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tv   Teen Kids News  FOX  November 28, 2015 9:30am-10:00am EST

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that's why it's time it has the fastest internet and wifi available. with speeds from 50 to 500 megs. and right now, you'll get 50 meg fios internet, tv and phone for 79.99 a month online for your first year. and with a 2 year agreement, we'll give you all the premium 400 dollars back. so go online or call now. get out of the past. get fios. >> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm livia. let's start with our top story for this week. this report is brought to you by a grant from the connecticut
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when it comes to tobacco use, there's a lot of misinformation out there. emily separates fact from fiction. >> by now, most of us know that cigarettes are unhealthy. but how do cigarettes stack up against other forms of tobacco? for example, what's do you think is safer - cigarettes or cigars? >> probably cigars, 'cause there's, like, less additives and stuff, i guess. >> how about cigarettes versus pipes? >> i think smoking cigarettes is safer than smoking pipes. >> pipes and cigars really have the same danger as smoking traditional cigarettes, because you're getting the nicotine, the tobacco, and all the toxins that you get from burning the tobacco, just like cigarettes. that occurs in cigars and pipes, as well. >> another way to smoke tobacco is with a device called a
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>> a hookah is also known as a water pipe, and you use it to smoke a tobacco which is burned with charcoal. and the smoke goes through water, and people inhale it through a pipe. >> i would probably say that smoking from a water pipe is safer. >> a lot of people think it's kind of safe to use hookah. it comes in different flavors, too. the smoke from hookah, though, science shows, contains a lot of things that are similar to cigarettes. it does contain tar, and it does contain chemicals which are linked to cancer. >> okay, so, we've heard that however you smoke tobacco, it's bad for you. but how about tobacco you don't burn, like chewing tobacco? >> i think chewing tobacco is safer, because what i know from it -- a lot of athletes like baseball players do chewing tobacco, so i would think that if an athlete can do it, it would be safer than smoking cigarettes. >> tobacco that you chew or snort or snuff -- that all
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contains nicotine, which is still addictive. the chewing tobacco actually contains little pieces of broken glass to help get the nicotine into your system a little bit faster, so think about that before you put the chewing tobacco in your mouth. >> i know chewing tobacco can lead to mouth cancer and other sicknesses. >> tobacco products like chewing tobacco, snuff, dip, which are all smokeless tobacco products, tend to have greater rates of oral issues -- so, cavities, gum disease, tooth decay leading to tooth loss. >> and you can develop cancer in your mouth, your head, and your neck in the future. >> it's equally as dangerous, 'cause it's still going into your system, and it will also cause damage to yourself as well as just regularly smoking it. >> correct. remember, if someone tells you only cigarettes are bad for you, don't believe it. they're just blowing smoke. for "teen kids news," i'm emily.
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>> because of this teen, countless lives will be saved. i'll have that story when
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>> when organ transplants were first performed, they were considered medical miracles. today, we tend to take the transplant of organs like a heart or a kidney for granted. what many also take for granted is that if they or someone they love should ever need a new organ, one will be available. that's not necessarily the case. >> lauren shields seems like a typical kid -- riding her bike, hanging out with her big brother, walking the dog. and she was a typical kid, until six years ago, when her life took a terrible turn. >> well, it was around the time of my 7th birthday that i started feeling just very tired, and i was just not like myself at all. i didn't have any appetite, and i lost all my energy.
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heart was seriously damaged. >> so... it was just... a complete shock just to know that from one day to the next i had gone -- like, i was never born with any defect or anything. i had simply just caught a virus that attacked my heart. >> that's how lauren wound up on a list -- the long, long list of americans waiting for a transplant. >> we have, nationwide, 117,000 people waiting for a life-saving organ transplant. and simply put, there are not enough people registered as organ donors to save lives. >> fortunately for lauren, a donor came through in time. she received her new heart and started on the road to recovery. she spent so much time in the hospital, she and her mother created a book about her experience. wanting to make a difference, lauren teamed up with the organization donate life. they urge people to enroll as organ donors.
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>> my friend lauren received a heart transplant. i have a liver transplant. and between us, we have about 9 extra years of life already. >> so you'd think that lots of people would sign up to be organ donors. but lauren learned that many don't. and that gave her a new mission in life. she helped persuade her state legislature to pass a new law. it changed the driver's license form. >> in the past, that section on that form was optional. now, when people are going to get their license or renew their license, they will have to answer the question, "do they want to become an organ donor?" they can either check "yes," or they can check "skip this question." >> by being required to check either "yes" or "skip," people can't just ignore the question like they could before. it's believed that extra moment of consideration might be enough to make more people willing to become organ donors. oh, and by the way, the name of that legislation? lauren's law. >> wow. that was, like, incredible to
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me that could ultimately make a difference in organ donation and hopefully increase the numbers on enrolled donors. it was just a great experience. >> oh, say, can you see >> lauren shares her story as often as she can. for example, she makes it a point to attend the ceremony where new american citizens are sworn in. >> it's a great opportunity to tell the new citizens of this great country about the opportunities they have to participate in our democracy and one those things being saving lives. >> and the governor signed into law, into law that bears her name, lauren's law. >> at age 13, lauren is already an experienced public speaker. >> just when it seemed that all hope was lost, the doctors came in and told mommy that my donor was found. i had an angel that was willing to give me the gift of life. the very next day, i had a heart transplant that saved my life.
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program, you will someday help people just like me. >> it's just amazing how this young girl stands up there and tells people about her journey which, in turn, inspires others to join this movement, to sign up and become organ donors. just today, we had close to 50% of all the people there signing up. >> prior to this speech, i donor. but after hearing how it changed her life and gave her another opportunity, i decided to become an organ donor. >> i love to help people. i love to give for people. so it's, you know -- it's in my heart. so it touch me a lot, her story. >> lauren would gladly have passed up this way to become famous. but she's using her story to spread an important message. and so can you, even if you're not yet old enough to register to be a donor.
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about organ donation, discussing it with their friends and family, and if it resonates with them, you know, advocating for it. >> lauren's very aware that her life is possible because someone else's life ended. she's forever grateful to people who choose organ donation if a tragedy occurs. >> it's the best gift that you will ever give anyone. you're giving the gift of life, and your life is living on in someone else. >> in fact, the organs from a single donor can save the lives of eight people. to find out more, there's a link on our website. for "teen kids news," i'm rachel. >> i'm cailin. >> and i'm hannah. >> and we'll tell you... >> what it's like being twins... >> when "teen kids news" continues.
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>> ever wonder what it was like to be an identical twin? or how about whether twins share a special connection? well, alexa got the scoop on this, from two sisters who have a special connection with
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"teen kids news." >> cailin and hannah are identical twins. and they're no strangers to working together. they have been reporting for teenkidsnews.com together for a few years now. and they've written a book together. "the twin connection" has recently won the juvenile nonfiction national indie excellence award. today, cailin and hannah are here talk with us about their book and what it's like to be an identical twin. >> i'm cailin. >> i'm hannah. >> [ chuckles ] >> now that we got that straight, do you ever trick people, pretending to be each other? >> okay, there was one major time -- i think it was in eighth grade -- and it was crazy tie day. and we spent the entire morning coordinating our outfits. >> our clothes, our skirts. >> we made sure that every curl of our hair was exactly the same. >> we curled our hair in the mirror next to each other. >> and everything was perfect, but we forgot that it was crazy tie day.
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completely gave it away. we were trying to switch classes -- just homeroom, so it wasn't, like, math. we didn't try to take tests for each other or anything. but our homeroom teacher noticed that we were wearing different ties. every set of twins has to do that at one point, right? >> so we knew that, and that's why we did it. >> cailin, what would you say is the best thing about being a twin? >> the best thing about being a twin for me is just -- and this is probably sort of obvious, but just, for us, it's that we get to experience everything together -- i mean, even what we've been doing with "teen kids news." we interview together. we have the same interests, so we like doing things that we enjoy doing, even just down to the fact we both love animals and, you know, we like going outside and going for walks and bike riding. just, everything that we like to do, we both like to do together. >> and i know that whenever i go through an experience, whether it be good or bad, i know she'll always know how i'm feeling. and so it's easy to have conversations about it together. and we kind of bounce ideas off of each other easily. it's really nice. friend. >> yeah.
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[ both chuckle ] >> hannah, how about the thing you like least about being a twin? >> i think that there are a lot of misconceptions. i know this was a thing, like, a long time ago, but there's a circus called barnum & bailey and other circuses, actually. and they kind of exploited the twin thing, and they kind of made it, like, a novelty act. >> creepy. >> yeah, the creepy twin thing. and i guess some people still kind of have that mind-set, although not as much. there's another part about being a twin which is kind of hard, which is you compare your life to your twin more than usual. >> 'cause it's like comparing apples to apples. >> yeah, so, if one twin gets a job or some opportunity, then you compare it directly -- and the other twin doesn't, you compare it directly to yourself and say, like, "why did she get that opportunity over me?" and i think you're harder on yourself in some ways. >> and it's more that twins -- like, i think for twins, when they're on the same playing field, if one twin succeeds, the other twin is more likely to see the other's success as their
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failure, even though that's not true, so... i just answered your question. [ both laugh ] >> that's okay. i agree. >> now, obviously, you're identical on the outside, but what about when it comes to your personalities? are there differences there? >> i think, for the most part, we're pretty similar, but i always say that she's more emotional than i am, which means that, like, in our case, she takes things harder. >> she's usually the one that kind of rationalizes my thoughts. like, we'll be upset about something, and i'll go to her and say, "oh, i just can't get over this." and she's the one who says, "yeah, but you have to think of it this way." and she'll start giving me examples. so i do that sometimes, but a lot of the time, it's her. >> yeah. >> so i would say she -- yeah, the emotional twin. >> i think that's the main difference. >> yeah. >> what made you decide to write a book together? >> well, we've always both been very into writing and storytelling. i think that's part of the reason why we enjoy journalism so much, 'cause it's storytelling. and kind of what inspired us to write "the twin connection" was hearing all the people -- people are very curious about twin
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relationships. and we noticed that's it's our classmates, relatives, people we meet on the streets, people we meet in grocery-store checkouts. people are just so interested in twin relationships. and so we decided that we wanted to answer those questions, whether they be lighthearted ones like, "have you ever switched classes?" or more serious ones like separation anxiety or things like that with your twin. we decided that we wanted to write a book answering those questions, only through stories in a fun and relatable way. i think that everybody, twin or not, will be able to relate to the stories. >> well, thank you both for being here, and congratulations on the book. >> thanks for having us. >> this was fun. thank you so much. >> while being a twin is not that common, there has been a steady increase in the number of twins in the past 30 years. today, about 1 in every 30 babies born in the u.s. is a twin. for "teen kids news," i'm alexa. >> there's lots more ahead on "teen kids news," so don't go away.
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>> as you're about to see, a state flag can have a lot to say. >> when the american colonies declared their independence from england, one led the way with a rousing motto. >> the year was 1774, two years before the declaration of independence. and new hampshire declared their own independence from great britain. their motto at the time was "live free or die," and it's still the state motto today. >> another revolutionary first for new hampshire is pictured here on the state flag. in 1776, the warship raleigh was the first to fly the new american flag. new hampshire is home to many other firsts. the first potato was grown here. america's first astronaut in space, alan shepard, was born here, as was the first free public library. >> new hampshire is known as the granite state, and it's because
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their number-one natural resource is granite. this is a particularly good stone for building bridges, houses, even statues. and although the colony was first established for fishing, they quickly learned what they really had going on. >> those nine stars around the border signify an additional claim to fame. after the revolutionary war, our new constitution required approval by 9 of the 13 states. new hampshire made it happen by being the ninth state to ratify the famous document. with "flag facts," i'm brandon. [ baseball bat thunks ] [ crowd cheering ] >> despite hitting 755 career home runs, hank aaron hit 3 home runs in a single game only once. the date was june 21, 1959, and his braves were taking on willie mays and the san francisco giants. aaron's 3 two-run home runs helped the braves win 13 to 3. i'm matt for "teen kids news."
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engineering students at the university of colorado are on a roll. they created a material that's ordinarily flexible. but when pressure is exerted, it becomes rigid. the process requires forcing together layers of construction paper, sealing them with plastic, and then pumping out the air. so what did they make with this scientific breakthrough? a skateboard, with the unique attribute that it can be folded in half. called the "floppy board," it can be easily stored in your backpack between rides. just what the world needed. >> this important message is brought to you by the national road safety foundation. [ car door shuts ] [ engine turns over ] [ car horn honks ]
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[ seatbelt clicks ] [ laughter ] >> oh! >> oh, no! [ seatbelt clicks ] >> yeah! [ car horn honks ]
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>> this report is brought to you by steelseries. many of us play video games, but you may be surprised to learn that there are people who actually make playing video games a career. it's called e-sports, and like traditional sports events, lots of people attend them. in fact, it's estimated that more than 70 million people worldwide watch pro gamers go head-to-head at e-sport competitions. colleges are getting in the game, too. robert morris university in chicago gives athletic scholarships to e-sports players. and some ivy league schools participate in an e-sports college league. so, how can an average video game player step up their game to compete on this level? joining me today to talk about this are mallory loar of steelseries, a company that makes gaming gear, and zombiunicorn. welcome. >> hi. thanks for having us. >> okay, so, zombiunicorn,
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that's obviously not your given name. >> no, that's my gaming username, and i picked it because i wanted to do something different than my real name that was non-gendered, and i like zombies and unicorns. >> and you are what's called a streamer. can you explain what that means? >> sure. streamers are people who stream themselves playing video games live, usually with running commentary about the game. and viewers can interact and chat on sites like twitch.tv. you can also watch pre-recorded content on youtube and have a lot of fun. >> do people actually spend a lot of time watching your stream? >> oh, absolutely. i stream more than 20 hours a week, probably closer to 60, on twitch.tv, and it's a pretty big deal. there's a lot of streamers who have built up large audiences career. money? >> yes, if you have a big enough following, some companies might reach out to you, such as steelseries and sponsor your stream. >> that brings us to mallory. you work for one of these companies.
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>> the gear that e-sports gamers use are things like headsets, mice, keyboards, controllers. having the right gear makes all the difference, whether you're a professional gamer or an everyday gamer who wants to improve. >> so what sets your products apart from the rest? >> well, steelseries is really focused on supporting the growth of competitive gaming, so we even have a team of e-sports gamers on staff to test and develop the products -- for example, this new siberia 200 headset. it's super comfortable and has a self-adjusting, over-the-head suspension system. it provides audio with realistic, immersive sound, and it has a unique retractable microphone. and it's available on amazon for $79, so you can put it on your holiday wish list. >> that's pretty cool. is there a special inspiration for these? >> yes. actually, there are seven color combinations inspired by the passion and personal style of top professional streamers and e-sports athletes. you can see their stories and what inspires the true colors behind these talented and dedicated gamers at steelseries.com. >> very interesting stuff. thanks for joining me. >> thanks for having us. >> thanks for having us.
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>> if you are really into playing video games, you might want to explore what it takes to get a college scholarship for it. for "teen kids news," i'm eric. >> that wraps it up for this edition of "teen kids news." we'll see you again next week. >> write to us at
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