Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 7, 2015 2:07am-4:01am EDT

2:07 am
laboring turkey and nato number and a key ally accused russian war planes of violating the airspace twice on the with could and today turkey said eight of the f-16 fighter jets were harassed by an unidentified mig-29. they called on russia to avoid escalating tensions. >> for us, this doesn't look as an accident. this is a violation of the airspace. >> as russia seems to we assert as a super power, behavior is angering the u.s. and allies. the nato chief said the substantial build up includes ground troops. the eastern official in moscow said that russian troops will
2:08 am
not carry out operations inside
2:09 am
2:10 am
million, have been forced from their homes and many of them are driving the largest refugee crisis in europe since world war ii. a german newspaper reports that the government there expects as many as 1.5 million refugees, nearly double the previous estimate. charley is in berlin tonight. >> their long walk may be over, but the wait has just begun. each day hundreds of migrants lineup outside the main registration center to apply for asylum. they are assigned a number and wait to be called.
2:11 am
some have waited for weeks. we watched while frustration gave way to anger and anger to fist fights among the men in the crowd. police stepped in after one man was knocked unconscious. strt can only process a few dozen applications a day, but thousands more migrants are still arriving. it took a family from damascus a month to make it from germany. >> we are waiting for 18 days. my friend is 30 days. >> what's your number. >> vn 2. >> you memorized it? >> of course. i give it all my friends. everybody watch my number also. >> inside, migrants face a series of questions. where they are from, weather their lives were in danger and what proof they have. germany said migrants fleeing poverty instead of war will not
2:12 am
be allowed to stay. he was told to pack up his family and leave. >> no germany? >> no. >> the crisis leaves germany with several problems. what to do with the hundreds of thousands who qualify for asylum and how to deport the hundreds of thousands who don't. successful applicants are provided with food and help. those who are rejected are ordered to leave the country. if they refuse, they are arrested, taken to the airport and sunday home. par charlie, changes. the american commander in afghanistan said his forces are responsible for the air strike this weekend that hit a hospital, killing 22 civilians. general john campbell said it was directed by troops on the
2:13 am
ground after afghan forces called for help. he called it a mistake and he ordered all u.s. personnel retrained on rules of engagement. campbell said president obama should reconsider the plan to reduce troop strength to 1,000. he said it's not enough to train and support the afghans. have a look at this. like a funeral shroud, a sparp covers the building where nine were shot to death last week at umpqua community college in oregon. the first of the funerals will be thursday. the president will meet with relatives of the victims on friday. in milwaukee, two victims of gun violence are fighting back in a courtroom. adriana has that. >> officer brian testified against the milwaukee store that
2:14 am
sold the gun that nearly killed him. >> how long have you had pain on your face? >> every day. >> he and his partner stopped 18-year-old julius burton from riding his bike on a sidewalk. burton shot him in the mouth. his friend was hit in the eye. the memories still torment him. >> i felt like i didn't deserve to live. i felt my duty on that street that day that i let the city down. >> they claim the weapon was negligently sold by badger guns. in 2005, 537 guns recovered from crimes were traced back to badger. it ranked as the number one crime gun dealer in america. they saw surveillance of the purchase. burton entered the shop with an older friend who he paid to buy the gun because burton was
2:15 am
underage. donald floora made the sale. >> the last thing we want to do is put a gun in someone's hands that is going to mitt a crime. >> the turn defended the store. >> who are is responsible when a criminal pulls a gun from his pocket and at point blank range fires at a police officer with the intent to till him? >> on the stand, he once considered suicide, but a friend, also an officer, talked him out of it. that friend is now his wife. >> she probably until now doesn't know that she saved my life. >> cases like this rarely go to trial. in 2005, congress strengthened protections against civil lawsuits. >> the shooter in that case got 80 years in prison.
2:16 am
thanks very much. a decision to save money ended up poisoning a city's drinking water. we will see one of nature's rare duets. the cbs overnight news will be right back. ♪ it's the final countdown! ♪
2:17 am
♪ the final countdown! if you're the band europe, you love a final countdown. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance, you switch to geico. it's what you do. dry spray? i've never used one of these before. ♪ that's fun. that is fun. ♪ it's already dry! it dried right away. it doesn't feel wet at all right now. no wait time. this is great.
2:18 am
♪ my skin feels loved. it's very soft. there's no white stuff. it does the moisturizing for me. it's everything i love about dove. can i keep it? ♪ all the care of dove. now in a dry antiperspirant spray. that detergand we'll have to like half thuse like double! maybe more! i'm going back to the store? yes you are. dish issues? get cascade complete. one pac cleans tough food better than 6 pacs of the bargain brand combined. cascade. now that's clean.
2:19 am
>> it's not safe to drink the water in flint, michigan. a city of nearly 100,000 in northwest detroit. a plan to save money backfired. here's jen reynolds. >> the people of flint lined up for free filters to make their water safer to drink. dorothy baits is one of them. >> mire tub is brown. >> last year they disconnected the water supply and began growing water from the flint
2:20 am
river. it saved the city about $15 million, but the river water even after treatment was risky. that's because the chemicals used were so corrosive, they peeled lead off pipes and sent it straight to faucets in a foul-smelling brew. researchers found elevated lead levels in children two to three times what it was before the switch to the river water. they declared a public health emergency. >> it is one of the most damning things you can do to a child. >> is there any safe level of lead in somebody's blood in. >> there is no safe level of lead. >> that kept leanne up at night. the mother of twins, she noticed mental and physical development delays. public workers were not much
2:21 am
help. >> we were told it's a few iq points. it's not the end of the world. >> she said that? >> just like that. >> flint mayor said other cities may face the same fate. >> i'm angriy that we have been put into this situation. we are trying to rebound and revitalize and we have one problem after another with the water sources. >> with complaints and health concerns, there negotiations to have the state help flint once again draw the water from detroit, but the city's annual river fest celebrations have been postponed indefinitely. >> den reynolds, tshank very much. before a power ball winner collected, she had business to take care of. that's next. j
2:22 am
2:23 am
>> everyone who bought a lottery ticket dreams of doing what julie leach did. she won last week's $310 million power ball jackpot and today she answered the obvious question. you leaving your job? what are your plans? >> i quit automatically. i was done. >> leach plans to buy homes for her boyfriend, three kids and 11 grandchildren. after taxes she will get a lump sum of $140 million.
2:24 am
>> the twin images captured off norway are priceless as the northern lights danced above a pod of hump back whales down on the bottom of the screen. they were playing in the shimmering light. a bit of water ballet thrown in for good measure. >> in a moment, another opening, another show. not just another star. >> announcer: this portion of the cbs evening news is sponsored by pacific life. for life insurance, annuities and investments, choose pacific life.
2:25 am
2:26 am
2:27 am
>> we end this autumn evening with an awakening. teenagers coming of age. this production has a real life subplot about a 20 something making broadway history. >> it's not easy keeping pace with ali. the 28-year-old is rushing to work. handing out free theater tickets and making last minute back stage preps. all as she prepared to be the first person in a wheelchair to be in the revival of spring awak awakening. >> i never saw anyone in a chair on broadway.
2:28 am
i wanted to make it happen. nobody of ever done it. a part of me was like i'm not going to get my hopes up because maybe it's not possible. >> she rolled over most barriers. she was 2 years old when a car accident left her paralyzed. five years later she caught the acting bug. >> i was a little girl in a wheelchair and when i started to perform, i felt like i was now an actress and a singer and it gave me another identity. >> she wowed audiences from the playhouse to the kennedy center. she had to choreograph her own movements to match the cast.
2:29 am
she had to learn sign language. half the cast is hearing impaired. >> for creates a different lens and adds a layer of vulnerability to the show that is so raw and real. >> i learn something from her all the time. >> what is it like took on stage with her? >> she ems a fierce woman, brave, courage touous, unstoppable. that girl is a broad. >> ♪ >> she turned most obstacles into opportunities and has no plans to slow down. >> cbs news, new york. >> that's the cbs overnight news for this wednesday.
2:30 am
for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city. >> this is the cbs overnight news. >> welcome to the overnight news. the floodwaters continue to rise in south carolina and so does the death toll in the wake of record rain and flooding. it's turning towns into islands and neighborhoods into swamps. david is there. >> for angela, coming home was hard. >> oh, god. i can't even breathe right now. oh, my god. this is just -- >> she does a breeshiate that her family is alive and her family kept trying to escape.
2:31 am
craig smith is her partner. >> by that time the refrigerator was floating. >> that they dialled 911, but still no help. >> did you think you and your family were going to die? >> when i saw the water coming up, yeah. there was nowhere to go. >> cole posted a plea on facebook. >> for anyone has a boat, please help. i have two children. with special needs, she wrote. smith feared help would not get there before his family drowned. from the attic looking down, he took photos and she posted. if anyone at all has a boat, please, please help. these three men responded to the family's plea. >> the look on their faces, you can't imagine. they thought they were done for. i don't think they had 20 minutes left. >> you guys are my yardian
2:32 am
angels. >> today angela and craig got a chance to thank the men for saving their lives. >> thank you so much. >> two days after the family was rescu rescued, you still needed waders to walk through their yard. getting back to normal will be tough. she said i tried to get a rental car and realized i can't even find my license. cbs news, columbia, south carolina. >> it's being called the worst american cargo ship disaster in more than 30 years. 28 americans and five polish nationals on board were lost. the latest on the search for answers. >> woeft guard searchers recovered more pieces today. each hour makes them more pessimistic about finding survivors. >> everything inside of me says
2:33 am
my daddy is coming home. i believe that. >> her father is 62-year-old larry davis, one of the missing crew and an able-bodies seaman serving most low as a look out. >> do you have hope? >> he always came home and had a story to tell. everything in me just knows that i need him to come home and tell this story. >> jacksonville's community knows they grew up around the port. 17 of the crew lived here. they have questions they hope to answer, how and when the ship lost power and propulsion near the eye of a monster storm. why the 53-year-old captain decided to beat the storm given the ominous forecast we reported last tuesday. >> joaquin is a tropical storm.
2:34 am
is it going to be a hurricane? >> that looks likely. >> rod sullivan, a former merchant marine is now a maritime lawyer. >> he could have turned back or cut through the windward passage that took him further south and out of the path of the storm. >> karla doesn't blame the captain. >> we all make judgment calls every day. >> no bitterness? >> not at all. he knew what he was facing. he had no doubt in his mind that his captain of that vessel made the right call. >> they acknowledged the captain of a ship without power has few options. the owners hired their own team of investigateors. cbs news, jacksonville, florida. >> come in milwaukee where officers are suing a gun shop.
2:35 am
they claim the store was negligent to sell the weapon. >> i have still a lot of bullet fragments or shrapnel. >> officer brian norbert testified against the store that sold the gun that nearly killed him. >> how often do you have pain on the right side of your face. >> right now. every day. >> norbert and his partner stopped 18-year-old julius burton from riding his bike on a city sidewalk. after a brief struggle, he shot them in the mouth and eye. the memories of the shooting still torment him. >> i felt like i doesn't deserve to live. my dude on tty on the street, ie city down. >> they were negligently and unlawfully sold by badger guns. in 2005, 537 guns recovered from
2:36 am
crimes were traced back to badger. that ranked as the number one crime gun dealer in america. they saw surveillance of the purchase. burton entered with an older friend who he paid to buy the gun because burton was underage. donald floor on made the sale. >> the last thing we want to do is put a gun in somebody's hand that will commit a crime. >> james defended the store. >> who is responsible when a criminal pulls a gun from his pocket and at point blank range fires at a police officer with the intent to kill him. >> on the stand yesterday, norbert said he once considered suicide, but a friend, also an officer talked him out of it. that friend is now his wife. >> she probably until now doesn't know that she saved my
2:37 am
life. >> the two biggest names find themselves behind the eight ball. they used insider knowledge to win hundreds of thousands of dollars and the scandal could lead to new federal regulations. >> the ads are everywhere and so is the money. one week leagues are paying $75 million a week. the business model is under the microscope after allegations of what amounts to insider trading. >> play for your share every single day. pick your sport. >> according to a reporter in the "new york times," a draft kings employee admitted he released early data on what players were most used ahead of the nfl's third week. getting that early information account serve as an advantage. they won $350,000 that week, betting on a rival website, fan duel. >> it gives an edge. it's no different than taking steroids and blasting home runs
2:38 am
out of the park. that's a little ek treatment being but you have an edge. >> the cbs overnight news will be right back. go pro with oral-b. oral-b's rounded brush head cups your teeth to break up plaque and rotates to sweep it away. and oral-b delivers a clinically proven superior clean versus sonicare diamondclean. my mouth feels super clean. oral-b know you're getting a superior clean. i'm never going back to a manual brush. well, things in the bedroom have alwaysyeah, no complaints. we've always had a lot of fun, but i wanted to try something new. and i'm into that. so we're using k-y love. it's a pleasure gel that magnifies both of our sensations. right, i mean, for both of us, just... yeah, it just takes all those awesome feelings you usually feel and it just makes them... rawr...
2:39 am
dare to feel more with new k-y love.
2:40 am
>> it was nearly 50 years ago that they invented a new genre of journalism. his widow is trying to keep the gonzo spirit alive, turning their legendary owl farm into a museum. >> not far away, there was a cabin that gave rocky mountain high a new meaning. it was a home of hunter s thompson, journalist and counter culture hero. despite nearly 40 years of binge
2:41 am
drinking, chain smoking and hallucinations, what under wrote the owl farm. >> i got paid to drive me mad. >> the sky was full of what looked like huge bats. >> it's a cult classic and starring hunter's friend, johnny depp. >> there was a teenage girl. he was like a teenage girl trapped in the body of an elderly dope fiend. >> she was hunter's writing assista assistant. it ended up his second wife. >> did you watch him write? >> absolutely. he would pull the typewriter for the and start clicking and it was beautiful in the house. >> that's a good sign. >> for made him happy and everyone happy. >> when they married, hunter promised her a good ten years.
2:42 am
she only got two. he committed suicide in front of his typewriter in 2005. >> so many years i'm expecting hunter to be at that chair. >> what do you miss the most? >> his physical body. his presence. his voice. him being here. >> anita left everything much as hunter left it. nixon masks hanging off a cactus and reading glasses. >> for brought me comfort to keep things as they were. that was the reason i was doing it. >> some fans couldn't leave her in peace. >> the trespassing is a problem. we deal with it not like hunter dealt with it. he shot out the window or shooting at them. >> she decided to invite a select few to visit, making it a museum of sorts, as long as she approves the guest list. >> it's ten years and it's not
2:43 am
the same, but the feel or the spirit is the same. >> there is i lot of energy here. you feel it when you walk in. >> do you still? >> absolutely. it's palpable. >> this is the room. >> this is where he did everything? >> this is where hunter wrote fear and loathing in las vegas where he started the campaign for sheriff. this was his sacred room. >> left behind are old credit cards and press badges and a pack or two of dusty dun hills. >> the only thing that changed is i moved the spider webs away. >> the famous convertible is as shiny as ever. >> this is the red shark. >> mini bottles still full rest where most drivers put their coffee. >> tank ray. you knew it was summer. he loved gin in the summer.
2:44 am
>> that was a monument to mischief. he saw guns and bombs as two of life's big pleasures. the beer keg floating around still. he and his pal who owned the farm once strapped dynamite to a jeep for fun. >> the penitentiary thing is we would experience a shock wave. >> you wanted the shock wave. >> we are standing there together. now we can drink. >> it's quieter than in hunter's day, but anita uses his shotgun to blow things up once in a while. >> all right, hunter, we love you! >> there is no explaining. even fans lucky enough to get an invite may be more baffled than
2:45 am
enlightened. >> literary icon, genius or both? just keep your head down while you are here. cbs this morning, woody creek, colorado.
2:46 am
2:47 am
>> people talk about life imitating art, but a visionary
2:48 am
considers his art to be a new form of life. some of his works are 12 feet tall and all can walk. >> this is a strand beast. an intricate collection of pipes with plastic ties. designed to move, scoot across beaches, powered by the wind. strand beach means beach creature in dutch. >> you refer to them as animals. are these living things to you? >> can imagine them as animals. it's a game. after a while if you play a game long enough, it becomes real. >> he spent 25 years tinkering with the design and making them
2:49 am
more real and alive. they a peesh stoob a strange mix. spartan insect and part poers. the key to the movements is in the legs. >> go to the ground and give can't to the animals. that might be the reason why it looks like the movement of real animals's legs. species have been spotted in massachusetts. recently they made it a plaza in boston to cheers of delight. >> what is it that brings out the child in us when we see the objects? >> for a child, life is new. every experience is new. if you see something new, you forget you have grown up. the child comes back.
2:50 am
>> they were there for a talk he gave at the massachusetts institute of technology. the ability to move smoothly and effortlessly captured the imaginations of engineers and physicis physicists. the museum displays them in an interactionive exhibition. >> it reminds people of their own power. >> this is a person whose creativity doesn't respect the boundaries of this is art or science or story telling. it's an amalgam of all three. >> what is your ultimate hope that this will grow into? >> before i leave this planet, i would like to leave a new specimen on earth. these animals will live in the future. >> he is taking steps to make sure they continue even after he is gone. he found a clever way to help
2:51 am
them reproduce and evolve. he openly posts the formulas on his website like how to store the wind energy and how the legs work. he encourages people to create their own versions. that is exactly what people do. these are considered back beasts. the ones that are hamster powered. there is nothing like the majesty of the original creations. >> do you have a favorite? >> yes, my favorite is always the one i still have to make. the that keeps me awake at night. that's my favorite. >> salem, massachusetts. >> wearable technology is a $5 billion a year business. it attaches to your head and designed to change your mood. we have the story for cbs this morning. >> if you talk to coffee for a
2:52 am
jolt or a glass of wine to relax, a wearable tech company wants you to consider electric currents. >> what are is the basis behind the concepts of electric stimulation to change your mood? >> we have nerves on the head and neck that connect to our brains and those nerves normally give a lot of input about what's going on around us. we are signalling those nerves electrically to just trigger your body to respond. >> the new device called think costs nearly $300 and fits on the forehead and the back of the head and comes with energy or calm. controlled through a smart phone app, because it is a wellness or style product rather than a medical device, it is not subject to fda regulation. izzie is the ceo of think. >> who is the ideal person to use think? >> somebody with an attitude that they have a full life,
2:53 am
conquering and conquering your day or on the calm mode, somebody who wants to unwind because live is stressful. >> they deliver a low dose of currency and claim the pulses or what they call vibes change brain activity by stimulating nerves on the face or the back of the head. they demonstrated the device to first time users in new york city. >> my heart rate is low. >> users are advised to wear the product between 10 to 20 minutes a session and for no more than 60 minutes a day. >> the design is really different and futuristic. >> think believes humans can't control their biological responses. randy browno disagrees. >> what you drink and what you
2:54 am
eat, these are all active choices we make to change our mood. >> she skeptical if the testing proves the wearable changes the brain's physiology and chemistry. >> is it really activating a part of your brain? they don't know that. they need to do more research. >> i wanted to learn what it felt like. >> this goes on your temple. >> choosing the calm setting in the middle of my day. >> i feel like someone is tickling my hair. my head. it's interesting. >> this is about a journey where there is another choice. now the question is, this choice of digital versus a chemical, language whether it's this or anyone else, we are using programs. it's not just a gimmick. it really helps people to feel
2:55 am
motivated and relax. it helps you.
2:56 am
2:57 am
archaeologists in egypt are close to solving a ancient mystery. they found markings on the walls of king tut and queen nephrotiti. >> sunrise in the valley of the kings. what brings us here now is a secret of the queens. egyptologist nicholas reed is from the university of arizona and on on an expedition. >> this is a burial chamber. probably the greatest archaeological discovery ever mead. >> here believes he found one even greater and in the same room. >> it's a definitely cry. >> markings that could indicate a man made door to more
2:58 am
chambers. >> i was astonished to find what looked like artificial features. >> another possible clue. they suggest it was not built for a king. >> that are is a tomb favored by queens. >> he has one in mind. queen nephrotiti. she could be king tut's mother. on the other side of this wall is where they believe the egyptian queen lies buried. they can't knock it down. they had to find another way to see through it. >> noninvasive ra bar and imaging will be used to test his theory. >> i think it is most important. >> more important? >> over the years, many people have claimed to have found the queen's tomb.
2:59 am
>> if i'm wrong, i'm wrong. we move on. but i think it's something we can't just ignore because if i happen to be right, then it will change everything. >> they won't stop digging. for cbs this morning, alex ortiz in the valley of the kings. >> that's the cbs overnight news for this wednesday. if are some of you the news conditions. for others, check back for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city.
3:00 am
. >> as floodwater filled their home, they sent out a facebook sos. >> did you think and you your family were going to die? >> yeah, i did. >> long after the cargo ship sanction, loved ones cling to hope. >> my daddy is coming home. >> two cops nearly killed sue the gun dealer. a disabled actress writes her own script for success on broadway. >> i had a dream and i wanted to make it happen, but nobody ever done it. >> announcer: this is the cbs overnight news. >> they discovered more dead yesterday in the worst flooding the carolinas had ever seen. at least 17 have died and they
3:01 am
can't even begin to put a number on the damage done by an estimated 11 trillion gallons of water. yesterday as the sun came out and that water slowly began to recede, we heard amazing stories of survival. david is in south carolina. >> for angela cole, coming home was hard. >> oh, god. i can't even breathe right now. oh, my god. this is just -- >> but she does appreciate that her family is alive. she snapped photos on her phone as the water was rising and her family kept climbing higher trying to escape. craig smith is her partner. >> by that time the refrigerator was floating. they dialled 911, but two hours later, still no help. >> did you think and you your
3:02 am
family was going to die? >> when i saw the water coming up, yeah. there was nowhere to go. >> cole decided to post a plea on facebook. if anyone has a boat, please help. i have two children and one with special needs. smith feared it would not get there before his family drowned. from the attic looking down, she took photos of the water rising and again posted. if anyone at all has a boat, please, please help. these three men responded to the family's plea. john heard them screaming. >> the look on their faces, you can't imagine. i think they thought they were done for. we wouldn't have been there, 20 more minutes, i don't think they had that much time left. >> you guys are my guardian angels. >> today angela and craig got a chance to thank the men for saving their lives. >> thank you so much. >> it has been two days since
3:03 am
the family was saved and you still need waders to walk through their front yard. their cars are destroyed in the drive wie. angela said i tried to get a rental car and realized i can't even find my license. >> thanks again, david. no sign of 28 americans and five polish sailors from that cargo ship that broke up in hurricane joaquin. the al faro lost power and sanction five days ago in the bermuda triangle. her name means the light house. loved ones are still carrying the torch. the coast guard recovered more pieces of al faro today. each passing hour makes them pessimistic about survivors. >> i believe my daddy is coming home. >> karla's father is 62-year-old dairy lafs. he is one of the missing crew,
3:04 am
an able-bodies seaman serving mostly as a look out. >> i still have hope. >> he alway came home and had a story to tell. everything in me knows that he needs to come home and tell this story. i need him to tell me now. >> the tight knit community knows the city grew up around the port. 17 of the crew of 33 lived here. the community has questions they hope to answer like how and when the chip lost why michael davidson, the 53-year-old captain decided to beat the storm given the ominous forecast we reported on tuesday. >> joaquin is a tropical storm. where is it going to go? >> that looks likely. >> he is now a maritime lawyer.
3:05 am
>> after he was on the route, he could have turned back and cut through the passage any number of ways that took him further south and out of the path. >> karla doesn't blame the captain. >> we all make judgment calls every day. >> no bitterness? >> not at all. he knew what he was facing and he had no doubt that the captain made the right call. >> the experienced sea men acknowledge that the captain of a ship in a hurricane has few options. the ownerships have hired their own team of investigators. >> on the case for us tonight, thank you. >> defense secretary ash carter demanded talks with moscow to keep u.s. and russian planes from colliding or shooting each other over syria. they were mostly bombing rebels.
3:06 am
holly williams reports the skies are crowded. >> five days into the campaign in syria, the fighter jeds targeted several positions. they are not in areas controlled by isis. the u.s. said what they are doing is propping up the syrian redeem by attacking the opponents. they had moderate levels what were supported by america. as david martin reported, syrian airspace is crowded with the u.s. and russia launching air strikes in syria that is backing different sides in the country's civil war. neighboring turkey and nato
3:07 am
number and a key ally accused war planes of violating the airspace twice on the weekend. and today turkey said each of the f 16 fighter jets were harassed by an unidentified mig-29, a soviet era fighter aircraft. the nato chief called on russia to avoid escalating tensions. >> for us this is not an accident. this is a violation of the air spagz. >> russia reasserts itself, the behavior is angering the u.s. and allies. the chief said that russia's build up of forces in syria includes ground troops. the senior official said that troops will not carry out
3:08 am
operations inside syria.
3:09 am
3:10 am
>> half of all syrians, 11 million, have been forced from their homes and many of them are driving the largest refugee crisis in super since world war ii. a german newspaper reports he expects as many as 1.5 million refugees, double the previous estimate. >> their long walk may be over. but their long wait has just begun. each day hundreds of migrants lineup outside the main registration center to apply for asylum. they are a signed a number and wait to be called.
3:11 am
some waited for weeks. we watched while frustration gave way to anger and anxietier to fist fights among men in the crowd. police finally stepped in after man was knocked unconscious. the center can only process a few dozen applications a day. thousands more migrants are still arriving. it took the family a month to make it to germany. >> we are waiting for 18 days. >> 18 days? >> yes. some people, my friend, 30 days. >> what is your number? >> vn 2. >> you memorized it? >> of course. and i give it to my friends. please, everybody watch my number also. >> they face a series of questions and where their lives were in danger and what proof they have. germany made clear that the migrants fleeing poverty instead
3:12 am
of war will not be allowed to stay. >> no germany? >> the cries leaves them with several problems. what to do with the hundreds of thousands who qualify and how to deport the hundreds of thousands who don't. successful abitants are provided with help finding a job. those who refuse are arrested and taken to the airport and sent home. >> reporting from berlin tonight. thanks. >> the american commander in afghanistan told congress his forces are responsible for the air strike that hit a hospital killing 22 civilians. the attack was direct bide troops on the ground after afghan forces called for help.
3:13 am
he called it a mistake and ordered all retrained on the rules. he said president obama should reconsider the u.s. troop strength to 1,000 jx near. he said it's not enough to train and support the afghans. have a look at this. a tarp now covers the building where nine were shot to death last week at umpqua community college in oregon. the first of the funerals will be thursday and the president will meet with relatives the victims on friday. in milwaukee, two victims of gun violence are fighting back in a courtroom. adriana diaz has that. >> i have still a lot of bullet fragments or shrapnel. >> officer brian testified against the store that sold the
3:14 am
gun that nearly killed him. >> how often do you have pain? are. >> right now. every day. >> he and his partner stopped 18-year-old julius burton for riding his bike on the sidewalk. he shot norbert in the mouth and his partner in the eye. the memories still torment him. >> i felt like i didn't deserve to live anymore. my duty on the street that day that i let our -- i let the city down. >> both claim the weapon was negligently and unlawfully sold. in 2005, 537 guns recovered from crimes were traced back to badger that ranked as the number one dealer in america. the jury saw surveillance of the purchase. burton entered with an older friend where he paid to buy the gun because burton was underage.
3:15 am
donald made the sale. >> the last thing you top the do is put a gun in somebody's hands that has is going to commit a crime. >> who are is responsible when a criminal pulls a gun from his pocket and at point blank range fires at a police officer with the intent to kill him. >> on the stand, nor berg said he once considered suicide, but a friend, also an officer talked him out of it. that friend is now his wife. >> she probably until now doesn't know that she saved my life. >> cases like this rarely go to trial. in 2005, congress strengthened protections against civil lawsuits. >> we want to note the shooter got 80 years in prison. thanks very much. >> a decision to save money
3:16 am
ended up poisoning a city's drinking water. and we will see one of nature's rare duets. the cbs overnight news will be right back. enough pressure in here for ya? ugh. my sinuses are killing me. yeah...just wait 'til we hit ten thousand feet. i'm gonna take mucinex sinus-max. too late, we're about to take off. these dissolve fast. they're new liquid gels. and you're coming with me...
3:17 am
wait, what?! you realize i have gold status? do i still get the miles? new mucinex sinus-max liquid gels. dissolves fast to unleash max strength medicine. start the relief. ditch the misery. let's end this. take a look at these bbq best cracked pepper sauce... most ribs eaten while calf roping... yep, greatness deserves recognition. you got any trophies, cowboy? ♪ whoomp there it is uh, yeah... well, uh, well there's this one. best insurance mobile app? yeah, two years in a row. well i'll be... does that thing just follow you around? like a little puppy! the award-winning geico app. download it today.
3:18 am
well, things in the bedroom have alwaysyeah, no complaints. we've always had a lot of fun, but i wanted to try something new. and i'm into that. so we're using k-y love. it's a pleasure gel that magnifies both of our sensations. right, i mean, for both of us, just... yeah, it just takes all those awesome feelings you usually feel and it just makes them... rawr... dare to feel more with new k-y love.
3:19 am
it's not safe to drink the water in flint, michigan, a city of nearly 100,000 northwest of detroit, a plan to save money backfired. >> for the people of flint lined up for free filters to make their water safer to drink. >> it's not good enough to take a bath in. my tub is brown. >> they disconnected the water supply and began drawing from
3:20 am
the river made it. it safered the city, but the river water was risky. that's because the chemicals were so corrosive, they peeled lead in a foul-smelling dis-colored brew. they found elevated lead levels. the county declared a public health emergency. >> it is one of the most damning things you can do to a child. >> the dr. is a pediatrician at the hurley medical center. >> is there any safe level of lead in your blood? >> no. >> the mother of 4-year-old twins, she noticed mental and physical delays. state public workers were not much help.
3:21 am
>> we were told by the state nurse. it's just a few iq points. it's not the end of the world. just like that. >> other cities may face the same fate. >> we are a community trying to rebound and we have one problem after another with the kaurt sources. >> with complaints and health concerns, there negotiations to have the state help flint draw the water from detroit. for now, scott, the city's annual river fest celebrations this weekend have been postponed indefinitely. >> thanks very much. before a power ball winner collected her jackpot, she had business to take care of. that's next.
3:22 am
3:23 am
>> everyone who has bought a lottery ticket dreams of doing what julie leach did. she won the $310 million power ball jackpot and today answered the obvious question. you leaving your job? what are your plans now? >> i quit automatically. i was done. >> leach plans to buy homes for her boyfriend, three kids and 11 grandchildren. after taxes she will get a lump sum of $140 million.
3:24 am
the twin images captured off norway are priceless as the northern lights danced above a pod of hump back whales on the bottom of the screen. they were playing in the shimmering light. a bit of water ballet for the light show. in a moment, another opening, another show. but not just another star.
3:25 am
3:26 am
announcer: here's to the things that can keep us safe. those we use all the time with hardly a thought. those that are silently standing by to save our lives. and, now, those that we carry with us everywhere we go. [alert tone] many mobile devices will now bring you wireless emergency alerts, real-time information directly from local sources you know and trust. with a unique sound and vibration, you'll be in the know, wherever you are.
3:27 am
>> we end this autumn evening with a spring awakening. a play about teenagers coming of age. this production has a real life subplot of a something 20 making broadway history. >> it's not easy keeping pace. handing out free theater tickets and making last minute back stage prep as she prepares to debut as the first person in a wheelchair in the revival of spring awakening. >> i never saw anyone in a chair on broadway. i had a dream and wanted to make
3:28 am
it happen, but nobody had ever done it. there was part of me that was like i'm not going to get my hopes up because maybe it's not possible. >> she rolled over most barriers. she was two years old when a car accident left her paralyzed from the chest down. five years later she caught the acting bug. >> i was a little girl in a wheelchair. when i started to perform, i felt like i was now an actress and a singer and it gave me another identity and made me feel really good. >> she wowed audiences from the paper mill playhouse. >> for the kennedy center in washington, d.c. stroker said she had to make casting directors feel at ease. choreographing her own movement to match the cast. in spring awakening, she had to
3:29 am
learn sign language. half the cast is hearing impaired. >> it creates a different lens and adds a layer of vulnerability that is so raw and real. >> i learn something pr her all the time. >> what are is it like to be on stage with her? she is a force to be reckoned with. >> she embodies a fierce recommend. fierce and unstoppable. she is a dame. that's what she is. >> stroker said she turned most obstacles into opportunities and has no plan to slow down. >> cbs news, new york. >> that's the cbs overnight news for this wednesday. for some of you the news
3:30 am
continues. for others check back for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city. >> this is the cbs overnight news. >> welcome to the overnight news. the floodwaters continue to rise in south carolina and so does the death toll in the wake of record rain and flooding. it turned towns into islands and neighborhoods into swamps. david is there. >> for angela cole, coming home was hard. >> i can't even breathe right now. oh, my god. this is just -- >> she does appreciate that perfamily is alive. she snapped photos and her family kept trying to escape.
3:31 am
craig smith is her partner. >> the refrigerator was floating in this direction. >> they're dialled 911, but two hours later, still no help. >> did you think you and your family were going to die? >> when i saw the water coming up, yeah. there was nowhere to go. >> if anyone has a boat, please help. i have two children, with special needs. smith feared help would not get there. angela took photos of the water rising and again posted. if anyone has a boat, please, please help. >> these three men responded to the pleas. >> the lock on their faces, you can't imagine. i think they thought they were done for. if we wouldn't have been there, 20 more minutes.
3:32 am
>> you guys are my quarterian angels. >> they got a chance to thank the men for saving their lives. >> two days after the family was rescued, you still needed waders. getting back to normal will be tough. she tried to get a rental car and realized she couldn't find her johnson. cbs news, columbia, south carolina. >> it is being called the worst american cargo ship disaster in more than 30 years. the al faro with 28 americans and five polish nationals was lost when it ran into hurricane joaquin. the latest on the search for answers. >> the searchers recovered more pieces today, but each passing hour makes them more pessimis c pessimistic. >> everything inside of me says
3:33 am
my daddy is coming home. >> her father is 62-year-old larry davis, one of the missing crew, an able-bodies seaman serving as a look out. >> do you have hope? >> he always came home and had a str to tell. everything in me knows i need him to come home and this story. this is a story i need him to tell me now. >> the tight knit community knows the city grew up around the port. 17 of the crew of 33 lived here. they have questions investigators hope to answer. how and when they lost power near the eye of a monster storm and why michael davidson and the 53-year-old captain decided to beat the storm given the forecast last tuesday.
3:34 am
>> where is it going to go some. >> that looks likely. >> a former merchant marine is now a maritime lawyer. >> here could have cut back through the windward passage and anything to take him further south and out of the path. >> karla doesn't blame the captain. >> no bitterness? >> not at all. i know what he was facing and he had no doubt that his captain made the right call. >> the experienced seaman acknowledge that the captain of a ship without power has few options. the owners pyred a team of investigators. cbs news, jacksonville, florida. >> dramatic testimony in milwaukee. the tops were shot in the line
3:35 am
of duty and said the store was negligent to sell the weapon used in the shooting. >> i have a lot of bullet fragments or shrapnel. >> brian norbert testified about the scores that sold the gun. >> how often are you having pain? >> right now. every day. >> in 2009 he and his partner stopped 18-year-old julius burton from riding his bike on a city sidewalk. burton shot norbert in the nouth a mouth and his partner in the eye. the memories still torment him. >> i felt like i didn't deserve to live. i felt like i let the city down. >> both officers claim the weapon wassing about thely sold by badger guns. in 2005, 537 guns recovered from
3:36 am
crimes were traced back to badger that ranked as the number one crime gun dealner america. the jury saw surveillance video of the purchase. he was in the shop with an older friend who he paid to buy the gun because burton was underage. >> the last thing we want to do is put a gun in somebody's hans that will commit a crime. >> who is responsible when a criminal pulls a gun from his pocket and at point blank range fire at a police officer with the intend to kill him. >> on the stand, he once considered suicide, but a friend talked him out of it and that friend is now his wife. >> she probably until now doesn't know that she saved my
3:37 am
life. >> the two biggest names in fantasy sports find themselves behind the eight ball. a scandal could lead to new federal regulations. >> the ads are everywhere and so is the money. week leagues are paying $75 million a week. >> it amounts to insider trading. >> play for your share every single day. pick your sport. >> according to a report, a draft kings employee admitted he released early data on what specific players were most used ahead of the nfl's third week. getting that information could serve as an advantage. the employee went on to win $350,000 that week betting on a rival website, fan dele. >> it's no different in professional sports to take
3:38 am
steroids and blasting home runs out of the park. the premises is the same because you have an edge. >> the cbs overnight news will be right back. life of now with the skin of then olay total effects vitamin-enriched. to fight the 7 signs of aging. in 4 weeks, skin looks up to 10 years younger. 7 in 1 from the world's #1 olay. your best beautiful well, things in the bedroom have alwaysyeah, no complaints. we've always had a lot of fun, but i wanted to try something new. and i'm into that. so we're using k-y love. it's a pleasure gel that magnifies both of our sensations. right, i mean, for both of us, just... yeah, it just takes all those awesome feelings you usually feel and it just makes them... rawr...
3:39 am
dare to feel more with new k-y love.
3:40 am
>> it was nearly 50 years ago that hunter s thompson invented a new genre of journalism. his widow is trying to keep the genre alive and turning their farm into a museum. lee cowan paid a visit. >> not far from aspen, colorado sits an unassuming habit that gave rocky mountain high a new meaning. it was the home of hunter s thompson. professional trouble maker. >> you never know. >> despite nearly 40 years of
3:41 am
binge drinking and chain smoking and hallucinations, he under wrote. >> i have pages that will drive you mad. >> suddenly there was a terrible roar around us and the sky was full of what looked like huge bats. >> it's classic with one of two books turned into a movie stars his friend, johnny depp. >> hunter was like a teenazge girl. he was like a teenage girl draped in the body of an elderly dope fiend. >> anita came as his writing assistant and ended up his second wife. >> did you watch him write? >> absolutely. >> what was it like? >> he would pull the typewriter forward and start clicking and it was beautiful in the house. it made him happy and everyone happy. >> when they married, hunter promised her a good ten years,
3:42 am
but she only got two. he committed suicide in front of his typewriter here in the cap in's kitchen in 2005. >> i'm still expecting hunter to be at that chair. >> what do you miss the most? >> his physical body. his presence. his voice. him being here. >> anita left everything much as hunter left it. mix on masks hanging off a cactus and reading glasses hitched to a lampshade. >> for brought me comfort. >> some fans couldn't leave her in peace. >> the trespassing is a problem. we deal with it not like hunter dealt with it. she shot out the window or at them. >> shoory decided to invite a select few, making it a museum of sorts. as long as she approves the guest list. >> it has been ten years and
3:43 am
it's not exactly the same, but the feel and the spirit of it is. >> there is a lot of energy here. no doubt about it. you feel it when you walk in. >> do you still feel that? >> absolutely. it's palpable. >> this is the room. >> this is where he did everything? >> this is where hunter wrote fear and loathing in las vegas where he started his campaign for sheriff. this was his sacred room. >> left behind are old credit cards and press badges and a back or two of dusty dun hills. >> the only thing that changed is i moved the spider webs away. >> his famous convertible is as shiny as well. >> this is the red shark. >> mini bottles where most drivers put their coffee. >> if he was drinking gin, it was summer. he loved gin in the summer.
3:44 am
>> he was a monument to mischief. he saw guns and bombs as two of life's great pleasures. evidence by the beer keg flying around still. he and his pal who owned the farm once strapped dynamite to a jeep just for fun. >> the important thing is that we were going to experience a shock wave. >> you wanted it. >> yes. now we can drink. >> it's quieter here than in hunter's day, but anita still uses his nickel-plated shotgun to blow things up once in a while. >> hunter, we love you. >> there is no explaining hunter s thompson. fans lucky enough to get an invite may walk away more
3:45 am
baffled than enlightened. literary icon, mad genius or both? come to owl farm and you decide. keep your head down. cbs this morning in woody creek colorado. mary gets her bounce on.
3:46 am
wow, is like, every mom from the neighborhood here? you are looking good! using bounce dryer sheets is paying off. your clothes have fewer wrinkles and static cling... ...ain't bringing you down. bounce, the 4 in 1 dryer sheet.
3:47 am
dry spray? ♪ that's fun. it's already dry! no wait time. this is great. it's very soft. can i keep it? all the care of dove. now in a dry antiperspirant spray.
3:48 am
>> people talk about life and art, but some of his work for 12 feet tall and all of them can walk. >> this is a strand beach. a collection of pipes fastened with plastic ties. designed to move, scoot across beaches, powered by the wind. they are the brain children of teo johnson. these living creatures to you? >> you can imagine them as animals. it's a game, in fact. after a while, if you play a game long yuf, it's real. >> he spent 25 years bingering with the design and taking them
3:49 am
more real and alive. >> they are a strange mix of insect and crab. the key to the life-like movements is in the legs. >> go through the ground quickly and give support to the animal again. that's what the animals do. that might be the reason why it looks like the movement of real animal legs. >> the original habitats were on the beaches of europe, they have been spotted in massachusetts. recently they made it a plaz near boston to cheers of delight. >> what is it that brings out the child in us? >> for a child, life is now. >> every experience is new. if you see something new, you forget you have bridgestone up. your child comes back. >> they were there for a talk he
3:50 am
gave at the massachusetts institute of technology where the ability to move smoothly captured the originations of energies and physicists. they are awe-inspiring as works of art. they are displaying them in an interactive exhibition. >> it reminds people of the hour. >> the contemporary art curator. >> teo's creative doesn't respect the boundaries of this is art, this is seanchs, this is story telling. it's all three of those things. >> what is your hope that this will grow into. >> i would like to leave a new specimen on earth. these animals will live in the future. >> he is taking steps to make sure they continue after he is gone and found a way to make
3:51 am
them reproduce and evolve. he posts the formulas like how to store the wind energy and how the legs work. he encourages people to create their own versions and that is exactly what people do. these are considered hack beasts. beasts made of lego or hamster-powered. there is nothing like the majesty of johnson's original creations. >> do you have a favorite? >> my favorite is the that i still have to make and keeps me awake at night. that is my favorite. >> salem, massachusetts. >> wearable technology is a $5 billion a year business. the latest attaches to your head and designed to change your mood. the doctor has the story for cbs this morning. >> if you turn to coffee for a jolt or a glass of wine to
3:52 am
relax, a wearable tech company wants you to consider electric current. >> what is the basis behind the concept of electric stimulation. >> we have nerves that connect to our brain and those give a lot of input about what's going on around us and we signal those to trigger the to respond. >> the new device costs nearly $300 and it fits on the forehead and the back of the r. because it is a wellness or lifestyle product rather than a medical device, it is not subject to regulation. >> who do you think is the ideal person to use it? >> somebody with an attitude that they have a full and
3:53 am
conquering your day or somebody who wants to unwild because is stressful. >> they deliver a low dose to the surface of the skin. they think it changes brain activity by stimulating cranial nerves on the face or the back of the head. they demonstrated to first time users in new york city. >> my heart rate is low, but i feel it at the same time. >> they said to wear it between 10 to 20 minutes and no more than 60 minutes a day. >> the design is futuristic. >> they think humans can't control their own responses. randy bruno, a neuroscientist disagrees. >> almost everything we do, what
3:54 am
you drink or eat are active choices to change your biologist or mood. >> he is skeptical if the testing proves the wearable changes the brain's physiology and chemistry. >> is it activating a part of your brain? they need to do more purchase. >> i wanted to learn what it felt like. >> put it on your temple. >> i feel like someone is tickling my hair and my head. how interesting. >> there is another choice now. the question is there is a choice of digical versus chemical. anyone elsewhere we are, it's a few things we want. it's not just a gimmick, but it does help people to be able to
3:55 am
feel motivated and relax. >> ♪ [electric guitar] caring - soft tone
3:56 am
3:57 am
3:58 am
i just need a second. is your weight holding you back? [male narrator] are everyday tasks getting harder and harder to do? did you see this? hm? your cousin's in the hospital from a heart attack. really? [narrator] health risks associated with excess weight or obesity can be serious. but you can do something about it. i know you're worried. i found this. [narrator] take the your weight matters challenge. visit your weight matters dot org where you'll find free resources to help you take control. you can start improving your life right away. download the free toolkit to prepa you to speak with a healthcare provider about your weight and health. your weight does matter. accept the challenge and take charge today.
3:59 am
visit your weight matters dot org. ople take action against housing discrimination? my friends were told they might be more comfortable in another neighborhood. my co-worker was pressured by her landlord to pay her rent with sexual favors. my neighbor was told she needs to get rid of her dog, even though he's an assistance animal. they all reported these forms of housing discrimination. when you don't report them, landlords and owners are allowed to keep breaking the law. housing discrimination is illegal. if you think you've been a victim, report it. like we did. narrator: if you suspect that you've been discriminated against because of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, familial status or disability, report it to hud or your local fair housing center. visit hud.gov/fairhousing or call the hud hotline at 1-800-669-9777. fair housing is your right. use it.
4:00 am
captioning funded by cbs it's wednesday, october 7th, 2015. this is the "cbs morning news." as south carolina starts to dry out from historic floods, the aftermath comes into focus and recovery from the deadly storms could take weeks. better late than never. facing flipping poll numbers. hillary clinton says she is putting her husband to work on the campaign trail and his latest stop is on "the late show" with stephen colbert. a mother's outrage at united airlines when she is told she has to use her breast pump in an airport restroom for pets. to

0 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on