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tv   Russia Today Programming  RT  August 30, 2017 8:00am-10:01am EDT

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no. it does look because did it because it didn't seem quite real cultural if you will be. to.
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in syria the u.s. led coalition has exchanged fire with turkish backed rebels near the city of my own beach as the interests of nato allies in the country clash. after being saved from islamic state all funds in iraq are still in search of a normal childhood. for abuse for profit q. four zero. danger of the children but it's. also the german foreign minister says it's time to kick america's nuclear weapons comes of his country the topics one of a number of issues that have occurred in the run up to the general election. not one of america's top universities which prides itself on its work with the indigenous community is refusing to budge as a native american tribe claims compass tom.
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thank you for watching r.t. international coming to you live from moscow with the news headlines and kate. the u.s. led coalition has confirmed to r.t. that its forces exchanged fire with turkish backed rebels near the syrian city of man beach artie's jacqueline virga explains how events unfolded. has found itself between a rock and a hard place in syria namely between kurdish and turkish forces both of whom are supposed to be american allies but consider one another and to me it seems tensions are on the rise with a coalition spokesperson revealing that u.s. backed forces exchanged fire with pro turkish rebels not once but several times in recent weeks when patrolling areas held by the forces turkey supports. patrols that have been conducting patrols in the area to keep tensions down received multiple times over the course of the last two weeks now the u.s.
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has told turkey to pass on to the rebels they support that firing on u.s. led coalition forces is quote not acceptable adding that patrols will continue and warning that coalition forces are always prepared and ready to defend themselves if need be which is not exactly the kind of dialogue you'd expect between two major powers meant to be important friends and allies but the reality of the situation is that northern syria is now a metaphorical minefield of possible clashes with conflicting alliances that could unravel at the slightest misstep. turkey remains a nato ally and an important part partner in the fight against dash we expect both those relationships those multilateral
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a shift to continue. going to continue to work with the white b.g. as a part of. syrian democratic forces. merica i told you many times you either side with us or those terrorist organizations you haven't had a good growth them and that's why the region is turned into the sea. up till now america has more or less managed to navigate the murky waters between the turks and kurds even deploying a number of troops to northern syria months ago with the specific task to turn the two parties from attacking one another but that effort has met with little success leaving few surprised in the wake of these recent skirmishes and fact conflicts like this one how little a long time coming if it's and then american military advisors go to our forces
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would not kid american. whether kerry's out there. by accident if you rockets can hit them about the u.s. was of course never invited into syria but rushed in anyway perhaps without fully understanding the lay of the land. now washington finds itself trying to keep peace between its own partners all the while distracting from the real enemy at hand i still just r.t. washington d.c. and the battle to force eyes so from war torn iraq has devastated civilian lives in parts of the country in particular more than five million children are said to be in desperate need of help from what i guess the of takes a look at the problems these youngsters face in their struggle for life. these children have seen more bloodshed and agony than most adults will in a lifetime nearly ninety percent of children have lost a member of
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a family either they were kidnapped or killed and when they were escaping from the fight many of them have lost family members they were shot at from behind or when they were falling on booby traps it has been a horrible experience. so this helicopter flies around. dropping down on the floor and i'm crying some of them my some of them feel when they see for a mess some of them feel when the ceiling you know the people that they are not comfortable with some of them shut up and say no what for quite a long time until they could act what opened up definitely they call the extreme distress and also physically unfortunately many of them are wounded. many of the hospitals we visit come from that. the biggest number of civilians they have in
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the hospitals and children traumatised in mind and body but alive lucky by local standards though let's be frank stuck in orphanages and refugee camps in iraq in june believe given the sheer magnitude of the problem thousands and thousands of orphans and little. do you believe you can adequately help them we are helping those sold and we see certainly we don't have enough resources the children are almost everywhere but ultimately the support comes from family from government and the extended family that once we connect children. everybody scheme to receive them and the support that the problem is makes. the connection at all of these orphans iraq so many a foreign children of isis fighters now learn how busy it is much better
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a foreign children were reunited with their families they will have problems here with documents in schools with health care they need their families love problems is putting it lightly in iraq tribal culture venerates blood feuds and revenge isis harmed millions there are those who would use these children who hate them for what their parents did. vulnerable for all abuse they are vulnerable for trafficking or for. any danger that children exposed to in today's technology any. bad group. could get those children and harmed them some of these lost children a raped their assaulted abused and abandoned killed for their organs hated for the sins of their fathers the un and you do what they can to protect them but
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there are too many getting them out is a reward unto itself. for . we helped identify and reunite a number of the shoulder yet it isn't straightforward uni set for example once these kids identities protected fearing stigma or exploitation we know we tell our children. if we do not allow the children to talk to normalize tensions that we do not know how do we think of a law. that have gone. price is. to expose him to a big comedy it's a choice you can show their faces for everyone to see and let their relatives
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recognize them or pray that they find themselves one desperate young refugees among the rocks millions more i guess due. for many be iraq. germany's foreign minister has said he'd like to see american nuclear weapons removed from his country signaling gabriele made the statement during a visit to washington where he met his u.s. counterpart rex tillerson speech all of a small but we saw on this visit this official visit to the united states. was right at the very end he came out and he said that he would fully support what martin shultz has said in the past that u.s. nuclear weapons it's time to open dialogue about getting them off german soil of course i'm convinced that we need to finally start talking about arms control and disarmament once again in this regard i agree with mr shultz is point that we need to get rid of the nuclear weapons the distinction that our country. well it's
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understood that there are around twenty u.s. nuclear warheads in germany based in the southwest of the country and just last week the s.p.d. candidate for chancellor martin shultz the former european parliament president of course was down in turkey have it right in the southwest of the country giving a speech about how it was time to get rid of these nuclear weapons we can hear what he had to say right now. i would. dream of the nuclear weapons currently stationed in germany well it's real has said on defense in the past that the us is demands for a two percent of g.d.p. payment by all nato members was unrealistic for germany and it does seem that along with martin schultz they're pushing this no to nukes policy really because it's one of the few ones that they can really go with the german chancellor on the
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s.p. day the closest rivals to angola merkel currently trailed by around fourteen points if you look at the latest opinion polls in nuclear weapons is really the only position that they can attack angela merkel on the german chancellor is accused in some circles here in germany of following the american line far too closely particularly when it comes to nuclear weapons and the esprit de want to set themselves aside in doing so they've got to put themselves in line with. the party of peace really how they're going to try and market themselves with just under a month to go before the german parliamentary elections take place here they're really far behind they're going to have to push very hard over the coming weeks if they're going to try and topple angela merkel from her position as german chancellor. after the break we'll tell you why one of america's elite colleges is not to bring a native american tribe. what
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politicians do something to. put themselves on the line to get accepted or rejected . so when you want to be president. or somehow want to be rich. but you'd like to be close to see what the forty three of them all can't be good. interested always in the waters. there should be. some seemed wrong but i. just don't all. get to shape out just to become educated and engaged because betrayal.
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when so many find themselves worlds apart we choose to look for common ground. i was. welcome back brown university a member of america's elite i really group of universities and colleges have long made fixing historical injustice one of its key priorities. people took things that hold. the mission that they were taking the
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communities they were taking. now we are different hear her speak how we use our fears our first fears so how both sides are lead in the dark there. but now the university is on the defensive ofter native american tribes set up a protest camp on his premises it insists the land of starting from them hundreds of years ago and now they want it back we've done everything possible by lower to engage the powers that be in this state and it's like we're just an invisible invisible tribe we don't exist this was our principal village and we want this here repatriated back to our charge so our spiritual high ground is a here and hopefully. these things will come to us. well brown claims to
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have warm relations with local indigenous tribes did host annual meetings to raise awareness about minority group issues and it made headlines after renaming a federal holiday from columbus day to indigenous peoples day last year however when it comes to the tribes demands the university is refusing to budge the block and not a tribe is not recognized by the federal government or more importantly by the other federally recognized indigenous communities there is an important technical difference between holding need of ancestry and holding nation status and that is at the heart of the issue here. well encampment has already been on the county hospitals in a week the tribe insisted staying there and he's also taking the case to court the co-founder of the code pink activist group thinks the dispute shows the university's progressive talk is just a facade talk is cheap it certainly is the in thing now or corporations university. sports associations to
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talk that talk about how progressive they are to the language. but when the call is for land to be given back or for reparations to be made for slavery or anything that involves actual financial restitution that's where you're out of the line. now the mayor thirty is now urging a halt to the upcoming rightwing free speech week in the city may result in even more violence to right wing rallies we counseled over the weekend reviving calls to impose legal regulations to control hate speech and as rhetoric on both the minds of the country's political debate escalates it's not clear who's going to be affected samir khan records. banning or canceling right wing to rallies and even events featuring conservative speakers has become pretty commonplace within the past few months here in the u.s.
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. and you know as well as i do that they have a message that we don't believe in the message of hate most recently organizers were compelled to cancel two rallies one in san francisco and the other in berkeley i left has made another appearance in berkeley california a planned anti marxism rally on sunday was canceled because of fears of west wing violence those fears turned out to be justified. but oh no. it doesn't work in space said earlier this. month the free speech rally in boston was labeled a white nationalist gathering despite denials by the event organizers we don't need to say but my message is clear to this group we don't want you in washington we don't want you in boston common now with hate speech accusations being thrown around the us remains the only modern democracy in the world without a legal definition of hate speech resulting essentially in the term coming to me i
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don't agree with the speech oh. oh oh so where do we draw the line and if the us does eventually take a legal stand against hate speech would it not strike those accusing others of being what's. the idea of hate speech being something legally outlawed has been rejected by the supreme court it is rejected by all kinds of precedent but it reflects an underlying bad idea which is the idea that we should try to respond to words with force that's what hate speech law would be would be that this person said something we disagree with so we're going to use force to shut them up the war of rhetoric will only escalate as both sides will defend their right to free expression but also use hate speech as an excuse to shut down the other side of the spectrum. samir han r. t.
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washington d.c. . now and i'm passengers have been left terrified after their plane past three tornadoes as they prepared to land in sochi but it shows the flight coming into the southern russian seaside resort which is notorious for its unpredictable weather the pilots managed to land safely though it was an unknowing experience with two responding and now that nine tornadoes on the same day around a dozen flights were delayed or diverted. me model report by swedish police has revealed that in less than two years there's been a dramatic increase in so-called no go zones across the country. the number of what swedish officials call vulnerable areas has now reached sixty one and according to the same with ports up to five thousand criminals are believed to be living in them making up some of the two hundred criminal networks currently active there all the problems in all the districts which are have any populated by migrants remain the
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same. they sell drugs openly they carry weapons i have heard that there are so many weapons in kissed that they could take over accused in a few hours. there has been quite a lot of shooting very brutal mistreatment of entrepreneurs' a lot of property. that.
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you need to make clear shift in direction we cannot continue in this direction ten more years to say didn't used to do more we need to do more we need to focus on these areas here the problem is that cultural differences and that these immigrants who come to sweden to not want to integrate or soft and don't want to integrate we see this in in is physically many of the european countries where they have taken a lot of immigrants we don't see it in for example poland or hungary but in. germany in this country where i live in denmark we also have not in copenhagen for example and in sweden also so especially in the places where they have taken in another a lot of immigrants we see these problems also in france and belgium and in sweden
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government people didn't want to admit that this is actually of property so they were did don't want to mention. no go some said as no cold symptoms. dozens of taken to the streets of paris to protest against president emanuel calls new labor lol which will make it easier for companies to hire and file workers details of the law to be repealed or critics some might call as representing the interests of big business while others aren't happy about the number of inexperienced new faces in his government ranging from millionaires to unpick medalists. ski was at wednesday's until government protest in paris. the demonstrators have come out again in france to show how i happy they are with a manual that one's plans reform all the working code they have been charging that they will resist those with the intent to which we do to find out in france oh and
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thursday they have to squire i'm on your mark on this being a man who not only supports business i once took on the rights of workers this is what people have been saying to us said that keeping small talk is a tax work in the workers who are against it because as it has no a share now we can share the work. represents the big bosses and those who want to come public services social protections and everything achieved by workers i don't agree with that so. it's about ideology to be able to sound quirk is more easily in stop work in fact he wants to get rid of employee protections all. it's a big attack of the hierarchy corporate deals will now take over those are some of the reasons why the demonstrators here feel so passionately against these reforms to the working code but not everybody is unhappy with the violence to reform the
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working code here in france forms that suggest it will mean that the is one have more ability to hire and fire people to negotiate over salary in terms of additional hours that people work and that's why the head of the employers' federation has actually come out not just in support of this reform but is actually a manual match point to go all in when he introduces that working reform some people have described this as being a bellwether for my presidency because this is his first major attempt to pass a big piece of legislation here in france but recesses have failed so means you see with the call will be able despite his continuing plunging popularity in the public in the polls to be able to push this reform through and to appease the french people charlotte devinsky all tea parties meanwhile we have some breaking news this
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hour russian journalist aleko batterer has been kidnapped by an unknown group of people outside her home in the ukrainian capital of kiev the abductions being reported by russia's china one t.v. station worker most of it works she's been doing news reports on ukraine and the channel and she had received threats about her work channel officials also claim that ukrainian security services might be behind the kidnapping about her also reportedly been added to a public blacklist on peacekeeper that's a ukrainian nationalist website which accused her of biased reporting and anti ukrainian propaganda will bring you more news on this story as we get. and i'm about the news headlines. the two thousand and eight economic crisis turns some countries into paid these are the countries with weaker economies that needed austerity policies if you are in
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a situation of flow bloat even the recession austerity is a very bad idea it doesn't work it makes millions of people very unhappy those who are unemployed see their wages decline almost a decade how good are the results. of these will by the people. in which the wider world get people to see what i. believe will be she. mean to for legal. challenge must. be something. while the same mission is still in place who one of the consequences is to weaken blue bird flu disputable who will first be one of those loosely truth be considered is the consequences are actually quite acceptable to the decision maker.
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best guys are financial survive until they say that the relatives could take it easy this is a central plank so for dying at the moment i don't call them right now so stop to. call the future we don't go. everywhere the world should experience. and you. will. according to. their.
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timeline see france is broadcasting around the world from washington d.c. tonight cryptocurrency is just keep on climbing bitcoin heads above forty seven hundred this comes as countries scramble to build regulations around it and the block chain in general also consumer spending is up but the numbers are shaky we take a look at what's contributing to this also my guest former u.s. trading commissioner bart chilton is with us to explain the damage hurricane harvey has caused on the oil and gas industry and on your wallet stand by it starts right now. the prospects of a u.s. rate hike dimming the euro soared to one dollar twenty cents for the first time
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since january two thousand and fifteen following hurricane harvey in texas most analysts assume the federal reserve will delayed major changes on top of that frequent confrontations with north korea have left the markets nervous as a result the euro has made some pretty big gains in two thousand and seventeen it rose nearly fifteen percent against the dollar monday's extended gains following last week's surge after european central bank president mario draghi speech at the jackson hole summit it also jumped after a fed chair janet yellen spoke at that same conference but made no mention of monetary policy. and across the global exchanges big coin is trade. at its highest level ever at four thousand seven hundred three dollars and twenty one cents big coin split back in august first but then it hit a high of four thousand five hundred twenty two on the eighteenth the crypto currency is up now three hundred fifty percent from roughly one thousand dollars on january first also of note is a light point it has reached
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a record high of nearly sixty five dollars a thirty six percent rise it holds the fifth spot worldwide with a market capitalization of just under three billion dollars according to coin market cap dot com that is now it rallied fourteen hundred percent since the start of the year when it traded at around four dollars thirty three cents vigorous trading in the last twenty four hours was seed in south korea which has a soft spot for light coins a warning though that country is set to see massive regulatory adjustments to crypto currencies which could change the landscape there for like coin that cited as a major reason for the dramatic upswing in crypto currency asset classes as a whole. consumer confidence numbers were released and the conference board numbers saw a rise of one twenty two point nine higher than one twenty in july which was surprising to some economists that predicted
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a drop the university of michigan also saw an increase with consumer sentiment up to ninety seven point six from ninety three point four but a drop in how consumers feel about the current economic conditions from one thirteen down to one eleven let's bring in danielle de martino both president of money strong and author of fed up an insider's take on why the federal reserve is bad for america look if we go up these numbers alone what does that tell us about how consumers as a whole feel about our current economic situation well currently there are good and i have to tell you. i can't take credit for this one of my buddies is an economist mentioned to me the fact that there right now americans are feeling really. arctic for the first time in the better part of a decade and you know what that thought had not occurred to me that why all this saber rattling and especially with what we saw with north korea flying an actual missile over japan why this wouldn't be polling down consumer confidence and his
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reaction which makes perfect sense is that americans are really feeling their patriotism right now i would warn you though that this will not be very long lived ok well let's take a look at some numbers we've got a graph here which shows you're sixteen years worth of consumer confidence levels why do we still see numbers so high even though we haven't really seen any major financial legislation pushed from the current administration you point to patriotism but do we see anything else he's well remember about a third of americans are still very much in favor of trump being in office that's not a small number and then when you tack on the twenty percent of americans who have benefited from the fact that the stock market remains near record highs you're talking about a good chunk of the population here who has yet to see a dent in their four a one k. statement and who still remains hopeful that the president's going to be able to push through legislation i for one have my doubts and they're increasing by the day especially as we see the distractions for the current administration begin to
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multiply ok let's talk about some sales numbers we seem to keep seeing these high confidence numbers but also against the backdrop of being box store retailers macy's sears stores closing down their stores are we seeing customers just have stronger faith in spending elsewhere are they becoming more discerning where they spend their money price comparisons trying to save what do you think this is well i think you hit on both of the factors that are driving what's going on here and look it is not it is not a feel good situation to see these stores closing down and the more stores that we see closing down my mother just meant. if you days ago my gosh i'm worried that my local mall has a sears and amazing it will start to chip away at consumer confidence but by the same token you hit the other major factor that's driving confidence and that's that they are able to exert their own pricing power by switching to e-commerce where
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we've obviously seen seen sales rise much more appreciably grow much more strongly ok but there's lots of oil refineries we need to talk about in the gulf texas we look at at this chart right here we can see west texas intermediate benchmark starting off strong and sinking in the week leading up to hurricane harvey we're still seeing massive fallout from that what kind of effect could this hurricane recovery do to consumer confidence in the long term if we account for not just dropping oil prices for something like home repairs there's tens of millions of dollars that are going to go into i'm sorry millions billions they're going to go into cleaning up the mess this size. the one factor that's missing and that huge way i mean that's going to be suffered upon consumer confidence and what economists will tell you is the very first thing to make households turn on a dime on confidence is rising gasoline prices now as it pertains specifically to the houston area it will be
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a double economic quickly if oil prices stay low on the one hand which is going to keep people out of work it's going to keep those refinery shut down it will be a drag on the fourth largest economy in the country but by the same token the entire nation feels that gasoline prices prices at the pump rise by thirty forty cents a gallon this could. we could potentially for this current cycle be seeing the peak in household consumer confidence and we've got analysts pointing to the effects of this hurricane as you as you mentioned some of the refineries closing down the platforms have been evacuated refineries closed down supply lines many of them wiped out still trying to analyze that situation and a lot of analysts are saying look the dominoes are just beginning to fall are you keeping your eye on the fall out of the situation as we hear the hurricane maybe you know winding up off of off the coast and coming back in. absolutely look this this is unprecedented i don't know that this is katrina because new orleans is not
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near the economic powerhouse that houston is nor does it have the same impact on the energy industry linsey i don't think anybody can make any sort of a determination at this point about what the potential ramifications were are going to be i saw a statistic earlier today that said ten to fifteen percent of homeowners in use didn't have flood insurance you're talking about a ton of devastation it's not that these repairs aren't going to happen in the coming years but what about so many millions of households who could potentially be deeply harmed by this situation and not have the financial wherewithal to simply not have the money to repair their homes that they need that it's a terrifying and catastrophic situation they're dealing with down there let's talk about the month of september which we are heading right into we're talking raising the debt ceiling with the potential government shutdown on the horizon mitch mcconnell even said quote there is zero chance no chance we will not raise the debt ceiling and quote if numbers aren't wavering now what kind of
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a drop can we see once these talks begin just real quick before we go well i think that there's a lot of vulnerability right now to any kind of a shock talk about cruising into the eye of the storm in the month of september if there's any kind of a wavering at all i would say that the markets right now are highly highly vulnerable to any kind of doubt that enters into these discussions will be will all be on red alert in the weeks to come that's absolutely right when congress goes back to school on capitol hill thank you so much danielle de martino president of money strong an author fed up an insider's take on why the federal reserve is bad for america thank you. over the past few decades the cost of higher education in the u.s. has skyrocketed along with that came a jump in student loan debt which just reached yet another all time high. has more on that for us now what's the average number. loans americans have now well to be exact the average american has three point seven loans so on average anywhere from
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three to four compared to ten years ago that number was two point four percent the student loan balance in the u.s. has changed a lot over the past decade according to the latest data we have hit the one point four trillion dollar mark up more than eight hundred billion dollars from two thousand and seven and currently the average american has a total of thirty four thousand one hundred forty four dollars in student debt that's a sixty two percent increase from ten years ago and that's not all a report from the consumer financial protection bureau shows that the number of borrowers with over fifty thousand dollars of debt has tripled during that same period and while members of every generation deal with it it's generation y. or the millennial that have taken out the most the average millennial has four point four loans more than both their parents' and grandparents' generation z. notably has less than that but that's because some of them haven't even started their freshman year yet and what's more interesting is that members of generation
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x. the highest average balance at almost forty thousand dollars meanwhile the average less than thirty four thousand dollars regardless of those difference is going to college has become one of the biggest expenses we make next to buying a house but the growing balance of student debt has hampered the ability to do that across the country in fact the u.s. home ownership rate sits at sixty three point seven percent down from sixty eight point four percent in two thousand and seven and to make matters worse the housing market hasn't adjusted to the rise in debt that young americans are taking on and neither have we. you know it's down by even a sixty eight point four percent back in two thousand and seven was an impressive zero home ownership for upwardly mobile adults let's talk more about these home prices though how do they play into this debt problem so they're not exact. connected to student debt but they do kind of depend on each other obviously with more americans taking out more student debt and having more or bigger balances it
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makes it harder to save for a down payment to buy a home that's why we're seeing one a decrease in the homeownership rate but also an increase in the rental rate and of course rent prices that goes along with that. and on top of that the housing issue wages have not kept up and in in fact in sixteen of the twenty biggest metro areas in the u.s. housing prices grew twice as fast as wages in those metro areas so when you combine student debt with stagnant wages it becomes almost impossible to really buy a home unless of course you live in an affordable area in the u.s. we can make a good info graphic of that and put it on we'll do a whole segment of that to find where those are in the united states because we're all on the hunt for those because it's exorbitant now a lot of the focus here is on the debt millennial specifically hold how does that affect other generations so you know every single generation has taken out some
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amount of student debt obviously taken out the most but because we're taking out more loans they need cosigners on these exorbitant amounts that they're taking out right means their parents and in some cases their grandparents are cosigning these loans so it's not just a millennial is that i've been hampered down and one hundred thousand dollars of debt when they graduate it's going to their parents and their grandparents accounts so that affects them not only because they're taking out for their kids or their grandkids on top of the debt that they might have so it's really an interconnected problem it's not just a separate one you'll have it worse than the older generations haven't suffered as much as a problem that affects everyone it's a family affair thank you very much. time now for a quick break but stick around because when we return u.s. visa holders seeking green cards based on employment are set to face mandatory in person interviews and my. guest fills us in on how the oil and gas industry is tearing in the gulf after hurricane harvey we go to break here are the numbers
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because. welcome to the wonderful world of blood donation i come here every three weeks to get my transfusion to be specific i receive in. my body gets and some bodies that i cannot produce itself around the world giving blood is seen as a symbol of generosity and does this because it helps people it's one of the side effects is that it. applies more. to put money on your car i'm really you know we don't have all plasma based drugs today come from
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private companies and are produced from paid. small conference in rome or a car from. one of the risks of a donation. then is proof that the frequency of pathologies is much higher paid in it. if i was. over two years old he will go in the money using the drug and who runs the blood business. to a public well. when the ruling classes protect themselves. with the fines.
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we can all. see. bustle in the dubrovnik in venice our little six travel destinations so it must be nice to live or is it. crowds of tourists disrupt the city's economic and social life to live for us on the slash and get out of the traditional story. as. a school but. while the city has tried desperately not to collapse. the profit of. the supper will probably be global in the coffee cup the economy in the bush was up. to me about. it.
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is a tourist phobia feel for them to own identity. starting on october first a visa holder seeking u.s. green card based on employment will be required to undergo in person interviews with u.s. citizenship and immigration services the same goes for visa holders who are relatives of refugees or asylum seekers it's all part of president extreme vetting plan for immigrants the interview has largely been waived for employment based card seekers because of the backlog it creates in processing and the strain it puts on resources such as personnel u.s. citizenship and immigration services says the agency will expand these cars. green card seekers requiring an interview on an incremental basis.
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homeowners hit by hurricane harvey in the gulf coast are racing against the clock to file insurance claims current texas insurance code gives claimants eighteen percent interest if their insurance company pays late pays too low or doesn't pay at all but house bill seven hundred seventy four changes that starting september first penalties for insurance companies will be reduced and climate lawyers will face stiffer requirements to file suit supporters say it will help shut out for the us lawsuits but opponents say it allows insurance companies a cheaper way to act in bad faith but that's just homeowners insurance flood insurance is another issue in harris county texas which includes houston fifteen percent of homes habit in two thousand and five hurricane katrina half of homes were covered by flood insurance people without coverage will have to apply for grants or low cost loans from other branches of the federal government homeowners in high risk flood zones are required to pay into the national flood insurance
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program but it can be hard to track if they're actually obeying that directive and premiums can be very expensive also those zones deemed high risk are growing fast hurricane hurricanes katrina and sandy lead to claims of nearly twenty five billion dollars this left the national flood insurance program in debt by twenty three billion dollars to the u.s. treasury grants and low interest loans could be the only way out for those without flood coverage. and the storm is also giving ramifications reciprocal ramifications and worries for fuel costs as the oil coast as it's called produces and refined oil into gasoline a huge chunk of it for the united states gasoline prices have surged more than four cents nationwide as a result former u.s. trading commissioner chilton says we can expect more at the same time price gougers are out there in the imp. acted area we're seeing some dirty stories out there there are oil prices going down gasoline prices have gone up what's happening in
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oil and gas markets well i mean this fifteen percent of the refining capability is gone offline that's two point five million barrels a day lynsey and there are some concerns that it could go high as thirty percent with the storm coming back around and port arthur in parts of louisiana so with that reduced refining capability refining capability it means that the actual crude oil is sitting there and growing a surplus and with that surplus comes lower prices so we saw on the new york mercantile exchange prices of west texas intermediate which is the u.s. benchmark go down to a five week low forty six forty four now at the same time we've got the gas the they need more of that right and so that's in you know tight supply or tighter supply and that's why we've seen a two year high in wholesale gasoline prices to
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a dollar seventy six a gallon for the rest of us that prices that prices are also going up there are two dollars and thirty seven cents on average right now so that's sort of the market dynamics on the stock market side some oil companies are doing better and some are sixteen what's going on to our viewers well really it's like they say about real estate right location location location and so if we look at the one that's really taken a tumble it's exxon mobil who's been pretty hard hit one with their beaumont texas plant that they've shut most of that down the refining capability and then just a little bit north and east of that is the number two refinery in the united states and that's in baytown and they're having big problems there even had to report to the texas environmental. quality folks they've had a spill that's not sure what it is but it really reeks and this is
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a plant that's known for having some problems in the past now a new few years ago they had a twenty million dollar fine so exxon mobil during this circumstance not looking too good others are up just a little bit marathon valero philip sixty six but again it depends where you are and what you know the impact of this hurricane on your refining capabilities as you say depending on where you are with some of the these refineries shut down limiting gasoline prices should people be going out to fill up their cars and trucks right now i would i did i mean this is a normal thing at this time of year right labor day weekend people will go and fill up but even now more than ever like i said the average cost nationwide is two dollars and thirty seven cents that's up four cents in a week but it's one of the larger price surges we had this summer the other day when we were talking about the storm coming in i said that you know estimates were from five to fifteen cents a gallon those estimates are up to ten to twenty cents
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a gallon but quite frankly when i look at what's going on in the reduced capacity of these refineries you know i could see thirty cents a gallon more and that could last for a long time too it could last for you know a month or six weeks or longer and as you noted you know katrina we saw forty cent increase right rices so it might not be that high but i think it's going to be higher than most of the experts are predicting i'd certainly higher than you know five to fifteen cents i'd say so katrina as you mentioned we saw forty cents in two thousand and five. gasoline prices how high could they call how how likely are they to stay high what think it's likely they'll stay there for a long time stay high for a long time whether or not it's thirty ish cents a gallon i think a long time because. they'd have. been able to even assess the damage and this is not just damage to the window narrowly and yes absolutely we don't know it's like i
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said yesterday to somebody it's reminds me of that old song the midnight oil song where they say how can we sleep when our beds are burning well how can they assess the circumstances when they're in the middle of the disaster and it's relentless and it keeps on and on they can't even get in workers can't even get there to do the assessment and it's not just the refineries too it's all of the logistics i mean the pipelines are closed the ports are all closed there's four or five i'm on the texas coast no oil is going out and nothing's coming in so everything's that a standstill and underwater and it's relentless so i think this is going to last a long time i think prices are going to go up i wouldn't be surprised if we see another nickel in the next couple of days then another nickel left over the weekend and we get up to that thirty cents a gallon and it stays there for a month well then we've got the holidays when terror and all those events and household expenses going up and it's going to be a real pinch on people at these prices they high you've always been
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a consumer advocate you've got a book about consumer protection last week on this show you warn viewers we could see price gouging update on that they're doing it bad actors are out there lindsey over five hundred reports of the texas attorney general of price gouging now this is an all just gasoline although the reports that the attorney general's office is take it in shows that some of charging four dollars a gallon which you could say well maybe there's a reason for dollars but allan come up to ten dollars a gallon some of them you know it's just crazy and it's look the free market is one thing but during these times when there's an emergency out there and people need fuel to survive you know that's a big deal and the fines by the way are also pretty hot out of doing this and you get fined twenty thousand dollars ok unless you are doing it to somebody not boy. you but somebody that sixty five or older than the finest two hundred fifty thousand because shame on you shame on you now by the way if this goes into
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louisiana and there's price gouging we did see that back in two thousand and five with katrina there you're doing jail time six months jail time and if somebody is injured by the price gouging you know as a result of what you've done then you can go to jail for even longer up to twenty one years if somebody dies so big deal the price gouging and they're doing it with water by the way they're doing i'll tell them. that i read a report that taxes are services for water ninety nine dollars for a case of water somebody was trying to charge so. be careful when you feel like just how do you go about reporting and telling someone about it getting pneumonia and both cattle you call the texas attorney general or the losing anna attorney general's office they have a hotline i've looked at their forms they're pretty easy to fill out and it's definitely something people should do these bad actors need to be caught is just
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not right particularly when everybody's in such a hurry right circumstance what are you looking at me coming down whether or not use find these other talk about the number two refinery in the country the exxon mobile in baytown but we're also looking at the. port arthur which shut down a little bit today that that's something that if they're closing the largest refinery in that second large refinery in the country that's going to have a longer term impact than others might and how the reassessment works over the next couple of weeks and it's going to be weeks to do this reassessment that's the key thing i'll be looking at is not going away thank you very much part of us try to assure. everyone here what it would feel like to trade and use crypto currencies. get free food in the process well burger king russia is rolling out its own crypto currency called the whopper coin customers will get
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a whopper coin so-called for every rouble they spend on a regular whopper when you get seventeen hundred you can redeem them for a free hamburger burger king russia even has apps ready for launch on apple and google devices can trade and share points with other users big fan base there in that country that's all for now check out the show on youtube youtube dot com slash boom bust our t.v. thanks for watching the next time.
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it was a. spliff it. was time we. each one of will carrying twenty a few of those of. course to. work for it. is the through. this business will be. ok. isn't it. i don't see a porno maybe you don't get a make or. break. for. around more. may still be helped out upon. your freedom.
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but. there. is no not one's up. enough limbs off let down one might have been a top of the definitions and i'm by any. one seeking out a new south. and. take in the eco city south jessa it would oxycodone and then you get really boring. how is that kind. of. movie it might not be. good if you know what that beach which we out on the south is out. to do this just
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the same if one means a leftist that you know the deep but only on the show this them tokyo find it is going to go. to. his work was because did it because he didn't seem quite a cultural fit for the premise. breaking news this hour a russian journalist working for the countries china want is believed to have been kidnapped by ukrainian security services in kiev. after being saved from islamic state all phones in iraq are still in search of
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a normal child. vulnerable for abuse for profit. for. children but exposed. in syria the u.s. led coalition has exchanged fire with turkish backed rebels near the city of man beach as the interests of nato allies in the country clash. germany's foreign minister says it's time to kick america's nuclear weapons out of his country the issue is one of several that have emerged in the run up to the german general election. thank you for watching r.t. international. news headlines live from the russian capital. andrew start with that breaking news story a russian journalist has allegedly been kidnapped outside her home in the ukrainian
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capital of kiev twenty nine year old anna who works for russia's channel one had been receiving threats regarding her work. for more on this story now i'm joined live now by artie's medina question of the medina thank you for joining us i mean what more can you tell us about the events that happened in kiev today well it is a developing story now with the news keeps coming in but what we know so far is that a reporter working for the russian first channel was kidnapped to this wednesday and the channel says she was taking very close to her home an unknown group of men captured her and put her in the car now chen also claims that she was taking by ukraine's security services and at the moment they are unable to reach her and her fate is unknown and now he has requested the ukrainian security services to comment on this. it's we've been in to explain what happened and we do we do we for some explanation to come in from ukraine now what we know about on the bottom is
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that she was born in the russian. and her last seven reports were aired and they were on the current situation in ukraine it was also revealed that should be soon before she was kidnapped just as you mentioned she received threats and just a few days earlier her name was added to the public blacklist on the website which is called a peacekeeper now it is a ukrainian nationalist website which accused her off by as through porting and also being. spreading and see ukrainian propaganda now her last report was on military parade that took place in ukraine to celebrate the country's independence state. well what you will not base is that i mean what's the situation like in ukraine i mean is it particularly dangerous for journalists what we see at
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the moment what is happening up in the moment all these news coming in on the court is unfortunately not exceptional situation really now journalists being prevented from working expelled from the country banned from returning now all this have become quite a common occurrence and ukraine and we keep hearing about that and keep receiving news on that now another russian reporter working for the second channel was wait quite recently back in two thousand and fifteen two reporters working for the same first channel as on the call about the war were also expel it and that really is the situation there is this trend not only applies not only to the russian media but also to differ in foreign journalists working in the country especially freelance journalists there were there was a situation. with two spanish freelance journalists working in ukraine and after they came back to spain they were after that banned from returning to ukraine and
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continuing their work now in terms of the situation in ukraine now three years ago ukraine was ringed by reporters without borders among the world's most dangerous places for journalists to work of course the situation has changed and it has improved and the rating has improved quite significantly but still we keep hearing news coming in now r.t. has requested ten different international stations to comment on this current situation concerning the russian journalists and among those companies those organizations were waiting for comments from international media support from center for freedom of the media from international federation of journalists and from other seven or so as i said before it is a developer. story and i'm sure we'll hear more of the fade. in on the general situation thanks very much we do know we just do have an update here
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i mean we've got a lot here the russian journalist. is to return to russia this is a line coming through the preparation of documents for her deportation from the ukraine is underway and that's according to the ukraine security service as i mentioned just another in line of those russian journalists are being expelled and being from returning from their work that they do in the. data warring situation but in a question of value very much indeed thank you. meanwhile relations between nato allies america and turkey are again in the spotlight after u.s. led coalition forces exchanged fire with turkish backed rebels near the syrian city of monday. verger explains how events unfolded. the u.s. has found itself between a rock and a hard place in syria namely between kurdish and turkish forces both of whom are supposed to be american allies but consider one another anime's and it seems tensions are on the rise with a coalition spokesperson revealing that u.s. backed forces exchanged fire with pro turkish rebels not once but several times in
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recent weeks when patrolling areas held by the forces turkey supports a multiple occasions in the last two weeks coalition forces conducting over mobile patrols northwest of members in northern syria received. from groups these incidents have occurred in territories primarily under the control of turkish booked flights is now the u.s. has told turkey to pass on to the rebels they support that firing on u.s. led coalition forces is quote not acceptable adding that patrols will continue and warning that coalition forces are always prepared and ready to defend themselves if need be which is not exactly the kind of dialogue you'd expect between two major powers meant to be important friends and allies but the reality of the situation is that northern syria is now a metaphorical minefield of possible clashes with conflicting alliances that could unravel at the slightest misstep.
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i. took he remains a nato ally and an important part partner in the fight against should we expect both those relationships with multilateral wishes to continue. going to get you to work with the white b.g. as a part of the overarching syrian democratic forces i . told you many times. you decide with us those spirits even as they should and you haven't had a good grasp of them and that's why the region is turned into the sea and. up till now america has more or less managed to navigate the murky waters between
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the turks and kurds even deploying a number of troops to northern syria months ago with the specific task of deterring the two parties from attacking one another but that effort has met with little success leaving few surprises in the wake of these recent skirmishes in fact conflicts like this one have been a long time coming if it's and then american military advisors go too far our forces would not care if american. carries out there. by accident if you rockets can hit them that the u.s. was of course never invited into syria but rushed in anyway perhaps without fully understanding the lay of the land. now washington finds itself trying to keep peace between its own partners all the while distracting from the real enemy at hand i saw jack and r.t. washington d.c. . and the battle to force i so from war torn iraq has devastated civilian
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lives in parts of the country with children particularly affected even before the liberation of mosul and the battle for talent far the number of youngsters desperately in need of help exceeded five million there are no present day figures but that numbers now expected to be much higher artie's what guys do you have takes a look at what problems these children face in their struggle for a normal life. these children have seen more bloodshed and agony than most adults will in a lifetime nearly ninety percent of children have lost a member of a family either they were kidnapped or killed and when they were escaping from the fight many of them have lost family members they were shot at from behind or falling on booby traps it has been a horrible experience as. soon as helicopter flies around. dropping down on the floor and some of them
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my some of them feel when they see for a mess some of them feel when they see you know people that they are not comfortable in with some of them shut up and say no what for quite a long time until they could actually opened up definitely they go all the extreme distress and also physically unfortunately many of them are wounded. many of the hospitals we visit confirmed that. the biggest number of civilians they have in the hospitals are children traumatised in mind and body but alive lucky by local standards though let's be frank stuck in orphanages and refugee camps in iraq and you believe given the sheer magnitude of the problem thousands and thousands of orphans and little. do you believe you can adequately
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help them we are helping those sold and we see certainly we don't have enough resources the children are almost everywhere but ultimately the support comes from family from government and the extended family that once we connect children they are everybody scheme to receive them and the support of the problem is made. king the connection old all of these orphans iraq so many a foreign children of isis fighters. and how big it is much better a foreign children were reunited with their families they will have problems here with documents in schools with health care they need their families love problems is putting it lightly in iraq tribal culture venerates blood feuds and revenge isis harmed millions there are those who would use these children who hate them for what their parents did. vulnerable for abuse they're
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vulnerable for trafficking they're vulnerable for. any danger that children are exposed to in today's technology any. bad group. could get those children and harmed them some of these lost children a raped they were assaulted abused and abandoned killed for their organs hated for the sins of their fathers the u.n. and unicef do what they can to protect them but there are too many getting them out is a reward unto itself. we helped identify and reunite a number of these shoulder and yet it isn't straightforward unicef for example once
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these kids identities protected fearing stigma or exploitation we know we tell our children do not do is playing chess. if we do not allow our children to normalize tensions that we do not know how do we think of allowing a child that have gone through a. crisis. to expose him to become a it's a hard choice you can show their faces for everyone to see and let their relatives recognize them or pray that they find them themselves one desperate young refugee among the rocks millions more i guess the. from iraq. germany's foreign minister has said he'd like to see american nuclear weapons removed from his country sigman gabriele made the statements during
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a visit to washington. and where he met his u.s. counterpart rex tillerson peter oliver as. we saw on this visit this official visit to the united states by zig mar gabriele was right at the very end he came out and he said that he would fully support what martin shultz has said in the past that u.s. nuclear weapons it's time to open a dialogue about getting them off german soil of course i'm convinced that we need to finally start talking about arms control and disarmament once again in this regard i agree with mr shultz is point that we need to get rid of the nuclear weapons the distaste and in our country. well it's understood that there are around twenty u.s. nuclear warheads in germany based in the southwest of the country and just last week the candidate for chancellor martin schultz the former european parliament president of course was down in turkey have it right in the southwest of the country giving a speech about how it was time to get rid of these nuclear weapons we can hear what
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he had to say right now. of the nuclear weapons currently stationed in germany well sick marcab real has said on defense in the past that the u.s. is demands for a two percent of g.d.p. payment by all nato members was unrealistic for germany and it does seem that along with martin shorts they're pushing this. to new tax policy really because it's one of the few ones that they can really go with the german chancellor on the s.p. day the closest rivals to angola merkel currently trailed by around fourteen points if you look at the latest opinion polls in nuclear weapons is really the only position that they can attack angela merkel on the german chancellor is accused in some circles here in germany of following the american line far too closely particularly when it comes to nuclear weapons and the esprit de want to set
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themselves aside in doing so they've got to put themselves in line with what has the party of peace really is how they're going to try and market themselves with just under a month to go before the german parliamentary elections take place here they're really far behind they're going to have to push very hard over the coming weeks if they're going to try and topple angela merkel from her position as german chancellor. and we'll be back after this short break.
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what politicians do something to. put themselves on the line. to get accepted or rejected. so when you want to express. yourself want to. have to be right. this is what. people are. interested always in the why. should. welcome back dozens of people have taken to the streets of paris to protest against president emanuel calls new labor law which is intended to make it easier for
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companies to hire and file workers demonstrators are also outraged by macross choice of labor minister a multi-millionaire whom they argue doesn't have workers interests at heart and is merely a penny coal isn't the only controversial face in the french cabinet also on the question of the ministerial credentials of a naturalized publisher of belgian origin and those of an olympic medalists. reports that the protesters think micro is failing to represent the people. but the demonstrators have come out again in france to show how unhappy they are with the manual not once planning perform on the working code they have been shouting that they will resist those with the intent to which we do to find out in front on thursday they have described emanuel my own as being a man who only supports business i once took the rights of look at this is what
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people have been saying to us and said that keeping small is a tax work and workers were against it because it has no a share now and we can share the work. resents the big boss says and those who want to get services social protections and everything achieved by workers turns a group without something. about ideology to be able to sign. up what in fact he wants to get rid of employee protections all together it's a big attack of the hierarchy deals will now take over those are some of the reasons why the demonstrators hate feel so passionately against these reforms to the working code but not everybody is unhappy with the plans to reform the working so take it in front. suggest it will mean more as well have more ability to hire and fire people to negotiate over salary in terms of additional hours that
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people work and that's why the head of the employers federation has actually come out not just in support of this reform but is actually emanuel not going to go all in when he introduces that working reform some people have described this as being a bellwether for my presidency because this is his first major attempt to pass a big piece of legislation hearing from his new thoughts precesses have failed. remains to be seen with matt colie will be able despite his continuing plunging popularity in the party in the polls to be able to push this reform through and to appease the french people charlotte devinsky ulti paris. now brown university a member of america's elite ivy league group of universities and colleges has long made fixing historical injustice one of its key priorities.
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people took things that didn't belong to them. without permission to feel that they were taken from the communities that they were taken from. i. know we were just you know how we used. to call it the dog. but now the university is on the defensive offer a native american tribes set up a protest count on its premises it insists the land was stolen from them hundreds of years ago and now they want to back. we've done everything possible by law to
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engage the powers of the industry and we're just an invisible invisible tribe we don't exist this was our principal approach and we want this to recruit you back to our charges about our spiritual higher grounds here and hopefully. these things will come. well brown claims to have will relay sions with local indigenous tribes it hosts annual meetings to raise awareness about minority group issues and it made headlines after renaming a federal holiday from columbus day to indigenous peoples day last year however when it comes to the tribes to moans the university is refusing to budge the block cannot get tribe is not recognized by the federal government or more importantly by the other federally recognized indigenous communities there is an important technical difference between holding native ancestry and holding nation status and
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that is at the heart of the issue here well being can't mint has already been on the campus for more than a week the tribe insisted staying there and is also taking the case to court the co-founder of the code pink activist group thinks the dispute shows the university's progressive talk is just a facade. talk is cheap it certainly is the in thing now or corporations universities sports associations to talk that talk about and have progressive they are to adapt the language. but when the call is for land to be given back or for reparations to be made for slavery or anything that involves actual plane and szell restitution that's where they draw the line crossed. a pilot's coming into land in the russian city of sochi has been confronted by not one but three tornadoes here's the plane
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as it makes its approach despite the. scene pilots managed to land the plane safely in total nine tornadoes were reported that day many flights were delayed or diverted because of those storms. but we're back at the top of the hour with the headlines for you then. the two thousand and eight economic crisis turned some countries into paid these
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are the countries with weaker economies that needed austerity policies if you are in a situation or even the recession austerity is a very bad idea it doesn't work and it makes millions of people very young. those who are unemployed see their wages decline almost a decade how good are the results. by the people gathered in which to watch the world get people to see what do i. believe will be she was i mean. these things. why are the same missions still in place to one of the. two we. will for. the truth be consider this is the consequences are actually quite
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acceptable to the decision. time after time saying we're going underground on the day of the richest horse race in british history. coming up at today's show is brussels backing corbin we speak in the fall of vice chair of the conservative party about trump and paris and whether the european commission is trying to manipulate the u.k. general election and we defeated london mayoral candidate zac goldsmith who is contesting a key marginal constituency next week's u.k. election why the riddle costings in the conservative manifesto don't look back in anger ahead of tomorrow's ariana grande their benefit gig legendary filmmaker and
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journalist john pilger on whether a smoking gun connects to raise a mate for the man just or atrocities all the civil coming up in today's going underground but first could the next week's general election be even more exciting albeit with more human life or death consequences than today's dalby race to the southwest of london stories amazing company to. mores of you turned on their manifesto even before the election and they've reportedly seen the biggest swing away from a party in the lead in history jeremy corbyn meanwhile has been deserted by most of his parliamentary colleagues because presumably none of them believe in the policies he and his close knit leadership has advocated over the course of his campaign according to opinion polls which have been consistently wrong of late jeremy corbin's party leads the tories by maybe fifty seven percent when it comes to young people while if only the old could vote to raise them a would win a landslide in scotland where a scottish labor leader favors old style tony blair liberalism labor appears to face a wipe out from the s.n.p. let alone even the tories but there are some questions that few of asked in this
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general election campaign take this from a state mandated b b c this week which has already been done for bias against corben frail weak and fighting for their lives. these are the faces of yemen's latest crisis tens of millions of civilians face calamity but who is to blame the b.b.c. appears to suggest the catastrophe is natural britain's channel four news goes further the strongest evidence we've seen has actually been in had data it was from a bomb that was dropped in twenty sixteen on a containing food containing rice on the markings we could see afterwards indicated that bomb was manufactured in the u.k. in may twenty fifteen twenty fifteen and twenty sixteen two years when tourism a was in government so why does mainstream media not confront the incumbent government ahead of the election especially since jeremy corbyn for labor let alone the s. and p. and ukip in the lib dems have all lost questions about the devastating impact of to
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raise amaze arms selling policies and aid that contributes to the conflict well we spoke to labor's shadow chief secretary of the treasury peter doubt about saudi arms on wednesday's show later we caught up with someone responsible for aid in the british government former sectors. state for international development and the former vice chair of the conservative party andrew mitchell we spoke to him just as news of doldrums decision to renegotiate a new paris climate deal was in the was and let's just quickly begin on these reports the donald trump is going to renege on the paris climate deal what's your reaction but i think it will be deeply regrettable. the rules on the changes that was set in paris which was a remarkable achievement having gates tremendously with the chinese for making great progress of america to turn its back on that i think it will be a terrible thing to happen but one should remember two things i think first of all is that there has been disagreement in the trump family about these matters and we
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must hope that they are not yet decided and secondly of course in america individual states have a role to play and so it would not perhaps be the disaster that it first appears but it would be a retrograde step given the tremendous amount of agreement that was achieved in paris was good to break the drays ways that all these acts have been deliberately turned reflect result of the general election will take place when we have a june referring to voices emanating from brussels and european commission's was is now saying that the date of the beginning of negotiations may change german corgan is elected thinks week what's your reaction well the british public the voting public in britain are being asked to make up their minds who is going to negotiate this very difficult agreement and my proposition to my constituents and the proposition which i think we face in britain is we need the best possible people to negotiate that tough agreement and in my view it is undoubtedly theresa may and
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david davis they are already very deeply immersed in all of this and i profoundly hope that it will be those who are negotiating for britain after the eighth of june it doesn't make any difference to the longer term to prepare the some of these utterances from the commission i think. unhelpful to everybody the date has been set eleven days after the election if the commission was to change that or if a different incoming government was to change that that is a matter for them maybe not in killing a very nice if we see individual city in a general election campaign it's no emerging with the home office at all the british newspaper the inquiry under the aegis of then whom secretaries a made commission by david cameron into the funding of jihad is that his group never be published is that because the resume has always supported saudi backed islam is groups some groups maybe even but are implicated mentions ritual city. i'm sure it is not and i can't possibly comment on that in any respect to
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talk because i have no knowledge of it but i think you are right the appalling atrocity. which is being condemned around the world was a terrible experience clearly for everyone it matched all those for involved but above all for the attack on innocent children and jawing on nights for which there can be no possible defense anywhere at any time you have of course it's become an election issue because goulburn is related to foreign policy what do you make of the spectators peter oborne who's been on this show saying british citizens run down to the encourage you traveled to libya to fight in the civil war to get rid of gadhafi in the war of course supported by tourism me well i don't think there were any encourage mint people to travel to libya those days i was in the cabinet at the time libya was an extremely dangerous place in the british intervention was a humanitarian intervention to save the lives of thousands of people in benghazi
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who faced a bloody massacre at the hands of gadhafi and that was the reason for what was essentially from britain a humanitarian intervention would have supported the rebels which is robel goes on to say with the encouragement of only six terrorist suspects released from control does to restrain them. because released by tourism a to them travel to libya and back maybe born as an outstanding british journalist and we live in an open country where these things are evaluated under her us but i'm in no doubt having been part of the cabinet the intervention in libya was right above all because it was a humanitarian intervention designed to save lives the failure at the end of the campaign to build a new libya was because the all the efforts of the international community under united nations leadership with very strong backing from britain came to nothing because there was no peace to stabilize and in order to have that sort of stabilization and build a new stability you do require
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a peace which tragically never materialized in libya so it was a tourism a wins that may destroy in that case it was the richest country in africa destroyed the country was on the tourism and i think one of the first things that resume said when she became prime minister was that the era of interventions and afghanistan and iraq those sort of interventions was over it was a point she emphasized in one of her first speeches and i don't see any reason why that policy is like change under mitchell thank you. another tory we spoke to after our interview on wednesday with labor's shadow chief secretary to the treasury was the defeated london mayor all candidate zac goldsmith who is contesting his old seat in richmond park a key module constituency in south west london and next week's general election back thanks for being on going underground again we had the secretary of the treasury on recently and he said why is it the tories haven't published. the
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accounts for this manifesto they're putting forward to the british electorate this election where if you have to ask him that question i wasn't responsible for getting the manifesto together i've a bottle here in richmond park move right down to the y. one of the few seats that will probably determine the outcome of this election is my job is to try. ensure that i win here the reason i get the majority she needs because without that majority i don't see how she can i don't think she would easily be able to negotiate a proper grants and she supported usually in a supporting role but a list of the candidates at the end of this segment to how helpful was a dimension tax in the or a chance to win no doubt my view is that the policy was poorly explained and that it does does no doubt has caused a look just leninist policy taking the assets away from that thing that i think bush was a i think that it was poorly explained to such an extent that it became very easy for opponents to scam on and it was there's no doubt that there are people have knocked on doors and the people who believe that just simply by dint of being old are going to lose their homes the reality is that the proposal which is not
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a complete proposes she made clear that the proposal is an improvement on the current situation at the moment you can lose everything down to a loss twenty three thousand if you end up in a cabin under the proposals that in the manifesto you lose up to your last one hundred thousand pounds is more than four times better from that point of view there will be a cap i can't tell you what that cap will be i wish i could i'd love to be able to tell residents what that will be i imagine the cap will be around seventy to eighty thousand pounds which is more that's what the. proposals. suggested and i think there was a consensus more or less around that figure but it's not for me to predict because i don't know how you're going to resume his chief of staff nick timothy's finished no i didn't and i think that this is i think the policy could have been better explained and i think the party you know obviously in the election you don't get everything right. and it's a it is a snap election it's a quick one but things like that do you have an absolute you have an in every you
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name your political party that hasn't hasn't missed explained the policy at some point during a campaign what is there why is there things like the need for voters to have id when they go to the polling booth why is that in the manifesto there is there have been many. cases before and i don't see why it's such a controversial proposal i mean we need to. i think eventually we're going to move to different system of voting in any case i think you'll probably have an electronic voting but before you can begin to move in that direction you've got to make sure that the opportunity to do is as close to eliminated as it's possible to be what about these changes in the manifesto from what minister said the man of his years as a radical welfare reform where is d.w.p. sector damian green only recently said no more welfare cuts what does it mean will the radical welfare reform doesn't necessarily mean cuts i mean is it two separate issues and i think that the majority of the reforms that are needed. have either done happened or they are happening now trying to create a universal system which makes it easier for people you know take the so-called
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bedroom tax for example rezin a little support for people who are on waiting lists to get homes but equally. you know there have been cases where people have wanted to change one's wanted to downsize have not been able to and it's still faced the penalty that's how the policy i'm certain that that is not what was intended by that policy said you know there's a does it as policies play out into improvement to find she needs to eat and one of the jobs of an m.p. of a good m.p. at least is to pick up on where these things are happening take it back to ministers and what and find you and that is that is the job of any good m.p. regardless of what party they belong to predict the controversial bedroom tax but it's a use of words in the matter give us give you that example any of this is an example that people understand sure ok but in the manifesto it says for instance that i mean previously trey's may said no hard border between north and south island my fester says as fiction lists a border as possible and what why these different i mean manifest to him what
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reason may have been saying i think that's probably a reflection of the fact that we don't know what the final outcome of the brits goshi actions are going to look like and you know it's not the chinese amazed holding the cards close to a chest it's a case that you know if i were negotiating with you to buy this bottle of water i mean i'd have an idea of what i'd pay you'd have no. what you do except that neither of us know where you can each of us is coming and we negotiate that's what happens we want to have a situation where we have as clean a relationship between north more than on in the rest of on as possible what that eventually looks like i don't know but it should be here that it shouldn't be hard border i don't know region of george osborne to any advisory role here because you always been slamming your immigration policy as economically illiterate i mean is and i'm not the person is recruiting advisers to government i wish i were of the kind of well we don't know what your role but i will i can tell you that i macand cheese or you know campaigning for you here to see it really matters and it matters a lot but i cannot so that kind of quite simply and i can i could i could i could guess but it would not be healthy to do so but you know even on immigration the
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thing that i think most people agree on in the party is that we need control of raw borders but there's a lot of discussion and even disagreement about what kind of immigration policy or what immigration policy should look like i mean my view is that the students learning has should not be included in that target i've always been i think we should have as many foreign students as possible so as a starting to get some universities. because i think they have to walk the country that they had to stay here and do incredibly well they go home they form a little bridge between our countries and that's a healthy thing that's a difference of opinion rather people in the party who disagree very strongly that the parliament is a battle of ideas and i hope to be about a few days' time taking part in the back of ideas like ultimate thank you very much other candidates in the richmond pa constituency etc only for the liberal democrats kate jewett of labor peter jewel of ukip will be speaking to the lib dems candidate for twickenham vince cable this coming monday after the break britain's west terra trustees and seventy seven we all join pill just britain's foreign intelligence
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services were complicit in the magister attack all the civil coming of a bad joke going underground. welcome to the wonderful world of blood donation. every three weeks to get my transfusion to be specific i receive in. my body gets. produced itself around the world giving blood is seen as a symbol of generosity. because it helps people it's just that one of the side effects is that it. puts money on your car immediately. half of all plasma based drugs today come from private companies and are produced from paid plasma as well as. you know.
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what are the risks of pay donation which. then is proof that the frequency of pathologies is much higher paid. if i was. over two years old. and who runs the blood business. selling you on the idea that dropping bombs brings peace to the chicken hawks the battle of. the new soft spread of tell you that if the public by support. off the bat doesn't tell me you are not cool enough to fight. off we. will watch. no not once i. don't want.
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any. take in the city. is. going to bring. me think i'm. just a. young tokyo find it. does work was because did a piece of dancing coral cultural fit in from the grammys. welcome
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back ahead of next week's u.k. general election jeremy coleman is fending off accusations that he is a terrorist as well as a pacifist but the legendary journalist and filmmaker john pilger has just written an article arguing that the causes of an atrocity commemorated tomorrow at the one loveman just a consulate in england are being suppressed to protect secrets of u.k. foreign policy the smoking gun he argues in terror in britain what did the prime minister know is the theresa may was british home secretary when libyan islam is group members were allowed to travel unhindered across europe john pilger his latest film is the coming war and china joins me now john thanks for coming on before we go on to the unsaleable as you say in your piece your reaction to the atrocity in afghanistan america's longest war it's horrific but predictable. i mean the extraordinary thing about afghanistan that afghanistan was invaded on
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a lie the the devastation caused by the invasion in two thousand and one had this terrible ripple effect right across the country so here is one of the seven wars the longest war that the west now has fought in the modern era sixteen years one of barack obama's seven wars. and what britain is still with five hundred troops why and that it was it was late labor's war will be it not well it wasn't a delay it was war and it was it was very much tony blair's war it was one of his four horses and gordon brown's war i mean the two parties in this country in terms of the there are the. four for a foreign policy that is violent a sometimes indistinguishable well let's get to what jayson may said of the
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manchester atrocity as he said we struggled to comprehend it but we can continue to take on and defeat the ideology that often fuels this violence what do you make of what you raise a make said well it doesn't make any sense because what the manchester atrocity. demonstrated as indeed the july the seventh two thousand and five bombing of the london underground demonstrated is that the rock of british foreign policy is briefly lifted and we see the cause and effect i mean it's not that's not an opinion you only have to look at the the or all the establishment. organizations from from chatham house right through to the joint intelligence committee. there is almost a unanimous unanimous understanding that what these atrocities like
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manchester and london in two thousand and five what they have it in common is that they are the product of british foreign policy of being where we shouldn't be and it's this basic truth and it is a truth that has become the unsayable in this election the unsayable by to reason mahen the whom sable by germany colp and i mean jeremy coburn has said that the war on terror in his opinion has failed but even doing a little r. is cool been said that he was immediately accused of us of my excusing terror at what links possible links if we look at it at the bench as your example take the can you trace between dres amazin secretary and the atrocity well for one thing this group the libyan islamic. fighting group
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l.-i she has been in manchester for something like twenty years according to french intelligence it was british intelligence the tried to get these so law office it's what hobbyists as they are in manchester to assassinate colonel gaddafi they are in plec oblio were implacably anti kadafi they were quite dangerous people some of them a number of them were under control orders and when in two thousand and eleven. the united states and france and britain and eventually nato invaded libya which they do plan to do anyway africa's largest producer of oil these to loftus wahabi is in manchester known as the manchester boys were told they could go to libya raise a mate. stamp there possible it's to eleven to go i don't know i don't know i don't
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know whether she did that it doesn't work like that but it was the argument blair was in that he used to argue well i didn't see it you know what jack straw said i didn't see it but they are the people ultimately responsible she was the home secretary and when tieri a minister. responsible for those control orders and they were lifted by m i five one of them to talk about going to heathrow airport where he's stopped by counterterrorism police and he gives them a name a number an m i five they call it he sits there white and they sell that fine fine off you go to battle. they wanted to overthrow gadhafi and these people we used how do you think if it's in the debate he may have traveled to syria from as a british subject as well to support what in effect was the british position just to support the rebels that was the route through once qaddafi was overthrown.
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these people who now were. at the very least al-qaeda affiliated were on their way to syria that was the next stop and so many of the libya the manchester boys if you like to use it you're never ended up in syria fighting the west war or fighting the west the efforts to wave or throw the government of a sad he was the next one. these it's a complicated story most certainly but it has strands running through it and the strongest strand is the support of powerful western governments like the british government the u.s. government the french government for what they call assets for these terrorist assets if a b.b. was known to the authorities why was he able to do what he did and it's quite interesting to see that now we have. in contrast to
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a leak from the united states last year which caused a great deal of panic and whitehall produced pictures of the apparent detonate at that use but now we've gone back to the original learned wolf spin. the police are saying. it was just an ordinary criminal really paid the intel. i was gonna take no more no more than the hello everyone and almost certainly he built the bomb himself so the original spawn story which is so proud and transparently nonsense has been given to us again but when you look at the faces of the twenty two dead children in manchester he could surely understand why you can't compute in the heads of journalism newsroom that even the possibility that solomon a baby could have been a british government asset well of course but when you look at the faces of children who have been bombed in some dusty rocky scabrous
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village in yemen lined up before they are buried can you then think that the cluster bombs or the hellfire missiles whatever kill words children originated in this country. the product originated and the collaboration and we have in yemen now british military advisors in riyadh assisting the saudis with their bombing raids in yemen that is having a devastating effect on the children of that country all children all people have a right to life and i don't think there should be any discrimination but we need to find out why this terrible event with its devastating human consequences happened in manchester do you think juries of a obviously may have been home secretary when m i five allegedly dropped their investigation into the baby but then on the other hand presumably the intelligence they were going to go on but would say there are so many jihad is now in this
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country so many of them is in this country that therefore they don't have the time to follow anyone so don't come to any conclusions that the mentions with those they paid for if they don't if they have the don't have the time. i mean they are a security organization. this l.-i f.-e. group has been around for some plague like twenty years but it is it's a strategy of been it's absolutely perscribe ization by look or just government describes prescriptivist private and describes it it's a it is wanting to to build this extreme islamic state across the world and that it follows is inspired by al qaida just as probably now inspired some of the members inspired by isis who knows about. the point was that this community from which it appears it appears and we are not absolutely certain that some on the
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bt came was well known to the security services in britain. and. certainly some of those who went to libya in two thousand and eleven were encouraged to do so. by the security services because the aim was to overthrow gadhafi and that happened when david cameron went there and all the crowds were cheering among those crowds no doubt some of the the manchester boys there are a lot of al qaeda inspired people there as well and many of those people were trained by the british s.a.'s. this web of collaboration for oxy power in the middle east invariably will produce this kind of violence and what we've seen since nine eleven is that the violence has come home and it's come home not only to the united
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states it's come home to this country it is very briefly no one got into trouble for british funding of al qaeda image editing in afghanistan do you expect anyone to get into trouble the british funding of what is the mists that ended up. i mean the british role in afghanistan was was virtually the beginning of the british role in operation cycle which which was devised by zubrzycki who was president carter's so-called national security adviser and in the end through the copper and reagan is these these the fanatics the mujahideen the creation of. a kind of support structure for extremism that would would work on behalf of western powers got something like five hundred million dollars from the united states we know that to be true and we also know that the british security services were deeply involved all across afghanistan. right through
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right up to the the western invasion and two thousand and one and then beyond that . and we have to take responsibility for it but it has to be debated like we're doing now it has to be discussed. we can't walk around with hands over i was. it's absurd that the people who died in manchester and the people who died on the london underground and the people who died in the twin towers and all those children in yemen and afghanistan on the other day does a better job thank you. hope you enjoyed that requested favorite show from the latest season of going underground we'll be back with another great season of going underground on saturday the second of september but till then keep in touch by social media we'll still be reading lol your communication with the team season.
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one of us opposed to some of the. last time we chased. each one of them carrying twenty kilos of drugs. for stuff and stuff. that they just employ. instead mean the money. they have. for me. i don't know maybe they don't make or. break right.
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now. here's what people have been saying about rejected in the us actually it's full on awesome the only show i go out of my way to launch you know what it is that really packs a punch oh yeah it is the john oliver of r t america is doing the same we are apparently better than blue. sea people you've never heard of love redacted tonight my president of the world bank so very. seriously send us an e-mail. here's what people have been saying about rejected in the us it actually was full on awesome the only show i go out of my way to launch you know what it is that really packs a punch oh yeah it is the john oliver of party americans do the same we are
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apparently better than the blue. sea people you've never heard of love redacted tonight not the president of the world bank so very. seriously he sent us an e-mail. a russian journalist working for the country's channel long will be deported from ukraine a security services wall this will happen to anyone they claim cranium. in syria the u.s. led coalition has exchanged fire with turkish bank brad wilson in the city of lumbini as the interests of nato allies in the country clash. after being saved from islamic states or for those in iraq still in search of a normal childhood. vulnerable full of used for trial.

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