he puts this together and has a coalition that can perhaps be durable and move forward. but the reality is that has begun to slip away. the problems are so deep and they are not getting much
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better. think aarrana touches on somethg important. i don't agree with the premise. too much of the separation of main street and wall street. we have to understand the impact of the system on all of the streets in america, terms of how our lifeblood of the economy works. and the pop lymph makes for bad policy and bad politics, but the political point she makes really important. has president obama delivered to the middle class for people out of work? who have stopped looking for work? the reality is, you do see wall street functioning much better. that is so difficult to square with what's going on in the rest of the country. in luexington, kentucky, or sacramento, california. >> harold, really quickly, that reminds me. i go around giving speeches once in a while. i talk to whether it's developers, builders, health
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care people, how is your year going? they say it's going badly. when do you expect it to turn around? maybe 2011. i gave a speech to people on wall street, bad year, when do you expect things to turn around? they all laugh, they had their best year yet. >> there's a disconnect. >> let's just stop and maybe this answers the question. wall street has had one of its best years ever. these people are making billions and billions of dollars. and main street is struggling. unemployment close to 20% in real numbers. >> it may stay there for a while unfortunate. not only the disconnect. i would argue the disconnect between washington and the rest of the country is great. i would love a health care bill, a universal health care bill. one that covers everyone in if we could find the money for it.
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when you travel outside of washington and the intellectual centers and elite centers in the country, people aren't worried about what washington is focused on with health care or climate change. they are worried about jobs and deficit. >> jobs, jobs, jobs. >> and the deficit is the one issue in washington when you talk to the regular joe, the morning joe outside of new york, their one concern, is government spending too much money? what am i getting for it? >> afghanistan, it's huge in terms of our deficit and where the president did not define what the national security threat is. so that's also going to come and haunt him. >> throughout the year, jobs numbers have stayed at a level uncomfortable for the country. i don't believe voters believe that this white house is as
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focused on jobs as they should be. >> they go from a stimulus plan to cap and trade. god help me. one of the worst political moves regarding jobs, afghanistan, iraq. all of the distractions keeping him away from jobs, jobs, jobs. >> if you think about it, two things are hurting barack obama. the marriage of ideology and the reality in the country. the ideology we have to have health care, we have to have it now. the reality is people have no jobs, they fear losing their jobs, they know people who are losing their jobs and they think to themselves that this guy is more interested in the ideology of health care than the reality of my job? that's hurting him. >> if that's the mood, david gregory, any way this president can turn it around? or is this a huge republican opportunity, fair or not? >>ith a huge opportunity, because it comes down to the roll of government, the effectiveness of government.
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health care is a policy, not just ideology. it delivers for people who may be out of a job, may be out of health care, may be working but doesn't have health care. that was a deliveriable that he set himself up to try and come through on. stimulus, financial crisis, all those things persisted well into the first year. >> and he didn't explain it well. >> there is that. stick around. just getting started on this holiday. coming up, we're joined by "newsweek's" john meacham about the decade that was. >> did you think he'll hearwear tie? >> i don't know, everyone is going "morning joe" on us. we'll be joined by savannah guthrie from the white house. that, plus willie's year in review. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by star bukds.
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>> i i think we're pushing the boundaries of our access. there is an old swimming pool underneath the press briefing room. >> pat buchanan wants you to look for his bathing trunks that he left there in 1972. buchanan's red speedo bathing suits. >> i heard he wore one of those one piece. it's simponi,™ and taken with methotrexate, and swelling of ra with one dose a month. visit 4simponi.com to see if you qualify for a full year of cost support. simponi™ can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious and sometimes fatal events can occur, such as infections, cancer in children and adults, heart failure, nervous system disorders, liver or blood problems, and allergic reactions. before starting simponi,™ your doctor should test you for tb and assess your risk of infections,
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right through that door w, k about 15 feet, is the oval office. >> let's go in. we're going to surprise the president. >> they won't let us do that.
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>> really? we're just going to -- >> we'll go in here. >> you can, but there are a lot of big guns in there. >> funny, that's how we started the year. we end the year, i kid you not, getting lost in the west wing. >> we actually almost walked in that door by mistake, visiting valerie. >> we come out and we take a right. secret service guy is like where you're going? i don't know. and he smiled and said that's the oval office, just in case you're interested. >> oh, well. >> they don't often let blonds through at the white house. >> i know. >> all right. >> they didn't stop you. i think you could have gone through that door. >> with us now from the white house to look ahead to obama's 2010 agenda is white house correspondent savannah guthrie. >> hi, mika hi, joe. >> happy holidays. the president has tackled a lot
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of things that were did i vicive this ye divisive this year. a very ugly august. next year, he may try to have a platform that's a bit more unifying, talking about deficits and education reform. what can you tell me about 2010? >> don't leave out the number one issue for the white house, and that will be the economy and jobs. they will be focused on that. that's what we'll be hearing more about than any other issue. we'll hear about the deficit and certainly see a greater emphasis on education reform. that's one of the issues that advisers tell me, it hasn't gotten as much attention. they are really making innovations there, that aroundie duncan, the secretary of education is taking strides and reforming the system. they want to talk about that. look, after everything that was done in 2009, i have aides tell
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me, let's face it. we won't have this vigorous legislative agenda next year as we did this year, just by virtue of the fact that everything they pushed through the system in 2009. and certainly the economy will be topping all of it. >> harold ford, 2010, a lot of people trying to push you to run in 20 10, my man, for senator from new york state. the last thing you want is d democrats pushing unpopular items. are you going to run in 2010? >> small businesses. >> are you going to run for the united states? >> you tell them they have to focus on small businesses and middle class families and jobs. if they don't stair there, john tanner retired, gourd know retired. you will have more of those if
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the focus is not on jobs, the mi middle class, and small business. >> you are carrying messages from everybody. can you ask larry summers what he was thinking when he was saying throughout december that jobs will come back starting in the spring? there will be growth in the spring. what is he basing it on? any idea since you are closer to him out in new york? >> romer said that and larry summers says that, that their forecasts show there will be some return to growth. and, look, they'd like to show thus flow chart that shows the trend of joblessness is going in the right direction. in other words, we are losing fewer job s every month. but other economists tell us we won't see anything out of double
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digit unemployment until late next year and we won't see pre-recession levels for years and years and that is the very bleak picture this white house faces and why they know they really have to focus on the economy. >> happy holidays, baby. thank you, savannah. i think i'm going to go home and crawl under my christmas tree. >> savannah guthrie from the white house. thank you very much. still ahead -- >> drink eggnog. cheer up. >> still ahead, willie's year-end review from the taco bell dog to sarah palin. all the news you just can't use. and the decade that was. we'll ask our panel and "newsweek's" jon meacham about the items that defined the decade. that, when "morning joe" continues. (announcer) the sinus triple threat. owwww....
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good morning. i'm chris jansing. time for a look although today's top stories. president obama will gets a report on intelligence failures leading up to the attempted bombing on a detroit-bound blaine on christmas day. the netherlands will begin using full-body scans. a gunman opened fire at a
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shopping mall. the man, dressed in black, began randomly shooting at hundreds of people, as they fled for cover. police have identified a suspect, but he is still on the loose. conservative talk show host rush limbaugh admitted to a honolulu hospital after suffering chest pains. his radio program released a statement saying he is resting comfortably. a quick look at the news. our special edition of "morning joe," continues after the break. d someplace familiar... or somewhere more distinctive... nice! then i can compare dates to find out when i can save the most cash. done and done. we should do this more often. more choices, more savings. where you book matters. expedia. ♪ dot com
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six in the morning. >> already started out. we are looking at shots from ta taken on top of the washington monument. mall starting to fill up. estimates, 2 million, 3 million. >> can you believe the crowds? the sun coming up over the national mall and tens of thousands of people are streaming in. >> look at the mall. look at the crowd, and it's just 9:00 in the morning. people have braved the chilly temperatures. it feels like 10 degrees outside, but they want to be in washington today to see history happen before their eyes. >> and they were there. the inauguration of the country's first black president. one of the many stories that helped define a decade. "newsweek" editor jon meacham,
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mike barnicle and har old ford. john meacham, election of barack obama, defining moment. september 15th, when the markets crashed, defining, 9/11. what is the defining moment of the past decade? >> the consolidation of executive power in the bush administration and the reaction to it is something that holds both halves of the decade together. what began in a moment of terrific and tragic national unity, ended all too quickly in late 2003, and the divisions that ultimately president obama, senator obama, was able to run against, saying i can transcend them, took shape then, and the
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great question i think for the end of the decade and therefore, for the present, have we worked through a cycle of partisanship and a kind of irrational hey tread of the other guy that started with clinton and carried over with bush? there are bits of obama. there are people on the right who don't think he was born in the country and all that. >> i don't think you were born in the country, but i don't hate you. >> but i think chattanooga has long established -- >> did you hear i said chattanooga. playing for the home bleachers. >> if it weren't for an drew jackson, would you have represented a spanish-held territory. florida would not be part of the union. >> your football team next year -- >> what about your defining moment, harold ford? >> for the decade --
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>> mr. senator. >> i think katrina was the defining moment i think for so many people and particularly those of us who live in cities to see america, our government, not be able to respond. the president i voted for and will work for, and a year into the administration and we don't have a full-service hospital in new orleans, parts of the city still find themselves living in the day like a third-world country, shame on us as americans. that was a turning point for democrats in a lot of ways. rahm emanuel, head of the democratic congressional campaign committee, but that moment, katrina in so many ways, demonstrates the incompetence on the part of the country and a new wave of political forces took force. >> mike barnicle, defining moment? >> i think without a doubt, for
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a myriad of reasons, the morning of september 11th, when america lost its sense of invulnerability, and the phrase national security came into being, and then quickly followed a few years later, by economic security came into being, and then the collapse and near disappearance of an american city. and toward the end of the decade, all of the security questions on the kitchen table, people wondering is this still my country? do we still make anything here? will my children be able to work the way did i? and the whole security issue, beginning with the collapse of the towers, and the attack on the ground of america, and at the end of the decade, what's going to happen to us? it's a profound decade. >> mika, what about you? >> it's the question that mike puts on the table. first of all, it's a decade clearly book ended by terror and financial collapse, and the moment in between of society
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changing and electing its first african-american president. for you, i ask not what is the defining moment, but perhaps what is the defining message of the decade? >> i think the takeaway is, and i think this feeds into what jon has said and everyone else, i think a disillusionment with washington, d.c., the belief that washington can fix the problem. look at all of the stories we're talking about. september 11th, the bush white house missed a memo a month before that says osama bin laden plans to attack the united states with airplanes. wmds wrong. we were told there were wmds in iraq. there weren't. 4,000, 5,000 men and women have died. tens of thousands have been maimed because of that mistake by the government. katrina the federal government was unable to respond to -- to the pain and suffering in two
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states in this country, and americans started to say wait a second. we can't take care of mississippi and louisiana, but we're going to transform iraq and afghanistan? the 15th of september, so many of those problems were caused by washington's failures from 1999 forward. what does this mean? this means azhar old ford jr. says, the majority of new york voters, according to a recent poll, consider themselves independent, and, jon, i would ask you, if you're feeling that americans are not going to reflexively hate the other side anymore, it's because they have come to believe, like i have come to believe, a former partisan republican, like harold ford has come to believe, i'm sure. a former partisan democrat, my side doesn't have the answers. the other side doesn't have the answers a loss of faith in big
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government, a loss of faith in big political parties, in big institutions. is that the takeaway of this decade of failure by the federal government sr. >> i think that's very well put. to my mind, the question is the tension between necessary humility and necessary confidence. we cannot be arrogant. we cannot act as though we have all of the answers. whether we're in the press or the white house or the congress. or god knows wall street. harold's been part of two of those, so that's not a good -- >> that will help you. i have to add one morale quickly. a huge oversight at the end of the decade. the failure of barack obama, just one year into his term. that's all that we have at the end of the decade to follow through on the promise of his campaign, where people believed i was going to be a magic position. that he was going to come in and fix everything, and his numbers have falling from 70 to 48%.
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disillusionment on all sides. >> a necessary humility, which is berkian. >> the first chapter of my last book "the last great hope." what was the theme? restraint. restraint at home, restraint by government, restraint on wall street. >> the question is by a whole group of leaders, how do you live in an era of limitations and wise restraint without becoming overly timid? there is a difference between timidity and humilitad you mill. if we can get that right, we'll have a better decade. >> but there is nothing timid if you do what millions of americans want you to do and run for the senate in the 201. >> leave him alone.
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>> nothing timid about showing restraint on medicare spending and restraint on social security. and generals, you've had your time in afghanistan. bring those troops home. restraint it seems to me is the hardest political thing to do right now. >> i don't think there's any doubt if we talk about wall street, washington, we can't leave the consumer out. if you think five years ago how wall street and main street was roaring because 70% of the nation's gdp was tied to consumer spending. consumers didn't have as much money as they thought. they were buying five or six times what they were making year. we as a country have to accept responsibility. if you earn $50,000, you should know you can't afford a half a million dollar home. as the consumer resets in 2003, the top shows on some of the
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networks owned by our own network was talking about how you can live to an extrav gant life. it's now changed to how you live a happy life. the messages, defining moments, the consumer just that term alone, evolution of the consumer over the last ten years has been a remarkable thing. >> one of the undercurrent in the country is the issue of vulnerability. american families feel vulnerable. they think their country is vulnerable. they think their futures are quite vulnerable. remember the cell phone ad popular for a few years, hasn't been on for about a year now. can you hear me now? that's what millions ask about washington. can you hear me now? and washington is proving to them they can't hear them. worse than that, washington isn't even listening to them. that's what they feel.
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>> let's lighten it up a bit and talks about the good moments of the decade. i shared one of my happier moments of the decade on a cell phone with mike barnicle. from the world series. >> other than the birth of my children and my marriage, it's the highlight of my life. october 2004. red sox win after 86 years, the drought ends. my kids have a picture of me, an embarrassing photo, you would probably think it's embarrassing. it's not to me. me on the ground on the infield near third base scooping up dirt from the infield and putting in my pocket to savor moment of red sox winning the world series that night. >> it's unbelievable and it was for me. that was a remarkable time. not as much for you.
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i've been suffering since '75. i remember talking to mike and telling me after the remarkable win, driving in the car home, 2:00 in the morning and heroes came on. and some other people in the car tears started flowing. i started tearing up listening to the story. harold ford, jr. do you have a pathetic of a highlight as me. >> november 14, 2004, i met my wife. >> oh, come on. we're talking about sports. you're going to make me talk about the birth of my children. >> my favorite sport moment of the decade, the tigers get to the finals. a big thing for my state, my city. we'll make it back. >> go big blue. jon me meacham, has to be the
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pulitzer prize. that doesn't happen every year. what was the highlight of your decade personally? outside of babies and wives and that stuff. >> this is going to sound goey too. given the incredible economic and cultural pressures on my business, putting out what i think is an important magazine, it's to be able to go in every day and be part of an enterprise going for 77 years. i love "newsweek" magazine. i think it's important, immodestly i think that. it's a tough climate and we're going to make it, and it's been a decade of covering all of these stories and try to keep people's attentions week in and
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week out. >> mika? >> my kids are tweens and teens. i survived the first decade of child rearing. right there, keeping the family together and moving forward. doing the show. watching your book come into fruition and being part of the conversation every morning. happy to be working. >> it's been a thrill. it really has been a thrill. >> the birth and success of "morning joe." >> congratulations. and it's about to fail if we don't go to break. my kids and joey and andrew and kate, all remarkable stories, and little jack born premature, ten weeks early and then got salmonella after that and then got the swine flu after that. he's tough as hell. >> that's great. >> so much to be thankful for. >> still ahead, our own willie geist takes us through news you
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cannot use through 2009. you can't use a bit of it, but it's worth watching, because you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. pure cane sugar and the stevia plant.
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a year ago at this time, barack obama hadn't even moved into the white house, he was a bundle of hope and change. michael jackson had no idea that he had played his last concert and tiger woods was just a great golfer with a boring personal life, so we thought. a lot has changed over the last 12 months. here is a look back over the year 2009. >> i, barack hussein obama" do solemnly swear. >> that will i execute the office of the united states president as well. >> a shaky start to a wild first
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year for president obama. there were speeches. >> would not apply to those who are here illegally. >> there were summits. some with foreign leaders. others with domestic beer. >> i offered to get him into harvard. >> there was nobel victory and olympic defeat. >> chicago, having obtained the least number of votes -- >> there was the long, painful deliberation over the first dog, and the quick, painless slaughter of a fly. >> nice. >> there was a controversy over the president's birth certificate and an ongoing fight with one of the believe tenants and a complete invasion of personal space by the nbc family. >> we're going to surprise the president. >> we're in the president's car waiting for the president. >> the president's agenda inspired a return of tea parties and town halls.
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>> how dare you. >> noyou! >> no more lies! >> on what planet do you spend most of your time. >> while obama focused on health, other fixated on death. >> die quickly. >> you're going to die soon. >> reporter: h1n1 gave pigs a bad name this year. >> i wouldn't go anywhere in confined places. >> reporter: and chuck todd got a lesson in prove sneezing. as the economy lurched along, the government got into the used car business, and billionaire ponzi schemers finally went out of business. >> i will punch you in the mouth. >> reporter: sarah palin was ready to punch letterman and levi in the mouth this year. >> pretty pathetic, good old david letterman. >> reporter: then she punched out of the alaska governor's office and "went rogue" as a best selling author. >> and there's the perk xwr one again with the microphone. >> reporter: hillary clinton stepped into a new job. >> i'm not going to be channeled
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my husband. >> reporter: then watched her husband step into her spotlight. it was a good year for the bronx with one historic appointment to the u.s. supreme court and another world series title for the trophy case. >> the yankees are back on top! >> reporter: 2009 was a rough year for relationships. >> hey, it's tiger. >> i have had sex with -- >> a dear, dear friend from argentina. >> i violated the vows of my marriage. >> i can't believe that actually happened. >> reporter: and an even rougher one for good manners. >> i'm really happy for you. i'm gonna let you finish. >> reporter: we said good-bye to some old reality friends this year and we welcomed some new ones. >> tin and gel everything. that's how serious i am. >> did save me from eating bugs. >> reporter: for others there was no welcome. they just showed up. >> we were invited, not crashers. >> reporter: a beauty queen
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spoke her mind and captured america's hearts. or maybe it was just my heart. >> same-sex marriage or opposite marriage. >> reporter: there were big losses in 2009. ♪ ♪ keep me in your heart for a while ♪ >> reporter: and small ones, too. this year was a mixed bag for aviation -- >> we may end up in the hudson. >> nobody was asleep in the cockpit. >> reporter: and at sea, pirates ran into a feisty american captain and some sharp shooting navy s.e.a.l.s. one movie star got weird on national television. >> joaquin, i'm sorry you couldn't be here tonight. >> oh, good four! and how was it? >> reporter: meanwhile, nasa tried to blow up the moon. wow! what a year. is there any way 2010 could be as exciting as 2009? >> hell, yeah!
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♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ you got to let me go ♪ are we human or are we dancers ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
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good morning. i'm chris jansing. the "morning joe" year-end special continues in just a moment. but first here is a quick look at some of the today's top stories. government agencies are under scrutiny after last week's attempted plane bombing. president obama today will receive a report detailing how some federal agencies failed to share or flag information related to the accused bomber before he allegedly tried to blow up a detroit-bound plane. topping business news, the treasury department says it will pump another $3.8 billion into the struggling home mortgage unit of gmac, the u.s. government now owns 56% of gmac giving it controlling interest in that company. around the world, nations have been ringing in the new year. one of the first to say good-bye to 2009, new zealand as the clock struck midnight, the sky
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tower became the launch pad for this spectacular fireworks show. and that's a look at the news. now back to our special edition of "morning joe." ♪ good morning, welcome back to "morning joe." it is great to have you here. and very excited, tom brokaw's here. >> yes, what a table. >> news legend. he's brought gifts. >> oh, did you get me a gift, tom? >> he's not going to give the gift out. it was given to him. >> too large to bring on to the set, mika. >> oh, i understand. that's fine. >> look, this is exciting. >> donny deutsch! >> the gravitas of tom brokaw.
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>> mika has been wanting to get a piece of you for the past couple of weeks about tiger woods. we'll talk about that. of course, mike barnicle. let's talk about the year. end of the year, end of the decade. tom, your reflections. >> the end of the decade, i've been thinking about this in a new way. the decade began with the contested election between al gore and george bush and it went to the supreme court. that in a way was the template for what happened for the next ten years because all the old rules went by the boards. we no longer did things the way that we had become accustomed to doing them. we were caught in an unaware a fashion as everything else. 2001 was a perfect example of 9/11. even though there were bomb attempts on the american
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embassy, suddenly we're at war not against another nation but against a stateless rage rooted in a faith. so that's one more example of how the wheels came off and the rules changed. and all that we'd been led to believe all of our lives we suddenly had to reorder our thinking about how we were going to deal with it. tiger woods is the most extreme example of now what happens to celebrities. there was a time not so long ago when celebrities got a pass. mickey mantel. a lot of other well known golfers who could go off and have nocturnal activities and nobody paid any attention to them. now as a result of the i.t. world in which we live, everything goes viral, flashes around the world. >> joe namath, my god, could you imagine? a hero of mine growing up. could you imagine if the rules that now applied to tiger woods applied to joe namath? or babe ruth? or some of these other sports figures who we've idolized for
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decades. >> frankly, i'm surprised if, given what we know about the level of his activity, that he got away with it for as long as he did. >> it is kind of stunning actually. >> yeah. >> and it is -- this is not a function that people are different today. it is a 24/7 media world that we live in. it is quite stunning that this has just come to the surface. pick up where tom was. what's so interesting about starting with contested election, that was the best of times, worst of times. clearly what it showed is democracy works. tanks did not roll out and 9/11, to me, more than anything showed that it was -- i don't want to say it was the beginning of really us understanding our vulnerability in the world that we are not necessarily going to be the super power going forward. our inalienable right is we were always safe, always going to be protected. you combine that with the emergence of china, not as a military force but we are no longer the kick-ass s.o.b.s of
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the world. we have to adapt our psyche that we're further along in our empire if you will. if you trace the history of any great empire, not that we're a bloated empire but we're no longer invulnerable. the t.e.a. party part of america that doesn't necessarily understand -- >> you know, at the beginning of this decade there is no doubt america stood alone in the world as the lone super power. by it is not a bipolar or tripolar world. it is a multi-polar world. but god, ten years from now, mike barnicle, you may not have peers but china, india, brazil, the eu, they're going to get a lot closer. >> if friends continue. >> tom is here. during the course of this decade ken burns had a magnificent documentary on world war ii. it focused on veterans from five towns, cities, in this country, lacrosse, wisconsin, sheboygan,
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wisconsin, sacramento, california, couple of others. and to look at those cities and reflect upon the world war ii generation and their children who grew up in the '50s and '60s and what those towns represented to them, a manufacturing base, the employment base, the roots of family in all of those towns and to think of what has happened over the course of this last decade. what's disappeared -- a manufacturing base, the security of our children and grandchildren. my children, are they going to be able to find jobs. >> they don't save anymore. people took irresponsible risks as consumers. people lending money to them were taking the same kinds of irresponsible risks so the wheels came off. >> how much of a function is this at after the greatest generation, my generation, joe's generation, the entitled boomers where we're soft. everything was going to keep going for us. everything was handed to us.
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we did not know adversity so of course we're going to keep borrowing and doing all these things. how much of kind of the wheels coming off is a function of this baby boomer generation coming of age as grown-ups but yet not having gone through some of the hard knocks that you really need to be intelligent grown-ups. >> we're coming to terms with that right now. >> i think it is the end of that chapter. i'm not sure if that chapter begib began with the death of jfk or when the beatles came to america in 1974 but i'm pretty sure it ended on september 15th, the self-indulgence of the baby boomers, wall street greed, that ended on september 15th, 2005. didn't it? >> you know, it is hard to make a general statement. i've been thinking about the generation i wrote about. they had tough times at the beginning of their lives, when they were teenagers and their early 20s.
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that imprinted them for the rest of their lives. the boomers had good times at the beginning of their lives, thought it would go on forever and now they're having the tough times when it's going to be more difficult for them to recover. >> the wires are built already. there was a big difference when you start with the bad times. >> let me say though, donny, mika and i talk about this all the time. we are so glad after our children -- i'm sure your children and your children -- spent the last ten years walking into best buy with their parents saying "can i have this dvd?" "sure." "can i have this cd?" "sure." going in buying big-screen tvs, we're glad this friday night in pensacola, florida or in westchester county kindz ads ar mindlessly going to the mall to shop as a past time. >> you're right. i mean this has been a decade where, to touch on your words, we always felt safe, we always felt protected and we always felt we could afford it, even
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when we couldn't. that has come home to roost completely. >> a good reset, if you look just a year ago, america's national savings rate, zero. even in the worst of times. it's jumped up to 7%. americans do self-correct and who knows? maybe this is a good reset. >> that's what i'm finding when i go across the country. people, both at the high-end communities, car dealers and people at the low end about to lose their homes as a result of foreclosure, they're looking at how they spend and how they manage their personal finances in a wholly different fashion. they're the first to say that. the people at the low end of the food chain when it comes to income are saying, you know, we've discovered that we can get along without all the cable channels, for example. we don't have to go to the movies every friday night, then out for dinner afterwards just because my husband came home with a little bit of overtime. we're trying to set some of that money aside. we are still working our way through all of this. there are those who believe that we'll return to our old patterns
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once this comes to an end. the toll brothers are the builders who build mcmansions. they were the boomers, the builders for the boomers. they've had a hard time. they built beautifully constructed homes, primarily in the northeast, but also had a lot of condominiums in new york and other developments. they think it will go back to where it was before. i'm not so confident of that. >> i don't think so. the american psyche has changed. >> mike barnicle, my grandmother lived to be 94. she never left anything on her plate because she had four kids from 1922 to 1934 and she had to carry them all through the great depression. listen, this is not the great depression but this is a great reset. i don't think people are going to be rushing out buying mcmansions in the next couple of years. >> i don't either. >> or the next couple of decades. >> i don't either, joe. i think you've got a couple of things going on in this country that haven't occurred in this country for many, many years. one is occurring and has been occurring for the past few years
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to people, age range maybe 48 through 60 who have lost jobs. those jobs are never going to come back to them and they've got to live with that reality. you've got another group of people, younger, put them at 22 to 28 years of age who are out in the job market. when we were starting in the job market we'd want to know how much we were going to get paid, how much did the job pay us. a great many people, employers, be tell me this -- young people go in for the interview, if they're lucky enough to get an interview, they want to know one thing above all -- do you have health coverage? do you have health coverage? then they get to the salary. >> i'll tell you something else though beyond that. a couple of years ago -- i would think i would be generous to somebody, say, hey, listen, if you want to come up to nbc and our congress and you want an internship. i'm not so sure, you know, i've got some options and some opportunities. now, you get a stack of letters.
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you got anything? i'm serious -- i'll work for free for six months. i just need the experience. it is tough out there. >> but that's the good news. i ran a business with all young people, the advertising business. and these people who grew up coming out of the dotcom, when am i making my first million? the most obnoxious entitled -- so this reset button, as you are calling it, is very good for our soul. downside if you go on these premises is we'll have a rough economy for the next ten years. >> there's something else that going on that affects your old business, the congress of the united states. with the growth of the internet, i think more so now than ever, you have a bunch of freelancers in congress. they're not afraid of the president. they have their own careers. they can be toppled by a series of e-mails to them. they have no courage. courage disappears when an e-mail. we got 100 e-mails on this issue -- oh, my goodness! >> not only that though, you
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have with an internet something that makes the parties less important. when you have the type of money that ron paul raised in '08, the type of money that barack obama raised on the internet, tom, what was the first convention you covered? '68? >> '68. >> still, the party bosses still had a firm hand in 1968. >> well, richard daley -- by the end of the week he didn't. >> by the end of the week he didn't in chicago. but the party seems -- the party seemed to be getting weaker and weaker by the year. you talk about the internet, it means that one person with a good message on the internet can raise millions and malls of dollars. >> people were unidentified with either the republican or the democratic party. there is -- i mean it is a little bit like nato. it's an illusion. it is a title primarily. >> what it really shows is that
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we as a nation, in some forms, are not restrained by the traditional barriers. there's two. there's two ways of thinking. really there is a tremendous, healthy -- think that's a wonderful thing. >> tom, you've had quite a year. traveled around an awful lot not only on "highway 50" but also talking about -- >> i've been doing a two-hour documentary on boomers for cnbc, "what next?" it will run in early march. that's been fascinating. i've been in europe a lot, also in south africa. i was in south africa and italy and the south of france, at normandy for the 65th anniversary. i've had a good year but i've also been in canada but that's in pursuit of the illusive steelhead in british columbia. >> we've loved to have your analyst. stay with us, chris matthews joins our panel. you're watching "morning joe."
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is this too much of a job for you to step back for a second and say, my god, we're experiencing something here that just doesn't happen very often? >> you know, joe, i think it will hit us all some time today. i'm not exactly sure when. do i think we're a little close to this. we're not used to be spectators at these events. but i was driving in d.c. yesterday and drove past the american red cross and they had a big banner up for their honorary chair, president obama. it was the first time i'd seen really seen those two words
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together. it sort of began to kind of hit me, wow, this is really going to happen. >> welcome back to "morning joe." joining us now from washington, msnbc chief washington correspondent norah o'donnell. norah, thanks for joining us. stand by just for one second because i've been waiting a long time. i've been waiting a long time to talk to donny about -- >> i'm sorry you're going to have to see this. >> say this outloud, if you could. i want you to just turn to the camera and say "i am sorry. i am an addict to the old cliche of men always get a pass when they act in a way that is completely ridiculously, ridiculously disdainful." >> donny, she says you're wrong on tiger woods. this is the worst thing that could have ever happened. >> i'm going to stand by exactly what i said. i said with one infidelity, complete non-event with respect to his endorsements. when it came to serial infa
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delts, along the perspective of advertisements, such as accenture, they're financial services, they've got to bail. as far as nikes, as far as electronic arts, young, male-oriented, nonevent. they're not going anywhere. is he big business for them. he did not break any laws. he will be fine. >> even now? >> even now. >> even now, donny? donny, come on! >> i'm not saying what he did was right or wrong. i'm saying if you are nike, you're phil knight and he's a billion dollar business, people are not going to stop buying golf clubs, grow up. that's reality. he will be fine. fast forward a year from now. is he in his first tournament. highest watched tournament of all time. he wins. if his wife has left him, he's on his own. if his wife is there she's crying in the gallery. they hug. this story has a different ending. >> norah o'donnell in washington, i just got chills. this is like a movie. norah, help me out.
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>> donny, you could not have predicted that he would take an indefinite leave from golf to try and get everything back together. those advertisers -- >> well that's a smart move. >> but all those advertise remembers going to sit and wait for an indefinite period of time? you bet a lot of those are coming up for renewal. >> as a guy who comes from that world, i promise you, save it comes out there was an underage woman or save it comes out there is some violent act, nike is going nowhere. here again, they're going nowhere. i'm not making a moral judgment i'm just telling you as a guy inside that world that it's not going to hurt their business. >> mike barnicle, what do you think? >> i actually think, having nothing to do with tiger's infidelities, his transgressions, the mind-boggling stupidity of what he's done, guys buy nike stuff. that's his market. they're going to stay with the market. >> thank you. >> and video games. >> thank you! >> women buy nike stuff, too.
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i can just get in here? i think you forget that women are athletes, too. aka mika and myself. we don't just sit and paint our nails. we also work out. >> norah, you buy sensibly. guys are morons. >> let me ask you a question. >> of course we buy sensibly. donny, you know women are the market force in that country. we buy more books, more groceries, more cars. we are the force when it comes to buying products. women make a majority of the decisions. moms who have teenage boys are going to think twice about their boys when they say they want clubs. >> if your husband wanted a tiger woods golf driver and that was the greatest club, are you going to not buy it for him -- >> with all due respect to nike, it's not the best driver that's out there. i'm not going to buy him a driver because tiger woods endorses it because i know that it is not the club necessarily, it is a lot of the skill that's
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involved, too. and nike doesn't have the best driver. >> that's a different discussion. >> tom brokaw, would you ever ask your wife to buy you a tiger woods driver this christmas? i know i wouldn't ask mine. >> i would if i thought it would do my golf game any good. mike barnicle knows my golf game. >> donny, in all seriousness, i do think that there is a change in tone in terms of -- there are businesses that have pulled back on advertising and there has been an impact. and our initial out-of had t-th thinking was he's going to be fine. >> multiple infidelities will have some effect. going forward, he can maybe change his image a little bit, maybe more racier versus squeaky clean. he's still the best golfer of all time, still an aspirational figure to many male americans.
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guys, that's fact. jump in any time. >> i actually think he might be all done. i think he might be all done because of the sport he plays -- >> crazy. >> -- psychically, it is such a fragile sport. in this country somebody someone's going to be on the 18th hole, green, at augusta, someone's going to yell "cheater!" it's going to happen. >> norah? >> that's an interesting point. i think it would be rude to do that certainly to the game of golf but you can't rule out people what they're going to do. >> i can tell you that if you do that at augusta, it is 20 years to life. >> it's death! >> well said, tom. >> norah, thank you very much. coming up, chris matthews joins the party for a look back at the decade that was. our panel goes over their top choices for the story of the past ten years. we'll be right back.
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good morning. i'm chris jansing. here is a quick look at some of today's top stories. the netherlands says it will immediately begin using full body scanners on passengers headed for the u.s. that follows last week's bombing attempt on a detroit-bound flight. dutch officials say the scanner probably would have alerted security guards to the materials being concealed by the accused bomber. police in finland are
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confirming at least four people were killed today when a gunman opened fire at a shopping mall. police also say they have found a body they believe to be the shooter. witnesses say the man began randomly shooting as hundreds of people fled for cover. michael jackson getting a posthumous nod. the library of congress is adding the 1983 music video "thriller" to a registry of films it deems culturally, historically or allegatiestheti significant to be preserved for all time. that's a quick look at the news. all the day's top stories at the cop of the hour. to a full body ache... at night. top ofnew tylenol cold rapid release gels day and night work fast too. they release medicine fast to relieve painful coughs, congestion and sore throats. so you can rest, day and night. feel better, tylenol cold.
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this goes without saying this is the most serious attack on the united states in more than 100 years. not since the war of 1812 and certainly the damage we did to ourself during the civil war has this country suffered this kind of damage within its interior. >> that was of course tom brokaw reporting on the events of september 11th as they happened. mika, you were actually down there that morning. >> yes. >> it was actually my first week on the job back at cbs. what a defining moment for the decade, for this country in terms of the whole way we think. welcome back to "morning joe" on this holiday edition of "morning joe." tom brokaw still with us. donny deutsch still with us. mike barnicle on the set as well. joining us now from washington -- he's used to it.
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>> made us all pretty uncomfortable. >> let's go to washington to talk to "hardball's" chris matthews. chris, images of 9/11, is that the defining moment of the decade? did everything that we saw happen in washington, across the country, flow from that morning? >> yeah, i think so. it scares me still because we were so proud and we were for so long of our first responders. i remember when the fire trucks in new york would go by, some outdoor restaurants and everybody would stand up and applaud. i remember the wonderful serenity on subways like the j train up in new york in the months after where people were just better with each other. people said hello more than they ever did before. wonderful kind of strange tranquility it put over us and unity i felt for months. through the following -- i think st. patrick's day. i think it was such a good thing. yet what scares me is the success of that attack, the ability of one horrible attack. as horrible as it was, to engage us in a new kind of look at the
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world where we're really part of this sort of islamic struggle against the west and we're playing our part in it. unfortunately. i don't know how we get out of it. it is in a way we're playing a part in continuing to struggle by simply being defensive. it is something we have to be. it is a horrible conundrum. we have to defend ourselves but we may be enraging the struggle, inviting more struggle. it is a very difficult path we're on. i think the people who attacked us on 9/11 succeeded. they got us engaged in this east-west struggle, made us a belligerent power in a way that israel was all these years, and i think it's unfortunately, a win for them that they got us involved in this struggle and it is a very difficult thing for us ever to get out of now. >> chris, we certainly were united after september 11th. do we end this decade more divided than ever? >> i think there is another strain -- couple strains. tom, you and i all think about
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it all the time, what's going on in terms of trend. a couple trends. one obvious trend inside the country is between, you can call them liberals, progressives, they want more government, more social programs, perhaps more individual liberty perhaps in a certain kind of way, for example, people with different sexual orientations, more rights for them. some people look at that as something they don't want to see. other people find that change very, very upsetting and don't like it. that certainly goes back to the certainly the civil war, certainly the big immigration, the golden door of more than 100 years ago with all the new people coming to the country. forces of change, people aren't too happy with the change. that's not new, whether they're called birthers or progressives. the title's changed but that word is not new. what's really disturbing in the last ten years began with the recount. it's gone on to this fight over getting 60 votes in the senate.
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i think a real frustration with the fact that we don't quite have a democracy and people are waking up to sort of the built-in checks and balances which we've always like to have, but they've become frustrating to people who want to see something more than the popular will. we saw it with the long recount. i loved covering it but it was disturbing to a lot of people to realize we don't pick the guy with the most votes and it is up to the supreme court in the end and up to location supreme courts like florida, very liberal. the national supreme court was very republican. i think people are seeing those kinds of frustrations and obstructions to democracy. i think this 60 votes in the senate thing is very disturbing to dib rals. i liberals and it is going to remain there. >> tom brokaw, i can't remember how many months ago it was. maybe it was in august. but you and pat buchanan had a fascinating conversation on our wet. of course, buchanan always talks about in '68, calling nixon the
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chaos out there. you think of 1968 as that crack in time. you two talking said that the anger, the rage, the animus in washington, d.c. in the summer of 2009 was the worst partisanship you'd ever seen. that blew me away. >> yeah. i think that -- >> even worst than water gate. >> i think that had t has been. i think in part, however, there are more instruments to fan the flames now than there were then. it goes on all day long because bloggers weigh in. cable television does a part of it going on all day long. examining everything, many instances blowing some of it out of proportion. the networks now have kind of divided themselves along various partisan lines. they're putting the flag in the ground at some point about it. i think all that feeds it and it
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is a much more radioactive arena as a result of that. everything is electrified now in a way that it wasn't then. during water gate i do remember, even as a white house correspondent, to say nothing of what was going on on the hill, i got to go do the "nightly news," then i worked the phones to get ready for the "today" show the next morning. one of the things was most proud of was the white house press corps in those days. nobody went on the air and said he's guilty, we just have to wait for moment to come which will be clear to everyone. we documented what went on day by day by day, everybody had a pretty tempered attitude about it. i can tell the story, i would go to the hill at his invitation twice a month and sit with senator byrd of west virginia. and he'd say to me, what's going on down there? i would tell him as best i could. i'd say what's going on up here? he would tell me kind of what the thinking of the senate was in that bob byrd way.
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and it was very useful to both of us to have our perspective. i took my perspective back, he had kind of a feel for what was going on at the white house. i didn't rush out to the camera and he didn't rush out to the camera after these exchange. >> how much that rage in 2009 you guys were talking about as a group was dormant that we elected an african-american president. obviously half the country. but that health care and the whole t.e.a. bag movement, was that an undercurrent that there is still so much racist rage that there is an african-american commander in chief in this country? >> i don't think so. i think one of the huge seminole events in the history of this country that's gone unreported and don't pay enough attention to it is the fact that there is no more fringe in this country. nobody feels isolated anymore in this country with their anger, their frustration, their rage, their sense of what doesn't work, what does work, because
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they're all joined together by the internet, by cell phones, by e-mail, by twitter. so you don't think, i must be a nut for feeling this way, because you have so many allies. >> every constituency has a constituency. >> yes! >> chris matthews, moving to donny's question about race, you and i were around -- i was on capitol hill and you were reporting -- when bill clinton was president. that guy was hated by republicans every bit as much as barack obama, or even more. i just -- i don't buy into the race thing only because i remember how much my people loathed bill clinton at the time. >> i just think that if you look at something like the birther thing though, you've got to think of the tribal aspect of it. it's not about somebody like barry goldwater who may have been born in arizona territory and that's a technical point perhaps for some, or that john mccain was born in the canal zone. it was raised as a more fundamental point, that this guy
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is not one of us. not that he was born outside the country, but he's not one of us. that has a tribal aspect. >> there was talk on capitol hill though in '94 and '95, wasn't it, that bill clinton may have been born somewhere else, it was that he was a murderer. it was harsh, dude! it was harsh. >> i want my constitution back. i want my country back. were they saying that about clinton? >> they were saying that about bush. my god, yes, they were saying that about bill clinton. >> remember waco, progressive versus reactionary. underneath black versus white, have versus have-not. >> no. >> listen twlb is always going to be an element. this country will be engaged in race for rest of our lives and the lives of our children. there is just no question about that. it is a matter of proportion. i was just in alabama and i was doing a story about, as part of the boomer documentary, about the bombing at the birmingham
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church. so i was in birmingham. they've got a wonderful civil rights institute there now. you know what everybody in alabama was talking about? people at the airport, people driving their car, people at the civil rights institute, waitresses? they were talking about -- >> alabama football. >> more important than that. that was first. but more important than that, their first heisman trophy winner from alabama is an african-american. mike ingram. and the whole state has real pride in that. it was obviously the pride was much higher in the african-american community and in what passes in alabama for the more moderate community, but almost everyone acknowledged this is a big deal for the state, this is what we care about. >> speaking of alabama, i had lunch with bob riley a couple of weeks ago, the governor of alabama. i said, tell me, how's it going down there? chris matthews, bob riley said, "barack obama is extremely popular in my state.
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they don't like his policies, but about 70%, 75% of people like him as a person." in fact, bob riley told me that obama on a personal level, right, is bitter than any other politician -- white, black, republican or democrat. that at the end of this year in 2009, pretty damn remarkable. >> you know it's interesting in terms of the president's temperament. you met him the other night and i met him when we did our picture-taking for christmas. it is always fun to have a minute or so with him and your spouse and enjoy that sort of frivolity of christmas. in a country as you've all pointed out as highly polarized and overheated i agree on some of these things we fight over on a daily basis, the president's so calm. in his company, it almost disturbs you. he's so calm.
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he is an incredibly debonair fellow. an incredibly debonair movie star from the late '40s and early '50s who was in "dial "m" for murder" if you want to see one of the classics. he one was of the husbands who tried to get his wife grace kelly killed. when he gets caught in the end of the movie for murder 1 of his wife, grace kelly, "oh, well, you caught me." it's one of those james mason type characters. the president is like that. >> chris, i've seen you do a lot in your life, but teeing up bach and ray miland and "dial m for murder," -- >> i love you, chris. >> mark ingram, heisman trophy winner with be crying, emotional, gets the heisman trophy. barack obama, bob riley says he is very popular personally in alabama. why? because he represents a dream.
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this is a country founded on a dream, prospered with a dream, we're all going to do better here than our grandparents did. he represents a dream. >> maybe so. chris matthews, will he do better next year than he did this year in the polls? do those numbers go back up? >> well, i hope he finds a topic that the american people share next year. i hope we're on the same page. he wasn't this year. health care was not on the american page. he was on that page. next year he's got to get on our page. that's what i think. >> chris, thank you so much. >> happy new year. >> i'm going to watch "dial m for murder." seriously. it is a classic. i haven't seen it. >> great movie. when we come back, the year in "morning joe" from the white house to new orleans, to willie starting his own show -- oh, it started. okay. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks.
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dampblts it gives me great pleasure to be here to make a contribution from the starbucks foundation. >> now it is a big check. i don't know if you have a bank that will actually take this. but -- >> in the amount of $125,000. sometimes the little things in life feel like our biggest enemies. [dripping] [shower running] they can be damaged... they can be stolen. happily, there's thamerican express charge card. if something you recently bought with the card breaks, it can be repaired...
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it's been quite a year. >> it has. >> here's a look back. >> in washington, d.c., people flooding to the mall right now, getting ready. the inauguration of the 44th president of the united states, barack obama. they're braving the freezing cold out here, they're lined up around the block waiting to get in nor a glimpse of you, joe and
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mika. >> he's wrapping up? should we fire him, jeff? >> we'll be right back. >> mike barnicle doing what he does best -- creeping out young women. >> i hated all day to see mike barnes. >> is that what we call him now, mike barnes? clearly they're huge fans of mike barnes. >> mika and i have a lot of common. we both have partners of joe who used to be in congress and don't know when to stop talking. >> this is the white house briefing. >> crisis! economic crisis! >> dow jones yesterday hit a low it hadn't seen since may of 1997. >> if it's way too early, what time is it? >> and it is freezing cold. >> cupcakes. you seemed a little cranky. "with xoxo, the cheneys."
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>> our guest co-host today is from msnbc's "morning joe." mika brzezinski. >> i'm going to be vocal. i love "morning joe." >> thank you so much! >> we're mostly making fun of ourselves. >> i'm in hd. oh, shut up. >> live from the reagan library in seem me valley, california. >> it is a "morning joe" road trip. i'm with microbarnacle. >> only just the beginning. >> our new green room. >> $125,000. >> i'm going to challenge this company in cincinnati robins sports services to rebuild this floor so that you can be state champions when you're a senior. >> if you watch long enough you, too, may be called out on this show by digger phelps. >> what's the problem? get over here so the kids don't
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have to use umbrellas. it's leaking. get it done. >> you know i have to do this with the lovin' spoonful. >> don't come to work with a sweater and food all over your stomach. >> this is how you get ready for going on the air in the morning. >> maybe when you retire. >> m >> mika is crazy. she abuses ambien and vodka. >> just vodka. >> i love your schtick. >> i have the cutest baby. here with us now, democratic virginia senator jim webb. >> what's going on, mika? >> i hear willie's getting his own show? >> welly is an amazing talent. >> are you going to call it
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"morning willie?" >> lewis is tearing this thing open, ripping out the innards. >> that's funny. >> this is the strangest program on television. >> willie, i'd like to thank you first for this opportunity. >> it's funny, i got a new co-host. but same rules apply. i'm still kind of scared of him and i'm not allowed to speak. >> i'm going to shout loudly. >> we're joined by vice president joe biden. great to see you. >> good to be with you guys. >> i know this would be a shock to a lot of people watching, that two joes would dominate the conversation. >> exactly. >> this is my favorite show! >> i want to tell you how delighted i am to be on this show. i watch you guys every morning. >> the show is the best show in the morning. >> i've done the olympics, "today," this is the single biggest show of my life.
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welcome back to "morning joe." you got your choice. you can talk about what you learned today, what you learned this year or learned through the decade. what did you learn? >> so much. i just hope it is a year or decade that makes us tougher. much tougher as we look ahead. tom brokaw? >> well, andy groh, one of the
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founders of intel wrote a book called "only the paranoid survive." i think that's a fairly good mantra. >> i know i did one of the low moments of "morning joe" this year when i bought mika shoes as a peace offering. i thought it would have gained some "kumbaya"? no. >> donny, donny? >> guys, don't waste your money on shoes. >> i love the shoes. >> oh, look at this! >> okay. i stand corrected. >> what i learned today was you think that tiger woods will survive a very, very bad year. >> of course he will. it's not even a question. like i say, save it doesn't get worse. if it is just this, of course he will. >> tom, how do we compartmentalize this decade, the '70s, the me decade, the '80s some would say the decade of greed. what about the past ten years? >> the last ten years you've used the phrase here a lot in the past 24 hours, this is a
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decade that requires a reset for the country across the board. we all were responsible here for getting into this jam. we're only going to get out of it if we all decide that we need to get out of it and then find some common way to do that. and that's across the board politically, culturally, economically. >> we were humbled. >> yeah. >> i learned donny said tiger woods going to have a good year. >> i still don't agree with you. happy holidays, everybody. have a great 2010. mika, what time is it? >> it is "morning joe." have a good one, everyone. have a great holiday. thanks for being with us. >> i can't believe you kissed donny. >> i did! then let's do more than talk about it. let's turn picturing it into planning it, thinking it over into making it happen. let's say out with the old and in with the new. let's create some wall-to-wall "wow." [ man ] ♪ oh! [ male announcer ] more saving. more doing.
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right now on msnbc thursday, high alert. big security at the biggest new year's eve party on the planet. a scare that turned out to be nothing is raising new questions this morning about why it took nypd so long to get on the case. who dropped the ball on the christmas day terror plot, and better yet, can we fix the broken system? a much-anticipated early report on those questions expected on the president's desk any time now. rush limbaugh rushed to the hospital in hawaii. we'll have the latest on the radio host's condition. and what do michelle obama and sarah palin have in common? we've got that answer coming up. good morning, happy new year's eve. i'm chris jansing. it is 9:00 here in new york, 6:00 out west. we begin with the final
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countdown to 2010 which is well under way in new york city's times square. security is on high alert to protect the hundreds of thousands of revellers who should be ringing in the new year. thousands of police officers will be deployed for pick-pockets to would-be terrorists. >> it will be a full-fledged deployment of our resources. every year we try to change it a little bit so it is not totally predictable. >> but serious questions are being raised after yesterday's security scare. the discovery of an abandoned van with no plates and a bogus police placard forced police to evacuate buildings, should down neighboring streets. nbc's mike taibbi joins us now. mike, some people are saying why was that van sitting there for 48 hours anyway? fy leave my car in a place where it shouldn't be, it's gone. >> the most amazing thing is that the meter maids didn't even ticket it. i can't believe it. i

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