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tv   BBC World News This Week  PBS  July 13, 2009 12:00am-12:30am EDT

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"bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, the macarthur foundation. >> this week has headlines, 180 died as violence erupted in
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western china. beijing sent in troops to restore order. president obama and the russian president pledged major cuts to the inner clear arsenals privy --. g-h secretary general says not enough was done. the final farewell, friends and family pay a final tribute to the king of pop. >> welcome. this week the world watched in shock as ethnic violence broke out in the western region of china. thousands of riots leaving over 180 dead and 800 injured. the violence centered and
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spread. many muslims report tension with the government. this report contains graphic images. >> violence erupts. the local chinese some more dragster the windows of bosses -- buses and dragged through their homes. this was a ferocious ethnic attack. this is a troubled place. few could believe the anger and violence that has happened here their attackers were their neighbors. the violence was sparked by killings miles away in a suburb of china.
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groups in exile said that amateur video + internet show and weaker man being chased, running for his life. he is one of two killed for a revenge attack. what happens next is too disturbing to show. this video from youtube appears to show hundreds perhaps thousands of people on the march. the victims cannot be verified. the commonest appointed leader said this was an uprising against chinese rule. >> the forces from inside and outside of china, severely undermined the unification of ethnic groups. there is little harmony here.
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these people want to separate from china. in the back streets of the city away from the crowd, one a meeting took place. passersby threw sticks. the city hospital had their full -- so of wounded. a curfew is now in place. a city of 2 million people that has no access to the internet. >> after the riots came the clampdown, a nighttime curfew was imposed in the area. chinese carried clubs and machetes looking for revenge.
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the chinese president returned from the g-8 early. this is a compilation of this report. >> in the muslim quarter, hundreds of women pour onto the streets, rushed to confront troops taking control of their neighborhood. old and young women alike shook their fists and demanded the return of local man -- return of local men. the defenders of chinese rule rarely come face to face. but they did today, and they retreated. >> the most extraordinary things here are hundreds of local women, and some men have gathered on the street, despite the fact there are lots of police here, they were shouting,
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we want our freedom and our man back. >> people that pretend to be, men and women were killed who died in a very tragic way. >> the women, they said, would not be arrested. later in the city, a smaller body of chinese men took to the street. >> hundreds of men have been marching through the city all afternoon. they are carrying homemade weapons, wooden poles and other implements. the thing -- they are saying the authorities on not doing their job, so they are taking it into their own hands. >> thousands of military police arrived. there was nothing subtle about their deployment.
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they want the locals to know that they have arrived and that china is back in control. for many chinese, their presence brought relief. the president of china return to beijing, he cut short his appearance at the g-8 summit. many felt he had no choice but to return. it is in the most muslim part of the city that many troops -- troops took a position. even if their presence did not stop the protests. >> tubes are deploying all around this neighborhood. they are in full body armor and
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carrying batons. some of them are carrying automatic weapons. >> a harry -- heavy military presence surrounding the neighborhood. but curfews have been lifted. the city is more peaceful than it has been in days, but it's still remains divided. >> the rest of the week's news, president obama said he wanted to reset relations with russia. this week he went to moscow for a two-day summit, where he tried to repair sites. his host acknowledged differences, but insisted there were smart to unite the country's then divide them. they pledged cuts to their nuclear arsenals. >> they welcome to barack and
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michelle, cozy and comfortable, with a few bodyguards. earlier amid the kremlin palace, the two presidents have agreed to slash their nuclear arsenals. >> we have taken a few steps forward to stop the spread of blue -- nuclear weapons. to reduce our own nuclear arsenal. the united states and russia must lead by example. >> president medvedev was even more effusive. our teams have done a fantastic job, and we have reached a new compromise. it is a long way from the bad
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old days of the cold war, when russia was controlled by an unsmiling president and each side matched huge arsenals. at the end of the cold war, russia had 11,000 strategic nuclear warheads. today, it has just under 3000. in 1990, america had more than 13,000 strategic nuclear warheads. a new treaty will cut each to about 1600. that is still more than enough to destroy the planet. critics say this is a throwback. >> we should understand that developing our relations is -- relations and the days of the cold war will make our relations very vulnerable. >> this summit the agreement on
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nuclear weapons will be hailed in washington as a real achievement, and it is. it is also just the first small step towards a better relationship. it is hard to break free of the cold war. >> in honduras a dramatic scenes at the airport. two people were killed in clashes as a plane carrying the outgoing president was prevented from landing. he went into exile in a military coup. >> in memory of those that died in clashes with the army on sunday night, these people say that the government here came to power illegally and is now governing outside the rule of law.
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clashes between them is -- has been the worst since it began. for several minutes, his venezuelan plane sat at the airport. throughout, he was providing live commentary. he says it was a serious attempt to return to his homeland. >> i wanted to land, if the pilot had landed i would be on the ground. i am not afraid. the pilot decided not to land. they were right, because they could not maneuver the plane in a short runway. >> he called on the soldiers of honduras to end of the coup. there is not signed of any decision from the honduran military. there are signs of just how
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difficult the coming weeks will be for the honduran government. embattled interim president, insisting that his government has rights and the majority of the people on its side, and that almost everything is negotiable. >> the government is standing firm. it says that what ever the president's plans might be, the one place he will not be coming is here to the presidential palace. >> the united nations refugee agency this week reported a huge -- from us about -- from mogadishu. there was severe fighting between the government and insurgent spirit clashes forced them to withdraw from the city, the first time in 17 years. bolivian government destroyed what was believed to be the country is -- country's largest
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cocaine processing plant in bolivia. last year it stop the operation with america's war on drop and expelled a drug enforcement agents. human sperm credit from stem cell spirit british scientists say they have done it. not everyone is convinced. >> this video shows sperm the overgrown not in man, and a dish. created from a braddocks stem cells frozen in this tank. scientists say they harvest of the number of chromosomes, the essential element in creating sperm. finally, they grew heads and tails. it all took six weeks. the aim is to study the growing problem of male infertility.
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the average sperm count was 120 million per milliliter in the 1950's. now it is just 60 million. nearly 50 percent of couples seeking fertility treatment have problems with sperm quality. some argue that destroying embryos is immoral. just because it is technically possible does not mean it should be allowed. is not ethical, there are certainly practical problems. three years ago, mice were created from laboratories sperm, but all have health problems and died. if this technique is perfected, the law would have to be changed. >> the retired general credit would with turning around indonesias economy looks certain for reelection in a landslide
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victory. the president was well ahead of his rival as a we came to a close. >> after tallying up votes from polling stations around the country, unofficial results showed that 60% of indonesians. box number two, suggesting the company has won a second term. indonesians have voted, no reports of violence have happened. turnout was low, but steady. the big issues were the economy and corruption. >> just down the road, the parties are different. this bridge is a home, the shelters and fees in entire community. then, election day is -- for
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them, election day is just another day. life is sometimes a daily struggle for survival. what these people want from their new leader is just a small improvement in the quality of their lives. she has lived here for the last three years. he fishes not for food but for -- that he sells. >> if the government cares, he should give us jobs so we can improve our lives. we have to live here under the street. >> for indonesias next president, reaching out to the disenfranchised is a huge problem. some politicians have provided little comfort. president obama announced agreements between the major industrialized nations with the emerging giants among developing countries like india and china.
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it was mr. obama said, a consensus. he admitted progress would not be easy. >> getting them lined up for the extended photo prove problematic. they were waiting for barack obama. judging by the good-natured applause, everyone's favorite leader. even obama was not able to bridge the gap between the g- eight and the other emerging economies for climate change. cracks progress on this issue will not be easy. >> one of the things we will have to do is to fight the temptation for cynicism. >> what if real progress has a son made on climate change?
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when it came to the g-a pledge to cut rich countries emissions by as much as 80% by 2015, and to get everyone else to sign up to cut 50% was no global -- consensus. even some g-h members, canada and russia were within -- were sounding unconvinced. some said the g-eight was a wasted opportunity. it just was not ambition and off, they said. >> the problem they have so far is not enough to meet the target -- ambitious enough to meet the target.
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>> with an important climate change conference looming, president obama in charge, he feels as though the new political will can get some of these agreements. a whole set of new guests arrived in italy. and another chance for president obama to show his emergence on the world stage can make a difference. >> leaders of the g-eight nations ended their meeting with a pledge to invest $20 billion to boost food production in developing countries, particularly in africa. it was a shift away from the summit, and the u.s. head for food for africa had a lot to
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deal with. british forces in afghanistan experienced their bloodiest week in combat in modern times. in the first 10 days of july, 16 soldiers died fighting the taliban. it brought the number of fatalities in afghanistan to 184. >> in the skies over will show this morning, at familiar sight. burying the bodies of the latest casualties and afghanistan. the government has to remind people why we are there. >> it is a chain of terror. people in britain today are
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safer because of the courageous sacrifices of british soldiers and afghanistan. >> operations are taking a toll on both sides. the taliban are getting pushed out of hellman did -- helmand province. hidden bonds are slowing down and can sometimes penetrate armor. but something has changed here. this summer, the americans have arrived, injecting a massive input of helicopters, that britain doesn't have an offer of. -- doesn't have enough of. the piece is still a long way off. >> the controversies of the past, it was a fitting tribute to the king of pop.
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there was a huge memorial service and los angeles, soul rend the life of michael jackson. -- celebrating the life of michael jackson. music from smokey robinson, lionel richie and more. >> [singing] michael jackson was brought back into the limelight one last time. the stark, who boast delighted in public, once again is the focus of the world attention his children have been largely kept away from the camera since their father's death. they mourned with the rest of the family. >> ever since i was born, daddy has been the best father you can
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ever imagine. i just want to say that i love him very much. >> this was a public memorial. it was also an intensely private affair. >> i love you, michael. mariah carey was the first are to appear. lionel richie, then a stevie wonder performed in front of michael jackson's body. and then michael jackson spoke in a video montage of his life. his friends in the audience
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cheered. jermaine jackson then sang his brother michael's favorite song, smile. this was the first we saw of michael jackson's coffin. earlier, just after a private memorial, the police closed los angeles highways. in downtown l.a., the fans queued up for the public memorial. this is a song for africa which michael jackson co-wrote. and then michael jackson left the stage. to many, he was controversial
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pop star. there have been few artists like him. today, even in death, michael jackson was still dazzling fans around the world. >> that is all for this week. jonas again at the same time next week. -- join us again up at the same time next week. "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, the newman's own foundation, and the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. macarthur foundation.
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