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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  June 5, 2013 6:00am-9:00am EDT

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today's caption day the cat phone smuggler nabbed by russian prison guards, no had to get realized i was persian. >> the trailer poster from the new irs training video based on james bond from russia with love. #way too busted. "morning joe" starts right now. see the new 3d printers could soon be printing your dinner.
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nasa is now funding research into 3d printed food. one researcher is using that grant money to print pizzas. >> fantastic! instant printed pizza at the touch of a button. unlike dominos where you have to wait for 30 minutes and the pizza only tastes like it came out of a printer! hopefully, we can combine our 3d printed food with our 3d printed guns and make a rifle that fires pizza rolls right into my food hole! >> good morning! >> it is a good morning. >> yes, it is. >> please! please! it's wednesday. june 5th. oh, lord. welcome to "morning joe." >> what? >> no, it's all right. i just remembered something. >> that is exciting. well, let me tell you something. i can tell you the people of canada got a big birthday
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present yesterday. willie geist, the mayor of toronto, it remains me. you know they have been looking for this tape, right? >> sure. >> they have been looking at this tape of this guy smoking crack and he is -- he has defended himself. well, we got word from gawker, late-breaking news from gawker, there is no tape. >> this is how we are going to start the show? >> there is no tape. reminds me, mike barnicle, of ray donovan famously say. >> where do i go now to get my -- >> what office do i go back to get my reputation back? willie geist, seriously? stupid. >> where does he go to get his reputation about? blago got framed because? >> he cared too much, joe! >> this guy cares too much. >> mayor ford was right all along. he was pretty bold.
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he was pretty assured when he gave those press conferences and turns out maybe he was right. maybe he doesn't smoke crack. >> maybe he doesn't. >> nbc contributor mike barn is cal with us on set. >> that's all that really matters. >> now, alex wagner. >> let me just say, i grew up in the era of marion berry. crack can be quite a campaign, just sayin'. >> like marion berry, this guy was set up. remember, marion berry's famous quote? >> i do. >> women's advocates everywhere. i remember that. >> in washington columnist and associate editor for the "the washington post" david ignatius. that is nice. >> that's great. >> hard hitting and intellectual way to start the day. >> calendar model, sam stein.
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>> sam is a little upset. more breaking news this morning. google glasses, they have actually denied an app for pornography so sam stein can't go around in his google glasses watching porn. >> look how creepy that is. >> isn't that a first amendment violation? >> i thought this was america. >> not having a porn app on your google glasses. >> i want to see his calendar picture. >> what is this calendar? what is that? >> sam, would you like to share? >> are you on one of those firemen calendars? >> sort of. go ahead, sam. talk to us. >> so i'm not on a firemen calendar although i do that in the past. we're on this calendar, the race for women challenge calendar. the men of the huffington post helped put together a calendar. it's a promotional item. >> we don't care about the details. what are you wearing?
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>> this is an awkward segment for me on "morning joe." >> no one is shirtless, joe! no one is shirtless! >> so they get a lot of in other words together on the calendar. >> is that ryan green in the center? >> it's ryan grim and arthur delanie and zach carter and we raising money in attention to women's charities and nonprofit groups. >> did you self-select yourself to be in the calendar? >> no. >> it was the only options. >> david ignatius is particularly happy to be joining us. >> he is glad he woke up -- all right. >> try to get the toronto male on the calendar. he declined. >> a foreign policy calendar. >> your dad, mr. october, and henry kissing ger, of course, in nothing but a santa claus suit! the polls are out, mika.
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>> yes, they are. >> you know what they say. they are fresh as the month of may. >> ournthe new nbc news/"wall st journal" poll looks at the recent scandals on the white house. a majority of the americans say ben ghazi and irs and d.o.j. scandals are raising questions. 10% of americans had a positive opinion of attorney general eric holder. half of all -- >> you know what? with numbers like that, eric should run for congress. he would fit right in i. he would do better. a negative view of the irs. however, the poll shows most americans don't hold the president personally responsible. this is interesting. his approval numbers are holding steady. 48% approve and 47% disprove.
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>> what has it been in a month and a half? some say this would bring down the white house. personally, it has not affected president obama because they have not led back to the white house explicitly. >> i think in some cases it has given the republicans to handle something well and they overstepped again. >> you look at the numbers, aebleg. they don't hold the president personally accountable for these things yet. >> yeah. i think there is still a kind of d d discomfort with the government which i think is the root of the problem for the administration. the irs overstepped its bounds and it's not well run and it's bloated and it's waesteful and partisan. the rollout another big government piece. while i don't think the public is holding the president accountable whether that is a democratic project, it remains
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to be seen. i think that is detrimental to the country in the long run. >> we have got a lot of other questions. >> and some other questions from the poll. more people hope democrats will control congress after the 2014 election and americans favor the u.s. drone program by 50 points. >> david, once gwynne. >> that is so something. >> i'm in the minority, david ignatius. you know, you go back and look. americans are very clear eyed about what they are willing to do to stay safe, but these numbers are each more of a stretch than i expected. 66 to 16%. >> you'd have to say the president, as he is tuning in to "morning joe" this morning and hearing about these numbers, probably is encouraged in the sense that the white house had feared that this climate of scandal, people really would begin to believe this is another watergate, this is coming at us
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from every direction and these poll numbers show some erosion but not in the president's personal popularity. for the average american he is still a likeable guy. on drones, the president says he wants new rules for the use of drones but he is recognizing that this is a weapon that we have to be careful about. i think he's got some support there for both sides of that opposition. >> when you look at that number, david, what jumps off the page, at least to me, is not an approval of the drone program, but just the idea -- ordinary americans look at the drone program and say to themselves, i think this means fewer of our people dying on the ground. don't you think so? >> i do. i think the drone issue really, for americans, is a proxy of do we feel safe? do we feel we have weapons that can protect the country? these are the weapons that took down the people who took down the buildings on every american
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remembers. you have to balance the numbers we are looking from america and around the world which tell us how unpopular they are and a sensible country chooses a course what is between popular domestically and pass muster internation internationally and that is the trick here. >> new jersey governor chris christie has ordered an october special election just three weeks before the state's general election. christie who could have had it on same day as the general election or let an pointee serve out the remainder of lautenberg's term said the cost associated with the extra vote is worth it. >> the cost of having a general primary election in mind cannot be measured against having an elected representative in the senate which so many controversial issues are being debated. >> that cost, by the way, a
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reported 24 million for a primary and general election. critics accuse the government of wasting money. corey booker is likely running for senate. some of the reaction to cris's move has been pretty tough. an editorial in the star ledger called it shameless and self-serving stunt. one board said christie's explanation sounded utterly holly and he was accused of debilitating stupidity in not immediately pointing a republican for the job. >> sam stein, watch through the option that governor christie could have done here. obviously he is hearing it from the right because they wanted him to appoint a republican and hearing it from the left because he had called the special election and didn't put this election on the same ballot he'll be on in the fall. is governor christie really that afraid of the corey booker vote?
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maybe not taking him down in november, but at least taking a piece out of his margin? >> three options that christie had. one was to do what he did which was hold a special election. the second was to put it off essentially to november 13 when an election was taking place and have it run at the same time. the third, most the legal but challenging option was to do it in november of 2014 and have a place holder until then. he would have had a lawsuit from democrats in the state. what he ended up doing was the one that is going cost the state the most money which is the special election and he is taking a lot of heat obviously. not just for the cost but from republicans who wanted him to have a place holder in there for a longer period of time. the interesting thing is twofold. yes, corey booker would have brought up more democrats and wouldn't have hurt christie nelson becau necessarily but would have hurt down ballot new jerseyans in the statehouse and trying to flip the statehouse as well.
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a tough task but he wants to it obviously. christie is on record that he opposed early voting in presidential years in new jersey because the cost was too prohibitive. he said $25 million and he didn't want taxpayers to flip the bill. that was a month ago and a record saying that it's curious about why his position of the cost effectiveness or the costliness of elections changed suddenly with respect to the senate elections and that is why he taking all of this heat. >> one month. we are talking about one month. >> $24 million. >> what is that? >> cost of it. >> i know. one month is going to cost $24 million. >> for the guy that said we are cutting these programs for low income and middle income children and women. you know? $24 million to have an election 20 days earlier seems to me maybe not the most prudent course of action. >> mike barnicle said i don't care how much it costs. not a fiscally prudent thing to
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say. >> this makes no sense. this makes no sense. i mean, if the potential for a national race has gotten him to the point where he is thinking if corey booker is on the ballot, my majority might not be 62%, it might be 58%. that is crazy talk. >> he is going to win. what is his approval rating right now? >> 68. >> he is 30 plus in the polls against his opponent. i think the question is the down ballot races. if you have a huge democratic turnout for the down ballot races you put a lot of more people in trouble. >> sam, isn't it that christie wants to begin by a gigantic margin to show he is the kind of republican that can huge numbers from both sides of the aisle? >> maybe but that seems so outlandish that i can't reconcile that. again, his lead is about 30 points in the polls. >> outlandish. outlandish says the man who wears a flaed shirt on a calendar! >> i'm distracted after seeing that calendar. >> david ignatius, this may be an example of a politician being
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too clever by where he thinks the best way to help himself is holding this a month early. at the end of the day, it might end up costing more support, you know, putting 24 million dollar bill on the people of new jersey for four weeks. >> nobody loves a thin man. this is the new chris christie's problem. >> wow. >> the one thing that we haven't mentioned that occurs to me, joe, is that chris christie doesn't want to have to choose himself between different wings of the republican party and if he had made the decision, if he had appointed a senator to fill this term, this abbreviated term we would have had to make that choice. now he ducks it. and i think that maybe that is a fact here that he says to the voters, you choose. you choose. i'm not going to intervene and he spares himself a politically awkward decision. >> yeah. >> i understand him saying what
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the voters choose but, again, unless i'm misunderstanding something, we are talking about the difference in one month. let them choose when he is on the ballot, right? >> it goes against -- >> am i missing something here? is it too late to print the ballots? what is going on? >> it goes against everything he has tried to establish for himself as an image. i'm not a politician and i'm not your regular politician. i will do what i think is best for the state and what is best for the people, except not on this one. you know? it's potentially kind of damaging to him in the sense of what he has established as a reputation. >> you know, mika, he is, obviously, a good friend of ours. good friend of yours. we need to call him and see what is going on. >> yeah. >> because i don't understand. >> i think it's definitely worth talking about more. until we do, there is another governor in the news. it goes in the category of men saying incredibly stupid things. >> that is my category! that is a big category. >> it is.
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>> computer jones, joe scarborough. >> it's in the jones category. i don't even know what to say. >> at least he is not an elected official. >> i know this person runs the state of mississippi. fueling controversy about the role of mothers in the workplace. this governor blames them for america's education woes. mississippi governor phil bryant made this questionable remark yesterday at a "the washington post" event. >> how did america get so mediocre? >> you want me to tell it the truth? and i tell the truth. you know, i think parents became -- both parents started working and the mom is in the workplace. it's not a bad thing. i will get in trouble. i can just see. i can see the e-mails tomorrow! but now both parents are working. they are pursuing their careers. that's a great american story now that women are certainly in
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the workplace. >> so it's the mother's place to teach them to read? >> no, no, no. but i think there was that loving, nurturing opportunity that both parents have a little bit of time. >> moments after those comments, his responsibility provided backlash and that's what we are giving you now. commended the advancement of women in the workplace. mika? >> america is mediocre because both parents work, because women work? >> i like the question, willie. why do we suck? i didn't know we did! powerful country economically. >> if we do it would be because of the men who cannot handle women in the workplace and i think he might be one of them. seriously. that is what has really been revealed in this conversation over the past few weeks about women as bread winners and jones and this governor. it's women are bread winners and women can't handle it.
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they really don't know what to do with themselves. they have got nothing left. they bring very little to the table because they can't multitask and now they are really -- it's being revealed and they can't handle it so it comes out in completely ridiculous erratic, stupid conversations like this! >> there is a social aspect which you're touching on and also the economic relate. most of the women in the workplace are because of necessity not because they don't want to nurture and love their children but because they have to bring home the bacon. >> and being rooted out now because the economy suffers. it's really bad! >> you see michelle obama. >> no, i didn't see that story. it's not so good. so they was mad at a protester. >> i was just going to say, she has got no problem being in the workplace. >> that's right. >> she is tough. >> she is a very modern woman, actually. >> yes, she is. >> you're a modern woman. >> wow! >> is that right? >> all right, i'll do it. >> two very modern women here.
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>> very deeply modern. >> a couple of cave men. >> there are a lot of cave men coming out of the shadows, seriously. >> true. >> mike and i are in the conversation? >> you are some of the best of the best if i may be very real about it. >> they are the best of the best? >> yes, mike barnicle is. >> some men -- >> you make fun but actually quite seriously. >> if you listen, if you listen, if you pay attention to the way the world works today and has worked for some time, some men, maybe a lot of men actually, the higher they get in whatever industry they are in, fear the fact and i think it's a fact that women are better balanced than men. they have better judgment about things than a lot of men and i think it's not an economic thing. i don't think men fear women's economic power but they feel their balance. women are balanced and men
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aren't. look at me. i'm unbalanced. >> willie, do you think mika is balanced? >> incredibly so. >> that was a correct answer! coming up on "morning joe," former white house press secretary robert gibbs. also nbc news political director chuck to do. >> and continuing the conversation, business leader karen fineerman will be here to navigate the challenges of balancing work at home and all of these really dumb men! >> later, tennis champion monica seles will be here. up next the top stories and the political playbook but, first, bill karins, with a check of the forecast. >> good morning. we found out the tornado on friday in oklahoma near el reno was an ef-5.
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200-mile-per-hour winds and at one point 1.6 miles wide -- 2.6 miles wide and making it the largest confirmed tornado to ever travel on the planet so that is how much of a huge story that was. this morning, oklahoma city they can't get a break. yesterday morning, they got nailed and hit about the another tropical storm an hour ago and another one building out to the northwest of town. that has been the case little further to the south too and up in areas of kansas. we will do it again this afternoon. no tornadoes, i don't think, at least not many. if they happen they will be out toward lubbock. oklahoma city and little rock downpours and damaging winds. we are watching the gulf of mexico. if this does get a name it would be likely either subtropical storm andrea or tropical storm andrea. it will not bring a lot of damage but a ton of rain up the east coast the next couple of days. that is the potential down there for some flooding, maybe in areas of georgia or north
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florida. for the most part, just a soggy forecast. that will include the east coast as we go through thursday into friday. enjoy today. we are looking at a gorgeous almost like a spring or fall-type day in many areas of the northeast and mid-atlantic. it won't last. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. we're here at the famous tapia brothers produce stand where we've switched their fruits and veggies with produce from walmart. it's a fresh-over. that's great. tastes like you just picked them. so far, it's about the best strawberry i've had this year. walmart works directly with growers to get you the best-quality produce they've ever had. all this produce is from walmart. oh, my gosh. i'm shocked. [ laughs ] i know where i'm going to be shopping for strawberries now. find fresh berries and all your quality produce backed by our money back guarantee. walmart.
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all right. >> welcome back to "morning joe." time to talk about the morning papers. the "new york post" girlfriend outrage. a-rod faces 100 game ban. i'm sure a lot of new york fans are hoping that they will get rid of his contract. also just got a question for you. next he is a great chef. his name is paul.
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he's in front of new york times dining but look at this guy. >> ew! >> would you eat food from this guy? >> no! >> look at that hair. >> he is going to run his hands through his hair? >> he hasn't washed his hair a couple of months and run his hands through the hair and then bring me the chicken. i'm going to bread it now. >> you know what he ought to try? he ought to try washing his hair before he is "the new york times." >> ""the washington times."" testing done in japan on a high speed train to reach speeds over 300 miles per hour using magnetic suspension. instead of wheels, these trains are set to launch in 2027 with full testing beginning in september. that looks just awful. >> can't they get it done faster? "the wall street journal" 100 students from an high school
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were ejected from a new york city to atlanta flight. all students and chaperones removed no safety concerns and causing of delay of 45 minutes. grumpy old men mike barnicle clapping in the background, turn the devices off p.m. when the people say -- just turn them off. >> from our parade of papers. the l.a. times. in a rare move chrysler will deny a government request for a recall on 2.7 million of its vehicles. the recall aims to replace effective fuel tanks in jeeps which leaked during car accidents allegedly causing explosions resulting in the death of 51 people. >> wait, wait, wait. they are not going to recall these? they want to be the pinto of the 21st century? if the pinto if you tapped the back, it would blow up? >> boom!
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>> come on. >> chrysler claims it the fuel tanks pose no danger to the passengers and risk litigation from victims. leave it there. move on. let it play out. >> 51 people have been blown up. like a scene from "mannix." iver time a study of fast food restaurants in great britain. ice in six out of ten restaurants has more backet than water from toilets. i know this because i drink it. hygiene risks because the rate of bacteria was so extremely. could be because employees not washing their hands after using -- >> thanks very much. >> the facilities were reminded
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not to go to burger joint in london. can you believe? >> yesterday, big moves surrounding amazon. yesterday, the company bought the rights to viacom programming such as your favorite show. >> spongebob. >> spongebob square pants. >> is there a better character than patrick star? >> i love patrick star! >> how many people love patrick star? you like when patrick star got smart, right? oh, my lord. patrick star rocks the house. he is not lord garmadon but he is close. can you tell i've had kids like 80 years? we have the wallpaper in the study. >> dora the explore will run on amazon prime instant move and after netflix failed to get a new contract. it will have a grocery store
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option called amazon fresh it's testing in seattle posing a big threat to other grocery chains. >> amazon taking over the world. >> it is. >> can we show my shoes here? >> no. >> show my shoes. >> they are close! you showed the chef with greasy hair. >> i bought these shoes on amazon.com for $29. i go on my app on my iphone there. it's just easy. >> they come without socks? >> they come without socks. >> he wears them every day and you can tell! >> look at mika's shoes. she did not buy them at amazon.com. quite a contrast. i'm a little bit country. you're a little bit rock 'n' roll. >> with us now is chief white house correspondent for politico, mike allen who is here with the morning playbook. mike, happy morning. how are you doing? >> life is good. thank you. >> good. i understand the gun debate may
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be resurfacing next week as the senate is beginning the deliberations over immigration. why would the gun debate be pulled into that? >> joe, as senators try to fix the immigration bill to make the changes that it would need to get a big vote or even to pass the senate, senators who want to add restrictions on guns are getting a second bite at that senator. blumenthal, democrat of connecticut, is going to push this. they are talking about adding restrictions on immigrants who could get guns. right now, the restrictions apply to illegal immigrants and they are talking about some amendments that would add restrictions for immigrants who are here legally but based on their immigration rights. will try to push their ideas including adding citizenship for
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foreign-born gay partners. so everybody who has an issue that hasn't been dealt with this year, is going to add it on because of that senator lindsey graham who was a member of the gang of eight of immigration, said if we don't watch it, this thing could fall apart. senator rubio saying earlier this week he is worried if too much gets added on, it could be trouble -- >> they don't have the votes right now to get it through the senate, let alone the house. >> that's right. they have been hoping for a really big vote, which is what would really take the pressure on the senate, just -- on the house, if it just gets out of the senate, by a vote or two, much easier for the house to walk away from it. one top house republican aide told me that it's a lot easier to see how this falls apart in the house than how it comes together. >> all right. politico's mike allen, thank you so much. up next, a lengthy suspensions may be coming for a-rod and other baseball stars. chris "mad dog" russo, joins us
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for sports. >> he washed his hair. i'd let him touch my chicken. >> he definitely could cook me dinner. we will be right back with more "morning joe." ♪ all the time we were close i remember these things the most ♪ my mantra? always go the extra mile. to treat my low testosterone, i did my research. my doctor and i went with axiron, the only underarm low t treatment. axiron can restore t levels to normal in about 2 weeks in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18 or men with prostate or breast cancer. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur.
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meeting."
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big story in the world of sports this morning. here with us now is chris russo who headlines his own talk channel on mad dog radio. good to see you, man. >> the dog is in the house. >> he's in the house and he is mad. >> girls and boys, how are you? >> how is it going? >> good to see you, willie. >> break this down. front page of "the daily news." a--r," d faces 100-game ban. >> tony bosch is going to talk to major league baseball maybe by the end of the week. he has a lot of people all over him. the feds might be over him. baseball sued him. he has no practice so he feels hi to come clean and maybe i can get my practice back. he has lots of bills and things can be a little better. >> he is talking. he is talking? >> that's it! >> he going to tell baseball about all of these players who used his steroid clinic to get themselves organized. a-rod is one of them. ryan braun. nelson cruz of texas and 15, 20 players involved here. the question is baseball has
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been after this so give baseball credit. they have been diligent to find these drug cheaters. the question is no failed drug tests so are they able to put these guys away without a failed drug test? >> a-rod we knew he was cheating all along. but braun was so self-righteous about it when he went -- so self-righteous. he is going to look like palmeiro or even worse for lying. >> don't forget. he brought the guy down too. he brought that poor guy down. >> the fedex guy. >> which was a disaster. the question is will the appeal process be so strung out that this will take forever because they can appeal now to the baseball players association. >> that is the interesting evasi equation here. how long do they fight this? 100-game suspension for a-rod if it comes to that. >> it's a whole year. >> it's a lifetime. >> you're talking about double offense for some of these guys too. so they are going to have to do this without drug testing. so it's going to be a little
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more unique and tricky but they will pursue this. >> it does help, willie, joe girardi, make his life a lot easier. won't have to wait until the playoffs to take a-rod out. >> good job. >> if i'm an attorney for a-rod or ryan braun, i say so what do you have on this guy? you've got a guy scribbling in a notebook, handwritten notes in a notebook and you have his testimony. what do we know about this guy? in other words, there's no test results. >> exactly right. >> how do they prove that with a hundred game suspension? >> even if it's 50 games, take that. everybody is saying a hundred games because he failed once before. the question is are they going to be able to nail a-rod and braun' all of these other players to the wall without that failed drug test? you have to ask the union that question. but baseball is going to pursue this one. it's not going away. >> long term, baseball has, by far, the strongest drug testing program of any other sports. what happens now to the nfl and nba because of baseball's strenuous efforts? >> the nba is not so much
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worried about steroids but i think the nfl is embarrassed they have not been able to come up with a blood testing scenario with their union. baseball has got it. olympics have it. golf doesn't, by the way. football doesn't. they like to think football, the nfl they are progressive and one step ahead of the curve and baseball has got a better drug testing program than the nfl and goodell can't stand that but that is because that union in football has been very stonewalled. like the union has been in baseball for a lot of years too. so i have no sympathy for baseball players because for years, they were doing steroids and not one baseball player went to bat to clean up the sport. now they have to because congress gets involved seven years ago. i don't have any sympathy for any baseball player. 15 years ago you could have stopped this and mcgwire and sosa and bonds and clemons. this is the price you now pay and everybody is painted with the same brush. >> the dog is tough this morning! >> i'm feisty! >> the dog. the bite is as tough as the bark this morning.
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>> yes, absolutely. >> you're giving nobody -- >> i was sharp and it was coming through my brain waves today! >> really going well, man. >> by 3:00, i'm dead! >> chris russo, we love having you here. >> good job, pal. >> can i ask my question, willie? where the hell did somebody come up with the word mad dog? how did he get that name? >> doesn't fit the man. >> kind of does. >> listen to the dog on sirius xm every day. >> margaret carlson will join us for mika's must read opinion pages and sam stein. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. ♪ you can't always get what you want you can't always get what you want ♪
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with us now the bloomberg news, margaret carlson. let's do our must read op-eds. >> one from "time." leaks help protect national skuve security. everyone seems to have gotten the message now we have to rethink the lines when it comes to the government going after the press to curtail leaks. even more important than where the lines are drawn, may be who draws them. it's understandable that government officials give primacy to its ability to keep things secret but we need the news organization at least to be able to make their case to a neutral judge who can consider national security as well as constitutional values in a broader context. >> david ignatius, does david westin have a point? >> well, i think this whole leaks investigation has remind is us of having an aggressive press and the problems with the
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kind of subpoenas and intimidation that results from them in terms of our ability to do our job for the public. we do not have a separate category of citizenship. i'm subject to a subpoena just like anybody else. but i hope the justice department will decide in future cases to forebear government officials saying things they shouldn't have said, go after the official but don't do anything to show the reporter's ability to tell the truth. >> we are hearing from other other news organizations that they are having a lot of sources dry up. have you noticed that over the past month or two? >> joe, i've noticed a little bit of backing away. people a little bit more tentative on the phone. one of my long time intel sources joked with me, i hope you're buying burner phones for all of your sources so that you can use these disposable phones to talk to people. i think he was pulling my leg.
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but there's no question when government officials who sign an oath saying they will not betray secrets see these kinds of prosecutions, they are a lot more careful. >> when willie geist and i talk about carrying around burner phones, we are not joking. >> we always have them. >> throw them away. hey, there. drop them in the trash can and keep walking. >> works every time. margaret, this fits into the context of the bradley manning trial happening right now. do you think leaking information -- obviously on a completely different scale. he is a whistle-blower or a traitor? where is the line between the public's right to know and compromising national security? >> well, every -- every journalist and every leaker thinks they are on the whistle blowing side. they think they are doing the right thing. they don't go out to do it for the wrong reasons. so you have this mantle of, you know, the first amendment and this is right. occasionally, that's not the case. it's self-serving. way you go after it, if you're
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the government and you think you're being betrayed by somebody on your staff, is not through the journalist end. you've got to go through your end more vigorously and not step over this line which, you know, eric holder and others, you know, clearly have. >> i think what is interesting about the manning case is the government is trying to prove it's no longer an issue of the criminality because manning has confessed to that. the government is trying to prove he aided the enemy and bradley manning's defense is trying to say he was is a good samarit samaritan. p.j. crowley thinks of manning as a window shopper in the mall of classified information that he was sort of given this access, wanted to do something with it, but when his motivation were as extreme to aid the enemy, i don't know if we can prove that.
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>> christie rejects a minimum wage increase for low income residents. is that fair? >> you know, what we like about chris christie is sometimes what can get him in a little bit of trouble is he seems to go a little too far and when he says get the hell off the beach, yes, he's right but when he says, i don't care how much it costs, then, you know, that trademark christie, can get him in trouble because there are things he needs to care about, like taking money out of the mouths of children. >> i think, david ignatius, i think he would have wished he would have said i don't care how much it costs. would there have been no costs, no additional costs if he had put the special election in november? >> you know, i don't know the cost comparison. i do think flip comments like
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that are once part of his charm. it seems like the guy will say anything. increasingly part of his problem. each statement which seems charmingly was made and you say, wait a minute, what does he mean by that that? it will be fascinating to watch the maturation of christie as a national political figure. >> stay with us, margaret, if you will. >> david ignatius, thanks very much for getting up early. i hope it was worth it and sorry about the toilet talk early in the day. >> i'm just glad to be able to see joe's shoes. >> exactly. and calendar boy. >> you are lucky you can only see them. willie, what do you have coming up next? >> we have the very picture of chemistry. >> what? >> yeah. it's on tv. >> it's our show. know? >> this is good stuff. this is anchorwoman in philadelphia, a meteorologist who -- well, they just don't like each other all that much and it spilled over on to the tv jon. >> all righty! >> "news you can't use" is next!
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. mine was earned in djibouti, africa. 2004.
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where over seventy-five percent of store management started as i'm the next american successon story. working for a company hourly associates. there's opportunity here. i can use walmart's education benefits to get a degree, maybe work in it, or be an engineer, helping walmart conserve energy. even today, when our store does well, i earn quarterly bonuses. when people look at me, i hope they see someone working their way up. vo: opportunity, that's the real walmart.
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oh, yeah, it's time. let's do it. i guess. >> let's do a little "news you can't use." what is so important in television is chemistry. >> what does everybody say about us? we're family. you can tell it right away. >> you can't create it. >> you either like them or you don't. >> we like to highlight good chemistry. >> you remember when we start
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this show in what did i do? i went over and i organized your closet easeme closet. >> that's right! >> i almost got a restraining order but that is okay. >> well, down in philly, they have the kind of chemistry you just can't teach between an anchor and the weather woman. watch this. >> oh. >> carol, i understand you have some good news and possibly a halo behind you? >> possibly a halo? nicole, it's always the halo. >> it always comes into question whether it's you and a halo. >> isn't it odd that i'm the one always carrying this halo around? thanks for the hard to get applause, nicole, cabinet. >> how is that girl? is that good enough for you? >> lackluster. >> it's just perfect. it's wonderful. >> lovely, like you, carol, is how i would describe it. >> >> no coal, did you notice? >> i don't see anything. >> you didn't call any attention to it. >> i didn't call attention to it
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because i know -- >> you don't see it! my halo, nicole! >> it's been manufactured. >> that is a small snippet. a larger clip, go online to watch. nicole and carol showing off their on-air chemistry there. >> you can't bottle it. >> they tweeted out a picture wake up with us on cbs. how gorgeous is carol today they said about each other. they are trying to mend some fences on the twitter. >> i think they are kind of interesting! >> yeah, i'd watch that show every day. >> anyone mila was so nasty? >> young talent. >> we will be right back with eugene robinson. >> a cat fight between those two! students everywhere are looking for someone who can help them reach their full potential. with an advanced degree in education from capella university,
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♪ what hurt the pacers was justin bieber who was there distracting them rooting for the heat in one of the most ridiculous outfits ever assembled. it's sunglasses indoors and bad gold chains and leather shirt and you can't see but he is wearing leather pants too. he is dressed like a cute little glove and that hut is it my imagination or is that hat floating above his head? is that how you're supposed to wear hats now? it reminds me of another famous hat aficionado, a young teen
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idol! even he had more -- >> you know what? my son gives me a hat. you know what i still do? i still fold the top of the bill just to piss him off. it's this year's model. i don't get it. >> with helcome back to "mornin joe." margaret carlson and alex wagner are still bus, along is sam stein. >> let's first of all, do the new york blood, all black. >> we get in our cars and hackensack and we drive across. look at you guys! it's spring, it's summer! >> black is the new black. >> we look to you to be chipper. this side of the table. >> not me. let's get the l.a. side of the table. >> editor in chief of new york
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magazine "the daily beast" tina brown. >> it's the orange moment! >> in washington associate editor of "the washington post" eugene robinson. and we are not done yet. in san francisco, former white house press secretary and msnbc contributor, robert gibbs. >> look how casual robert looks out in san francisco. >> early out there. >> it is early. so, robert, let's start with you. sam stein not with us? there is sam and calendar model sam stein. they are not calling it up post any more. they are calling it buff post, because sam and some of the nerdiest people in all of the internet have decided to do a calendar. look at that. it's just straight out of -- i mean, he's a dartmouth guy. >> the raise for women challenge. sam, thank you for doing that. >> let's go to san francisco. it is 1:30 morning out there probably.
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robert gibbs is awake. i wouldn't wear a tie if it were 4:03 where i were as well. the president's numbers came out. you want to dig into it and everybody wants to dig into it. they ask, you know, do you trust the president more or less because of ben ghazi and because of the irs and -- by the way, those are leading questions. what are people going to say? o no. i trust him more because that have. you look at the overall approval rating the president is holding up pretty well. 48% approval rating is actually above the average of where he has been. why? >> well, i think, you know, if you dig as you said deeper into this poll, there's a sense of economic optimism like we haven't seen in the country since 2006 and i think that's sort of the driving political dynamic and, as you said, these three scandals have not altered in any real aappreciative way
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the dynamic we have seen in the country so people are still concerned about the economy. >> i wonder if you agree with alex. th not that to the president personally, but to the president legislatively. as we move towards implementing obama care and having the irs component on it, it just raises the skepticism of what washington can and can't do. 3 out of 4 americans say they like the president. do you agree with that assess many? >> i do. as you said, you see in this poll that there is the president is extremely likeable and i think it makes the case that many republicans are trying to make against him a harder one to prove. i wonder if your republican strategist and you're looking at this, you don't think to yourself let's pick a target easier to hit that the president wants to do in terms of health
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care. >> that is the republican problem right now. the republican miscalculation. you call people paid liars. so many other republicans say why don't you call him a paid liar? that is what he is. even if you think he is a paid liar, again, it's about winning. if you're a republican, you want to win. you want to pull the swing voters over and, instead of personalizing it with a guy 3 out of 4 americans like, they tried to paint horns on him. that is what the policies should do against the president. >> in some cases let a story breathe. that turned the whole dynamic against the republicans in my opinion when i watched that sound bite unravel. it was like you guys are overplaying your hand. here are the numbers. nbc news/"wall street journal" looks at the scandals on the white house. a majority of americans say the irs and ben ghazi and d.o.j. scandal is raisie questions abot
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the integrity of the administration. 10% of americans had a positive view of eric holder, the attorney general. >> half of all americans have a negative view of the irs. however, the poll also shows most americans don't hold the president personally responsible. and his approval numbers are holding stead. 48% proof and 47 disapprove and increased slightly from april. most people hope democrats will control congress after the 2014 election and overall the u.s. favor the u.s. drone program. >> george h.w. bush, bill clinton, george w. bush didn't have the popularity that reagan did and it used to drive democrats crazy. they would go after him.
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tina, this president has the same sort of special sauce or whatever as a politician. >> listen. he is an amazingly gifted performer. he has a charm. when he gives that big smile, it's very, very compelling. the fact is certain kinds of scandal never really get traction in the public sort of got, you know? things like ben ghazi, i think, irs was more potent, in the end, this noise out there really doesn't destroy people's feelings about the president. they also see that he certainly cannot affect every decision in this vast array of issues that deals with this. people screw up. below the line. i think that people who run businesses and being in businesses are aware enough of that. they are not actually blaming him for these things. as i say, they really don't. he they think stuff happened on his watch and all of the noise and shouting of the republicans, as mika says, it just overplays
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the hand. >> gene, it seems pretty simple to me. fountain republicans want to destroy this president and drive him from office and cripple him or get his approval ratings in the 30% they will be very frustrated the next three and a half years. but if they want to stop his legislative program dead in its track and want to kill progressive government, the expansion of the federal government, the president's administration has given him some pretty good political weapons. >> well, he has given them an opening. those integrity numbers, the integrity of the administration numbers, you know, you think there's a problem there. those relatively high numbers are -- that's the one bit of really bad news, i think, for the administration in this poll. i think, overall, it conforms what we know which is most people want the president to succeed. outside of that basement room in the capital where the republican
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caucus needs to beat up john boehner, in there they have a different view, but most people want the president to succeed and one interesting thing is they asked do you have positive or negative feelings about president obama, positive or very positive added up to something like 47%. the republican party added up to 32% and very positive feelings by the republican party was something like 8%. so it's not as if the republicans are doing themselves a lot of good politically by trying to do harm to the president. they don't seem to be helping themselves very much. >> not at all. margaret carlson? >> you know, by craft to the republicans, there is a steadiness to president obama that people like. they look at it and you look at darrell issa who has been the face of republicans these last couple of weeks. you say, i don't know about that guy. also americans want to like their president so they don't
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like to like their attorney general so they dump a lot of of it him. yesterday at the irs hearings, republicans aren't helping themselves. they are making the case that, yes, these are all political operations and they did get their exemptions. by the way, we have to kill the 501(c)(4)s! thank you, republicans! >> i would just say that eric holder numbers don't add up to 100%. i'm not entirely -- >> where are those people? >> 42% of people know who eric holder actually is. >> all right. sam stein, it's interesting watching the president kind of get through these bumps in the road because initial when something happens and i can think of lao different big news events the past six years, like come on where is assist response and why isn't he punching bag? he kind of waits and rides it out and then the republicans punch hard and look like the lesser men.
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>> yeah. you know, i think we are trying to make too much or reading too much into these numbers. it seems to me like the country is entrenched in their opinions of each side of the debate. democrats will be defensive of obama and republicans will be distrustful of obama. the fact this might affect healt health care i think is overstated. this gives them a vehicle to say we dent have the irs do x, y, and z but not like they are opposed to to the act they always were. i think might and could have come out of the scandal is the irs scandal might have prompted more calls for tax reform but i don't think that is likely. two in a same political role, we would have a reporter law based off what is happening with the d.o.j. subpoenas but that too is unlikely. i think the numbers say washington have two campses and you're not moving them off of their positions. >> at the end much day, robert, i think margaret is right.
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americans root for their president. ronald reagan had tough two years, iran/contra and exploding deficits. he left with a 60% plus approval rating. bill clinton we went after that guy nonstop and the more he did seriously, we could have caught him smoking crack in toronto and his approval ratings who have gone up to 70%. he drove us crazy. there was that "saturday night live" skit after impeachment was washed away. daryl hammond said, i think i'm going to go outside now and smoke me a big old stack of pot! but it was the truth! and i think you have here -- yes, republicans can go after the president personally and there are a lot of things he can go after this administration for. but at the end of the day, americans, they exact a price not only on the president, but
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the party attacking the president from both sides. ask democrats, robert, how well it did for them to attack reagan politically. >> right. you know, clearly the president has been insulated a bit because of the personal like ability numbers, that's been true really all four of the years in the first term and i do think if you're a republican, you're a little disconcerted to see that while the public believes there are some legitimate oversight activities, as y'all have been saying on the set, you have republicans that, quite frankly, are trying with a very low positive rating in their own party. they are trying to, through exaggerate radiation prove that isn't there. they are trying as hard as they possibly can and trying to push this bolder up a hill and it's not just going to work. >> i want to get to a couple of other stories that we will talk about the sex assault in the
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military right now and then talk about the governor of mississippi. top military officials are vowing to crack down to the skyrocket it issing cases of sexual assault. members of congress wonder why the crimes haven't been better tracied in the past. the visual at yesterday's hearing was striking. all of the pentagon's top leaders in one place and all of them male with just one exception. many admitted grave concern about what is happening inside the armed forces. >> accountable in the marine corps begins and ends with me. sexual assault prevention within our ranks is front and center with me and at the top of my priorities. >> nothing saddens me more than knowing this cancer exists in our ranks and that victimized airmen on what is the worse day of their life sometimes feel they can't receive compassionate support from our support or
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don't trust us enough to ensure that justice is done. it's time for thoughtful consideration of every reasonable option. >> wow. despite those admissions, those are incredible pictures. some of the senate armed services committee were less than satisfied with the answers from this panel that looks like a blast from the past in some ways. take a listen. >> we need to know how many men and women are raped and sexual assaulted on an annual basis and we have no idea right now. >> you have lost the trust of the men and women who rely on you, that you will actually bring justice in these cases. they are afraid to report. they think their careers will be over. they fear retaliation. >> just last night, a woman came to me and said her daughter wanted to join the military and could i give my unqualified support for her doing so.
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i could not. i cannot overstate my disgust and disappointment over the continued reports of sexual misconduct in our military. >> so what senator mccain said, i mean, that pretty much sums it up. that incredible for him, by the way, to share that. this is -- this store is stunning to me we are dealing with this in day and age. we are breaking news to get to but quickly. >> thank goodness for the women on the senate armed services committee. once they acknowledged will do anything to fix it. they have been presented with a way to fix it. move this to uniformed military prosecutors outside. the command structure and they won't do it. the one thing they could do to fix it, they won't do. >> mika, we have some breaking news. coming out of the white house right now and chuck todd is bus. what is going on.
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tom donlan stepping down and susan rice stepping in. big shake-up on president obama's national security -- >> i wouldn't call it. this is an open secret for months the idea when susan rice was passed over or however you want to describe it for secretary of state, it was clear she was headed to washington and -- >> chuck, a lot of people are saying because of ben ghazi especially and because of the e-mails and because of everything else, that the president was going to have to think twice about appointing susan rice. this is a press saying i'm in my second term and i'm going to do whatever i want to do. >> there was the chatter in w. about you when you were talking to folks inside the white house, it was pretty clear ben ghazi had no impact on how the president viewed susan rice. this is not a senate confirmation pick. this is a presidential personal
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appointment. he can put whoever he wants at national security adviser. susan rice is the national security adviser and waiting arguably off and on for more than two years. while there had been some chatter about her as secretary of state, there is still -- it was always still thought of that if not there, then she would be brought into the west wing and arguably she is going to be more influential and always this divide. tom donilan always sat in the middle of the jen racial divide. sometimes siding with the guard how to handle mubarak or what to do in libya. others have been the heart and soul where the president is when it comes to different foreign policy decisions and where he wants to go and how he wants to intervene or how he doesn't want to intervene. so this is a very, what i would call a comfort pick. what i think is surprising is
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that they are doing it -- they just sent tom donilon to prepare for this china summit. he was in china last week doing the prep work with his counterparts in china for the summit that is taking place at the ends of the week, yet they are doing this switch today so donilon is not involved. it's susan rice. that part of it seems a little whiplashing. >> robert gibbs, what do you think is i didn't understand the announcement now behind the timing? >> tom has been there a long time and been in this administration the first term and first as national security adviser and head of the national security adviser. i agree with chuck, i think this has been a poorly kept secret in washington. i think the president has tremendous respect and affection for susan rice. she's done a wonderful job for the united states at the united nations and, as chuck said, this is not a senate confirmable job, so there is no concern on his
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part in elevating susan to this very important role. >> gene robinson, republicans are going to be taking to the microphone today. i suspect we are going to hear some sound and fury. >> we are going to hear a lot of denouncing and a lot of people who are shocked and dismayed, but in the end, it's not going to amount to anything, as everyone has pointed out, this is the president's prerogative. everyone should recall. susan rice has been with the president since, you know, before the 2008 campaign or during the 2008 campaign. she came over early. she is really a key foreign policy adviser in a lot of ways will have more impact on our foreign policy going forward, perhaps than season john kerry, the secretary of state. >> it's much better to be inside the white house if you really want to influence policy. only in washington would this be controversial where the person who went on a sunday talk show
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and gave talking points would become the focus of all the ire over ben ghazi. republicans will do this but it's not going anywhere. >> the poll numbers showed today it does nothing for them. >> i think the president was so angry over her trashing over the talk show, in a way it created a deeper bond them them and i think he felt he owed her this even more, that he wanted to do this and she was trashed on his behalf and she behaved eloquently over that and didn't whine about it and did it with fortitude and now she gets her reward. >> i say this without comment or any opinion. it's just a reality, chuck. the president has a deep bond with susan rice, but this is going to cause also a deeper divide in washington, d.c. between the president and his opponents. >> you know, i don't agree with
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you. >> chuck, you're just being so disagreeable this morning! if you could just go back to "today" show, that would be very helpful for us. did somebody not give him the ground rules for doing this show? where is my producer? >> here it is. >> they let the philadelphia news people and the weather person. i'm a meteorologist. go ahead, chuck. >> susan rice, yes, lindsey graham and john mccain were extremely upset to use susan rice as a proxy to set up the president. set aside that and susan rice is much more of an interventionist than some inside the white house. sometimes more hawkish than the president. john mccain ideologically, that part, lindsey graham, the loudest voices were critical of susan rice at the time do like susan rice's hawkishness when it
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comes for instance where she was on libya and may end up being on syria. she is a driver when it comes to being a believer in using u.s. power to intervene during humanitarian crises. i think ideologically and on policy, this is going to be something that actually mccain and graham happy and she has a good professional relationship with those two when you subtract what happened over ben ghazi. >> eugene, do you agree with that? >> chuck is absolutely right. susan rice was deeply scarred by what we witnessed in rwanda without doing anything. she is much more aligned with what mccain and lindsey graham believe our foreign policy should be. i think this is the beginning of
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a beautiful friendship. >> the history of fighting. >> we shall say about that, gene. >> chuck todd, thank you so much. we will see you coming up on "the daily rundown." >> no, you won't. i'm just being disagreeable. sorry. >> what is wrong with him? all right. >> is that a halo behind his head? no? >> don't you look good today! sam stein, thank you as well. speaking of looking good, the men of huff post. it's the men of huff post calendar is part of the effort to spotlight women who are changing the world. ahead of the women's summit we are convening raise for women challenge a fund-raising competition for women and they are nearly at the $1 million goal which is pretty amazing. for more information, visit crowdrise.com/raiseforwomen.
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for more on tomorrow's women summit join the conversation on twitter with the #third maerkt. thanks very much, everyone. kenner finerman says women should use their sexuality to get ahead infant workplace? huh? that and other things she said she would only tell her daughters about business and life. we will get reaction on those comments that the mississippi governor made as well on why america is so mediocre. >> he says because women are working. >> just go back home and cook eggs and make coffee. >> that will help him with the swing vote. >> that's a good one. i wish this test drive was over, so we could head back to the dealership. [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. test drive! [ male announcer ] but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a jetta. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today.
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on any new volkswagen. i am an american i'm a teacher. i'm a firefighter. i'm a carpenter. i'm an accountant. a mechanical engineer. and i shop at walmart. truth is, over sixty percent of america shops at walmart every month. i find what i need, at a great price. and the money i save goes to important things. braces for my daughter. a little something for my son's college fund. when people look at me, i hope they see someone building a better life. vo: living better: that's the real walmart.
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♪ did marshall get confirmed? >> did marshall? >> marshall, did he -- get him on the phone. >> okay. >> and, emily. >> yes? >> that's all.
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>> anne hathaway's character, remember that? was judged from her frumpy look in the office. here is us no karen finerman who uses the film to illustrates while women should stop dressing down and use their sexuality and one of the tips of success in her new book. "secrets i would only tell my daughters about business's line. >> i already like her. she sits down and we have never met and she goes i'm reading your book. i was getting so pissed off at you so i made you angry? >> you did. i was furious. >> talk about it. breaking all of the rules? >> the common thing you talk about about, you know, not being your own advocate and being
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apologetic when you go in. >> isn't it exhausting? >> it is exhausting. women need to realize you in charge of your life and no other advocate. that's not how we go into things. we think is there a right way to be and -- >> we back into things and we sort of hem and haw and apologize our way in thinking we are going to make everyone feel comfortable and get what we want. it does not work. >> absolutely it doesn't work. >> i found that four times over but let's get tour book "finerman's rules secrets i would only tell my daughters about business life." tell us and we have been teasing this but using your sexuality and talking about the way you dress. is there an explanation for this? >> there is absolutely an explanation. it is certainly not -- >> i was getting angry. okay, good. >> certainly not that. look, you're women in the workplace. it is different than being a man. >> that's right. >> we all know that. it is different. so you need to put a little effort into it, i think, and not try to dress like a man, be like a man, and pretend you're a man.
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for me, going into wall street when you first go into the field, there's a lot of different places you can go so you can look at different industries you want to follow. if you follow the retail space and you look at retail companies, most of the analysts there are actually women. but if you look at companies that are industrials, energy, things like that, they are mostly men. so i figure you know what? i got to go where the men are. i have a much better chance of standing out. so when i go to an industrial conference, the ratio of men to women is 9-1, 10-1. so i always feel like i got a little bit of a better shot here getting the attention of male ceo and i sort of, you know, use a little flattery. i care. i hang on every word he is going to say because i'm trying to research these companies. >> that actually works. >> no. >> i'm serious. >> there isn't a guy out there who would love to have someone -- >> exactly. >> so i sort of feel like you
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know what? it's just math. go where you're going to have much more value and for me that sort of being a woman and particularly going into the fields that are more male dominated as an analyst. >> when you say choosing a mentor, pick a man. avoid single middle-aged women. >> yes. look. i'm not trying to be piecy, obviously. but what i'm -- >> no, you're not. >> i understand and i get a lot of backlash and i understand it. if you're in a male dominated field, it's just math again. pick a man. that's going to be more helpful to you. there are going to be a lot more men that can help you. there are going tor a lot more men, period. the likelihood of your finding someone who can be a mentor to you is much higher than it's going to be a man. pick a man who has daughters, if you can. that is particularly helpful. they see you. they see their daughters in you. >> i love your six steps and we will open the conversation to the mississippi governor because
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i want to hear about that. six steps to making better decisions. frame the problem. take your emotions out of the equation. i think that is really great advice. know your options. look for the 51% solution. priorityize what needs to be decided now, and cut your losses. let's what is the most important one of all of those if you had to pick one? ii'd say the emotion part. >> the emotion we know is absolutely important. we all know, some women wonder, can i control my emotions? >> oh, please. >> if any of you are married and you got in a fight with your husband and you pretend everything is fine for the sake of your kids, that happens to everyone, right? you can get it together. so get it together. that's one thing actually women can learn from men. men have very good at compartmentalizing. >> oh, yes. >> it helps frame the problem in a way that you just focus on what exactly is the issue. you don't turn into and you do this and you do that.
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>> you call it compartmentalizing, i call it forgetting everything. >> what about sheryl sandberg and her book "lean in" talks about crying at work all the time. >> for me, never cry, ever, ever. never! >> absolutely. >> it is death. >> it is death. >> and the other time was 9/11 which, you know, that's a whole different thing. >> yeah. but the bottom line is if you're crying about something at work, you have completely lost your perspective on things. >> yes. >> and i also think absolutely losing control. screaming and losing control. i actually think starting to swear is the beginning of letting yourself unralph ravel. >> if you lose control or raise your voice because men can at work. unfortunately, i think we are up against a stereotype we need to still work on bucking and that is that we appear to be unleashed in a way that applies
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to a stigma that perhaps may not be fair. so we have to be more controlled. more focused. more disciplined and more tough, i think, when we are on the job. >> let me just go back to one point which is the 51% solution. what that means is a lot of times you're going to be making very, very difficult decisions where there is a lot of pluses and minuses in each side's favor. and you have to recognize that you got to find the solution that works 51% of the time or more. and expect to feel some ambiguity or some uncertainty about the decision you've made. it doesn't mean you made the wrong decision. it just shows you made a complicated decision. >> if you can stay, i'd like you to stay a block to talk a few other stories. the book is "finerman's rules secrets i would only tell my daughters about life." thank you. i'm sorry i made you so angry. did you finish the book? were you happy at the end. >> i finished the book and i was happy at the end.
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i was just -- >> i was worried about that sexuality. before, i remember actually when helen gurley brown was famously asked what do you think about sleeping with your boss? she police department "why exclude him?" and i thought, oh, no, we are going back in that directionion. to me, the men have so much passive aggression. >> they are coming off as big babies lately. we will speak about the mississippi governor coming up next. michelle obama pushes hard against a haggler. we will show you what she said when you keep it here on "morning joe." ♪
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[ telephone ringing ] now a waiting room is just a room. it was very painful situation. the rash was on my right hip, going all the way down my leg. i'm very athletic and i swim in the ocean. shingles forced me out of the water. the doctor asked me "did you have chickenpox when you were a child?" the pain level was so high, it became unbearable.
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♪ >> how did america get so mediocre? >> you want me to tell the truth? and i tell the truth. you know, i think parents became -- both parents started working and the mom is in the workplace. it's not a bad thing. i'm going to get in trouble. i can just see. i can see the e-mails tomorrow! but now both parents are working. they are pursuing their careers. that's a great american story now that women are certainly in the workplace. >> so it's the mother's place to teach them to read?
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>> no, no, no. but i think there was that loving, nurturing opportunity that both parents have a little bit of time. >> mika, rule number one in politics, it's politics 101, my friends. i'm giving this to you for free and you don't have to come to my seminar. you can say, i, too, was in congress. when you're a man and about to talk about a woman and you say you probably shouldn't say this, shut your mouth! >> who was that? >> that is mississippi governor phil bryant at a "the washington post" forum yesterday. i'm sorry. that was about the stupidist thing i've ever heard anybody say. >> they keep doing it. >> he wowed i have just stepped back in it and let me backtrack as quickly as i can. i kind of got what he was saying. he gave a great example of him to help him out of his dad reading to him. i think what he -- i try to take
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it at face value. i was all excited that i really thought he was going to step in it and i actually didn't think he did. i think what he was trying to say a parent needs to be there. it's likely the mom but mom needs to work and more pressure on parents. >> that's not what he said. >> you do have one family where two people both work. >> yes, we do. >> and they live in the white house. >> yes. >> and, yesterday, the woman in that relationship punched back! >> okay i'll do that. more comment on this. during a high priced fund-raiser at a private home michelle obama came face-to-face with a protester. according to the "the washington post" a gay rights activist demanding she sign a executive order and the first lady moved over to the protester and said, listen to me or you can take the mike but i'm leaving. you all decide. have you one choice. as the -- >> you have one choice. >> who did the crowd pick?
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>> they shouted to the first lady to stay. the woman was escorted out. the woman 56-year-old ellen sterts told "the washington post" the first lady came down into my face and i was taken aback. >> was it gale from new jersey? >> yes. >> it's none of your business! >>, tina, sometimes like little figur -- political figures not putting up with that crap. >> i think you don't mess with michelle obama. this is one tough opponent. she doesn't like to be disrespected a ennor should she. >> i'm not techling michelle obama or chris christie. >> they are tough figures. i think we could probably agree on this, mika. women have a tougher road in terms of public perception than men do. i think what a lot of people will say michelle obama can't handle a heckler? she is a fantastic first lady. but women are judged different
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than what men. republican you listen to this what women being the bread winners there are huge amounts of resistance in american society to powerful women and women bringing home the bacon. >> i'm intimidated by all of you around this table. >> you should work through it. >> i am. i'm smart. >> tina and karen, thank you so much. alex, see you later today on "now noir "now," on msnbc. up next, remember this move? >> he jumped across the stage and he's so cool, except for the fact he landed on a lady's face and not usually what you want to do on national television. >> she is considering her next move and it could be in court. ouch. "morning joe" is coming right back. [ female announcer ] now you can apply sunblock
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>> so if you're trying be cool, mika, and you jump across the stage and you land on a lady's face, is that -- is that good or bad for your career? that's bad. i actually was watching that live and my daughter carly said, he hit her, he hit her. apparently he did. the woman's lawyer now says she is experiencing head trauma. >> if a guy lands on -- mike barn a c barn cal, if a guy jumps across the stamg and lands our head. >> it wasn't as bad as it looks. i was there that night. >> we are learning that the show's producers told miguel not to do it but he did. >> we have a lot of stuff going on. tons in the news. susan rice, the president is basically staring down republicans. he has appointed susan rice. he is going to appoint her. i think the press conference is at 2:00.
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and she is going to be the new national security adviser. a lot more. plus coming up next, fascinating story. >> we are going to have tennis champion monica seles how her real life experiences on the court inspired her first knowledge and she will be here to talk about that. you you're watching watching "m brewed by starbucks. ♪ ♪ even if it's so wrong ♪ i wanna scream out loud ♪ boy, but i just bite my tongue ♪ ♪ this one's for the girls messin' with boys ♪ ♪ like he's the melody and she's background noise ♪ [ volume decreases ] thanks, mom! have fun! you too. ♪ ♪ ♪ your chance to rise and shine. with centurylink as your trusted technology partner,
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joining us now, hall of fame tennis great monica seles. she's out with a new book "the academy, game on." it's her first novel. it's good to have you on board here. >> thanks so much. >> it's great to have you. 16 you wonni ieyour first frenc open, 17 you became the best player in the world. 55-1 in tournaments. you know what my dad would ask me? how could you lose that match? 53 career winning tights. that's absolutely fantastic. but while there were rain delays and while you were just kind of hanging out, you were doing something. >> well, i really started writing because tennis all my life has been just so focused,
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hitting that little yellow fuzzy ball six, seven hours a day, six days a week. and during off time i just needed some diversion, i needed fantasy because my life was pretty one dimensional. >> how old were you when you started the pretty tough training regimen? >> probably about 10. >> how tough is that for kids? because if you want to be great in tennis, you have to have like these old guys screaming at you for ten hours a day. how tough is that for kids. >> it's not for everybody. you definitely have to sacrifice a lot. but there's also some huge things at age 16, i got to win my first french open, be number one in the world, travel the world, you make a lot of money, you're well known anywhere. there's always a trade-off. i love playing tennis. i say if you're passionate about it, it's worth it. if you're doing it for just the fame or money part, i think you'll burn out.
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>> and one thing i didn't know, born in yugoslavia, a country that doesn't exist anymore, went through hell for so long. >> i left at age 9, 10 to further my tennis career. i came to the u.s. by myself at age 13 for a year and a half. that was a trough transition to leave my family and home behind. but you realize you just want to follow your dream. and i'm big into that. >> tell us about "game on." how much tof it is based on you own life? >> i went to different academies and i wanted to create the character a strong female. my time in the academy was a lot about tennis day in and day night, no boys, which at the academy i had more colorful things happening so i really had a lot of fun with it. >> i just read a few months ago
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andre agassi's book and the intensity of it, how intense are these places for people who don't know it? >> it's very intense. at the age 16 you essentially empl employ six, seven people who work for you, making millions of dollars and yet you're a teen-ager. and you're still struggling growing up, you're selfish. you loved it. i loved creating the characters and letting my imagination go away. >> how difficult would it be for you to inject in the novel one of the most infamous things on the tennis court that happened to you? >> i think you're talking about my stabbing. it definitely changed my tennis career and soon after i lost my dad. essentially i rediscovered my love for it and went back to playing tennis. i still love it and i still do a lot of other things and that
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tennis has given me the platform for it. >> the book is "the academy: game on." monica seles, thank you so much for coming in. good luck with the book. it looks great. >> up next, brand new polling shows the trouble is not sticking to the president. we'll discuss how he's staying above the fray next on "morning joe." ♪ [ ship horn blows ] no, no, no! stop! humans. one day we're coming up with the theory of relativity, the next... not so much. but that's okay -- you're covered with great ideas like optional better car replacement from liberty mutual insurance. total your car and we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. learn about it at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy?
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good morning. it's 8:00 a.m. on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. on the west coast. take a live look at new york city. mike barnicle, alex and calendar boy. i could just eat him up, sam stein. >> what is this calendar? sam, would you like to share it? >> are you on one of those firemen calendars? >> sort of. >> go ahead, sam. talk to us. >> i'm not on a fireman calendar, though i did that in the past. we're on the raise for women's calendar, the men of t"the huffington post" put together this calendar. >> we don't need that many details. what are you wearing? >> this is an awkward segment.
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>> it's a nerd calendar. >> is that ryan grimm in the center? >> it is. arthur delaney, zach carter. it's for a good cause. we're raising money -- >> for nerds. >> for attention to women's charities and nonprofit groups. >> nerds. >> did you select what you were wearing yourself? >> it was the only option. >> david ignatius looks particularly happy. >> yeah. >> i don't know why we don't have calendars. >> there should be a foreign policy calendar. we could have david ignatius mr. june, henry kissinger in nothing but a santa claus hat for december. >> eat your yogurt, have some breakfast, please. >> so the polls of our, and
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they're fresh as the month of may. >> you'd think he'd get hit with the scandals. the new nbc news/wall street journal polls. just 10% of americans had a positive opinion of attorney general eric holder. half of all americans -- >> with numbers like that, eric should run for congress. he'd fit right in. >> he'd do better. >> a negative view of the irs, however, polls show that people don't hold the president personally responsible. his numbers are holding steady. 48% approve, 47% disapprove. >> how about that, he's holding steady. >> all of these controversies,
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people thought it would bring back the white house. personally it has not affected president obama because it has not led back to the white house specifically. >> and given the republicans and opportunity to handle something well and they overstepped again. >> you look at the numbers, alex, they don't hold the president personally accountable for these things yet. >> yeah, i mean, i think there's still a kind of discomfort with the government, which is i think the root of the problem for the administration, right? >> right. >> the irs has overstepped its bounds, it not well run, it's bloated, wasteful, it's maybe partisan. that's the most damning thing here. it's october, the aca rollout, it's another big government piece. while i don't think the public is holding the president accountable, whether that undermines the democratic project remains to be seen. look at congressional approval. that's detrimental to the country in the long run. >> and other questions from the
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poll, more people hope democrats will control congress after the 2014 election and most people favor the drone program by 50 points. >> i'm in the minority, david. americans are very clear eyed about what they are willing to do to stay safe. but these numbers are even more of a stretch than i expected. 66% to 16%. >> you'd have to say that the president, as he's tuning into "morning joe" this morning and hearing about these numbers probably is encouraged in the sense that the white house had feared that this climate of scandal, people really would begin to believe this is another watergate, this is coming at us from every direction. and these poll numbers show some erosion but not in the president's personal popularity, that for the average american he's still a likable guy.
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on drones the president has said he wants new rules for the use of drones but he's recognizing that this is a weapon that we have to be careful about. i think he's got some support there for both sides of that position. >> david, when you look at that number, i mean, what jumps off the page at least to me is not an approval of the drone program but just the idea ordinary americans look at the drone program and say to themselves i think this means fewer of our people dying on the ground. don't you think so? >> i do. i think the drone issue really for americans is a proxy of do we feel safe, do we feel we have weapons that can protect the country. these are the countries that took out core al qaeda, the people who took down those buildings on that terrible day that every american remembers. you have to balance against the numbers that we're looking at from america, numbers from around the world which tell us how unpopular they are. and a sensible country choose as
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course between what's popular domestically and what will pass muster internationally and that's the trick here. >> all right, moving on. the task of filling the late senator lautenberg's seat has turned into a battle. chris christie said the added cost of a separate vote is worth it. >> the cost associated with having a special primary and general election, in my mind, cannot be measured against the value of having an elected representative in the united states senate with so many consequential issues are being debated. >> that cost, by the way, a reported $24 million for a primary and general election. critics accuse the governor of wasting money in a play to try and keep his name off the same
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ballot as newark mayor democrat cory booker, who is likely running for senate. some of the reaction to christie's move has been pretty tough. an editorial in the "star ledger" called it a "shameless and self-serving stunt." the editorial board said it sounded "utterly hollow" and dick armey accused christie of da bi debilitating stability. >> they wanted him to just appoint a republican that could have gone through to 2014. hearing from the left because he called a special election and will be on the same ballot healing on in the fall. is governor christie that afraid
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of the vote? >> he could have held a special election, or he could have put it off and have it run at the same time until 2013 or the third most interesting option is to do it in november 2014, have a place holder until then. he would have had a lawsuit from democrats in the state. he ended up doing the one that will cost the state the most money, which is the special election, and he's taking a lot of heat obviously, not just for the cost but from republicans who wand him to have a place holder there for a longer period of time. cory booker would have brought out more democrats and that wouldn't have hurt christie necessary lip because he's got this big lead in the governor's race but it would have probably hurt down ballots new jersey republicans in the statehouse and he's trying to flip the state house as well.
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and christie said it was $25 million and he didn't want taxpayers to foot the bill. if he's on the record saying that, it's curious about why his position of the cost lcostlynes changed suddenly with respect to the senate elections. >> one month. we're talking about one month. >> $24 million. >> what's that? >> the cost of it. >> one month is going to cost $24 million. >> for the guy that said we're cutting these programs for low income, middle-income children and women, $24 million to have an election 20 days earlier seems maybe not to me the most fiscally prudent course of action. >> and he also said, mike barnicle, i don't care how much it costs. not a prudent thing to say. >> this makes no sense. makes no sense. if the potential for a national
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race has gotten him to the point of thinking if cory booker is on the ballot, my popularity is going to be 62% instead of 68%, that's -- >> he's 30 plus in the polls against his opponent. i think the issue is the down ballot races. you put a lot more people in trouble. >> isn't it also that christie wants to win by a gigantic margin to show he's a republican who can get huge numbers from both sides of the aisle? >> maybe but that seems so outlandish that i can't reconcile it. >> outlandish says the man who wear as plaid shirt on a calendar. >> i'm so distracted that i can't take him seriously. >> david ignatius, this just may be an example of a politician being too clever by half where he thinks the best way to help himself is holding this a month early. at the end of the day it might
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end up costing him more support, putting a $24 million bill on the people of new jersey for four weeks. >> nobody loves a thin man. this is the new chris christie's problem. >> wow. >> you know, the one thing that we haven't mentioned that occurs to me, joe, is that chris christie doesn't want to have to choose himself between different wings of the republican party. and if he had made the decision, if he'd appointed a senator to fill this term, this abbreviated term, he would have had to make that choice. now he ducks it. and i think that maybe that's a factor here, that he says to the voters you choose, you choose, i'm not going to intervene and he spares himself a politically awkward decision. >> i understand him, mike, saying what the voters choose but unless i'm misunderstanding something, we're talking about the difference in one month. let them choose when he's on the
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ballot, right? >> it goes against -- >> am i missing something here? >> no. >> is it too late to print the ballots? what's going on? >> it goes against everything he's tried to establish for himself as an image. i'm not your regular politician, i'm going to do what's best for the state, what's best for the people, except not on this one. it's potentially kind of damaging to him in the sense of what he's established as a reputation. >> mika, he's obviously a good friend of ours, a good friend of yours. we need to call him and see what's going on because i don't understand. >> i think it's worth talking about more. until we do, there's another governor in the news and it goes in the category of men saying incredibly stupid things. >> that's my category. >> i know. >> that's a big category. you know joe scarborough and the governor of mississippi -- >> you're not in this category. it's in the paul tudor jones
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category. and i -- i'm -- i'm -- i don't even know what to say. >> at least he's not an elected official. >> this person runs the state of mississippi. >> all right. >> fueling controversy about the role of mothers in the workplace. this governor blames them for america's education woes. mississippi governor phil bryant made this questionable remark yesterday at a "washington post" event. >> how did america get so mediocre? >> you want me to tell the truth and i tell the truth, you know, i think parents became -- both parents started working and a mom is in the workplace. it's not a bad thing. i'm going to get in trouble and i can see the e-mails tomorrow but now both parents are working, they're pursuing their careers, it's a great american story now that women are certainly in the workplace -- >> so it's the mother's place to teach them to read? >> no, no. but i think there was that loving, nurturing opportunity that both parents had a little
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bit of time. >> moments after those comments, he joked at his response provided backlash and that's what we're giving you now. he commended the advancement of women in the workplace. >> america's mediocre because both parents work? >> i like the question, willie. why do we suck was i think the question. >> that's a legitimate question. >> the most powerful country economically. >> well, if we do it would be because of the men who cannot handle women in the workplace and i think he might be one of them. seriously, that is what has really been revealed in this conversation over the past few weeks about women as bread winners and paul tudor jones and this governor is that women are bread winners and men can't handle it. they really don't know what to do with themselves. they've got nothing left. >> i got nothing.
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i got nothing at the table. >> and now it's being revealed and they can't handle it so it comes out in completely ridiculous, erratic, stupid conversations like this. >> and, you know, there's a social aspect we're touching on and there's the economic reality. most of the women in the workplace are there because of necessity. >> coming up best selling author mark bittman joins with us his new health plan that embraces the benefit of a vegan diet without giving up cheeseburgers for good. he explains why eating green before 6 p.m. helped him shed some pounds. and also, katrina joins the table. but first we'll checkin -- chec forecast. >> we found out the specifics on the tornado that struck oklahoma friday night. this is mind boggling. the area of white is the damaged
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path. it started here and made an unexpected turn to the right and then it made a turn to the left. right in here is where it was two and a half miles wide. as you're going out in your car today, use your odometer and see how wide two and a half miles is. it's crazy wide. it's one of the biggest, if not the widest tornado recorded in the world. that's the world. the other story today, 50% chance of development in the gulf of mexico, this has a 50% chance of becoming andrea in the next 48 hours. no matter what it's going to bring heavy rain to florida and eventually all the way up the east coast. be prepared for a very rainy friday in the northeast and thankfully we will not be tracking too many tornadoes. looks like just your garden variety storms, just the ones with hail and damaging wins. you're watching "morning joe." we're brewed by starbucks. ♪
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i am an american success story. i'm a teacher. i'm a firefighter. i'm a carpenter. i'm an accountant. a mechanical engineer. and i shop at walmart. truth is, over sixty percent of america shops at walmart every month. i find what i need, at a great price. and the money i save goes to important things. braces for my daughter. a little something for my son's college fund. when people look at me, i hope they see someone building a better life. vo: living better: that's the real walmart.
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how old is the oldest person you've known? we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us have known someone who's lived well into their 90s. and that's a great thing. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn't changed much is the official retirement age. ♪ the question is how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years. ♪
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this afternoon president obama is set to announce a big shake-up to his national security team. let's go to nbc news white house correspondent peter alexander with the latest on this. peter >> good to visit with you this morning. we're being told by white house officials at roughly 2:00 today
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the president will announce he's moves within the white house. the first move is that his national security adviser, tom donilon, is resigning, as you've been reporting. that means the president, we are being told will now make susan rice, the u.s. ambassador to the u.n., his national security adviser. that's significant for a variety of reason, not the least of which this requires no confirmation. for many republicans, including a gop strategist who told me this morning, this is a, quote, arrogant move, the president obviously feels rice has been vindicated as a result of the sort of relitigating of those benghazi talking points. and finally a senior administration official tells me that today the white house will -- the president will also announce samantha power, a long-time aide of the president as his new -- or as his nominee to become the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. power you may be familiar with. she hasn't been serving this
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president recently. in fact she's been home relaxing the last several months with her family. her name was controversial during the 2008 campaign. during that campaign she called hillary clinton a monster and as a result had to resign. the campaign at the time said she was not a paid staffer, but she is a long-time foreign policy expert, a pulitzer prize winning author as well. >> so, peter, let me ask you, how do you know what samantha has been doing at her home the last several months? and by relaxing, what do you mean by relaxing? does she have a pool? is she like chairman mao where she has a black phone by the pool? >> you're right. he said she has a 3-year-old child at home. i have a baby on the way, i'll find out soon. >> oh, congratulations! >> i don't know how this turned
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into that. >> it always turns into things that we don't expect. >> thank you very much. oh, he's having a baby! >> well, he's not having a baby. >> no, of course not. >> with us now, jeremy scahill, author of the book "dirty wars, the world is a battlefield" and co-writer and producer of the corresponding film. and also with us ka tretrina va heuvel. what do you think about the susan right nomination? chuck said rice is more of an interventionalist. >> an interventionalist? >> an interventionist more and thou -- than others. >> our foreign policy has been
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defined as a battle between liberal interventionists. people like samantha powers did support the war in iraq, which in my mind is one of the great disasters of american national security. >> and teamed up with the conservative interventionists, mccain and -- >> i think susan rice has not had a distinguished career. i think it's interesting because senator john kerry now, our secretary of state, has been working very hard, in my mind, to what is the only possible outcome to this humanitarian disaster in syria, which is a political, plocdiplomatic, not >> john kerry has been more of an interventionist too, hasn't he? >> he supported the war in iraq. he said the other day the united states has come plate to diplomacy, which was an implicit
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underreported rebuke to the obama administration. you will remember a real division in the carter division. can you see that twbl secretary of state kerry and susan rice. >> jeremy, all the lines have been blurred. you have samantha powers, john mccain, john kerry, susan rice. >> i was looking at the transcripts of the hearings that were held around clinton's 78-day bombing of yugoslavia in 1999. it was interesting, republicans, people like tom delay were raising objections to it and you had rise of what i call the cruise missile liberals and susan rice is a major player in that world, as is samantha powers. >> that is how the lines have been blurred. republicans used to be far more reticent of using force. i was against bosnia, against
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kosovo, said there had to be a better way of using our troops in a humanitarian crisis. >> if you put this in the context of president obama's recent speech, he's trying to have it both ways. he's going to continue the perpetual war, he bombs yemen and pakistan and then you have the appointment of these people very closely linked to that clintononian foreign policy. this is really how the democrats wage war. >> let me ask this, chairmjerem because i supported the iraq war at the beginning, it was a mistake. for a large part i've been a traditional republican realist, very critical of launching drones at countries we're not even at war with. you are share my concerns. look at these numbers, though, we, my friend, are in the minority.
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66% favor these drone strikes, only 16% oppose. >> that's because -- i mean, i think we have just rank intellectual dishonesty that is molded by partisanship in this country. president obama has sold liberals a bill of goods that it's a clean war. >> there's nothing clean about it. >> there's democratic hell fires and republican hell fires. when there are democratic hell fires, it's all good. >> it's kind of like the guys who flew over vietnam. that war was the clean war. you didn't see who died on the ground. >> the part of the problem in our media coverage are the euphemisms. i mean, "signature strikes," "collateral damage." i'd love to know how these questions are asked of americans. obviously people are war wary. they don't want troops on the ground and occupations. >> are you concerned about the drone strikes? >> of course i am. i'm concerned on many levels. i think it's a departure from
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constitutional principles in this country that can be secure and also abide by the rule of law. on a security level, these drone strikes are going to trigger a backlash. they're creating the extremists we claim to be fighting, the human cause. >> and in countries where we haven't even declared war or haven't even announced we're at war. >> with no capacity or ability to measure the collateral damage, in other words, civilian deaths. i would submit that the 66%, there's something else involved in that. a couple of things. one, we live in an age where fewer than 1% of american citizens have anything to do with the military other than reading about it. and, two, that question, no matter how it's posed, we have created over the last 15 years a video game mentality in this country about war. people think war is antiseptic. they see it on tv. they see it in movies. >> and, jeremy, people think and
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i've heard politicians say it, some democratic politicians i like and respect say this is a much cleaner war, that we can somehow do this without troops. as katrina says, listen, you water boarder terrorists, the two or three that we did, that's going to cause some problems. you drop a bomb on a home and you kill a 4-year-old daughter and my grandmother, you are my enemy for life and i'm going to spend the rest of my life trying to find people from your country that was responsible for that. that happens every day. >> the most egregious aspect of this every day has been the signature strikes where we're effectively iengaged in a sort f precrime, we're looking at patterns of life and targeting people whose identities we don't know and against whom we don't have actual evidence they're terror spots. >> we're targeting demographics. if you're a male between the
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ages of 18 and 35 and you are in the vicinity of a suspect, you are presumed guilty. and -- >> the term suspected militants. when president obama says people are inflating the number of civilian deaths and there on have been a small handful of civilian deaths in these drone administration, it's because they're classifying the people they've killed, whose identity they don't know in many cases, as having been al qaeda or militants. >> is the president changing? he said he was going to do the chang in policy but i'm skeptical. >> you know, the president, we've seen this time and time again, the disconnect between words and action. i think, and jeremy may disagree, we have divisions at the nation, he's our national security correspondent. i think he said some important things about ending this war, about but he's not taking that to congress with a piece of
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policy. we're not seeing the actions. the drone strikes continue. this country has departed from its constitutional principles i would argue six times in the course of its history. unless we find a way out of this endless war, we're going to see more and more of what jaeremy's brilliant book and movie describe, the secure costs. >> "dirty wars," tell me where we can see it. >> it opens this weekend in new york, l.a. and d.c., at lincoln plaza up town. you're in it, you and mika. you're committing the horrid sin of agreeing with me. >> is this the joe klein movement? >> no, no.
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>> could i just disagree? this is not about being a lefty. it's about being a citizen in america to stands for the rule of law. >> those crazies join my crazies. >> this is america's most fearless correspondent bringing us the front line news. >> by the way, i went up against you in times when bush was president, usual talking about it now when obama's president. congratulations. and i know and these democrats that are attacking you now when there's a republican president you're going after, you're going to have a lot more credibility. and then suddenly they'll love you again. >> i look forward to debating you the next time is republican is in often. >> i don't think that will happen. >> good luck with that. >> thank you, katrina. >> nice to see you. >> jeremy scahill, i'm not easily horrified. the book is "dirty wars: the war is a battlefield" and the corresponding film opens in select cities nationwide on friday. >> our next guest says eating
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vegan before 6:00 p.m. can dramatically improve your health. the science behind the new diet plan by food writer mark bittman. we'll be right back. ♪ that i'm older, my heart mine was earned in djibouti, africa. 2004.
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your children's health can affect their gpa. yes, exercise and education go hand in hand. so make sure your kids are active 60 minutes every day. you'll help them feel good and even perform better in school. the more you know. ♪ ♪ >> when you come to my house and i cook for you. >> okay. >> yeah, that might be a
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problem. >> what's problem? i'm the best cook in the family. tell him. >> oh, i did, didn't i? >> twice. >> it's just -- >> yeah? >> ian is a vegetarian. he doesn't eat meat. >> he don't eat no meat? >> no. he doesn't eat meat. >> la do you me-- what do you m don't eat no meat? >> oh, that's okay, that's okay, i make lamb. >> that was the scene from the movie "my big fat greek wedding," i like that movie, with its take on vegetarianism. joining us food columnist from the "new york times" mark bittman, the author of "vb6" eat
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ve vegan before 6:00. >> the science says we need to eat more plants than everything else. so what's the strategy for doing this? mine was and i've been doing this for six years and it works. that is eat plants, fruits, vegetables, legumes and such during the day and at 6:00 do whatever you want. and why before 6:00? because at night many of us like to put a cap on things, sit back, relax, have a glass of wine, eat some meat and let the rules go. it's a strategy for doing what the science says we ought to be doing here. >> this is pretty basic. >> it's totally basic. >> is there a physical thing or a mental -- >> it's not a physical thing. many people will say to you it's counterproductive to eat your biggest meal late in the day. >> that's what i would think. >> you hear that.
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the fact is if i say to you drink wine and eat steak at 6:00 in the morning or 8:00 in the morning, you're not going to have a very productive day. the reality is we like to hang out at night. that's how much we live. we go out at night or stay home at night but we relax and eat what we want to eat, we don't want it be bound by rules. to me it's a very pragmatic strategy. >> at my house we wake up at like 3:00 in the morning and we walk around drooling. >> you guys are different. >> and tired. >> but most people do go out -- >> morning talk show hosts a weird breed. >> oh, yeah. >> but if you can go through 6:00 basically eating fruits, vegetables, nuts, chances are good -- >> what you've done is changed two-thirds of your -- as we were talking about before, you've changed two-thirds of your habits. you've stayed away from the stuff that we know what -- the reason these principles are so straight forward is because we know what the rules ought to be.
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>> is there any evidence that being vegan improves your health and your life expectancy? you always see these crazy studies -- salt, put on as much salt as you want, it doesn't make a damn bit of difference. >> that isn't quite what it says. >> you always get these things that blow apart 50 years of studies. what do we know about being vegan? >> we know vegetarians and vegans have longer life expectancy than meat eaters but we can't say that conclusively. but what you can say is a lot of meat and junk food aren't good for you and eating fruits and vegetables are better for you. >> some people need a structure, a realistic one to live by, and this is. >> the science says eat more
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plants and vegetables. the processed food, the junk food, that's what is really killing people. the science says eat more plants. there are many strategies. there are many strategies but this is a strategy that's worked for other people and can work for others as well. >> tell me your diet for today. >> i got up early and ran actually. >> never mind, we can't relate. >> i had a salad for breakfast. we had a friend stay over and sheep said she said i love this savory morning kind of thing but clearly the dominant culture is sweet, it's oatmeal with maple syrup or whatever. for lunch i have rice and beans or a salad at work or stir fry if i'm at home like that and then dinner, dinner is whatever. >> the work is "vb6, eat vegan
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before 6:00 and restore your health." up next, the newest member of the "squawk on the street" team kelly evans. [ both ] we're foodies.
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[ both laughing ] but our plants were starving. [ man ] we love to eat. we just didn't know that our plants did, too. then we started using miracle-gro liquafeed every two weeks. now our plants get the food they need while we water. dinner's ready. come and get it. no one goes hungry in this house. so they're bigger, healthier, and more beautiful. guaranteed. with miracle-gro anyone can have a green thumb. and a second helping. [ both laughing ] when you feed your plants... everyone grows with miracle-gro. everyone grows uh-oguess what day it is!is?? huh...anybody? julie! hey...guess what day it is?? ah come on, i know you can hear me. mike mike mike mike mike... what day is it mike? ha ha ha ha ha ha! leslie, guess what today is?
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it's hump day. whoot whoot! ronny, how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? i'd say happier than a camel on wednesday. hump day!!! yay!! get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more.
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46 past the hour. >> it's time for business before the bell with cnbc's kelly evans. kelly, new job indicators are out this morning. what's it looking like? >> good morning. i wish i could bring you a little bit better news. it's not terrible. this is the private sector employment. it often comes out before the big kahouna. it's not a disaster, 135,000. but we're looking for something
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around 165,000. we're looking at a labor market that's okay and we know new claims for unemployment benefits have been falling, but these aren't yet the strong enough numbers that are going to give people real confidence in the u.s. labor market. by the way, this is going to be the complicated thing for the federal reserve to handle now. if it's not strong enough for them to leave the market entirely, what more can they do to g to that point where the chi isn't getting enough traction? >> and we have apple news out today? >> did you see this? this came out yesterday, took people a little bit by surprised. we were all focused on this e book dispute with apple, nobody was paying attention to this issue with samsung. these two companies have been back and forth, accusing each other of violating each other's patents. but samsung was able to say apple infringed its patent. the supply to older model iphones, not the latest ones. but if the appeals court holds
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this with this ruling, it could be a big problem for apple, guys. >> i have yet to try the samsung. >> how much better is she than brian sullivan? she doesn't like flap her wings like a bird or prance like brian -- >> i hope brian hasn't been prancercizing, guys. >> that's an image -- oh, just got a little sick myself. >> thanks very much. >> things get a little testy between the news anchor and meteorologist. we'll talk about that next. i'm the next american success story. working for a company
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where over seventy-five percents hourly associates. there's opportunity here. i can use walmart's education benefits to get a degree, maybe work in it, or be an engineer, helping walmart conserve energy. even today, when our store does well, i earn quarterly bonuses. when
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people look at me, i hope they see someone working their way up. vo: opportunity, that's the real walmart.
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oh, yeah, it's time. let's do it. >> let's do a little news you can't use. it's so important in television, cat chemistry. >> we're family and you can tell it right away. it's people, you like 'em or you don't like 'em. >> we like to highlight good tv. >> when we started this show, what did i do? i went over and i organized your closet.
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i did. >> i almost got a restraining order but that's okay. >> put all my accessories in one place. >> down in philly they have the kind of chemistry you just can't teach between the anchor and the weather woman. >> cheryl, i understand you have some good news and possibly a halo behind you. >> possibly a halo? >> it always comes into question whether it's you or the halo. >> isn't it odd i'm the one always carrying this halo around? thanks for the hard to get applause from nicole. >> how's that, carol? is that good enough for you? >> it's just wonderful. >> lovely like you is how would i describe it. >> nicole, did you notice? >> i didn't see anything. >> you didn't call any attention to it? >> i didn't call attention because it's been manufactured. >> that's just a small snippet
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i'm going to ask you to go online and watch. >> you can't bottle that. >> they tweeted out a picture "wake up with us" on cbs. "how gorgeous is carol" they said about it. they're trying to mend fences. >> i didn't know mila kuhnis was so nasty. >> what a local young talent you are. ♪ where i come from nobody ever works, hang five, well hang five ♪
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here's a look at your business travel forecast. we are watching thunderstorms in oklahoma and kansas. still another beautiful day in the northeast and we're dry as can be everywhere on the west coast. starting to get a little hot in a few spots like arizona and texas. temperatures in the 90s and 100s. enjoy. you must be garth's father? hello. mother. mother! traveling is easy with the venture card because you can fly any airline anytime. two words. double miles! this guy can act. wanna play dodge rock? oh, you guys! and with double miles you can actually use, you never miss the fun. beard growing contest and go! ♪ i win! what's in your wallet? since aflac is helping with his expenses while he can't work, he can focus on his recovery. he doesn't have to worry so much about his mortgage, groceries, or even gas bills. kick! kick... feel it! feel it! feel it! nice work! ♪
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♪ shine bright like a diamond, shine bright like a diamond ♪ fine light in the beautiful city, just be happy you and i ♪ you and i, you and i, we're like diamonds in the sky ♪ >> welcome back to "morning joe." we learned today -- >> that was fun last night. >> that was a lot of fun. >> michelle smith had a fund-raiser. we co-hosted it

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