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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  September 6, 2016 2:07am-4:00am EDT

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my name's hillary. septembe11 i know a lot of people who go to my school. and lost their parents or other family members in 9/11. i would hoeople can realize how much the world has grown. doing something good makes me realize i have the power to change things.
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a new hurricane formed today in the pacific. newton is about 200 miles southeast of cabo san lucas tracking toward the baja peninsula. remnants could hit arizona by wednesday. >> today, president obama flew to laos after a turbulent few days at the 20 strike a deem with russia to stop the fighting in syria. but that did not happen. margaret brennan is traveling with the president. >> reporter: president obama left his 90-minute meeting with vladamir putin empty-handed. >> we haven't yet closed the gaps in a way where we think it would actually work. >> reporter: putin pulled back at the last minute from a cease-fire deal in syria turning down a u.s. offer to coordinate
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that mr. obama would even consider making such an extraordiny proposal shows how powerful vladamir pun has become. >> on the eve of what would have been another tense meeting with philippine president dutarte. the white house called it off after the controversial leader icly insulted president obama. >> you must be respectful. >> reporter: then speaking, he said he would call the u.s. pr judicial killing of suspected drug runners since july. the president said he was awaver the insult. >> i have seen some of those colorful statements in the past. and so clearly he is a colorful guy. >> elaine, the white house says that president obama will instead meet with south korea's leader to discuss north korea's latest ballistic missile test. >> margaret brennan, margaret,
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president. laos paid a terrible price during the vietnam war as american bombs rained down in a secret campaign. as the adriana diaz learned, t rules are still fresh. >> reporter: try telling her the war ended 43 years ago. in july the 8-year-old picked up what he thought was a ball. instead it exploded. >> these bombs are just waiting out there on the land to be found by >> reporter: she has made it her life's mission to get rid of the millions of unexploded bombs littering laos. >> this is a solvable problem. we can get the bombs out of the ground. there wouldn't be death and injury in the future. >> reporter: during the vietnam war, the u.s. dropped 270 million bombs on neighboring laos in part to cut off north vietnamese supply routes. craters from the blasts still
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laos is the most heavily bombed country in the world per capita. on average, bombs were dropped here every eight minutes for nine years. chamvaongsa, lobbied u.s. congress and raised millions to clear the land. one aecre can take two months t clear. >> it took second forhe bombs to drop. it will take a to clear it. >> reporter: in the chaos after the war, chamvongsa and her family fled to the u.s. when she was 6. when she learned about the legacy of the u.s. bombing campaign, she knew she had to return. >> i would hope that, you know, little children would be able to walk to school without having to fear that they might not return at the end of the day. >> reporter: a bomb killed this
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told us. he was just 5 years old. the family is now afraid to work their land. >> there is so much work to be done, but we are going to be able to finish this job if people continue to be committed. >> so that children like this one can play outside without consequences. adriana diaz, cbs news, laos. ameca enjoying what could be the longest streak of falling food prices in a half century. family to feed. not so good for farmers. here's manuel bojorquez. heather buen says putting food on the table has gotten easier. >> less painful to go to the store. >> reporter: the texas mom tracks what she spend each week and says savings on bread and eggs add up. >> i would say i can save anywhere from about $25 to $50
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comparison to last year. >> reporter: the average price of a dozen eggs dropped from $2.57 a year ago to $1.54. down nearly 40%. a gallon of milk about 40 cents cheaper. a pound of ground beef, down about 50 cents. the reason -- the nation's food supplies have been steadily growing while demand has declined in major overseas markets like china. where a strong dollar has the made american good more expensive. >> going to put cheese on it. >> reporter: good for u.s. en but not pete bonds of texas who owns one of the nation's largest cattle operations. >> these cows would have been worth $3,000, $1,500 now. >> reporter: the loss in value for you means? >> several million dollars. >> reporter: several million dollars? >> yes. >> reporter: a price drop smaller ranchers may not sur survive. the government tried to boost the dairy industry buying $20
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whether that is enough depend on how long prices remain lower in the grocery aisle. michael buyers is ceo of fiesta mart. >> i think that is anybody's guess right now. what we are hearing, could go on throughened of year and into the first part of next year. >> reporter: but not everything is cheaper. elaine, the price of some fruits and vegetables has actually increased. due in part to a drought in california. >> reporter: manuel bojorquez. thank you. of a young boy may belater, don people what they can't do.
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tonight minnesota a remembering, jacob wetterling, lving an outside light on. tterng vanished 27 years ago. himains re found last week. jamie yuccas repoome say this is a case that should have never gone cold. eporter: 11-year-old, welt wetterling, aypical minnesota kid who loved hockey and time with his family. on the night of october 22nd, 1989, jacob, his brother and a friend biked to a convenience
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approached the boys and abducted jacob. letting the other two boys go. >> he grabbed jacob. he told me to run as fast as i could into the woods or else he would shoot. >> reporter: last week, 53-year-old, daniel heinrich told the fbi where wetterling's remains were located as an on going plea agreement. a reporter with the saint cloud times. >> i think they were waiting until they had definite proof. name have come and gone between the time of the abduction and where we are today such there were other people who looked like >> reporter: court documents show authorities interviewed heinrich three times beginning months after the abduction. tire marks from his car were consistent with those at the crime scene. he was never charged. >> i have always believed that they have been associated. >> reporter: jared scheirl, kidnapped and sexually assaulted nine months before jacob disappeared. last year, authorities found dna on the sweatshirt scheirl wore.
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child pornography. the good news is we have your guy. the bad news is statute of limitations is him. >> reporter: jared's attack was preceded by eight incidents in painesville between 1986 and 19 # 88. >> one victim was troy cole. >> gave a statement to city police. what happened. never heard anything back from anybody. one answered question now, why didn't they do anything >> reporter: this is the spot jacob was ated from three decades ago. just blocked from his family's home. and many here say they will never get over this tragedy. elaine, the wetterlings did release a statement earlier today saying that they have received an outpouring o support. but they're still deeply grieving. >> heartbreaking story. jamie, thank you. next, another star athlete has joined colin kaepernick's
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the largest living primate has been moved to the critically endangered list. africa's eastern gorilla population has fallen by 70% in 20 years. it is now one step away from extinction. illegal hunting is mostly to blame. the news is better for giant pandas. they'reow off the endangered list. actor hugh o'brien died at his home in beverly hills. o'brien a star in the late 1950s wyatt earp in one of tv's first westerns and started an organization to develop youth leadership with more than 350,000 graduates. hugh o'brien was 91. in the queen song "don't stop me now" freddie mercury, sang he was a shooting star leaping through the star. that was prophetic. day on what would have been his 70th birth a day.
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finally tonight, it has been said the only limits are the ones you set for yourself. chip reid discovered how true that is. >> reporter: 8-year-old matss stover ling was born with spina
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what he does have is fierce determination. what did it feel look when you got to the top? >> it felt really cool at the top. like i was flying or something. >> reporter: his chance to fly was made possible by eric gray, who founded catalysts sports which teaches climbing to people with all kind of disabilities. >> it just brings me joy to see that, to see people push themselves. and, and just go as far as they can. >> reporter: the ropes keep them from falling, but the upward progres >> what is the hardest part of this, john? >> um, remembering to breathe. >> reporter: remembering to breathe. >> reporter: dr. jonathan lessin had parkinson's for 13 years. >> left foot up. >> reporter: climbing he said is the perfect therapy. >> look you walk in. you feel stiff. you can't walk. your joints are stiff. you climb, you are making big movements. stretching your joints.
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can run out of here. >> reporter: gray who lost an eye to cancer calls climbing an equalizer. >> you will see a lot of people they will come in in a wheelchair. they leave the wheelchair behind. you take pictures, you can't tell whether they're, you know, have a spinal cord injury or whether they have cerebral palsy, it looks look someone is climbing. >> just ask channelle houson >> didn't think i would get to the top. >> a big challenge. i did it. proud of my sef. with no legs. >> reporter: no legs. but here all you really need is heart. chip reid, cbs news, alexandria, virginia. that's the "cbs overnight news" for tuesday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new
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this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "cbs overnight news". president obama continues to make history in the final months on the job. he is the first u.s. president to visit the isolated asian nation of laos. storm. laos, a communist controlled country. it will host an annual meeting of southeast asian nations. before arriving, mr. obama was at the g-20 summit in china. margaret brennan has our report. >> in a 90 minute meeting with vladamir president obama tried to salvage a cease-fire deal in syria. but he is walking away empty-handed. president obama had hoped to broker a ground breaking deal
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coordinate air strikes against isis and ooik lal qaeda linked terrorists in syria. last minute russia pulled back. the proposed deal would have stopped ally, bashar al-assad from bombing rebels, and also allowing aid into starving cities look aleppo. sadly the city came under siege as the deal fell apart. president obama said they needed the russians if they're to make progress in syria. >> if we do not get s the violence and easing the humanitarian crisis, it is difficult to see how we get to the next phase. >> reporter: any alliance with russia would be extraordinary. given their brutal behavior inside syria. but putis military might made him indispensable. the white house is reluctant to use force andas no diplomatic backup plan. the mideast crisis overshadowed president obama's main mission
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to bridge tension with china whose aggressive military expansion in asia is rattling nerves. with asia onedge, nuclear armed nort korea test fired three ballistic missile into the sea of japan. the white house strongly condemned the missile test and called it aec threat to boats and planes in the area. behind closed doors, president obama also pressured china's xi, the presidential candidates spent labor day in ohio. our latest tracker poll shows a tight race with hillary clinton up two points over donald trump. clinton addressed supportersn cleveland. >> that's why if tim and i are ected we are to say n to attacks onun bargaining. no to unfair trade deals like
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the security retiremen that you have earn. no to right to wor because right to work isrong for workers and wrong for america. >> clinton did notddress the latest fbi revelation as but her use of a personal e-mail sver while secretary of state. nancy rdes reports. >> she said it was a mistake. she learned from it. >> rorter: clinton's runningmate repeated the campaign line of defense this weekend after fbi notes showed that a clinton compu specialist deleted a tvef her e-mails last year, after a congressional committee had ordered thee preserved. the fbi not also revealed that clinton told agents she couldn't recall receiving any briefing or training on how to handle classified information as secretary of state. when presented with a confidential e-mail wh the marking c next to the pair graft, she speculated marked in alphabetical order and
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>> kaine, had this explanation. >> we look at so much material. if it is pulled out and identified. difficult to know if a statement paragraph is classified or not. >> reporter: in a trump, tweet went after clinton. lying hillary clinton told the fbi shid not know the c markings on classified. how can this be happening? >> theib also deter -- the fbi determined she used eightla berriesing her tenure. agents could not examine them because her lawyers were unable to locate any of these devices. donald trump's runningmate, mike pence. >> more evidence that hillary clinton is the most dishonest candate for president of the united states. >> she wasn't the only secretary of state wary of their e-mails becoming public reco 2009 e-mail, colin powell told clinton be vy careful.
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systems that captured the data. >> that exchange conadicts what powell told "people" maga last month when he says that he only sent clinton a memo abhis e-mail practices a year into her teen tenure. as to the trump attack and tweet, shows clinton doesn't understand that c means classified. he has his facts wrong too. the fbi director says the c classified. >> donald trump battling for votes. reporters asked him about his recent speech on illegal immigration. >> we had a very big crowd. it was unbelievably supportive and enthusiastic. d i think that probably, led to people saying, gee whiz, that was stuff. the crowd was so strong about it. the crowd loved it. some people loved it. way i look ate. mexico was 100%. the speech,he were, 60%
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the tone wastough. >> reporter: donald trp accomplished what he sought out to do. he made the race competitive. hillary clinton still leads. trump has the cut her post-conventiondvantage by more than half in the recent cbs news battleground survey. even though, trump faces charges of a muddled immigration policy and, those charges are coming from republicans. >> donald trump made it very clear that a priority of our criminal aliens. >> donald trump is going to get rid of very early on, 2 million to 3 million criminals that are here illegallien this country. >> reporter: donald trp's advisers have the talking points down on criminal undocumented immigrants. just not specifics. >> if they'reriminals they're going immediately. we d know what the number is. anything from 1 million to 2 million. country have misdemeanors. for millions of immigrants with
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>> what donald trump wants to do is take a deep breath and lk at where we are in the country then. find out a humane way to deal with those. >> senator jeff flake who skipped trump's immigration speech, calls it amuddle. >> he pivots, pivots right back. so it a 360 degree p at times. >> reporter: hillary clinton' campaign said immigrant families can see straight through her opponent's cynical ploys. and that trump's message >> a recent cbs news poll shows more than 60% of voters believe bo trump and clinton only talk about issues concerning minori to gain support. >> as part of his effort to reach african-american voters, trump traveled to detroit over the weekend. >> f centuries the african-american church has been the conscience of our country. >> reporter: as rudy giuliani defended trump's outreach to
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the african-american community. well he reached out to t african-american community. >> "cbs overnight news" will be right back. so pick your shade. and show the world your roots... ...with root touch-up. ? music ? extraordinary starts here. new k-y intense.
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federal officialsre concerned that hackers, working for a foreign country, could break into the u.s. voting system and wreak havoc. state owe election web sites in illinois arizo had to be shut down this summer because they were hacked. and just last week, the fbi warned, local officials nationwide to be aware of not only government computers at risk. ey're finding it easy to spy on yr cell phone. as sharon alfonzi found out for "60 minutes." >> if you have somebody's phone number what can you do? >>rack their whereabouts. know where they go to work. spy on whom they call. and what they say over the phone. and you can read their texts. >> we wanted to see whether knoll's group could do what they
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york to representative ted lou, a congressman from california, computer science degree from stanford and member of the house committee that oversees technology. he agreed to use our phone talking to his staff knowing they would be hacked. and they were. all we gave knoll was the number of the 60 minutes iphone that we lent the congressman. >> hello, congressman, sharon al >> soon as i called congressman lou on his phone. >> good, how are you doing? >> nell and his team were listening and recording both end of our conversation. >> i'm calling from berlin. wonder if i might talk to you about this hack story we are working on. >> they were able to do it by exploiting a security flaw they discovered in signaling system 7. or ss 7. it is a little known, but vital global network that connect
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>> congressman, thank you so much. >> reporter: every person with a cell phone needs ss 7 to call or ptext each other. though most of us have never heard of it. knoll says attacks on cell phones are growing. as the number of mobile devices explodes. ss 7 is not the way most hackers break into your phone. those hacks are on display in las vegas. >> three days of nonstop hacking. >> reporter: where john herring guided us through the unnventional convention where 20,000 hackers get together every year to share secrets and test their skills. >> you know, proving what is possible. any system can be broken. just about knowing how to barack it. >> herring is a hacker hem self. the 30-something whiz who co-founded mobile security company lookout when he was 23. lookout developed a free app scans your mobile phone for
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>> how likely is it that somebody's phone has been hacked? >> in today's world. there is really only two types of companies or two types of people, which are, those who have been hacked and realize it. those who have been hackednd haven't. >> hutch do you think pea have been ignoring the security of eicell phones? thinking i have got a pass code. i must be fine? >> i thinkost people have not really thought about their phones as computers. that is really starting to shift. awe. >> reporter: what you think of. >> absolutely. your mobile phone is a super computer in your pocket. more technology in your mobile phone than in the spacecraft that took man to the moon. it's really unbelievable. >> reporter: is everything hackable? >> yes. >> reporter: everything? >> yes. >> reporter: if somebody tells you you n't doit? >> i don't believe it. >> reporter: john herring offered to pro it. he gathered a group of ace hackers at our las vegas hotel. each of them a specialist in
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>> when you put your mey in the bank that didn't test the locks on their savesch we need to bar we need to try to barackreak it. >> reporter: do i need to connect to it? >> yes. >> reporter: it started when we logged on to the hotel wi-fichlt. it looked like the hotel wi-fi. herring created a ghost version, called spoofing. >> very legitimate. >> are you connected? awe >> reporter: i am. >> and i have your e-mail. >> reporter: you have access to my e-mail account? >> coming through right now. i actually, i now have a ride share application up here. all of the information that is being transmitted including, your account id. your mobile phone which i just got the foebl mobile number. and all the credit card
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weakness in mobile security is human nature. >> with social engineering you can't fix the human element. humans are gullible. they install malicious applications. they give up their password every day. and, it's really hard to fix it, human element. >> reporter: john herring warned us he could spy on any one with their own phone itch the camera had a clear view. we propped up the phone. set up cameras to record a demonstration. rs with an attachment to download. >> we're in business. then herring called from san francio. and proved the hack worked. >> you installed malware. broadcasting from your phone. >> my phone is not lit up? >> i understand, yes. >> that is so creepy. >> pitch black for us. >> in this case when i downloaded the attachment, herring was able to take control of my phone.
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to do anything to get attacked. all carson knolls team in berlin needed to get into the congressman's phone was the number. remember, ss 7, that little known global phone network we foemd you told you about earlie. there is a flaw that allowed knolls to intercept t congressman's calls and track his movements in washington and back home. >> the congressman has been in, in california, more specifically, the l.a. zoom in a little bit. torrance. >> reporter: the ss 7 network is the heart of the worldwide mobile phone system. phone companies use ss 7 to exchange billing information. billions of calls and text messages travel through its arteries daily. it is also the network that allows phones to roam. are you able to track his movements even if he moves the location services and turnds that off? >> yes, mobile network,
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where you are. so any choices that the congressman could have made, choosing the phone, choosing a pin number, installing or not installing apps have no influence over what we are showing. this is targeting the mobile network that of course is not controlled by any one customer. >> despite him making good choices. you are still able to get to his phone? >> exactly. >> carson and his team were legally granted access to ss 7 in exchange, the carriers wanted knoll to test the networks vul ner built vulnerability to attack. that's because criminals have proven they can get into ss 7. >> mobile networks are the only place in which this problem can be solved. no global policing of ss 7. each mobile network has to move -- to, to protect their customers on their networks. and that is hard.
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u.s. carriers are easier to access through ss 7 than others. 60 minutes contacted the cellular phone trade association, to ask about attacks on the network. they acknowledge there have been reports of security breaches abroad. but assured us that all u.s. cell phone networks were secure. congressman lou was on a u.s. network using the phone we lent him and he was part of our hacking demonstration from berlin. something we were able to capture off of your phone. >> hey, it's mark. how are you? i'm good. i sent you some revisions on the letter to the nsa regarding the, the data collection, you know, keeping. >> wow. >> what is your reaction to knowing that they were listening to all of your calls? >> first it is really creepy. and second it makes me angry. >> makes you angry, why? >> they could hear any call.
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phone. it could be stock trade. you want some one to execute. could be calls with the bank. >> carson knolls team automatically logged the numbers of every phone that called congressman lou. which means there is a lot more damage that could be done in just interception that one phone call. a malicious hacker would be able to target and attack every one of the other phones too. give us an idea without being specific of the types of people that woulde phone. there were other members of congress. other elected officials. last year, the president of the united states called me my cell phone. we discussed some issues. so the hackers, were listening in they would know the phone conversation. immensely troubling. >> reporter: knolls told us the ss 7 flaw is a risk to political leaders and business executives. whose private communications
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hackers. the ability to intercept cell network is an open secret among the world's intelligence agencies including ours. and they don't necessarily want that hole plugged. >> if you hear from intelligence agencies that flaw kpis valuabl to them and the information they are able to get from it. what would you say to that? >> that the people who knew about the flaw and saying that should be fired. >> you can see the full rep cbs news,.com. the "cbs overnight news" will be
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america's biggest veterans charity continues to clean house. wounded warrior project fired about half management staff in response to a scandal involving lavish parties and millions of dollars wasted. chip reid reports. >> i'll be damned if you will take hard working >> reporter: veteran eric malett quit his job denouncing what he saw as parties and executive salaries. >> it was extremely extravagant. dinners, alcohol. >> other former employees were so fearful of retaliation they asked us not to show their faces. >> a lot of the warriors that i saw needed mental health treatment. they don't get that from wounded warrior project.
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nardissi who made flamboyant entrances at parties, focusing on fund-raising rather than veterans pre v veterans programs. >> ceo, and this week, on cbs this morning, announced a serie transpar transparency. >> what i am doing today is of any donor doll >> wounded warrior project say it banned extravagant staff parties and will increase investments in mental health care. >> doubling down on the efforts. indeed that need is great and growing. >> donations to wounded warrior project have reportedly been down significantly ever since we exposed their extravagant spending. now, maurice, the new management hopes the changes they're making
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the retirement community in southern california, caters to hollywood veterans. called motion picture and television country house and hospital. a full service senior living center with a twist. own production staff. michelle miller paid a visit. >> this looks more like the set of a tv show than a retirement home. >> come on, let's shoot this. >> reporter: it is both. in los angeles, retired tv and film workers in their 80s, 90s and 100s, run their own closed circuit tv station. channel 22. the station and its retirement
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live here. we went behind the scenes to see what channel 22 means to them. >> what are you editing? >> 84-year-old ann faulkner schedules the station shows. she started action in the 80s in "roseann" before moving here she nearly died of cancer. >> i didn't really care. i let my system and my body go down because of the >> reporter: are you saying this place healed you? >> yes. absolutely. >> reporter: for some channel 22 staff, this community is mending broken hearts. >> i wrote three elvis movies. >> reporter: 86-year-old, tony lawrence worked on 70s and 80s classics, elvis and hawaii 50. moved here with his wife nancy after he was written off as too old for hollywood. >> when hit age 60, the ax
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>> it was devastating. >> reporter: in 2007, nancy died. >> i was kind of on a downward spiral. >> reporter: that changed when he met mattie, moved in earlier this year with her three legged dog. >> and i just -- fell for her in a big way. for a lot of other reasons. not just because she had a three-legged dog. lawrence now stars in channel 22 shows like dream catcher. internet dating. >> chapter 8 begins. >> reporter: he says living here turned his life around. >> stopping and smelling the roses is not just a phrase. it is a metaphor for, being awakened to life. and what life has. >> no matter what, season of life you are in. >> that's the "cbs overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new
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the sprint to the finish. trump reaches out to african-americans. >> why wouldn't they vote for me? >> while clinton invites the press on to her new plane. >> i am so happy to have all of you with me. it is just, i was waiting for this moment! >> no ocean for us. >> a young boy's murder may solved, but why did it take 27 years? and going up. life without limits. >> what did it feel like when you got to the top? >> it felt really cool. like i was flying or something.
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a year ago is in its final weeks, and picked up a new urgency over labor day weekend. democrat hillary clinton got help on the campaign trail from her husband, the former president. also, a vice president, her runningmate and a former opponent. republican donald trump was joined by mike pence. for both parties. ohio was the focus. the trump and clinton planes were even spotted on the tarmac major garrett begins our coverage. >> reporter: donald trump and mike pence greeted large enthusiastic crowd amid food huts at canfield fair outside typically democratic stronghold of youngstown, ohio. the throngs circled trump and pence and shouted their labor day approval for a gop ticket that aims to cut deeply into blue-collar northeastern ohio. >> we are going to bring jobs back to ohio.
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first time in months on his private jet and summed up the labor day pitch. >> we are bringing back jobs. jobs is the whole thing. it is going to be so vital to this country to bring back our jobs. our jobs have been taken like grant took richmond. >> reporter: with that civil war reference, trump addressed how to win african-american and hispanic votes with a thinly definecivil rights agenda. >> the democrats haven't done the level of poverty is 40%. the youth can't get jobs. 58% unemployed. i am going to fix it. why wouldn't they vote for me? the democrats all they do they get their votes every four years and wave bye-bye. i am going to fix it. >> reporter: trump implied hillary clinton is weak for failing to meet as trump did with recent flood victims in baton rouge or mexican president,enrique nieto. >> she didn't have the energy to go to louisiana and didn't have
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she should have gone to mexico. and she should have gone to louisiana. >> reporter: trump was also asked if he would participate in all three presidential debates? >> as of this moment, i look forward to the debates. i think it is an important element of what we are doing. >> after leaving these fairground. trump told us the size of the crowd and its enthusiasm convinced him he can win ohio. we did meet former democrat whose happily call themselves trump supporters. elaine here in the county, the climb is still very steep. president obama carried this county twice, with more than 62% of the vote. >> major garrett. major, thank you. hillary clinton spent much of august ising money out of public view. today, she as back on the campaign trail. here is nancy cordes. >> clinton kicked off labor day with a new ride and some new travel mates. her campaign press corpswhich has been flying separately until now, with little access to the
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>> i want to welcome you on to the plane. >> reporter: first stop, cleveland, ohio, battleground state so important, clinton's plane had to share space on the tarmac with donald trump's and his runningmates. >> he managed to turn his trip to mexico into an embarrassing international incident. >> high profile supporters went after trump in other battleground states. vice president biden in pennsylvania. >> he really does believe that workers ke runningmate compared trump to nixon. >> even richard nixon produced tax returns. the trump campaign likened clinton to nixon after fbi documents revealed her computer specialist deleted an e-mail archive three weeks after news of her server broke last march. clinton was peppered with question as but that on her campaign plane? >> do you feel that you contributed to the perception that there were these blurred lines between the state
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employees who seemed to go back and forth between the two? >> no, i don't, nancy. look, everything iid at the state department i did in furtherance of america's interests and our security. e statdepartment has said there is absolutely no evidence of anyind ofxternal influence. and i know that to be the fact. and i know that the people who work with me were devoted as well to pursuing the foreign policy that the obama >> clinton goes into the fall with an advantage in most battleou states. last cbsews battleground tracker has her up 4 in north carolina and up 8 in pennsylvania. ncy cordes, cbs news, cleveland. tonight hermine is still causing trouble after ruining a lot of labor day plans. there is still cleaning up debris along the florida panhandle.
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at least three people were killed in the south. the northeast was spared the high wind as the storm headed out to sea. but hermine is still sending large waves crashing in new england. here is demarco morgan. >> reporter: as hermine turned up the northeast she put a fizzle on the unofficial last day of summer. thrashing waves and dangerous rip currents kept most beach-goers from new jersey to cape cod out of the water. geraldine spent the day at coney island. >> we were in the water. lifeguard were looking at us. >> hermine, a cat 1 hurricane, came ashore early friday morning in florida with 80 mile per hour wind and dumped up to 18 inches of rain. it quickly lost steam as the it veered through the carolinas. still tropical storm warnings were issued for shore towns up the east coast. overnight, rough waters rocked this royal caribbean cruise ship headed from new jersey to
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>> when you see the crew on a cruise ship starting to get dizzy and sick you know it has gotten pretty bad. >> the owner of the beachcomber restaurant in wellfleet, massachusetts relieved to be spared the brunt of the storm. any concern when it was moving from florida? >> pretty much they thought it would stay east of us. fine with me. system is packing 60-mile-per-hour wind off the coast of new engnd and could make landfall by wednesday. hermine expected to head to sea th week.
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>>a new hurricane formed today in the pacific. newton is about 200 miles southeast of cabo san lucas tracking toward the baja peninsula. remnants could hit arizona by wednesday. >> today, president ob days at the g-20 summit in china. e president had hoped to strike a deem with russia to stop the fighting in syria. but that did not happen. margaret brennans traving with the president. >> reporter: president obama left his 90-minute meeting with vladamir putin empty-handed. >> we haven't yet closed the gaps in a way where we think it would actually work. >> reporter: putin pulled back at the last minute from a
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air strikes against isis and al qaeda linked terrorists. that mr. obama would even nsideraking such an extraordinary proposal shows how powerful vladamir putin has become. >> on the eve of what would have been another tense meeting with ilippineresident dutarte. the white house called it off afthe coroversial leader publicly insulted president obama. >> you must be respectful. >> reporter: then speaki, he said he would call the u.s. president a of a -- if questioned about the extra judicial killing of suspected drug runners since july. the president said he was awaver the insult. >> i have seen some of those colorful statements in the past. and so clearly he is a colorful guy. >> elaine, the white house says that president obama will instead meet with south korea's leader to discuss north korea's latest ballistic misle test. >> margaret brennan, margaret,
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first by a sitting u.s. president. laos paid a terrible price during the vietnam war as american bombs rained down in a secret campaign. as the adriana diaz learned, the rules are still fres >> reporter: try telling her the war ended 43 years ago. in july the 8-year-old picked up what he thought was a ball. instead it exploded. >> these bombs are just waiting out there on the land to be found by some child. >> reporter: she has made it her life's mission to get rid of the millions of unexploded bombs littering laos. >> this is a solvable problem. we can get the bombs out of the ground. there wouldn't be death and injury in the future. >> reporter: during the vietnam war, the u.s. dropped 270 million bombs on neing
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vietnamese supply routes. craters from the blasts still scar the landscape. laos is the most heavily bombed country in the world per capa. on average, bombs were dropped here every eight minutes for nine years. chamvaongsa, lobbied u.s. congress and raised millions to clear the land. one acre can take two months to clear. >> it took second for the bombs to drop. it will take a lifetime or two to clear i >> reporter: in e aos ter the war, chamvongsa and her family fled to the u.s. when she was 6. when she learned about the legacy of the u.s. bombing campaign, she knew she had to return. >> i would hopthat, you know, littlehildren would be able to walk to school without having to fear that they might not return at the end of the day. >> reporter: a bomb killed this
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thwas souch blood, she told us. he was just 5 years old. the family is now afraid to work their land. >> there is so much work to be done, but we are going to be able to finish this job if people continue to be committed. >> so th children like this one can play outside without consequences. adriana diaz, cbs news, laos. american shopper enjoying what could be the longest streakf prices in a half century. that's good if you have got a family to . not so good for farmers. here's manuel bojorquez. heather buen says putting food on the table has gotten easier. >> less painful to go to the store. >> reporter: the texas mom
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and says savings on eaan eggs add up. >> i would say i can save anywhere from about $25 to $50 some times on my grocery bills comparison to last year. >> reporter: the average price of a dozen eggs droppeom $2.57 a year ago to $1.54. down nrly 40%. gallon of milk about 40 cents cheaper. a pound of ground beef, down about 50 cents. the reason -- thti growing while demand has declined in major overseas maets like china. where a strong dollar has the made american good more expensive. >> going to put cheese on it. >> reporter: good for u.s. consumers likeable. en but not pete bonds of texas who owns one of the nation's largest cattle operations. reporter: the loss in value for you means? >>everal million dollars. >> reporteeveralillion dollars? >> yes.
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the dairy industry buying $20 million worth of cheese distributed to food banks whether that is enough depend on how long prices remain lower in the grocery aisle. michael buyers is ceo of fiesta mart. >> i think that is anybody's guess rit now. what we are hearing, could go on througned of year and into the first part of next year. >> reporter: but not everything is cheaper. elaine, the price of some fruits and vegetables has actually increased. due in part to a drought in california. >> reporter: manuel bojorquez. thank you. > coming up next, the murder >> later, don't tell these people what they can't d
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tonight thousands minnesota are remembering, jacob wetterling, leaving an outside light on. wetterling vanished 27 years ago. his remains were found last week. jamie yuccas reports, some say this is a case that should have never gone cold. >> reporter: 11-year-old, welt
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iend biked to a convenience store. on waye, a masked gunman approached the boys and abducted jacob. >> he grabbed jacob.o boys go. he told me to run as fast as i uld shoot.he woods or else he >> reporter: last week, 53-year-old, daniel heinrich told the fbi where wetterling's remains were located as an on going plea agreement. a repo with the saint cloud times. >> i think they were waiting e time of the abduction and n where we are today such ther were other people o >> reporter: court documents sh authoties interviewed heinrich three times beginning months after the auction. tire marks from his car were consistent with those at the crime scene. he was never charged. >> i have always believed that they have been associated. >> reporter: jared schrl, ! kidnapped and sexually assaulted nine months before jacob disappeared. last year, authorities found dna on the sweatshirt scheirl wore. and investigators, searched,
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the good news is we have your guy. the bad news is statute of limitations exist in your case we cannot prosecute him. >> reporter: jared's attack was preceded by eight incints in painesville between 1986 and 19 88. >> one victim was troy cole. >> gave a statement to city police. what happened. never heard anything back from anybody. one answered question now, why didn't they do anything about it >> reporter: this is the spot jacob was abducted from thre decades ago. just blocked from his family's home. and many here say they will never get over this tragedy. elaine, the wetterlings did release a statement earlier today saying that they have received an outpouring of support. but they're still deeply grieving. >> heartbreaking story. jamie,hank you. next, another star athlete has joined colin kaepernick's anthemrotest.
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but you have got a full day ahead of you, try mucinex 12-hour. only mucinex has a unique bi-layer tablet. the white layer releases immediately. mucinex is absorbed 60 percent faster than store brands. while the blue extended release layer lasts a full 12 hours. relieve chest congestion with mucinex, and enjoy living well. today president obama defended colin kaepernick's right not to stand during the national anthem. in china, the president said the 49ers quarterback cares about some real legitimate issues though he acknowledged it is a tough thing for the military to accept. kaepernick says he is protesting racial injustice. on sunday, soccer star, megan ropinoe joined the protest kneeling before a game, in her
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been moved to the critically endangered list. africa's eastern gorilla population has fallen by 70% in 20 years. it is now one step away from extinction. illegal hunting is mostly to blame. the news is better for giant pandas. they're now off the endangered list. actor hugh o'brien died at his home in beverly hills. o'brien a star in the late 1950s playing the real life he wyatt earp in one of tv's first westerns and started an organization to develop youth leadership with more than 350,000 graduates. hugh o'brien was 91. in the queen song "don't stop me now" freddie mercury, sang he was a shooting star leaping through the star. that was prophetic. today on what would have been
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finally tonight, it has been said the only limits are t ones you set for yourself. chip reid discovered how true that is. >> reporter: 8-year-old matss stover ling was born with spina bifida and has no use of his
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determination. what did it feel look when you got to the top? >> it felt really cool at the top. like i was flying or something. >> reporter: his chance to fly was made possible by eric gray, who founded catalysts sports which teaches climbing to people with all kind of disabilities. >> it just brings me joy to see that, to see people push themselves. and, and just go as far ashey can. >> reporter: the ropes keep them from falling, but the upward >> what is the hardest part of this, john? >> um, remembering to breathe. >> reporter: remembering to eathe. >> reporter: dr. jonathan lessin had rkinson's for 13 years. >> left foot up. >> reporter: climbing he said is the perfect therapy. >> look you walk in. you can't walk. your joints are stiff. you climb, you are making big movements. stretching your joints.
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>> reporter: gray who lost an eye to cancer calls climbing an equalizer. >> you will see a lot of people they will come in in a wheelchair. they leave the wheelchair behind. you take pictures, you can't tell whether they're, you know, have a spinal cord injury or whether they have cerebral palsy, it looks look someone is climbing. >> just ask channelle houson whose spine was broken in a car accident. >> reporter: what died you think? i did it. proud of my sef. with no legs. >> reporter: no legs. but here all y really need is heart. chip reid, cbs news, alexandria, virginia. >> that's the "cbs overnight news" for tuesday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us later for the morning news and cbs thisorning.
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this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "cbs overnight news". president obama continue make history in the final months on the job. he is the first u.s. president to visit the isolad nation of laos. air force one landed in a rain storm. laos, a communist controlled country. it will host an annual meeting of southeast asian nations. before arriving, mr. obama was at the g-20 summit in china. margaret brennan has our report. >> in a 90 minute meeting with vladamir putin, president obama tried toalvage a cease-fire deal in syria. but he is walking away empty-handed. president obama had hoped to
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coordinate air strikes against isis and al qaeda linked terrorists in syria. last minute russia pulled back. the proposed deal would have stopped ally, bashar al-assad from bombing rebels, and also allowing aid into starving cities look aleppo. sadly the city came undesiege as the deal fell apart. president obama said they needed the russians if they're to make ogress in syria. >> if we do not get some buy-in from the russians, on reducing the violence and easing th humanitarian crisis, it is difficult to see how we get to the next phase. russia would be extraordinary. given their brutal behavior inside syria. but putin's military mightade him indispensable. the white house is reluctant to use force and has no diplomatic backup plan. the mideast crisis overshadowed president obama's main mission here at the g-20. to bridge tensions with china whose aggressive military expansion in asia is rattling
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with asia on edge, nuclear armed north korea test fired three ballistic missile into the sea of japan. the white house strongly condemned the missile test and called it a reckless threat to boats and planes in the area. behind closed doors, president obama also pressured china's xi, to rein in north korea. the presidential candidates spent labor day in ohio. our latest tracker poll shows a tight race with hillary clinton up two points over donald trump. clinton addressed supporters in cleveland. >> that's why if tim and i are elected we are going to say no to attacks on unions. no to rolling back collective bargaining. no to unfair trade deals like
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no to pension cuts that deny you the security retirement that you have earned. no to right to work because right to work is wrong for workers and wrong for america. >> clinton did not address the latest fbi revelation as but her use of a personal e-mail server while secretary of state. nancy cordes reports. >> she said it was a mistake. she learned from it. >> reporter: clinton's runningmate repeated the campaign line of defense t weekend after fbi notes showed that a clinton computer specialist deleted a trove of r e-mails last year, after a congressional committee had ordered they be preserved. the fbi notes also revealed that clinton told agents she couldn't recall receiving any briefing or training on how to handle classified information as secretary of state. when presented with a confidential e-mail with the marking c next to the pair graft, she speculated marked in alphabetical order and questioned classified level. >> kaine, had this explanation.
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identified. difficult to know if a statement or paragraph is classified or not. >> reporter: in a trump, tweet went after clinton. lying hillary clinton told the fbi she did not know the c markings on documents stood for classified. how can this be happening? >> the fib also -- the fbi also determined she used eight black berries during her tenure. agents could not examine them because her lawywe to locate any of these devices. donald trump's runningmate, mike pence. >> more evidence that hillary clinton is the most dishont candidate for president the unit states. >> she wasn't the onlyecretary of state wary of their e-mails becoming public record. 2009 e-mail, colin powell told clinton be very careful. i got around it all by not saying much and not using
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>> that exange contradicts what powell told "pele" magazine last month when he says that he only sent clinton a memo about his e-mail practices a year into her teen tenure. as to the trump attack and tweet, shows clinton doesn't understand that c means classified. he has his facts wrong too. the fbi director says the c stood for confidential, not classified. >> donald trump battli votes. reporters asked him about his recent speech on illegal immigration. >> we had a very big crowd. it was unbelievably supportive and enthusiastic. and i think that probably, led to people saying, gee whiz, that was stf. the crowd was so strong about
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mexico was 100%. the spee, there were, 60% loved it.ought it was, the tone was tough. >> reporter: donald trump accomplished what he sought out to do. he made the race competitive. hillary clinton still leads. trump has the cut her post-convention advantage by more than half in the recent cbs news battleground survey. even though, trump faces chaes of a muddled immigration policy and, those charges are coming from republicans. >> donald trump made it very r administration will be removing criminal aliens. >> donald trump is going to get rid of very early on, 2 million to 3 million criminals that are here illegally in this country. >> reporter: donald trump's advisers have the talking points down on criminal undocumented immigrants. just not specifics. 700,000 in the country have re illegally committed felonies or serious misdemeanors. for millions of immigrants with no criminal record. trump's plan.
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is take a deep breath and look at where we are in the country then. find out a humane way to deal with those. >> senator jeff flake who skipped trump's immigration speech, calls it a muddle. >> he pivots, pivots right back. so it is a 360 degree pivot at times. >> reporter: hillary clinton's campaign said immigrant families can see straight through her opponent's cynical ploys. and that trump's message is clear. everyone must go. >> a recent cbs news poll shows more than 60% of voters believe both trump and clinton only talk about issues concerning minorities to gain support. >> as part of his effort to reach african-american voters, trump traveled to detroit over the weekend. >> for centuries the african-american church has been the conscience of our country. >> reporter: as rudy giuliani defended trump's outreach to minorities. >> for years, people say,
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well he reached out to the african-american community. >> "cbs overnight news" will be
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federal officials are concerned that hackers, working for a foreign country, could break into the u.svoting system and wreak havoc. state owe election web sites in illinois and arizona had to be shut down this summer because they were hacked. and just last week, the fbi warned, local officials nationwide to be aware of unauthorized in strugss. not only government computers at risk. they're finding it easy to spy on your cell phone. as sharon alfonzi found out for "60 minutes." >> if you have somebody's phone number what can you do? >> tra their whereabouts. know where they go to work. spy on whom they call. and what ty say over the phone. and you can read their texts. >> we wanted to see whether
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iphone from 60 minutes in new york to representative ted lou, a congressman from california, computer science degree from stanford and member of the house committee that oversees technology. he agreed to use our phone talking to his staff knowing they would be hacked. and they were. all we gave knoll was the number of the 60 minutes iphone that we lent the congressman. >> hello, congressman, sharon alfonzi from 60 minutes. >> soon as i called congressman u on h >> good, howre you doing? >> nell and hiteam were listening and recording both end of our conversation. >> i'm calling from berlin. wonder if i might talk to you about this hack story we are working on. >> they were able to do it by exploiting a security flaw they discovered in signaling system 7. or ss 7.
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global network that connect phone carriers. >> congressman, thank you so much. >> reporter: every person with a cell phone needs ss to call or text each other. though most of us have never heard of it. knoll says attacks on cell phones are growing. as the number of mobile devices explodes. ss 7 is not the way most hackers break into your phone. those hacks are on display in las vegas. >> three days of nonstop hacking. >>ep guideds through the unconvential conntion where 20,000 hackers get together every year to share secrets and test their skills. >> you know, provinghat is possible. any system can be broken. just about knowing h to barack it. >> herring is a hacker hem self. the 30-something whiz who co-founded mobile security company lookout when he was 23. lookout developed a free app scans your mobile phone for malware and alerts the user to an attack. >> how likely is it that
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>> in today's world. there reallonly two types of companir two types of people, which are, those who have been hacked and realize it. those who have been hacked and haven't. >> hutch do you think pea have been ignoring the security of their cell phones? thinking i have got a pass code. i must be fine? >> i think most people have not ones as computers.ut their that is really starting to shif >> reporter: what you think of. like having a laptop now? >> absolutely. your mobile phone is a super computer in your pocket. more technology in your mobile phone than in the specraft that took man to the moon. it's really unbelievable. >> reporter: is everything hackable? >> yes. >> rorter:verything? >> yes. >> reporter: if somebody tells yoyocan't do it? >> i don't beliet. >> reporter: john herring offered to prove it. he gathered a group of ace hackers at our las vegas hotel.
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figuring out how to protect. >> when you put your money in the bank that didn't test th locks on their safes, we need we need to try to break it. >> reporter: do i need to connect to it? >> yes. >> reporter: it started when we logged on to the hotel logged on to the hotel wi-fi. it looked like the hotel wi-fi. called spoofing.a ghost version, this looks legitimate. awe >>eporter: i am. >> and i have your e-mail. reporter: you have access to my e-mail accot? >> coming through right now. i actually, i now have a ride share application up here. all of the information that is being transmitted including, your account id. your mobile phone which i just t the bile number. and all the credit card associated with the account. >> reporter: the greatest weakness in mobile security is
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>> with social engineering you can't fix the human elemen humans are gullibl they install malicious applications. they give up their password every day. and, it's really hard to fix it, human element. >> reporter: john herring warned us he could spy on any one with r own one itch the camera had a clear view. we proede phone. set upameras to record a demonstration. with an atment tdownload. >> we're in business. then herring called from san ancisco. and provhe hacworked. you italled malware. oadcasting from your phone. >> my phone is not lit up? >> i understand, yes. >> that is so creepy. >>itch black for us.
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downloaded the attachment, heing was able to take control of my phone. but coressman lou didn't have to danng to get attacked. all carson knolls team in berlin needed to get into the congressman's phone was the number. remember, ss 7, that little known global phone network we emd told you aut earlier. there is a flaw that allowed knolls to intercept th congressman's calls and track his movements in washington and back home. >>he congressman has been in, in cornia, more specifically, the l.a. area. zoom ia little bit. torrance. >> reporter: the ss 7 network is the heart of the worldwide mobile phone system. phe companies use ss 7 to exchange billing information. billions of calls and text messages travel through s arteries daily. it is also the network that allows phones to roam. are you able to track his movements even if he moves the location services and turns that
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where you are. so any choices that the coressman could have made, choosing the phone, choosing a pin number, installing or not installing apps have no inuence over what we are showing. this is targeting the mobile network thf cour is not controlled by any one customer. >> despite him making good choices. you are still able to get to his phone? >> exactly. >> carson and his team were legally granted access to ss 7 by several international cell phone carriers. vulnerability to attack. that's because criminals have proven they can get into ss 7. >> mobile networks are the only plin whi this problem can be solved. no global policing of ss 7. each mobile network has to move -- to, to protect their customers on their networks. and that is hard. >> knoll and others told us some
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something we were able to capture off of yr >> hey, it's mark. how are you? i'm good. i sent you some revisions on the letter to the nsa regarding the, the data collection, you know, keeping. >> what is your reaction to knowing that they were listeni to all of your calls? >> first it iseally eepy. and second it makes me angry. >> they coular anyall.
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you want some one to execute. could be calls with the bank. >> carson knolls team automatica?lly logged the nbers of every phoneressman lou. which means there a lot more damagehat could be done in just interception that o?0??ne e call. a malicious hacker would be able to target and attack every one of the other phones to give us andea without being specific of the types of people that would be in a congressman's phone. congress. other ecd officials. last year, the president of the united states called me my cell one. we discussed some issues. so if the hackers, were listening in they would know the phone conversati immensely troubling. >> reporter: knolls told us th ss 7 flaw is a risk to political leaders and business executives. whose private communications
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the ability interpt cell network is an open secret among the world's intelligce agencies including ours. and they d'tessarily want that hole plugged. >> iu hearrom intelligence agencies that flaw is valuable to tm and the information they are able to get from it. what would you say to that? >> that the people whonew about the flaw and saying that should be fired. >> you cbs news,.com. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. we're going to prove just how wet and sticky yourrent gel antiperspirant is. now, we're going to show you how degree dry spray is different. degree dry spray. degree. it won't let you down. covergirl has big news for lhes! lashblast is our most award winning mascara millions of girls, millions of looks
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americggest veterans charcouse. wounded warrior project fired about ha magent staff in response to a scandal involvin lavisharties and millions of dollars wasted. ch rd reports. >> i'll be damned if you will take hard working american's money and drink it and waste it. >> reporter: veteran eric malett quit h j denouncing what he saw as parties and executive salaries. >> it was extremely extravagant. dinners, alcohol. >> other former employees were so fearful of retaliation th
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>> a lot of the warriors that saw needed mental health treatment. th don't get that from wounded warrior project. >> after an internal investigatio t board of directors fired ceo, steven nardissi who made flamboyant changes and promised riess transparency. >> what i am doing todays pledging to everyone my best efforts, to squeeze every nickel of any donor dollar. >> wounded warrior project says it banned extravagant staff parties and will increase investments in mental health care. >> doubling down on the efforts. indeed that need is great and growing. >> donations to wounded warrior project have reportedly been down signifintly ever since we exposed their extravagant no maurice, the new management hopes the changes they're making will help convince the public that they are back on track. >> the "cbs overnight news" will
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>>the retirement community in southern california, caters to hollywood veterans. called motion picture and television country hse and hospital. a sr living center with a twist. this one comes complete with its owod >> this looks more like the set of a tv show than a rerent home. >> come on, let's shoot this. >> reporter: it is both. in los angeles, retired tv and film workers in their 80s, 90s and 100s, run their own closed circuit tvtation. channel 22. the station and its retirement
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motion picture and television fu, than 200 residents live here. we went behind the scenes to see what channel 22 means to them. >> what are you editing? >> 84-year-old ann faulkner schedules the station shows. she started acting in the 80s in "roseann" before moving here she nearly died of cancer. >> i didn't really care. i let my system and my body go downecause othe surgery. place healed you? >> absolutely. >> reporter: for some channel 22 staff, this counis mending broken hearts. r: 86-year-old, tony s movies. lawrence worked on 70s and classics, elvis and hawaii 50. moved here with his wife nancy after he wtten off as too old for hollywood. >> when i hit age 60, the ax came down like, a guillotine. >> reporter: what did that feel
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died. i was kind of on a downward spiral. >> reporter: that changed when he met mattie, who moved i earlier this year with her three legged dog. >>nd i just -- fell for her in a big way. for a lot of other reasons. not just because she had a three-legged dog. lawrence now stars in channel 22 shows like dream catcher. about a wiwer who tries internet datg. >> chapter 8 begins. >> reporter: he says livinre turned his life around. >> stopping and smelling the roses is just a phrase. it is a metaphor for, being awakened to life. and at life has. >> no matter what, season of
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? it's tuesday, september 6th, 2016 this is the "cbs morning news." a close encounter in ohio for the trump and clinton campaigns. withhey are planes parked on same runway. and a rare occurrence on board both as the candidates finally took questions from the press. president obama cancelled the meeting withhe president of the philippines after he hurled an insult athe commander in chief. now, he says he's sorry.

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