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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 8, 2015 2:07am-4:01am EDT

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within five years. daily fantasy leagues have financial relationships with major league baseball, nbc, comcast, fox sports and cbs. prominent nfl owners robert kraft of the patriots and jerry jones of the cowboys are investors. there is even a draft kings fantasy lounge in both of their stadiums. both fantasy league companies say they have stopped allowing employees to play. draft kings ceo jason robbins played defense on espn's "outside the lines." >> you know i think this is a real eye opening experience. in retrospect it seems obvious that would cause people some concern. >> reporter: draft kings based here in boston. there are members of congress who want to look at whether fantasy sports leagues constitute gambling or whether simply they're games of skill. scott, the difference is, gambling is regulated. so far, fantasy sports leagues are not. >> don dahler reporting tonight. a new study on medical costs
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shows huge price differences for the same
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today president obama personally apologized for the american air strike on saturday that killed 22 civilians at a hospital in afghanistan. he phoned the head of doctors without borders which ran the hospital and he also called the
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afghan president. the u.s. commander in afghanistan said the attack was directed by american troops after afghan forces called for help. he called it a mistake. doctors without borders says it still wants an independent investigation. today prosecutors in oregon said the gunman who killed nine people last week also shot at two detectives. they fired back, wounding him. then, he took his own life. president obama will meet friday with families of the victims. and julianna goldman tells us the shooting has now become a major issue in the presidential campaign. >> from the indications that i got they did not rush the shooter. >> reporter: on cbs this morning, ben carson doubled down repeating the suggestion that victims of last weak's mass shooting at an oregon community college could have done more to protect themselves. he apparently didn't know that an army veteran did in fact try to stop the shooter do.
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you know who chris mintz is? >> no. >> reporter: the republican presidential candidate ignited the firestorm yesterday. >> i would ask everybody to attack the gunman he can only shoot one of us at a time. that way we don't all wind up dead. >> reporter: the former neurosurgeon, post aid provocative defense of the second amendment. i never saw a bed with bullet holes that was more devastating than taking the right to arm ourselves away. some rivals like senator lindsey graham took issue with carson's remarks. >> i just don't think that's the road to go down in terms of questioning people who have lost their lives you have no idea what you would do. >> reporter: donald trump came to cars on's defense. >> i thought he was treated unfairly. >> reporter: the republican presidential field largely responded to the massacre by rejecting calls for stricter gun laws. in iowa today hillary clinton jumped on their rhetoric. >> you have got people running for president on the other side who say, well, you know, we just need more guns. and the idea that you need more
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guns to stop people who are committing mass shootings is not only illogical but offensive. >> reporter: this isn't the first time carson invited controversy. in 2014 he compared the obama administration to nazi germany. and he recently said muslims shouldn't be president. it may not be what carson said but how he said it that is controversial. government guidelines for how to handle a gun shooting, as a last resort adults in immediate danger should try to overpower the gunman. thank you. in iowa today. major garrett asked jeb bush about carson's comments. >> i don't quite understand what that means. >> reporter: bush said the focus should be on the victims' families and he has sccompassio for those calling for stricter gun laws, but disagrees. >> name a case where gun rights being restricted out of washington would have changed
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the course of any of the cases. the bigger problem right now is that we have team that are, having growing despair, that are isolated from society, that's are disconnected from the rest of us, and spiral out of control and then commit these atrocious acts of violence and in many cases commit suicide. >> despite a fund-raising and organizational advantage bush runs fourth or fifth in polls in early voting states and nationally. there is now talk of bringing former president george w. bush on to the campaign trail to rally gop support. >> he doesn't have to rescue me. i am on the path. i'm totally confident about where we are. i will continue to, to ask his advice and counsel. but i got to go win this. this is my job. >> reporter: bush likes to call himself the tortoise in the race. slow and steady. >> it is a long haul. you know? it's, what happens in october is completely irrelevant. ask me how it is going in january i've will tell you it is going pretty good. >> the tortoise metaphor is
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interesting, i don't remember the tortoise going backward? >> huh, look i am not going backward. >> your numbers have gone down. >> these polls don't matter. >> you haven't caught on yet. >> i don't have a clue about what people's expectations of me were. i don't care about that. i have a plan from the beginning to the end wec will lay out provocative idea to lift people up. >> reporter: bush told us high will one of the first four nominating contests and might win as many as three. bush is running in the middle of the back in iowa, new hampshire, south carolina, a. a committee urging joe biden to run for president aired its first ad today. uses audio of a speech biden gave at yale earlier this year talking about the tragedy that shaped his life. >> my wife and three children were christmas shopping, a tractor-trailer broadsided them and killed my wife and killed my
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daughter. and they weren't sure that my sons would live. >> the ad is by an independent political action committee not sanctioned by biden. but if biden wants in he has until november 20th to file for the first primary in new hampshire. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. ♪ ♪ ♪
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a new study out today found that patients are often charged draftically different prices for the same medical procedures. dr. john lapook looked into this. >> reporter: in 2008 when nancy
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was diagnosed with breast cancer she struggled not only with her disease but with figuring out how much it would all cost. >> it put more stress on me than the actual diagnosis of cancer. >> reporter: today's report by cast light health which studies health care costs ranks cities by common women services, office visits. hpv screening and mammography. sacramento, california ranked highest on mammograms at average of $485 compared to $159 in cincinnati. michelle scott is general counsel for fair health, a consumer organization that tries to make health care costs more transparent. has there been anything that just knocked your socks off? >> i think sometimes the fact that there are such disparities in pricing and that they can occur within blocks of each other. >> reporter: for example, a mammogram done for suspected cancer where bergman lives costs $211. 30 miles away in teaneck, new jersey, the same test is $95.
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why is there such a wide range of prices for the same procedure? >> there is a wide range there are a lot of different circumstances and cost maze be driven by other factors, overhead, rental considerations, and the methods that different doctors use to perform the procedures. >> i think consumers need to take a more proactive role in their health care. there are tools they can use in order to make proper decisions so that they can be the educated consumer which we need to be in today's day and age. >> online tools can help calculate medical costs based on your zip code. michelle scott acknowledged it can take a lot of work to learn the details but said we dent usually buy a house without checking out what the mortgage terms are. >> john, thanks. a way to stuff more people into planes. just ahead.
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the great wall of china stood more than 2,000 years. but china's brave men's bridge
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cracked in two weeks. a tourist dropped a thermos on the glass walkway. officials insist it is safe but may require more bravery than before. >> another curious bit of engineering the origami car from lexus, the sedan is made almost entirely of cardboard. it took about three months to glue the together. it's drivable but just for show. seemed like a good idea on paper. and maybe not such a good idea, have a look at this. airbus filed for a patent for a split level airliner cabin, two tiers of seats that lie flat like bunkbeds. that's in business class. no telling how they're going to stack them up in coach. if you are looking for more space. we have it. the singing astronaut is next. ♪ major tom
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we end tonight with a man who traveled into space and turned into a star. here's jim axelrod. >> reporter: when canadian astronaut chris hadfield blasted off for a five month stay on the international space station in 2012, a few thousand people followed him on twitter. >> we had a million by the time we settled back on earth. >> reporter: how does that happen? >> all i was doing was saying i am a human being doing something unusual and new and you are welcome to come and look if you like. >> reporter: they did through the snapshots he tweeted and videos he posted, from everything making a sandwich in space to crying in zero gravity. >> if you keep crying you end up with water. >> reporter: new views of life from space with a remarkable
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accessibility. ♪ this is ground control to major tom ♪ ♪ you've really made the grade >> reporter: it was his performance of david bowie's "space oddity" done at his son's suggestion that launched his popularity into a new orbit. ♪ but it's team to guide the capsule if you dare ♪ >> reporter: the video has been seen on youtube more than 26 million times. what is going on there? that has so grabbed people? >> i sang it. and i could hear how the environment much to my surprise had crept into how i interpreted the song. >> shake my hand, ethan. nice to meet you. >> reporter: not like hadfield was unknown. the first canadian to walk in space, he is on the back of the canadian $5 bill. but his new found fame its broadening his capacity to inspire. >> i was struck by one headline calling you the most famous
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astronaut on earth. pretty big title. >> yeah, it is. social media allows access now where you can look through the eyes of an explorer and get insight into what it is look to be right on the edge of human existence. i think that is kind of what people are celebrating. ♪ you and i you and your bedroom me up in the sky ♪ >> reporter: this friday chris hadfield will release an album of 12 songs written and recorded in space. ♪ and lightly land upon the bed and lay done to sleep ♪ >> reporter: a 53-year-old retired canadian astronaut and his guitar is leading a new generation of space lovers positively star struck. ♪ lay down now to sleep >> jim axelrod, cbs news, toronto. ♪ that's the "cbs overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a
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little later for the "morning news" and bs"c this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. republican presidential candidate dr. ben carson sparked controversy over what some are calling insensitive comments about last weak's massacre at a community college in oregon. >> i would not just stand there and let them shoot me. i would say, hey, guys everybody attack him he may shoot me. he can't get us all. >> take action. >> absolutely. >> hopefully will not have that happen. >> reporter: the comments haven't hurt his showing in the polls. second to donald trump for the gop nomination in three swing states. he sat done to discuss his views on mass shootings on "cbs this morning." >> good to have you here. >> thank you. >> what did you mean when you said i would not just stand
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there? >> i want to plant in people's like this. to do in a situation because unfortunately this is not probably going to be the last time this happens. >> do you believe the victims in oregon just stood there? >> from the indications that i got they did not rush the shooter. the shooter can only shoot one person at a time. he cannot shoot a whole group of people. and so the idea is overwhelm him so that not everybody gets killed. >> do you know who chris mintz is? >> no. >> so he is an army veteran. he was shot seven times. he did actually rush the shooter. he is being hailed as a hero. he blocked the door and saved people's lives. some one in the incident did act heroically. >> that verifies what i'm saying. that's what should be done. if everybody does that the likelihood of him being able to kill as many people diminishes quite significantly. >> you are being accused this morning of being incense tich to
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the victims. people say look you don't really know what you will do if god forbid you are ever in that situation. how do you respond to that? >> i respond to that, we live in a culture now where people decide that everything you say we need to set up battle lines and we need to get on this side of it or that side of it rather than, collectively trying to figure out how we solve the problem. it's, it's sort of an immature attitude it seems to be something rampant in america today. >> the question is what do we do about this? i mean everybody expects it will happen again. the president said it has become routine. so how does a nation come to grips with this fact it is a combination of who is doing it, access to weapons, and the opportunity? >> well in medicine we have a tendency to make decisions based on evidence. not on ideology. so, let's say this were a disease, what we would be saying is -- let's take each one of these shooters and let's go back and let's study their lives.
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and let's see if we can see some commonalties here. are there some early warning signals for people like this? so that we can begin to identify them and intervene before the tragedy occurs. not only for the people who were shot, but for the shooter themselves. >> how would you do that? number one. and secondly, once you begin to see a pattern how to you make sure that pattern will help you lead to the next potential assailant? >> i think we have to for instance, empower the psychiatrist. the psychologist. and number these cases, these people have already been working with mental health professionals. nothing was done about it. we have to be able to move to the next step. not just recognizing that their mentally ill, but being able to take the, appropriate interventional steps. >> should there be new laws to make it harder for people who have mental illness to purchase guns? >> for people who have been
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declared dangerous individuals by mental health professional absolutely we should be looking for a mechanism to keep dangerous weapons out of their hand. now, you know we need to study all the possibilities. and we cannot do anything that compromises the second amendment. but as long as we keep in mind, we don't want to compromise the second amendment. but we also want to keep dangerous weapons out of the hand of dangerous people. that makes imminent sense. >> at the time of the second amendment they were talking muskets, weren't talking ak-47s and rifle tuesday, you write in your book you, thought the ban on military style assault weapons was a good idea. you have now written you since changed your mind. what changed your mind? >> you'll also see that, that i talked about the fact that they recognize that things would change. that we would become a more modern society, we face different principles, different
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situations but we had to recognize that it was the principles that were important. st so what were the principles of the second amendment? those principles were we wanted to make sure that the people had the ability to assist the military in case of an invasion and that the people also had the ability to protect themselves from an overly aggressive federal government. that was a very important part of the reason for it. now, obviously, if we say -- well we are talking muss kelts. so yeah, you can have a musket. as we advance in terms of our weaponry. you can't have any of those things. that vie lates the principle. >> michael bloomberg is also close to the university you work, johns hopkins. he has become a very, very strong add voe scvocate for gun. what is it that he doesn't understand that you understand? to answer that question.
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>> let me go with you first. and then. >> what i understand quite vividly is what daniel webster said. daniel webster said america will never suffer under tyranny because the people are armed. that's what i understand. so i don't want to see tyranny occur here. >> can't -- >> adams also said that there may come a time when we do not have good people at the helm of our country. we can't always assume that it is going to be that case. >>-up ha you criticized preside obama for going to or gun egon meet with victims' families, you said it is becoming a political issue, can you change it without politicizing it? >> first, let's set the record straight. what i was asked, if i were president, would i go? >> uh-huh. >> i said, no, not if it was going to open wound and inflict,
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you know, a lot of -- controversy. i would not. i said i would have probably lots of other things on my schedule i could do. the other thing. this is important. the other thing is i don't think i would have the pushback if i were president. because the i wouldn't be picking and choosing which groups i sympathize with. i would have, i mean i would have talked to kate steinley's family killed by an illegal alien. you have to be compassionate to everybody. you don't peck aick and choose. >> if you in fact as president could play a role and express the nation's grief in going to oregon you could be pleased to do that and would object to a president whose effort is to console the grief of a nation and the families who have been suffering? >> i wouldn't object to it. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. i know blowdrying fries my hair, but i'm never gonna stop.
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the new york state attorney general launched an investigation into the fantasy sports betting sites fan duel and draft kings. an employee reportedly used insider information to score big winnings of $350,000 in one weekend. don dahler has the the latest. >> reporter: in fantasy sports leagues participants pick@lets to create their own teams. >> a belt to deep left field. >> reporter: they're rewarded on how the athletes perform. elizabeth vagianos has been playing on fan duel a year she won $45. now the boston resident is crying foul. >> any time the playing field isn't level, it's, it does make you think like, hmm, you know, what's really going on here?
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>> reporter: up until this week it was common practice for employees of the two biggest fantasy sports companies draft kings and fan duel to play in the other's fantasy league. the concern is that fantasy league employees knew which athletes were being picked before that information was made public. they could then create a fantasy team of less popular picks, who if they performed well in a real game, would pay off big. a fan duel spokesperson confirmed to cbs news that draft kings employees have racked up millions. and a teacher of entrepreneur at northeastern university. it's arbitrage. >> reporter: the controversy is a black eye for the rapidly growing industry expected to generate $3.7 billion in ten tree fees this year and over $17 billion within five years. daily fantasy leagues have financial relationships with major league baseball, nbc, comcast, fox sports and cbs.
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prominent nfl owners robert kraft of the patriots and jerry jones of the cowboys are investors. there is even a draft kings fantasy lounge in both of their stadiums. both fantasy league companies say they stopped alug their employees to play. draft kings ceo, played defense on espn "outside the lines." >> i think this is a real eye opening experience for us. in retrospect that seems obvious that would cause people concerns. >> reporter: draft kings is based in boston. members of congress want to look at whether fantasy sports leagues constitute gambling or if they're games of skill. the difference is gambling is regulated and soap f far, sport leagues are not. don dahler, boston. online gaming continues to gain players every day. traditional casinos are hurting. revenue on the las vegas strips, dropped 5% in august. the third straight month of
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declines. sin city isn't standing still. and casinos are looking to lure younger gamblers with the next jen ration of gaming. ben tracy reports from the palms in vegas. >> reporter: when people come to las vegas. a lot come to play the slots. the biggest revenue generator for the casinos. the problem is they're finding younger gamblers don't want to sit here and pull one of the levers. so the future of gambling could look a lot less look this and a lot more like an arcade. las vegas as we know it was built on the back of the one-armed bandit. slot machines with their 60% profit margins are cash cows. but it may be time to put them out to pasture. >> 45 and under are not going to play slot machines. just not. >> reporter: if he sound like a guy with something new to sell, well, he is. we're going into a brand new world. he heads one of the companies at this year's game sing expo in l
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vegas. betting on a very different kind of gambling. a casino looks like an arcade and nightclub. filled with games that require skill not just games of chance. >> this feels much more like video games than gambling to me. >> yes it does, doesn't it. i am fighting for my life over here right now. i want to turn the casino into where you have a fighting chance to win some money use your skill. race a car. shoot a target. >> reporter: i can't imagine that your sales pitch to the casinos they dent want to give people a fighting chance to win money. >> they're all going to change. as the your base gets older and you have to be prepared for the next generation coming in. >> reporter: the generation is the millenials those born after 1980 they head to vegas in droves and walk right by the casino and into the nightclub. just 63% of them, who visited vegas last year gambled. that's compared to 78% of their parents' generation and 87% of
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their grandparents. younger people come to vegas for night life, clubs, partying, dancing, for all the great things vegas is nonfor, really no longer for gambling. you always have to keep your eye on the prize. >> reporter: the chief marketing officer for gambling. >> within $3.20 t. >> reporter: their idea is to take the games people already play on their smart phones and add gambling. you can also compete not against a dealer, but against your friends. >> as opposed to the focus of did i win or did i lose money. start playing. get invested did i beat the boss. am i getting to the next level? how am i doing at the game play as oppose to just money part of it. flip side of that is they're not realizing how much money they're losing? >> right. absolutely possible. >> reporter: a change in nevada gaming regulations last month, now allows for skilled players to potentially win more money by advancing further into the game. but the downside is, if you aren't good at the game, you could lose even more often than
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you would at a game of chance. thighs new skill based games are expected to hit casino floors next year. >> we are now treading into new territory. again we are trying to attract a different generation. they don't play poker or black jack. but they play arcade games. >> reporter: and the slots no matter how much manufacturers try to keep them relevant may be on their final spin. >> ten years from now, those will be antique slot machines that dad used to play. we've got trouble in tummy town.
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>> if you are frazzled from life in a big city or the suburbs, maybe it is time to get back to nature. a new study shows a few days in the woods can lower your blood pressure and improve your mood and even increase creativity. who has time for that? so more people are getting their outdoor fix online. thanks to an internet mogul. chip reid tracked him down in the woods outside berriville, new york. >> climb up inside? >> yes, do it. >> reporter: whether building tree houses. or bridges. >> good and bouncing. >> reporter: zach klein is living his boyhood dream with his very own getaway in the woods. >> my bioin some places i work in the internet now so i can live in the wood later. >> reporter: did you think it would come this soon? >> i was surprised how quickly things worked out. no, i thought it would take me
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decades to be able to get to this spot. >> reporter: it didn't take long to get here as designer and co-founder of the video sharing website viveo, klein found himself flush with more than enough disposable income to acquire 55 acres of serenity in upstate new york. what's the best thing for you about being out here in the woods? >> by profession i am a designer. when i come out here, i am reminded just how perfectly designed nature is. >> reporter: to get idea of what would be built here, klein started a blog featuring pictures of simple structures in natural settings. calling it, cabin porn. >> reporter: developed its own following which now has grown something like 12 million people looked at it in the past year. >> reporter: where did the name cabin porn come from? >> well we were all young once. we all made mistakes. that was the first thing that came to my mind it was provocative. not certain it would be as
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popular if it did if it didn't have such a viral name. >> reporter: he curated 200 images from his website to create a book full of cabin porn. >> reporter: it is remarkable how often we receive letters from people letting us know it plays that role in their lives. that this is their way to relax or to destress themselves. and it inspires them. i think. >> reporter: to inspire others to join him, klein started a school. >> full length rip straight. >> reporter: where design experts teach building techniques and develop the property he named beaver brook. this woman who spent a week learning japanese timber framing find the time a great escape from her career as a tech ceo. you are wired in all the time? >> i am on my computer for, eight to 12 hours a day. >> reporter: is that one reason you are out here? >> a huge part of why i am out here. there is an increasing
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prevalence of technology everywhere seems to be taking over everything in our lives. getting outside, unplugging is an essential part of staying sane, healthy and happien todyi today's world. >> reporter: klein insist he is no henry david thoreau and says the beauty of beaver brook is in sharing it. and because the devices that normally connect us don't work here, a different kind of social network can take shape. >> having fun, mostly what this is about? >> yeah, exactly what it is about. >> it is about building relationships with each other through projects that we find rewarding. >> reporter: as rewarding as living in the woods with his family and friends can be, it is not a year-round endeavor. yes, even zach klein spend most days plugged in. >> okay, jobs page. >> reporter: recently as ceo of an online school, diy. >> this was on the property when
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we moved here. >> reporter: for about six weeks a year, he recharges right here at beaver brook. >> the internet is pretty one dimensional when you kid it to a massive plot of wood like this. there are so many wonders beholden here. just look down at the ground to see them. >> reporter: what may have been zach klein's biggest discovery about building a cabin in the woods it really doesn't cost that much. >> in new york state you can get an acre of agricultural land for $3,000. you know, which is the price some people pay for their televisions. and i think what's really compelling to people is the realization that this simplicity that they're interpreting as luxury is actually pretty obtainable for any one who wants it. >> reporter: for cbs this morning, chip reid, barryville, new york. >> these mass shootings that seem to occur every couple months have a lot of americans grasping for ways to end the bloodshed. in our series "voices against violence," we hear from a man
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who lost two of his uncles to gun violence. a president and a senator. >> i'm patrick kennedy. i'm the author of the mental health parity act. one consistency in all the tragedies is the perpetrator had untreated mental illness. the most basic thing we can do is wraparound services upon the first incidence of some one's psychosis usually in their late teen years early 20s. we know when to expect these when they happen. we ought to wrap our arms around the people who are suffering from these illnesses and treat them early. as opposed to ignoring them until they become pathologic, stage 4 illnesses and that's what lead to these ultimate tragedies. if you do that, you change the permanent trajectory of the illness thereby curbing the ultimate strtragedies that have taken place. >> former congressman patrick
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kennedy. we will hear more idea on curbing gun violenc
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fashion icon ralph lauren is stepping down as chief executive of brand he created nearly half a century ago. to the surprise of some, handing the reins to former president of old navy. that isn't scaring wall street. shares in ralph lauren are going through the roof. vladamir dudier reports for "cbs this morning." for nearly five decades ralph lauren crafted an image of american style. his mark was made in fashion home goods fragrances makeup and accessories. now 75-year-old lauren is handing over the ceo, reins, will be executive chairman and design chief. ♪ >> reporter: ralph lauren made billions by taking risks and staying true to his vision. >> part of the excitement is breaking rules. is knowing the rules and
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breaking the rules. and making them even better. >> reporter: lauren founded his company in 1967 with neck ties and be came a trail blazer in american fashion. his brand polo becoming synonymous with classic preppy style. >> he is one of the last designers also the ceo of his come of pane. there are very few of those. >> reporter: a fashion journalist. >> his legacy is he really created this dream. his personal idea of the american dream. and he has formed it in the fashion business and brought the idea of hollywood glamour, american west, iconic american idea and visions to the fashion world. >> what you thought you can buy in england, what you thought cary grant, fred astaire, you could not walk into the store and buy. when i came along the business was not at all. the things i made you could not buy. you couldn't find it. >> reporter: in one of his only television interviews, lauren sat down with char low rose in 1993. >> i was very influenced by
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movies. i was very influenced by a world that had a sense of dream. >> reporter: shares of ralph lauren rose 5% tuesday after stephen larson was named ceo. >> largely credited with old navy's turn around. >> reporter: the stock is now up over 4% after hours. larson worked for h/m 15 years and served for three years as global president of old navy a division of the gap. >> obviously there is a mass market move there. or an idea about expanding more into the mass market. even though tip is consider aid luxury brand. >> reporter: the ralph lauren brand encompasses 20 brands at various price ranges. larson in his new role in november. >> that's the "cbs overnight news" for thursday. for some of you the news continue thousands. for others check back later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city.
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two more bodies were found in the carolinas yesterday, bringing the death toll from the worst flooding there on record to at least 19. in south carolina, 14 dams have failed since the weekend. and now, david begnaud tells us they have called in the cavalry. >> reporter: drastic measures are being taken to stop rushing floodwaters. this national guard chopper crew spent the day dropping these bags trying to shore up a canal in the state capital of columbia. the bags are 3,000 pounds. some filled with sand and some are filled with rocks. they're being used to build a barrier because the columbia canal has breached threatening the water supply to more than
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350,000 people. >> just being here on the scene lets you know how real that is. >> reporter: director of the state emergency management division, kim stenson. >> reporter: how long do you think it will take? to temporarily shore it up? >> the next day or so. you would be able to do that. >> reporter: today he toured the canal with fema administrator craig fugate. both are monitoring floodwater flowing east and threatening to breach 62 other dams in the state. with 14 dams now breached, south carolina's shaky maintenance record is being scrutinized. the state spent $260,000 on inspections and maintenance in 2014. by comparison, north carolina spent more than $2 million. nearly ten times as much and had zero dam failures from recent rainfall. one of your local newspapers is calling the dam safety program flawed. would you take exception with that? >> you know, i think there is going to be a lot of people have
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a lot of opinions. what i will tell you this is a 1,000 year flood. we have thousand of dams in this state. and you know, there will be a lot of things we can go back after this and say, okay, where do we go from here. >> reporter: this morning authorities recovered the bodies of two railroad workers. they died when the driver of a pickup truck drove around a barricade. the vehicle fell into a washed out road. three other men inside survived. here in columbia, the first dam failed on sunday. by monday, five dams had failed. and officials say the was like a domino effect from there. scott everyone is looking to the east as the floodwater heads to the coast. cities like charleston have been told to be on alert. >> and the water may continue to rise for another 48 hours. david begnaud reporting. thank you. >> today the coast guard ended the search for the crew of a cargo ship that sank off the bahamas six days ago.
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33 were on board. 28 americans. just one body spotted but not recovered. the ship lost propulsion in hurricane joaquin. and sank in 15,000 feet of walter. today by air, land and sea, russia launched a major escalation in syria to seize the military initiative from the united states. russian warships fired dozens of missiles in support of the al-assad dictatorship. russian bombers hit rebels some backed by the united states. the u.s. has been bombing syria foa year. attackthing e isis extremists. holly williams is covering. >> reporter: russia says it launched 26 cruise missiles today from its warships on the caspian sea. they flew over 900 miles, across iran and iraq, hitting parts of northern syria where both isis and al qaeda linked fighters have a heavy presence.
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russian president vladamir putin said the high precision caliber missiles used for the first time reflected good preparation and training by his country's military. but the u.s. says moscow's air strikes in syria are also targeting moderate american backed rebels. and that russia's real goal in syria is to prop up the regime. protected by russian air cover, regime troops began a ground offensive today in rebel strong holds. opposition fighters hit back, in some of the most intense fighting in several months. but after four years of bloody civil war, russia's air campaign may be tipping the balance in favor of syrian regime.
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russia's military build-up in syria now also include a battalion of ground troops. according to the u.s. ambassador to nato. and scott, that is despite russian assertions that it will not use ground troops in its operations inside syria. >> the u.s. said the russian troops are equipped with their top of the line tanks an artillery. holly williams reporting from istanbul, thanks. >> new york's attorney general opened an investigation of the fantasy sports industry. employees at two major companies are accused of gambling with inside information that millions of customers did not have. here is don dahler. >> reporter: in fantasy sports leagues, participants pick athletes to create their teams. they're rewarded on how the athletes perform, elizabeth vagianos has been playing on fan
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duel a year. sunny won $45. but now the boston resident is crying foul. >> any time the playing field isn't level, it does make you think, hmm, what's really going on here? >> reporter: up until this week it was common practice for employees of the two biggest fantasy sports companies, draft kings and fan duel to play in the other's fantasy league. the concern is that fantasy league employees knew which athletes were being picked before that information was made public. they could then create a fantasy team of less popular picks who if they performed well in a real game, would pay off big. a fan duel spokesperson confirmed to cbs news that draft kings employees have racked up millions in winnings. ted clark, teaching ethics and entrepreneurship at northeastern university. >> it's information arbitrage. they have information. the other group doesn't. they use tight their advantage. >> reporter: the controversy is a black eye for the rapidly growing industry expected to generate $3.7 billion in entry
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fees this year and over $17 billion within five years. daily fantasy leagues have financial relationships with major league baseball, nbc, comcast, fox sports and cbs. prominent nfl owners robert kraft of the patriots and jerry jones of the cowboys are investors. there is even a draft kings fantasy lounge in both of their stadiums. both fantasy league companies say they have stopped allowing employees to play. draft kings ceo jason robbins played defense on espn's "outside the lines." >> you know i think this is a real eye opening experience. in retrospect it seems obvious that would cause people some concern. >> reporter: draft kings based here in boston. there are members of congress who want to look at whether fantasy sports leagues constitute gambling or whether simply they're games of skill. scott, the difference is, gambling is regulated. so far, fantasy sports leagues are not. >> don dahler reporting tonight. a new study on medical costs shows huge price differences for
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the same procedure. and putting the car in cardboard.
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today president obama personally apologized for the american air strike on saturday that killed 22 civilians at a hospital in afghanistan. he phoned the head of doctors without borders which ran the
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hospital and he also called the afghan president. the u.s. commander in afghanistan said the attack was directed by american troops after afghan forces called for help. he called it a mistake. doctors without borders says it still wants an independent investigation. today prosecutors in oregon said the gunman who killed nine people last week also shot at two detectives. they fired back, wounding him. then, he took his own life. president obama will meet friday with families of the victims. and julianna goldman tells us the shooting has now become a major issue in the presidential campaign. >> from the indications that i got they did not rush the shooter. >> reporter: on cbs this morning, ben carson doubled down repeating the suggestion that victims of last weak's mass shooting at an oregon community college could have done more to protect themselves. he apparently didn't know that
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an army veteran did in fact try to stop the shooter do. you know who chris mintz is? >> no. >> reporter: the republican presidential candidate ignited the firestorm yesterday. >> i would ask everybody to attack the gunman he can only shoot one of us at a time. that way we don't all wind up dead. >> reporter: the former neurosurgeon posted a neurosurgeon, post aid provocative defense of the second amendment. i never saw a body with bullet holes that was more devastating than taking the right to arm ourselves away. some rivals like senator lindsey graham took issue with carson's remarks. >> i just don't think that's the road to go down in terms of questioning people who have lost their lives you have no idea what you would do. >> reporter: donald trump came to carson's defense. >> i thought he was treated unfairly. >> reporter: the republican presidential field largely responded to the massacre by rejecting calls for stricter gun laws. in iowa today hillary clinton jumped on their rhetoric. >> you have got people running for president on the other side who say, well, you know, we just need more guns. and the idea that you need more
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guns to stop people who are committing mass shootings is not only illogical but offensive. >> reporter: this isn't the first time carson invited controversy. in 2014 he compared the obama administration to nazi germany. and he recently said muslims shouldn't be president. it may not be what carson said but how he said it that is controversial. government guidelines for how to handle a gun shooting, as a last resort adults in immediate danger should try to overpower the gunman. thank you. in iowa today. major garrett asked jeb bush about carson's comments. >> i don't quite understand what that means. >> reporter: bush said the focus should be on the victims' families and he has compassion for those calling for stricter gun laws, but disagrees. >> name a case where gun rights
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being restricted out of washington would have changed the course of any of the cases. the bigger problem right now is that we have team that are, having growing despair, that are isolated from society, that's are disconnected from the rest of us, and spiral out of control and then commit these atrocious acts of violence and in many cases commit suicide. >> despite a fund-raising and organizational advantage bush runs fourth or fifth in polls in early voting states and nationally. there is now talk of bringing former president george w. bush on to the campaign trail to rally gop support. >> he doesn't have to rescue me. i am on the path. i'm totally confident about where we are. i will continue to, to ask his advice and counsel. but i got to go win this. this is my job. >> reporter: bush likes to call himself the tortoise in the race. slow and steady. >> it is a long haul. you know? it's, what happens in october is completely irrelevant. ask me how it is going in january i've will tell you it is
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going pretty good. >> the tortoise metaphor is interesting, i don't remember the tortoise going backward? >> huh, look i am not going backward. >> your numbers have gone down. >> these polls don't matter. >> you haven't caught on yet. >> i don't have a clue about what people's expectations of me were. i don't care about that. i have a plan from the beginning to the end we will lay out provocative idea to lift people up. >> reporter: bush told us high will one of the first four nominating contests and might win as many as three. bush is running in the middle of the back in iowa, new hampshire, south carolina and nevada. major garrett in des moines tonight. major, thank you. >> a political action committee urging joe biden to run for president aired its first ad today. uses audio of a speech biden gave at yale earlier this year talking about the tragedy that shaped his life. >> my wife and three children were christmas shopping, a tractor-trailer broadsided them
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a new study out today found that patients are often charged drastically different prices for the same medical procedures. dr. john lapook looked into this. >> reporter: in 2008 when nancy
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marie bergman of merrick, new york, was diagnosed with breast cancer she struggled not only with her disease but with figuring out how much it would all cost. >> it put more stress on me than the actual diagnosis of cancer. >> reporter: today's report by cast light health which studies health care costs ranks cities the price by common women services, office visits. hpv screening and mammography. sacramento, california ranked highest on mammograms at average of $485 compared to $159 in cincinnati. michelle scott is general counsel for fair health, a consumer organization that tries to make health care costs more transparent. has there been anything that just knocked your socks off? >> i think sometimes the fact that there are such disparities in pricing and that they can occur within blocks of each other. >> reporter: for example, a mammogram done for suspected cancer where bergman lives costs $211. 30 miles away in teaneck, new jersey, the same test is $95.
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why is there such a wide range of prices for the same procedure? >> there is a wide range there are a lot of different circumstances and the costs may be driven by other factors, overhead, rental considerations, and the methods that different doctors use to perform the procedures. >> i think consumers need to take a more proactive role in their health care. there are tools they can use in order to make proper decisions so that they can be the educated consumer which we need to be in today's day and age. >> online tools can help calculate medical costs based on your zip code. michelle scott acknowledged it can take a lot of work to learn the details but she said we don't usually buy a house without checking out what the mortgage terms are. a way to stuff more people into planes. just ahead.
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the great wall of china stood more than 2,000 years. but china's brave men's bridge
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cracked in two weeks. a tourist dropped a thermos on the glass walkway. officials insist it is safe but may require more bravery than before. >> another curious bit of engineering the origami car from lexus, the sedan is made almost entirely of cardboard. it took about three months to glue the together. it's drivable but just for show. seemed like a good idea on paper. and maybe not such a good idea, have a look at this. airbus filed for a patent for a split level airliner cabin, two tiers of seats that lie flat like bunkbeds. that's in business class. no telling how they're going to stack them up in coach. if you are looking for more space. we have it. the singing astronaut is next. ♪ major tom
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we end tonight with a man who traveled into space and turned into a star. here's jim axelrod. >> reporter: when canadian astronaut chris hadfield blasted off for a five month stay on the international space station in 2012, a few thousand people followed him on twitter. >> we had a million by the time we settled back on earth. >> reporter: how does that happen? >> all i was doing was saying i am a human being doing something unusual and new and you are welcome to come and look if you like. >> reporter: they did through the snapshots he tweeted and videos he posted, from everything making a sandwich in space to crying in zero gravity. >> if you keep crying you end up with water. >> reporter: hadfield provided
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new views of life from space with a remarkable accessibility. ♪ this is ground control to major tom ♪ ♪ you've really made the grade >> reporter: it was his performance of david bowie's "space oddity" done at his son's suggestion that launched his popularity into a new orbit. ♪ but it's team to guide the capsule if you dare ♪ >> reporter: the video has been seen on youtube more than 26 million times. what is going on there? that has so grabbed people? >> i sang it. and i could hear how the environment much to my surprise had crept into how i interpreted the song. >> shake my hand, ethan. nice to meet you. >> reporter: not like hadfield was unknown. the first canadian to walk in space, he is on the back of the canadian $5 bill. but his new found fame its broadening his capacity to inspire. >> i was struck by one headline
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calling you the most famous astronaut on earth. pretty big title. >> yeah, it is. social media allows access now where you can look through the eyes of an explorer and get insight into what it is look to be right on the edge of human existence. i think that is kind of what people are celebrating. ♪ you and i you and your bedroom me up in the sky ♪ >> reporter: this friday chris hadfield will release an album of 12 songs written and recorded in space. ♪ and lightly land upon the bed and lay done to sleep ♪ >> reporter: a 53-year-old retired canadian astronaut and his guitar is leading a new generation of space lovers positively star struck. ♪ lay down now to sleep >> jim axelrod, cbs news, toronto. ♪ that's the "cbs overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a
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little later for the "morning news" and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. republican presidential candidate dr. ben carson sparked controversy over what some are calling insensitive comments about last week's massacre at a community college in oregon. >> i would not just stand there and let them shoot me. i would say, hey, guys everybody attack him he may shoot me. he can't get us all. >> take action. >> absolutely. >> hopefully will not have that happen. >> reporter: the comments haven't hurt his showing in the polls. second to donald trump for the gop nomination in three swing states. he sat done to discuss his views on mass shootings on "cbs this
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morning," with charlie, nora and gayle. >> good to have you here. >> thank you. >> what did you mean when you said i would not just stand there? >> i want to plant in people's minds what to do in a situation like this. because unfortunately this is not probably going to be the last time this happens. >> do you believe the victims in oregon just stood there? >> from the indications that i got they did not rush the shooter. the shooter can only shoot one person at a time. he cannot shoot a whole group of people. and so the idea is overwhelm him so that not everybody gets killed. >> do you know who chris mintz is? >> no. >> so he is an army veteran. he was shot seven times. he did actually rush the shooter. he is being hailed as a hero. he blocked the door and saved people's lives. some one in the incident did act
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heroically. >> that verifies what i'm saying. that's what should be done. if everybody does that the likelihood of him being able to kill as many people diminishes quite significantly. >> you are being accused this morning of being insensitive to the victims. people say look you don't really know what you will do if god forbid you are ever in that situation. how do you respond to that? >> i respond to that, we live in a culture now where people decide that everything you say we need to set up battle lines and we need to get on this side of it or that side of it rather than, collectively trying to figure out how we solve the problem. it's, it's sort of an immature attitude it seems to be something rampant in america today. >> the question is what do we do about this? i mean everybody expects it will happen again. the president said it has become routine. so how does a nation come to grips with this fact it is a combination of who is doing it, access to weapons, and the opportunity? >> well in medicine we have a tendency to make decisions based
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on evidence. not on ideology. so, let's say this were a disease, what we would be saying is -- let's take each one of these shooters and let's go back and let's study their lives. and let's see if we can see some commonalties here. are there some early warning signals for people like this? so that we can begin to identify them and intervene before the tragedy occurs. not only for the people who were shot, but for the shooter themselves. >> how would you do that? number one. and secondly, once you begin to see a pattern how to you make sure that pattern will help you lead to the next potential assailant? >> i think we have to for instance, empower the psychiatrist. the psychologist. and number these cases, these people have already been working with mental health professionals. nothing was done about it. we have to be able to move to the next step. not just recognizing that their mentally ill, but being able to take the, appropriate interventional steps. >> should there be new laws to make it harder for people who have mental illness to purchase guns?
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>> for people who have been declared dangerous individuals by mental health professional absolutely we should be looking for a mechanism to keep dangerous weapons out of their hand. now, you know we need to study all the possibilities. and we cannot do anything that compromises the second amendment. but as long as we keep in mind, we don't want to compromise the second amendment. but we also want to keep dangerous weapons out of the hand of dangerous people. that makes imminent sense. >> at the time of the second amendment they were talking muskets, weren't talking ak-47s and rifle tuesday, you write in your book you, thought the ban on military style assault weapons was a good idea. you have now written you since changed your mind. what changed your mind? >> you'll also see that, that i talked about the fact that they recognize that things would change. that we would become a more modern society, we face different principles, different
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situations but we had to recognize that it was the principles that were important. so what were the principles of the second amendment? those principles were we wanted to make sure that the people had the ability to assist the military in case of an invasion and that the people also had the ability to protect themselves from an overly aggressive federal government. that was a very important part of the reason for it. now, obviously, if we say -- well we are talking muskets. so yeah, you can have a musket. as we advance in terms of our weaponry. you can't have any of those things. that violates the principle. >> michael bloomberg is also close to the university you work, johns hopkins. and a proud graduate. he has become a very, very strong advocate for gun control. what is it that he doesn't understand that you understand? >> i think we ought to get him
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to answer that question. >> let me go with you first. and then. >> what i understand quite vividly is what daniel webster said. daniel webster said america will never suffer under tyranny because the people are armed. that's what i understand. so i don't want to see tyranny occur here. >> can't -- >> adams also said that there may come a time when we do not have good people at the helm of our country. we can't always assume that it is going to be that case. >> you criticized president obama for going to oregon to meet with victims' families, you said it is becoming a political issue, can you change it without
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going to open wounds and inflict, you know, a lot of -- controversy. i would not. i said i would have probably lots of other things on my schedule i could do. the other thing. this is important. the other thing is i don't think i would have the pushback if i were president. because the i wouldn't be picking and choosing which groups i sympathize with. i would have, i mean i would have talked to kate steinley's family killed by an illegal alien. you have to be compassionate to everybody. you don't pick and choose. >> if you in fact as president could play a role and express the nation's grief in going to oregon you could be pleased to do that and would object to a president whose effort is to console the grief of a nation and the families who have been suffering? >> i wouldn't object to it. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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all the care of dove. now in a dry antiperspirant spray. the new york state attorney general launched an investigation into the fantasy sports betting sites fan duel and draft kings. an employee reportedly used insider information to score big winnings of $350,000 in one weekend. don dahler has the the latest. >> reporter: in fantasy sports leagues participants pick athletes to create their own teams. >> a belt to deep left field. >> reporter: they're rewarded on how the athletes perform. elizabeth vagianos has been playing on fan duel a year she won $45.
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now the boston resident is crying foul. >> any time the playing field isn't level, it's, it does make you think like, hmm, you know, what's really going on here? >> reporter: up until this week it was common practice for employees of the two biggest fantasy sports companies draft kings and fan duel to play in the other's fantasy league. the concern is that fantasy league employees knew which athletes were being picked before that information was made public. they could then create a fantasy team of less popular picks, who if they performed well in a real game, would pay off big. a fan duel spokesperson confirmed to cbs news that draft kings employees have racked up millions. and a teacher of entrepreneur at northeastern university. they it's arbitrage. >> reporter: the controversy is a black eye for the rapidly growing industry expected to generate $3.7 billion in ten tree fees this year and over $17 billion within five years. daily fantasy leagues have financial relationships with
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major league baseball, nbc, comcast, fox sports and cbs. prominent nfl owners robert kraft of the patriots and jerry jones of the cowboys are investors. there is even a draft kings fantasy lounge in both of their stadiums. both fantasy league companies say they stopped alug their employees to play. draft kings ceo, played defense on espn "outside the lines." >> i think this is a real eye opening experience for us. in retrospect that seems obvious that would cause people concerns. >> reporter: draft kings is based in boston. members of congress want to look at whether fantasy sports leagues constitute gambling or if they're games of skill. the difference is gambling is regulated and so far, sports leagues are not. don dahler, boston. online gaming continues to gain players every day. traditional casinos are hurting. revenue on the las vegas strips,
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dropped 5% in august. the third straight month of declines. sin city isn't standing still. and casinos are looking to lure younger gamblers with the next generation of gaming. jen ration of gaming. ben tracy reports from the palms casino resort in vegas. >> reporter: when people come to las vegas. a lot come to play the slots. the biggest revenue generator for the casinos. the problem is they're finding younger gamblers don't want to sit here and pull one of the levers. so the future of gambling could look a lot less look this and a lot more like an arcade. las vegas as we know it was built on the back of the one-armed bandit. slot machines with their 60% profit margins are cash cows. but it may be time to put them out to pasture. >> 45 and under are not going to play slot machines. just not. >> reporter: if he sound like a guy with something new to sell,
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well, he is. we're going into a brand new world. he heads one of the companies at this year's gaming expo in las vegas. betting on a very different kind of gambling. a casino looks like an arcade and nightclub. filled with games that require skill not just games of chance. >> this feels much more like video games than gambling to me. >> yes it does, doesn't it. i am fighting for my life over here right now. i want to turn the casino into where you have a fighting chance to win some money use your skill. race a car. shoot a target. >> reporter: i can't imagine that your sales pitch to the casinos they dent want to give people a fighting chance to win money. >> they're all going to change. as the your base gets older and evolves. you have to be prepared for the next generation coming in. >> reporter: the generation is the millenials those born after 1980 they head to vegas in droves and walk right by the casino and into the nightclub. just 63% of them, who visited vegas last year gambled.
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that's compared to 78% of their parents' generation and 87% of their grandparents. younger people come to vegas for night life, clubs, partying, dancing, for all the great things vegas is nonfor, really no longer for gambling. you always have to keep your eye on the prize. >> reporter: the chief marketing officer for gambling. >> reporter: their idea is to take the games people already play on their smart phones and add gambling. you can also compete not against a dealer, but against your friends. >> as opposed to the focus of did i win or did i lose money. start playing. get invested did i beat the boss. am i getting to the next level? how am i doing at the game play as oppose to just money part of it. flip side of that is they're not realizing how much money they're losing? >> right. absolutely possible. >> reporter: a change in nevada gaming regulations last month, now allows for skilled players to potentially win more money by advancing further into the game. but the downside is, if you
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aren't good at the game, you could lose even more often than you would at a game of chance. these new skill based games are expected to hit casino floors next year. >> we are now treading into new territory. again we are trying to attract a different generation. they don't play poker or black jack. but they play arcade games. >> reporter: and the slots no matter how much manufacturers try to keep them relevant may be on their final spin. >> ten years from now, those will be antique slot machines that dad used to play. powers through this brownie mess better than the competition, the first time. cascade.
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>> if you are frazzled from life in a big city or the suburbs, maybe it is time to get back to nature. a new study shows a few days in the woods can lower your blood pressure and improve your mood and even increase creativity. who has time for that? so more people are getting their outdoor fix online. thanks to an internet mogul. chip reid tracked him down in the woods outside berriville, new york. >> climb up inside? >> yes, do it. >> reporter: whether building tree houses. or bridges. >> good and bouncing. >> reporter: zach klein is living his boyhood dream with his very own getaway in the woods. >> my bio in some places i work in the internet now so i can live in the wood later. >> reporter: did you think it would come this soon? >> i was surprised how quickly things worked out. no, i thought it would take me
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decades to be able to get to this spot. >> reporter: it didn't take long to get here as designer and co-founder of the video sharing website vimeo, klein found himself flush with more than enough disposable income to acquire 55 acres of serenity in upstate new york. what's the best thing for you about being out here in the woods? >> by profession i am a designer. when i come out here, i am reminded just how perfectly designed nature is. >> reporter: to get idea of what would be built here, klein started a blog featuring pictures of simple structures in natural settings. calling it, cabin porn. >> reporter: developed its own following which now has grown something like 12 million people looked at it in the past year. >> reporter: where did the name cabin porn come from? >> well we were all young once. we all made mistakes. that was the first thing that came to my mind it was provocative. not certain it would be as popular if it did if it didn't have such a viral name. >> reporter: he curated 200
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images from his website to create a book full of cabin porn. >> reporter: it is remarkable how often we receive letters from people letting us know it plays that role in their lives. that this is their way to relax or to destress themselves. and it inspires them. i think. >> reporter: to inspire others to join him, klein started a school. >> full length rip straight. >> reporter: where design experts teach building techniques and develop the property he named beaver brook. this woman who spent a week learning the finer points of japanese timber framing finds the time a great escape from her career as a tech ceo. you are wired in all the time? >> i am on my computer for, eight to 12 hours a day. >> reporter: is that one reason you are out here?
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>> a huge part of why i am out here. there is an increasing prevalence of technology everywhere seems to be taking over everything in our lives. getting outside, unplugging is an essential part of staying sane, healthy and happy in today's world. >> reporter: klein insist he is no henry david thoreau and says the beauty of beaver brook is in sharing it. and because the devices that normally connect us don't work here, a different kind of social network can take shape. >> having fun, mostly what this is about? >> yeah, exactly what it is about. >> it is about building relationships with each other through projects that we find rewarding. >> reporter: as rewarding as living in the woods with his family and friends can be, it is not a year-round endeavor. yes, even zach klein spend most days plugged in. >> okay, jobs page.
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>> reporter: recently as ceo of an online school, diy. >> this was on the property when we moved here. >> reporter: for about six weeks a year, he recharges right here at beaver brook. >> the internet is pretty one dimensional when you kid it to a massive plot of wood like this. there are so many wonders beholden here. just look down at the ground to see them. >> reporter: what may have been zach klein's biggest discovery about building a cabin in the woods it really doesn't cost that much. >> in new york state you can get an acre of agricultural land for $3,000. you know, which is the price some people pay for their televisions. and i think what's really compelling to people is the realization that this simplicity that they're interpreting as luxury is actually pretty obtainable for any one who wants it. >> reporter: for cbs this morning, chip reid, barryville, new york. >> these mass shootings that seem to occur every couple months have a lot of americans grasping for ways to end the bloodshed. in our series "voices against violence," we hear from a man
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who lost two of his uncles to gun violence. a president and a senator. >> i'm patrick kennedy. i'm the author of the mental health parity and addiction equity act signed into law in 1998. one consistency in all the tragedies is the perpetrator had untreated mental illness. the most basic thing we can do is wraparound services upon the first incidence of some one's psychosis usually in their late teen years early 20s. we know when to expect these when they happen. we ought to wrap our arms around the people who are suffering from these illnesses and treat them early. as opposed to ignoring them until they become pathologic, stage 4 illnesses and that's what lead to these ultimate tragedies. if you do that, you change the permanent trajectory of the illness thereby curbing the ultimate tragedies that have taken place. >> former congressman patrick kennedy.
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we will hear more idea on curbing gun violence in the days ahead. the "cbs overnight news" will be [male announcer] for our troops and their families,
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the only thing better than playing a hero in the movies, is being a hero in real life. like the 50,000 veterans who returned from iraq and afghanistan with devastating injuries. they are true heroes. and they're why i'm proud to support paralyzed veterans of america. for more than 60 years, paralyzed veterans of america has made a promise to never leave a fallen comrade behind. they make sure veterans with spinal cord injuries get the quality medical care, rehabilitation and housing they need when they come home. they stay with our fallen heroes for the long term, offering counseling, job training and support to help them regain the freedom and independence they fought so hard for. all at no cost to them. our veterans fought for us. let's fight for them. to learn more about how you can help, visit pva.org. that's p-v-a dot org.
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we will never leave a fallen comrade behind. it's thursday, october 8th, 2015. this is the "cbs morning news." rusch plunges head-long into syria's civil war. vladimir putin's military steps up on his attacks on opponents of bashar al assad, some of whom is backed by the united states. the search ends for the ship lost at sea during hurricane joaquin. the families of the 33 crewmembers on board say the coast guard gave up too soon. cubs fans are still dreaming after world series title coming to chicago. their team advances in the major league playoffs after a wildcard win.

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