Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 1, 2015 2:07am-4:01am EDT

2:07 am
reasons here, scott but i think they boil down to two. first he is trying to prop up up assad. assad is weaker today than he's been since the fall of 2012 and putin is trying to prop him up. why? because putin really fears that if assad were to depart the scene there would be more instability in syria that isis could grow even more, perhaps take over damascus. he really believes that. the second reason is that russia in general, putin in particular want to be seen as major players on the global stage, and this gives that to putin, as well. >> has the obama administration been out maneuvered by russia? >> i think the real problem here scott, is that what putin has done on the ground in syria has now made it more difficult to get to the only solution to the problem. the only solution to the problem is a negotiated transfer of power from assad to something else. that's been our strategy all along. he's undercutting our strategy. >> michael thank you so much.
2:08 am
>> you are welcome. >> the cbs overnight news will be right
2:09 am
welcome to subway, what can i make for you? how about one of our reuben sandwiches? choose from tender corned beef or oven roasted turkey breast, topped with sauerkraut melty swiss cheese and thousand island dressing. enjoy one while they're here! subway. eat fresh.
2:10 am
there's breaking news in washington tonight where members of the u.s. secret service are accused in a scheme to retaliate against a republican congressman. >> reporter: as head of the house oversight committee, jason chafe fets has investigated misconduct by the secret service including an indent in march where agents allegedly drove
2:11 am
drunk on white house grounds a department of homeland security inspector general says in retaliation some at the secret service saw to embars him. according to the report the assistant director wrote in an e-mail some information he may find embarrassing needs to get out. days later it was cleeked to the media. report says at least 45 members of the secret service viewed the application. the inspector general concluded the conduct was simply wrong. >> i don't trust them. i really don't trust them. >> reporter: chaffetz says it reflects deeper agency. >> if they are doing this to me who knows what else they are doing. it really is scary. >> reporter: he assistant director who sent the e-mail said he was venting and didn't want the information leaked. the director of the secret service apologized and said he
2:12 am
will take appropriate disciplinary actions. >> jeff thank you. early today, the state of georgia executed kelly gissenander. she sang "amazing grace" as the lethal drug was administered. the pope asked oklahoma to spare another murderer. he did get a reprieve today because of questions about a new lethal injection drug. also in oklahoma today, the tulsa county sheriff resigned after he was indicted. the charges stem from the fatal shooting of eric harris by reserve deputy robert bates last april. bates, who says he meant to use his taser is a friend of sheriff stanley glans. he is accused of cover ugh up a report that questioned whether
2:13 am
bates was fit for duty. exxon mobil says it is de selling its refinery in torrance california. it has been shut since a tremendous explosion last february. we found out the disaster was nearly a catastrophe. >> look at the damage to this portion of the refinery were when part of this refinery blew up in february south of los angeles smoke filled the sky and ash rained down on nearby neighborhoods. >> it was scary. >> reporter: her family lives a mile from the plant and felt the blast. so strong it registered 1.7 on the richter scale. >> thought it was an earthquake because it shook and it was loud big boom. >> reporter: four workers were injured. at the time exxon mobile told residents there was no danger to the community. cbs news learned it could have been much worse. >> we were really, really lucky. >> reporter: vanessa sutterland the recently appointed head of the chemical safety board, the
2:14 am
federal agency charged with investigating the accident calls it a near miss. >> i think it is of concern to us we have a facility that had a near miss which i actually feel lucky about. it could have been much more catastrophic. >> this picture tells it all. >> reporter: catastrophic she says because when the explosion happened a piece of equipment weighing 80,000 pounds was sent flying nearly 100 feet. sources say this photo, submitted to federal investigators and obtained by cbs news shows that piece landed a few feet from a tank containing a form of hydrochloric acid. it is a highly toxic chemical that if released can form a cloud of toxic gas that can drift for miles. potentially causing thousands of injuries and even deaths. >> hf in our view and in my view, is one of the most hazardous and deadly chemicals. in worse-case scenarios, at dead live levels it causes asphyxiation because once
2:15 am
inhaled it causes respiratory problems that build up and you ultimately drown. >> reporter: 200,000 people live within three miles of the plant. in documents filed with the epa, exxon mobil estimates in a worse-case scenario release of hydrochloric acid all of them in that distance could be injured or die. >> that does not sound reassuring to the community around that plant. if i were in the community i would be concerned. >> exxon mobil disputes the idea it was a risk in february telling us they strongly disagree with any claims there was a significant risk to the hydro florek acid unit. the company refers our questions about the risks of hydro florek acid to an industry group. spokesman -- >> i think the technology that are employed in these refineries for all of the hazardous
2:16 am
materials used have proved to be successful. >> what if the risks are managed and you have an accident and people are killed? is it worth that risk? >> not going to answer that question. sorry. >> reporter: last month, there was a leak of hydroflouric acid. sutherland said the company is resisting the agency's subpoenas for information about the february explosion. >> why do you think they don't want you to have it? >> generally, my experience as a regulator and enforcer when someone doesn't want you to have records is they don't kwa want you to see what is in it. >> strong words. 50 u.s. refineries use the chemical nationwide. united steelworkers study found 75% had hf related incidents or
2:17 am
near bhiss misses within the past three years and 50% ouf impacted the community sdplchlt anna werner thank you. there will be no shut down of the federal government facing a midnight deadline congress approved a spending bill today. pub cans were fighting to end funding for planned parenthood which provides abortion and other health services. the planned parenthood funding will stay. the bill will fund the government for only ten weeks. why are some high schools dropping football? and foul balls prove elusive when the cbs evening news continues. >> more real news every morning. >> wildfires in the west are tearing through homes and forcing people out of their neighborhood. >> the wind is pushing the flames up the hillside away from the highway. >> helicopter snent by the national guard doing water drops.
2:18 am
. >> cbs news, honored with ten edward r. myrrh row edward edward r.murrow awards.
2:19 am
♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ geico motorcycle great rates for great rides. today you can do everything in just one click, even keep your toilet clean and fresh. introducing lysol click gel. click it in to enjoy clean freshness
2:20 am
with every flush. lysol. start healthing. ♪ yeah, click ♪
2:21 am
today the ncaa scored a big victory. a federal appeals court struck down a plan to pay college athletes as much as $5,000 a year on top of tuition with room and board. college football of course is bigger than ever but many high schools are dropping the sport. >> let's go! russia football runs through isaac's blood line. er play. the sophomore from maplewood, missouri choose a different field. >> my mom is like soccer is your thing. she doesn't want me to get hurt. soccer is something i really liked. >> reporter: the school has a proud tradition of football
2:22 am
having gone to the state championships as recently as 2010. but there's no team at maplewood this season. maplewood had a hard time finding enough players due to injuries and lack of interest. >> when you have low numbers of students from a school this size you are drawing all the way from freshmen to seniors. that could have a significant affect on the possibility of injuries. >> going against bigger teams. >> absolutely. that was a difficult for us also. >> reporter: the number of high school football players in the u.s. declined by 25,000 over the past five years. last year, five high schoolers died playing football. more than in college, semi pro or professional levels. still maplewood senior misses the game. >> i was devastated because football was my favorite sport. even when we didn't do good in the games we had the fun experience with the team.
2:23 am
>> reporter: students will still attend the homecoming game but for the first time the sport will be soccer. cbs news maplewood, missouri. nascar's tony stewart makes a big announcement. that's next.
2:24 am
tony stewart said today next year will be his last lap of sprint cup racing. he will be 45 and hasn't won a race in two years. last year he hit and killed a driver who with confronted him during a dirt track race. he can't help but feeling bad for a fan at yankees stadium last night. first a foul pop went through his hands and then another foul bounced off of his chest. a skimp thetic ball boy flipped him a ball but that went off his face. his companion hid her face in embarrassment. also crying foul the folks who operate these fan boats. their story is next.
2:25 am
welcome to subway, what can i make for you? how about one of our delicious reuben sandwiches? loaded with your choice of tender corned beef or oven roasted turkey breast. we top'em with sauerkraut and swiss cheese drizzle on our thousand island dressing and toast'em to perfection on your choice of freshly baked bread. don't miss the corned beef reuben and the turkey reuben. both won't be here long, so try one today! subway. eat fresh.
2:26 am
2:27 am
we end tonight with the largest subtropical wilderness in the united states. ever glades national park. 1.5 million acres. some of the most familiar sights in the park are headed for extinction. now we have new rules that will phase out a way of life. >> reporter: keith price is right at home riding on this bed of grass. she fighting for the rights of future generations. >> i would be grandfathered in. >> reporter: your kids are not. >> that's what i'm going to battle for. >> reporter: for 85 years airboater have used this as their playground n. 1989 it was added to the everglades national park where airboating has been off limits.
2:28 am
for the last 26 years, airboaters have been fighting with the national parks service. they want to pass along their hobby to their children and grandchildren grandchildren. congress says when they die recreational airboating does too. >> i have grown up on airboats. >> reporter: tyler is one that will be banned. >> like a dying breed. my grandpa took me out when i was a kid. i have pictures from when i was 5 years old. >> reporter: the regional director for the national parks conservation association, an independent advocacy group. >> everglades national park is not just the backyard of a few local folks. >> reporter: he says the everglades require congressional protection. airboats are loud and noisy machines that can run through the everglades scaring birds out of their nests and leaving pathways for water flow that wouldn't naturally be there. >> reporter: using a google map he showed black lines highlighting pathways the
2:29 am
airboats are creating jeopardizing, he says the health of the ever glades ecosystem. price insists the ban is not necessary. >> we were doing it before the national park was here. >> reporter: price says the ashes of at least 30 airboaters are scattered here and he's not giving up. >> i haven't lost until they throw a chain on that gate out in front of my club and tell me i can't go in anymore. even then, i'm still going to make enough noise to be heard. >> reporter: the ban could be enforced as early as next month. there are more than 1 million other acres outside of the national park where gladesmen, such as this gentleman, are still free to run their airboats. >> thank you very much. and that's the cbs overnight news for this thursday. for some of you, the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city.
2:30 am
this is the "cbs overnight news." >> to the overnight news. washington is on edge this morning as russian war planes and helicopter gun ships continue their strikes in syria. russian president vladamir putin insists his military is targeting gangs of international terrorists presumably isis fighters. but attacks are centered on homs where syria backed rebels are in control. the russians are deing into they're targeting the group. >> reporter: the pentagon counted eight russian aircraft attacking two areas in western syria away from where u.s. aircraft operate, and well away from territory controlled by isis. the targets which russia said were weapons, ammunition and % other military equipment belongs to terrorists in areas controlled by groups fighting to
2:31 am
overthrow the regime of bashar al assad. in other words russia is not joining the u.s. in the fight against isis but instead intervening on the side of assad. a brutal dictator president obama repeatedly said must go. defense secretary carter said it amounts to throwing gasoline on a fire. >> the result of this kind of action will inevitably simply be to enflame the civil war in syria. >> carter was also miffed by the way russia notified the u.s. of the strikes. one hour ahead of time a russian general walked up to the u.s. embassy in baghdad and announced russian aircraft were about to begin flying over syria and american war planes should stay away. >> this is not the kind of behavior we should expect professionally. >> reporter: the u.s. did not change flight plans. but the two sides have begun talks on setting up procedures for making sure their planes don't run into each other. that was not a problem today.
2:32 am
but could become one if the russian aircraft attack opposition groups supported by the u.s. >> now that the russian strikes have begun both sides are in a hurry to get the talks moving. and it could happen as soon as tomorrow with a video conference between the two militaries. >> the russian air strikes are sending a political shiver through the arab world. nora o'donnell sat down with foreign minister of saudi arabia for "cbs this morning." russia says it is in syria to defeat isis do you believe that's why they're there? >> i believe that there is an international coalition to fight isis in syria. and this coalition includes a number of countries. i believe that if the russians want to be part of that coalition, i doubt any of the members would mind. >> but they're currently not? >> correct. so the question it begs why would they go to syria unilaterally to fight when there is an international coalition in place fighting them as we speak. >> what do you believe is the answer? what are their motives?
2:33 am
>> i believe it is to support al assad. >> russia says there can be a broad coalition in syria with assad in power. is that conceivable? >> inconceivable. they're proposing a coalition with assad to fight against them in syria. he was the person who created them. >> you believe russia is comb ply kagtcomb -- complicating this effort? >> i think their assessment may not be correct. >> would the kingdom of saudi arabia consider putting their soldiers, their boots on the ground in syria to defeat isis? >> we have our aircraft flying in syria, over syria to combat isis. we continue to be part of this coalition. with regard to an other issues i think we have to consider all of the options and see and do a cost benefit analysis. >> what do you think should be done? what is going to break the log jam in syria? >> i believe there has to be
2:34 am
more robust intervention in syria. i believe that the world has to be more firm in in insisting that bashar al assad leave. if he wants to leave through a political process that would be preferable. if not then i think we should step up the military support for the top position to bring about a change of the balance of power on the ground. which will then force him to leave. >> in your view how long could assad stay in power under any exit deal? secretary kerry said assad would stick around until isis was defeated. >> this could be a long time. i don't know. i think a political transition would require as i mentioned a governing council that takes over authority. prepares the country for elections. writes a new constitution. maintains the institutions of the state, military civilian while assad departs. >> the obama administration is canceling its efforts to train what it calls moderate syrian fighters to battle the islamic state. the pentagon sent $500 million
2:35 am
hoping to put tens of thousand in the war zone. in the end a handful of men joined the fight. most u.s. weapons ended up in the hand of the islamic state. what went wrong? holly williams is in turkey near the syrian border. >> reporter: good morning, we spoke yesterday with colonel hasan mustafa, a commander in division 30, the home of the american trained rebel fighters. colonel mustafa is too frightened of assassination by islamic extremists to show his face. but wanted to tell us about what he called the strategic mistakes made by the u.s. in its program to train and equip syrian fighters. when the first group of 54 american trained fighters entered syria in july several of them were captured by islamic militants. because we had so few men, they were easy prey colonel mustafa
2:36 am
told us. he claims he gave the u.s. the names of more than 1,200 fighters. but after strict vetting, just over 100 were accepted. his other complaint is that america left his men vulnerable by giving them too few weapons and too little ammunition. but the commander of the second group of 70 u.s. trained fighters admitted to us that he gave half of his american weapons to al-nuzra al qaeda's syrian affiliate. colonel mustafa said the commander should be court martialed. it's difficult for the u.s. to give division 30 more weapons and ammunition when it has already handed over some of those weapons to al nuzra. >> translator: that's true. i agree. he told us. we need to review the whole strategy to make sure our
2:37 am
fighters are loyal to syria. america's problem in syria has always been not knowing who to trust. carefully vetting and training a select group of so-called moderate rebels was supposed to solve that problem. instead though some of the fighters and their weapons have ended up in the hands of terrorists. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
2:38 am
2:39 am
i pinky promised my little girl a fabulous garden party for her birthday. so i mowed the lawn, put up all the decorations. i thought i got everything. almost everything! you know, 1 in 10 houses could get hit by a septic disaster, and a bill of up to $13,000. but for only $7 a month, rid-x is scientifically proven to break down waste, helping you avoid a septic disaster. rid-x. the #1 brand used by septic professionals in their own tanks.
2:40 am
singer/songwriter john fogert gained more fame than fortune in the 60s with credence clearwater revival. out with a memoir entitled "fortunate son" and sat down with steve blackstone for "cbs this morning." ♪ keep on burning ♪ ♪ rolling rolling rolling on the river ♪ >> the rolling on the river part that was magical to me. >> reporter: magical indeed. and "proud mary" transformed john fogerty and his band from struggling musicians to music superstars. ♪ rolling on the river ♪ >> i absolutely knew that it was
2:41 am
a great song. and usually i am a kind of modest person. and i would probably be wanting to say, well it was kind of good, you know. it was okay. no, i, at that moment it was great. >> reporter: it also came at the time when you knew you didn't want to be a one-hit wonder. >> yeah. yes. >> reporter: fogerty quickly followed up with a string of hits that would become music classics. ♪ the bad moon on the rise ♪ ♪ get out my back door ♪ ♪ i'm not singing a song ♪ >> you wrote a lot of great songs in '1969. >> that was a heck of a year. >> reporter: 1969 the title of fogerty's latest year. >> the year me and my band put out three albums in one year. >> reporter: his set list draws
2:42 am
from the band's short but prolific career. who'll stop the rain looking out my backdoor. down on the corner. fortunate son. >> reporter: as you give me those titles. i can start to hear the lyrics of every one of those songs. what's it look to have had that impact on a generation? more than a generation? >> i tell you john. i feel just really grateful because as you know i had a, a long very dark period. >> reporter: fogerty writes about the long dark period in his memoir "fortunate son. "the story of a kid from el cerrito and his musical dream. it came true and then it turned into a nightmare. because almost as quickly as credence became the biggest rock band on the planet it disintegrated. tom fogerty left to follow a solo career out from his younger brother's shadow. and bassist and drummer demanded
2:43 am
more creative control. >> they wanted to write songs, sing the songs they wrote. either it was going to be this way or we were going to fall apart right here. so i agreed. >> reporter: cook and clifford would later say fogerty sabotaged the album forcing them to write to prove a point. when mardi gras was released a rolling stone reviewer called it the worst album oohi have ever heard from a major rock band. credence never made another record. plenty of rock 'n' roll band have broken up. i don't know whether any have the sort of spring of lawsuits. that has followed ccr. how many times have you sued each other? >> i have no idea. happily, i don't keep count. >> reporter: fogerty spent decades battling the record company that signed him as a teenager and claimed ownership of his iconic songs. >> the fact that i don't own
2:44 am
these wonderful songs certainly has gnawed at me. >> reporter: they're still your songs. >> i think the phrase i used the whole world knows those are your songs. and, that's a really good thing to know. ♪ i want to know have you seen the rain ♪ >> reporter: today at the age of 70, fogerty embraces the songs he wrote that made him and credence music legends. >> it is a really happy for me. >> reporter: and you are performing with your son? >> yes. those are amazing moments in life when you -- when you get to share that closeness. after all it is in his dna. >> and the f right after it. >> at his home in los angeles, fogerty and sons shane and tyler have built their on recording studio. where they invited us to listen in on a family jam session.
2:45 am
♪ every time ♪ >> reporter: what is it like you are out on the stage, you are with a rock 'n' roll legend or are you just out there with dad? >> just dad. more like that. it's fun. it's great experience. >> because it is fun. it never gets stodgy. like how it sounded like when you just said rock 'n' roll legend. >> reporter: john fogerty is a rock legend who is still on a roll. ♪ rolling on a river ♪ yeah! >> reporter: for cbs this morning, john blackstone los angeles.
2:46 am
2:47 am
forget the saggy diaper cowboy walk dance freely in new pampers cruisers with three extra absorb channels. it stays drier and doesn't sag like others. so dance, however you want! in new pampers cruisers
2:48 am
plastic surgery and other cosmetic procedures are not only the rage in south beach and l.a., they're also big business in asia. doctors in south korea for instance performed more than a million procedures last year. there are only 50 million people in the whole country. cbs's seth dome is there. >> south korea is a trendsetter here in asia setting the tone for everything from k pop to soap operas to yes plastic surgeons. now south korea is offering a 10% tax break for tourists who are inclined to go under the knife. to walk down the street take the subway in seoul, is to be bombarded by commercials for plastic surgery. and even some real life examples. turn on the tv it's there too.
2:49 am
this show's formula. music accompanies someone presurgery and crescendo during the procedure to until finally a dramatic reveal. even a digitally produced before and after catwalk. >> i just everyone wants to be pretty, right? >> reporter: on the street in seoul, we heard how plastic surgeries are a common gift received when graduating from high school. new face. new start, 20-year-old sally park said. how many of your friends have had plastic surgery? i would say almost everyone she replied. but why? we asked this woman if we could follow her as she want to her surgery at regen. one of seoul's biggest cosmetic hospitals. when i told my friend i was going to get this surgery their reaction was bland she said. they weren't surprised. >> reporter: you are so beautiful though? >> translator: i really don't think i am beautiful at all, she
2:50 am
said. kim allowed us to join her final consultation. as her doctor morked edmarked up her face. at 23 she worries she looks old and gloomy. she saved up $1,800 working part time retail jobs to get a fat graft of the full face. we watched as doctor roe took fat from kim's thigh and injected it into her temple and under her eyes. what's the desired effect here? why is she doing this? >> she thinks she has a very haggard look a very skeletonized look which makes her look older than her age. she wants to have a more babyish face or younger face. >> reporter: a simple procedure he says and one that is so subtle he calls it the perfect crime. >> reporter: plastic surgery is very common here in south korea. but people don't want to look as
2:51 am
the nay have had the surgery. later he showed us some of his work. >> this is the same person you. created a jaw. >> yes i created the jaw. >> walking down the street here in seoul you see people eyeing themselves in their phones taking selfies, you have to attach your picture to resumes when you are getting a job the why are looks such a big deal here in korea. >> i think it is more competitive than other areas of the world. very highly educated. so you can't have just a good spec on your resume. >> can't just have good grades? >> everybody has good grades. everybody has all the credentials. how are you going to get ahead of it? >> reporter: less than 24 hours achts after her surgery. >> hello. how are you doing? >> we met up with a still swollen patient? >> what are you looking at in the mirror?
2:52 am
>> i will be stressed out less since the depressed of my face are now filled with fat. i think i will be able to live a brighter life. be it the oddly similar looking receptionists saying we love you. or the waiting room's filled with pamphlets and posters promising change i's not long before you find yourself wondering. i never thought about plastic surgery the doctor offered a free consultation. >> i hope you are not offended by my language. >> reporter: thankfully there is not enough time in the broadcast to tell you everything he suggested. >> you can see how the deep wrinkles here and here. we can do this. >> okay. >> you will look much younger here. >> some cosmetic procedures can be expensive. you may want to hold off until you win the lottery. anna werner reports on a new app that lets you buy your lottery tickets on your phone.
2:53 am
>> reporter: the creator of the app claims it is legal and up and running and gaining in popularity. this man is buying $40 of powerball ticktickets. not for himself. on behalf of people who ordered through jackpocket. with a few finger taps jackpocket allows users to buy powerball, mega millions and other lottery tickets. a jack pockpocket employee full fills the order buying the tickets. >> started one person one desk. >> reporter: the brain child of peter sullivan. tickets are scanned. the user can see them on their phone. if a person wins over $600 their tickets are delivered to them so they can claim prizes in person. smaller winnings are amrid to their account. sullivan started working on the app 2 1/2 years ago. he was inspired by his father who often crossed state lines to play the lottery.
2:54 am
>> i remember growing up being embarrassed we were lit to practice due to the fact he had to play his numbers. >> reporter: the lottery was to blame? >> wouldn't say that. yeah, could be yes. >> reporter: the attorney says the app doesn't break any laws. >> in 2011 the department of justice determined buying lottery tickets on line was completely legal. >> reporter: jackpocket monitors how people play to flag problem gambling and limits daily purchases to $100 per person. something powerball itself does not do. for now, only people in new york can use jackpocket. but sullivan is hoping to expand to other states. jackpocket already has 10,000 registered users. tuesday night, 20 orders were being placed every minute. do you feel bad at all about making it easier for people to maybe spend money they didn't have? >> if we can make it convenient for the people who want to play and be responsible with monitoring their play, i
2:55 am
2:56 am
welcome to subway, what can i make for you? how about one of our delicious reuben sandwiches? loaded with your choice of tender corned beef or oven roasted turkey breast. we top'em with sauerkraut and swiss cheese drizzle on our thousand island dressing and toast'em to perfection on your choice of freshly baked bread. don't miss the corned beef reuben and the turkey reuben. both won't be here long, so try one today! subway. eat fresh.
2:57 am
professional football is the most popular sport in america. a lot of kids are deciding not to put on the helmets and shoulder pads. it's gotten to the point where many high schools are dropping their football programs entirely. our report from maplewood richmond high school. >> this used to be home to the maplewood blue devils football team. no telling how many touchdowns were scored over the decades. there will be no more. now the field is use ford cross-country and soccer because maplewood joined the ranks of a nm wereumber of schools that scrapped their football program over concerns over injuries. the maplewood blue devils made it all the way to the missouri state championships in 2010. nelson mitten is the school board president. does this school have a proud football tradition? >> yes, it does. i have spent many times, hours
2:58 am
with alumni dating back to the 1960s talking about the tremendous football teams they had going back till then. >> reporter: after last season the high school football program has been canceled. >> one of our students suffered a head injury that put him out the rest of the season. then we had one broken ankle. >> reporter: mitten says the team had so many players hurt last fall they had to forfeit a game. only 14 active players were on the roster at season's end. down from 40 just seven years ago. >> reporter: the board did an assessment of interest in the program. found that there were probably insufficient students to maintain a team and decided to cancel the team for this year. >> reporter: maplewood isn't alone. schools in maine and new jersey have canceled or cut short their seasons this year. due to injuries or low student interest. and total number of high school students playing football across america has dropped by more than 25,000 over the past five years. sean gregory reports on football for "time" magazine. he writes about the dangers of concussions on the gridiron.
2:59 am
>> i'm not ready to call friday night lights off in the next ten years. i've wouldn't be surprised if coaches are having a more difficult time attracting quality players. >> reporter: at maplewood an increasing number of students are trying out for cross-country and soccer teams. isaac pearson is a sophomore on the soccer team. his older brother jp played football at maplewood high. football has been part of your family a long time. why did you decide to play socker? >> i just kind of grew up around soccer. my mom said soccer is your thing. doesn't want me to get hurt too. soccer is something i really liked. >> reporter: in another sign of the times there will be a homecoming game played here next month but that game will be soccer not football. >> that's the "cbs overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you, the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city.
3:00 am
heavy rain and flooding hit the east coast and it could be just the beginning. hurricane joaquin is on the way. also tonight, the world just got more dangerous with u.s. and russian warplanes in the same skies on opposite sides. refinery disasters. the one that happened and the bigger one that almost did. and a way of life is coming to an end for the gladesmen. >> my grandpa took me out here from when i was a kid. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." with scott pelley. this is our western edition. have a look at the rain in maine. cars up to their gas caps. a storm system is whipping up scenes just like this from florida to new england, and it's likely to get worse with hurricane joaquin now
3:01 am
threatening the east coast. chip reid is in virginia where an emergency has already been declared. >> reporter: sheets of driving rain pummelled the northeast on wednesday. a half foot of rain fell in some areas. it came down in buckets, almost iterally. the streets of downtown portland, maine, flooded dramatically, though the waters quickly receded. >> this is insane. it looks like rapids. >> yeah. >> reporter: it's unbelievable. >> reporter: rush hour was a slog in providence, rhode island. some cars ended with as much water inside as out. the system which drenched coastal alabama and florida over the weekend an hit virginia and the mid-atlantic yesterday has now pretty much moved into canada. but the ground here is now well-saturated: a date with hurricane joaquin next week could bring more serious flood ing. you know that this is ground
3:02 am
zero. >> george stables runs a marina and charter boat company in virginia and remembers the damage from hurricane isabel in 2003. he is watching the storm track very carefully. >> we can all handle storm surge, but we cannot handle, 70 80 90-mile-an-hour winds. it doesn't take much for the river to overflow its banks. in 2003 was in ten feet of water and dozens of homes and businesses flooded. scott, you can imagine people around here are hoping it doesn't turn out that way this time around. >> chip reid tonight, thanks. now with the latest on the hurricane we will turn to the loni quinn, chief weathercaster of our new york station. what do we know? >> we are talking about big changes, not in the intensity but in the track. according to the national hurricane center, you are look ing at a category one storm. if it is up to 96 mile an hour it is a cat two. that's exactly what we believe is going to happen. watch the track it will push off toward the west. moving towards the bahamas.
3:03 am
gaining strength. then it turns to the north. big push. turning to hurricane three. that's a major hurricane, that's bad news. then turns inland, makes landfall we believe somewhere from south carolina border up to possibly delaware or so with the highest probability around this outer banks. if you take a lack as the storm sets up around the outer banks. if you think we are north of that we live in big metro city like philadelphia, new york, we have no problem. i disagree with that. you do have a problem. if it is south of you. counterclockwise spin just picks up water and pushes it along the shorelines. flooding will be a problem even if you are not where the eye of the hurricane makes landfall. >> we already have all these rain storms. now we have a hurricane coming in behind them. what's the combined effect likely to be? >> i keep losing this little saying, it's footprints on top of footprints. today roanoke, virginia picked up 5 to 8 inches of rain. that's a problem. tomorrow the same area picks up
3:04 am
1, 2, 3 in. s -- inches of rain. maybe a little more. and by the time you are saturday, sunday you look at the hurricane in the area with a lot of rain. flooding will be a problem with this one with, scott. >> lonnie quinn, wcbs, thank you, lonnie. today the stakes shot up in the worst war in the world. russia joined the fighting in syria. and now russian and american planes are on opposite sides. let's remind you how we got here. syria is run by bashar al-assad. four years ago rebels rose up against him. now 250,000 have died. 12 million have fled. the chaos had spawned the refugee crisis in europe and the isis terrorist regime which now holds a third of syria and iraq. the u.s. is bombing isis. david martin tells us who russia is fighting for. >> reporter: the pentagon counted eight russian aircraft attacking two areas in western syria, well away from where u.s. aircraft normally operate, but
3:05 am
also, well away from territory controlled by isis. the targets which russia said were weapons, military equipment, belonging to terrorists were in areas controlled by groups to overthrow the regime of bashar al-assad. in other words, russia is not joining the u.s. in the fight against isis, but instead intervening on the side of assad. a brutal dictator president obama has repeatedly said must go. defense secretary carter said it amounts to throwing gasoline on a fire. >> the result of this kind of action will inevitably be to enflame the civil war in syria. >> reporter: carter was miffed by the way russia notified the u.s. of the strikes. one hour ahead of time, a russian general walked up to the u.s. embassy in baghdad and announced russian aircraft were about to begin flying over syria, and american warplanes should stay away. >> this is not the kind of behavior we should expect professionally. >> reporter: the u.s. did not
3:06 am
change its flight plans but i the two sides have begun talks on setting up procedures for making sure their planes don't run in to each other. that was not a problem today but could become one if the russian aircraft attacked opposition scott, now that russian strikes have begun both sides are in a hurry to get the talks moving. it could happen as soon as tomorrow with a video conference between the two militaries. >> david martin at the pentagon, thanks. with unique insight into this we will bring in former number two at the cia and senior security contributor for cbs news. michael, how significant is this? >> scott, this is of historical significance. this is the first time the russians have conducted combat operations in the middle east since the end of world war ii. >> what do you think the russian president vladimir putin is up to? >> there's a lot of reasons here, scott but i think they
3:07 am
boil down to two. first he is trying to prop up assad. assad is weaker today than he's been since the fall of 2012 and putin is trying to prop him up. why? because putin really fears that if assad were to depart the scene there would be more instability in syria that isis could grow even more, perhaps take over damascus. he really believes that. the second reason is that russia in general, putin in particular, want to be seen as major players on the global stage, and this gives that to putin, as well. >> has the obama administration been out maneuvered by russia? >> i think the real problem here, scott, is that what putin has done on the ground in syria has now made it more difficult to get to the only solution to the problem. the only solution to the problem is a negotiated transfer of power from assad to something else. that's been our strategy all along. he's undercutting our strategy. >> michael, thank you so much. >> you are welcome. >> the cbs overnight news will be right back.
3:08 am
♪ ♪ here is your egg mcmuffin. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ i'll see you at home. the egg mcmuffin. made with an egg cracked fresh in our kitchens and real butter. only at mcdonald's. i'm lovin it.
3:09 am
welcome to subway, what can i make for you? how about one of our reuben sandwiches? choose from tender corned beef or oven roasted turkey breast, topped with sauerkraut melty swiss cheese and thousand island dressing. enjoy one while they're here! subway. eat fresh.
3:10 am
there's breaking news in washington tonight where members of the u.s. secret service are accused in a scheme to retaliate against a republican congressman. >> reporter: as head of the house oversight committee, jason chaffetz has investigated misconduct by the secret service including an indent in march where agents allegedly drove drunk on white house grounds a
3:11 am
department of homeland security inspector general says in retaliation some at the secret service saw to embarrass him. by accessing this application to be an agent. his file was protected by the privacy act. according to the report, the assistant director wrote in an e-mail some information he may find embarrassing needs to get out. days later it was leaked to the media. report says at least 45 members of the secret service viewed the application. the inspector general concluded the conduct was simply wrong. >> i don't trust them. i really don't trust them. >> reporter: chaffetz says it reflects deeper problems at the agency. >> if they are doing this to me who knows what else they are doing. it really is scary. >> reporter: he assistant director who sent the e-mail said he was venting and didn't want the information leaked. the director of the secret service apologized and said he will take appropriate disciplinary actions.
3:12 am
>> jeff, thank you. early today, the state of georgia executed kelly gissendaner. turning aside pope francis's plea for mercy. gissendaner sang "amazing grace" as the lethal drug was administered. the pope asked oklahoma to spare another murderer. he did get a reprieve today because of questions about a new lethal injection drug. also in oklahoma today, the tulsa county sheriff resigned after he was indicted. the charges stem from the fatal shooting of eric harris by reserve deputy robert bates last april. bates, who says he meant to use his taser is a friend of sheriff stanley glanz. he is accused of cover ugh up a report that questioned whether bates was fit for duty. exxon mobil says it is selling its refinery in torrance, california.
3:13 am
it has been shut since a tremendous explosion last february. our anna werner has fund that disaster was nearly a catastrophe. >> look at the damage to this portion of the refinery were when part of this refinery blew up in february south of los angeles smoke filled the sky and ash rained down on nearby neighborhoods. >> it was scary. >> reporter: lorain harding's family lives a mile from the plant and felt the blast. so strong it registered 1.7 on the richter scale. >> thought it was an earthquake because it shook and it was loud, big boom. >> reporter: four workers were injured. at the time exxon mobile told residents there was no danger to the community. cbs news learned it could have been much worse. >> we were really, really lucky. >> reporter: vanessa sutherland, the recently appointed head of the chemical safety board, the
3:14 am
federal agency charged with investigating the accident calls it a near miss. >> i think it is of concern to us we have a facility that had a near miss which i actually feel lucky about. it could have been much more catastrophic. >> this picture tells it all. look at this. >> reporter: catastrophic, she says, because when the explosion happened a piece of equipment weighing 80,000 pounds was sent flying nearly 100 feet. sources say this photo, investigators and obtained by cbs news, shows that piece landed a few feet from a tank containing a form of hydrofluoric acid. it is a highly toxic chemical that if released can form a cloud of toxic gas that can drift for miles. potentially causing thousands of injuries and even deaths. >> hf, in our view and in my view, is one of the most hazardous and deadly chemicals. in worse-case scenarios, at dead live levels it causes asphyxiation because once inhaled it causes respiratory problems that build up and you
3:15 am
ultimately drown. >> reporter: 200,000 people live within three miles of the plant. in documents filed with the epa, exxon mobil estimates in a worse-case scenario release of hydrofluoric acid all of them in that distance could be injured or die. >> that does not sound reassuring to the community around that plant. if i were in the community i would be concerned. >> exxon mobil disputes the idea it was a risk in february telling us they strongly disagree with any claims there was a significant risk to the hydrofluoric acid unit. the company refers our questions about the risks of hydrofluoric acid to an industry group. the western states petroleum association. spokesman tucker hall. >> i think the technology that are employed in these refineries
3:16 am
for all of the hazardous materials used have proved to be successful. >> what if the risks are managed and you have an accident and people are killed? is it worth that risk? >> not going to answer that question. sorry. >> reporter: last month, there was a leak of hydrofluoric acid. at the same refinery. exxon mobile said it was a small leak and had no impact on the community. sutherland said the company is resisting the agency's subpoenas for information about the february explosion. >> why do you think they don't want you to have it? >> generally, my experience as a regulator and enforcerwhen someone doesn't want you to have records is they don't want you to see what is in it. >> strong words. from the federal government watch dog charged with investigating chemical accidents. 50 u.s. refineries use the chemical nationwide. united steelworkers study found 75% had hf related incidents or near misses within the past
3:17 am
three years and 50% of those would have impacted a community. anna werner, thank you. there will be no shut down of the federal government facing a midnight deadline congress approved a spending bill today. republicans were fighting to end funding for planned parenthood, which provides abortion and other health services. the planned parenthood funding will stay. the bill will fund the government for only ten weeks. why are some high schools dropping football? and foul balls prove elusive when the cbs evening news continues.
3:18 am
lysol disinfectant spray kills 99.9% of bacteria on more than just the trashcan. it's the "pungent gym bag stink" neutralizer. and the "prevent mold and mildew on the shower curtain for up to 7 days" spray. it's also the "odor causing bacteria" fighter. and even the "athlete's foot fungus" killer. discover more ways you can use lysol disinfectant spray to help keep your home healthier.
3:19 am
3:20 am
3:21 am
today the ncaa scored a big victory. federal appeals court struck down a plan to pay college athletes $5,000 a year on top of tuition, room and board. college football of course is bigger than ever. but, don dahler tells us tonight many high schools are dropping the sport. >> let's go! football runs through isaac pearson's bloodline. both his father and brother played. the sophomore chose a different field. >> my mom no no soccer is your thing. she doesn't want me to get hurt too. soccer is something i really leaked. >> pearson's school has a proud tradition of football having gone to the state championship
3:22 am
as recently as 2010. there is no team at maplewood this season. maplewood had a hard time finding players and due to injuries and lack of interest. >> when you have low numbers of students from a school this size you are drawing all the way from freshm affect on the possibility of injuries. >> going against bigger teams. >> absolutely. that was a difficult for us also. >> reporter: the number of high school football players in the u.s. declined by 25,000 over the past five years. last year, five high schoolers died playing football. more than in college, semi pro or professional levels. still maplewood senior misses the game. >> when i first heard about it. i was devastated. football was my favorite sport. even when we didn't do good in the games we had the fun experience with the team. >> reporter: students will still
3:23 am
attend the homecoming game but for the first time the sport will be soccer. don dahler cbs news, maplewood,so misuri. nascar's tony stewart makes a big announcement. that's next. former nascar champ tony
3:24 am
stewart said today, next year will be his last lap of sprint cup racing. he will be 45 and hasn't won a race in two years. last year he hit and killed a driver who with confronted him during a dirt track race. he can't help but feeling bad for a fan at yankees stadium last night. first a foul pop went through his hands and then another foul bounced off of his chest. a sympathetic ball boy flipped him a ball but that went off his face. his companion hid her face in embarrassment. also crying foul, the folks who operate these fan boats. their story is next.
3:25 am
welcome to subway, what can i make
3:26 am
for you? how about one of our delicious reuben sandwiches? loaded with your choice of tender corned beef or oven roasted turkey breast. we top'em with sauerkraut and swiss cheese drizzle on our thousand island dressing and toast'em to perfection on your choice of freshly baked bread. don't miss the corned beef reuben and the turkey reuben. both won't be here long, so try one today! subway. eat fresh.
3:27 am
we end tonight with the largest subtropical wilderness in the united states. everglade national park. 1.5 million acres. some of the most familiar sights in the park are headed for extinction. now we have new rules that will phase out a way of life. >> reporter: keith price is right at home riding on this river of grass. as president of theboat -- he is fighting for the rights of future generations. >> i would be grandfathered in. >> reporter: your kids are not. >> that's what i'm going to battle for. >> reporter: for 85 years airboater have used this as their playground. but in 1989, it was added to the everglades national park where airboating has been off limits. for the last 26 years, airboaters have been fighting with the national parks service.
3:28 am
they want to pass along their hobby to their children and grandchildren. congress says when they die recreational airboating does too. >> i have grown up on airboats. >> reporter: tyler is one that will be banned. >> like a dying breed. my grandpa took me out when i was a kid. i have pictures from when i was 5 years old. >> reporter: the regional director for the national parks conservation association, an independent advocacy group. >> everglades national park is not just the backyard of a few local folks. >> reporter: he says the everglades require congressional protection. airboats are loud and noisy machines that can run through the everglades, scaring birds out of their nests and leaving pathways for water flow that wouldn't naturally be there. >> reporter: using a google map he showed black lines highlighting pathways the airboats are creating, jeopardizing, he says, the health of the ever glades ecosystem.
3:29 am
price insists the ban is not ne >> we were doing it before the national park was here. >> reporter: price says the ashes of at least 30 airboaters are scattered here, and he's not giving up. >> i haven't lost until they throw a chain on that gate out in front of my club and tell me i can't go in anymore. even then, i'm still going to make enough noise to be heard. >> reporter: the ban could be enforced as early as next month. there are more than 1 million other acres outside of the national park where gladesmen, such as this gentleman, are still free to run their airboats. >> thank you very much. and that's the cbs overnight news for this thursday. for some of you, the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city. i'm scott pelley.
3:30 am
washington is on edge as russian war planes and helicopter gun ships continue their strikes in syria. russian president vladamir putin insists his military is targeting gangs of international terrorists presumably isis fighters. but at takes are centers on the city of homs where syrian rebels are control. the russian dez nigh they're targeting the group. david martin begins our coverage. fighting to overthrow the
3:31 am
regime of bashar al assad. russia is not joining the fight against isis but instead intervening on the side of assad. a brutal dictator obama said must go. defense secretary carter said it amounts to throwing gasoline on a fire. >> the result of this kind of action will be to enflame the civil war in syria. >> carter was also miffed by the way russia notified the u.s. of the strikes. one hour ahead of time a russian general walked up to the embassy in baghdad and announced russian aircraft were to fly over syria and american war planes should stay away. >> this is not the kind of behavior that we should expect professionally. >> the u.s. did not change its flight plans. the two sides have begun talks on setting up procedures for making sure their planes don't run into each other. that was not a problem today, but could become one if the russian aircraft attack opposition groups supported by
3:32 am
the u.s. now that the russian strikes have begun both side are in a hurry to get the talks moving. it could happen as soon as tomorrow with a video conference between the two militaries. >> the russian air strikes are sending a political shiver through the world, nora o'donnell sat down with "cbs this morning." >> but they are currently not? >> correct. >> so the question it begs why would they go to syria unilaterally to fight when there is an international coalition in place fighting them as we speak. >> what do you believe is the answer? what are their motives? >> i believe it is to support al assad. >> russia says there can be a
3:33 am
broad coalition in syria with assad in power. is that conceivable? >> inconceivable. they're proposing a coalition with assad to fight against them in syria. he was the person who created them. >> you believe russia is comb -- complicating this effort? >> i think their assessment may and their assessment of what is doable and not doable in syria may not be correct? >> would the kingdom of saudi arabia consider putting their soldiers, their boots on the ground, in syria to defeat isis? >> we have our aircraft flying in syria, over syria to combat isis. we continue to be part of this coalition. with regard to an other issues i think we have to consider all of the options and see and do a cost benefit analysis. >> what do you think should be done? what is going to break the log jam in syria? >> i believe there has to be more robust intervention in syria.
3:34 am
i believe that the world has to be more firm in, in insisting that bashar al assad leave. if he wants to leave through a political process that would be preferable. if not then i think we should step up the military support for the moderate opposition to bring about a change of the balance of power on the ground which will then force him to leave. >> in your view how long could assad stay in power under any exit deal? secretary kerry said assad would stick around until isis was defeated. >> this could be a long time. i don't know. i think a political transition would require as i mentioned a governing council that takes over authority. prepares the country for elections. writes a new constitution. maintains the institutions of the state, military civilian, while assad departs. >> the obama administration is canceling its efforts to train what it calls moderate syrian fighters to battle the islamic state. the pentagon spent $500 million hoping to put tens of thousand in the war zone.
3:35 am
in the end a handful of men joined the fight. most u.s. weapons ended up in the hand of the islamic state. what went wrong? holly williams is in turkey near the syrian border. >> reporter: good morning, we spoke yesterday with colonel hasan mustafa, a commander in division 30, the home of the american trained rebel fighters. colonel mustafa is too frightened of assassination by islamic extremists to show his face. but wanted to tell us about what he called the strategic mistakes made by the u.s. in its program to train and equip syrian fighters. when the first group of 54 american trained fighters entered syria in july, several of them were captured by islamic militants. because we had so few men, they were easy prey, colonel mustafa
3:36 am
told us. he claims he gave the u.s. the names of more than 1,200 fighters. but after strict vetting, just over 100 were accepted. his other complaint is that america left his men vulnerable by giving them too few weapons and too little ammunition. but the commander of the second group of 70 u.s. trained fighters admitted to us that he gave half of his american weapons to al-nuzra, al qaeda's syrian affiliate. colonel mustafa said the commander should be court martialed. it's difficult for the u.s. to give division 30 more weapons and ammunition when it has already handed over some of those weapons to al nuzra. >> translator: that's true. i agree. he told us. we need to review the whole strategy to make sure our fighters are loyal to syria. america's problem in syria has
3:37 am
always been not knowing who to trust. carefully vetting and training a select group of so-called moderate rebels was supposed to solve that problem. instead though some of the fighters and their weapons have ended up in the hands of terrorists. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
3:38 am
♪ ♪ ♪ it's the final countdown! ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ the final countdown! ♪ if you're the band europe, you love a final countdown. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance you switch to geico. it's what you do. i pinky promised my little girl a fabulous garden party for her birthday.
3:39 am
so i mowed the lawn, put up all the decorations. i thought i got everything. almost everything! you know, 1 in 10 houses could get hit by a septic disaster, and a bill of up to $13,000. but for only $7 a month, rid-x is scientifically proven to break down waste, helping you avoid a septic disaster. rid-x. the #1 brand used by septic professionals in their own tanks. start the interview with a firm handshake. ay,no! don't do that! try head & shoulders instant relief. it cools on contact, and also keeps you 100% flake free. try head & shoulders instant relief. for cooling relief in a snap.
3:40 am
fogerty gained more fame than singer/songwriter john fogerty gained more fame than fortune in the 60s with credence clearwater revival. out with a memoir entitled "fortunate son" and sat down with john blackstone for cbs this morning. ♪ big wheel keep on turning mary keep on burning ♪ ♪ rolling rolling rolling on the river ♪ >> the rolling on the river part that was magical to me. >> reporter: magical indeed. and "proud mary" transformed john fogerty and his band from struggling musicians to music superstars. ♪ rolling on the river ♪ >> i absolutely knew that it was a great song. and usually i am a kind of
3:41 am
modest person. and i would probably be wanting to say, well it was kind of good, you know. it was okay. no, i, at that moment, it was great. >> reporter: it also came at the time when you knew you didn't want to be a one-hit wonder. >> yeah. yes. >> reporter: fogerty quickly followed up with a string of hits that would become music classics. ♪ the bad moon on the rise ♪ ♪ get out my back door ♪ ♪ i'm not singing a song ♪ >> you wrote a lot of great songs in '1969. >> that was a heck of a year. >> reporter: 1969 the title of fogerty's latest tour. >> the year me and my band put out three albums in one year. >> reporter: his set list draws from the band's short but prolific career.
3:42 am
who'll stop the rain, looking out my backdoor. down on the corner. fortunate son. >> reporter: as you give me those titles. i can start to hear the lyrics of every one of those songs. what's it like to have had that impact on a generation? more than a generation? >> i tell you, john. i feel just really grateful because as you know i had a, a long very dark period. >> reporter: fogerty writes about the long, dark period in his memoir "fortunate son. "the story of a kid from el cerrito and his musical dream. it came true and then it turned into a nightmare. because almost as quickly as credence became the biggest rock band on the planet it disintegrated. tom fogerty left to follow a solo career out from his younger brother's shadow. and bassist and drummer demanded more creative control. >> they wanted to write songs, sing the songs they wrote.
3:43 am
either it was going to be this way or we were going to fall apart right here. so i agreed. >> reporter: cook and clifford would later say fogerty sabotaged the album forcing them to write to prove a point. when mardi gras was released a rolling stone reviewer called it the worst album i have ever heard from a major rock band. credence never made another record. plenty of rock 'n' roll band have broken up. i don't know whether any have the sort of string of lauf suits. that has followed ccr. how many times have you sued each other? >> i have no idea. happily, i don't keep count. >> reporter: fogerty spent decades battling the record company that signed him as a teenager and claimed ownership of his iconic songs. >> the fact that i don't own
3:44 am
these wonderful songs certainly has gnawed at me. >> reporter: they're still your songs. >> i think the phrase i used, the whole world knows those are your songs. and, that's a really good thing to know. ♪ i want to know have you seen the rain ♪ >> reporter: today at the age of 70, fogerty embraces the songs he wrote that made him and credence music legends. >> it is a really happy for me. >> reporter: and you are performing with your son? >> yes. those are amazing moments in life when you -- when you get to share that closeness. after all it is in his dna. >> and the f right after it. >> at his home in los angeles, fogerty and sons shane and tyler have built their on recording
3:45 am
studio. where they invited us to listen in on a family jam session. ♪ every time ♪ >> reporter: what is it like you are out on the stage, you are with a rock 'n' roll legend, or are you just out there with dad? >> just dad. more like that. it's fun. it's great experience. >> because it is fun. it never gets stodgy. like how it sounded like when you just said rock 'n' roll legend. >> reporter: john fogerty is a rock legend who is still on a roll. ♪ rolling on a river ♪ yeah! >> reporter: for cbs this mornin, john blackstone, los angeles. ever since darryl's wife started using gain flings, their laundry smells more amazing than ever. (sniff) uh honey isn't that the dog's towel? (dog noise) hey, mi towel, su towel. more gain scent, plus oxi boost and febreze for 3 big things in one gain fling. it's our best gain ever!
3:46 am
hey buddy, let's get these dayquil liquid gels and go. but these liquid gels are new. mucinex fast max. it's the same difference. these are multi-symptom. well so are these. this one is max strength and fights mucus. that one doesn't. uh...think fast! you dropped something. oh...i'll put it back on the shelf... new from mucinex fast max. the only cold and flu liquid gel that's max-strength and fights mucus. start the relief. ditch the misery. let's end this.
3:47 am
today you can do everything in just one click, even keep your toilet clean and fresh. introducing lysol click gel. click it in to enjoy clean freshness with every flush. lysol. start healthing. ♪ yeah, click ♪
3:48 am
plastic surgery and other cosmetic procedures are not only the rage in south beach and l.a., they're also big business in asia. doctors in south korea for instance performed more than a million procedures last year. there are only 50 million people in the whole country. cbs's seth dome is there. >> south korea is a trendsetter here in asia setting the tone for everything from k pop to soap operas to yes plastic surgeons. now south korea is offering a 10% tax break for tourists who are inclined to go under the knife. to walk down the street, take the subway in seoul, is to be bombarded by commercials for plastic surgery. and even some real life examples. turn on the tv, it's there too. this show's formula. music accompanies someone
3:49 am
presurgery and crescendo during the procedure to until finally a dramatic reveal. even a digitally produced before and after catwalk. >> i just everyone wants to be pretty, right? >> reporter: on the street in seoul, we heard how plastic surgeries are a common gift, received when graduating from high school. new face. new start, 20-year-old sally park said. how many of your friends have had plastic surgery? i would say almost everyone, she replied. but why? we asked this woman if we could follow her as she want to her surgery at regen. one of seoul's biggest cosmetic hospitals. when i told my friend i was going to get this surgery their reaction was bland she said. they weren't surprised. >> reporter: you are so beautiful though? >> translator: i really don't think i am beautiful at all, she
3:50 am
said. kim allowed us to join her final consultation. as her doctor marked up her face. at 23 she worries she looks old and gloomy. she saved up $1,800 working part time retail jobs to get a fat graft of the full face. we watched as doctor roe took fat from kim's thigh and injected it into her temple and under her eyes. what's the desired effect here? why is she doing this? >> she thinks she has a very haggard look, a very skeletonized look which makes her look older than her age. she wants to have a more babyish face or younger face. >> reporter: a simple procedure he says and one that is so subtle he calls it the perfect crime. >> reporter: plastic surgery is very common here in south korea. but people don't want to look as nay have had the surgery. later he showed us some of his
3:51 am
work. >> this is the same person you. created a jaw. >> yes, i created the jaw. >> walking down the street here in seoul you see people eyeing themselves in their phones, taking selfies, you have to attach your picture to resumes when you are getting a job the why are looks such a big deal here in korea. >> i think it is more competitive than other areas of the world. very highly educated. so, you can't have just a good spec on your resume. >> can't just have good grades? >> everybody has good grades. everybody has all the credentials. how are you going to get ahead of it? >> reporter: less than 24 hours after her surgery. >> hello. how are you doing? >> we met up with a still swollen patient? >> what are you looking at in the mirror? >> i will be stressed out less,
3:52 am
since the depressed areas of my face are now filled with fat. i think i will be able to live a brighter life. be it the oddly similar looking receptionists saying we love you. or the waiting room's filled with pamphlets and posters promising change, it's not long before you find yourself wondering. i never thought about plastic surgery the doctor offered a free consultation. >> i hope you are not offended by my language. >> reporter: thankfully there is not enough time in the broadcast to tell you everything he suggested. >> you can see how the deep wrinkles here and here. we can do, this. >> okay. >> you will look much younger here. >> some cosmetic procedures can be expensive. you may want to hold off until you win the lottery. anna werner reports on a new app that lets you buy your lottery tickets on your phone.
3:53 am
>> reporter: the creator of the app claims it is legal and up and running and gaining in popularity. this man is buying $40 of powerball tickets. not for himself. on behalf of people who ordered through jackpocket. >> hit play. pick your own numbers or quick pick. with a few finger taps, jackpocket allows users to buy powerball, mega millions and other lottery tickets. a jackpocket employee full fills the order buying the tickets. >> started one person, one desk. >> reporter: the brain child of peter sullivan. tickets are scanned. the user can see them on their phone. if a person wins over $600, their tickets are delivered to them so they can claim prizes in person. smaller winnings are applied to their account. sullivan started working on the app 2 1/2 years ago. he was inspired by his father who often crossed state lines to play the lottery. >> i remember growing up being
3:54 am
embarrassed we were lit to practice due to the fact he had to play his numbers. >> reporter: the lottery was to blame? >> wouldn't say that. yeah, could be, yes. >> reporter: the attorney says the app doesn't break any laws. >> in 2011, the department of justice determined buying lottery tickets on line was completely legal. >> reporter: jackpocket monitors how people play to flag problem gambling and limits daily purchases to $100 per person. something powerball itself does not do. for now, only people in new york can use jackpocket. but sullivan is hoping to expand to other states. jackpocket already has 10,000 registered users. tuesday night, 20 orders were being placed every minute. do you feel bad at all about making it easier for people to maybe spend money they didn't have? >> if we can make it convenient for the people who want to play and be responsible with monitoring their play, i think
3:55 am
3:56 am
welcome to subway, what can i make for you? how about one of our delicious reuben
3:57 am
sandwiches? loaded with your choice of tender corned beef or oven roasted turkey breast. we top'em with sauerkraut and swiss cheese drizzle on our thousand island dressing and toast'em to perfection on your choice of freshly baked bread. don't miss the corned beef reuben and the turkey reuben. both won't be here long, so try one today! subway. eat fresh.
3:58 am
3:59 am
4:00 am
captioning funded by cbs ♪ it's thursday, october 1st, 2015. this is the "cbs morning news." millions are watching joaquin. the hurricane picks up in the atlantic before making its way up to the east coast where it will dump as much as 10 inches of rain. targeted criminals. and a school shooting that could have been far worse, if not for the actions of a few heroic educators.

118 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on