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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 23, 2015 2:22am-4:01am EDT

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instagram postings and it led to deleted accounts and angry fans. janet asked instagram to remove concert videos posted by fans claiming they were violating her intellectual property rights. they didn't just remove the videos, they deleted some user accounts due to a bug. janet responded on facebook, inviting users to continue to post short concert clips only. my team is passionate about protecting the property that we are creating for the tour and possible future projects, she never intended for accounts to be removed. instagram is working on restoring the deleted accounts. after eight months, rosie o'donnell agreed to divorce terms. rosie told reporters, there is peace in the middle east. it's done. we've settled. >> and you're happy with the financial settlement? >> happy with everything. it' >> michelle rounds all smiles exiting court. the two agreed to joint custody of their 2-year-old daughter dakota. >> joint legal custody. >> i feel great.
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thank you. >> glad they finally got it worked out. tonight on "scandal," like it or not, olivia pope has a new gladiator played by cornelius smith jr. you may remember him because he got a start on "all my children" just like our cameron masterson. and they reunited on the "scandal" set. >> that is how you handle a scandal. enter marcus walker. >> how do you fit in to all of this? >> you know, olivia is in crisis mod she has a lot going on. she's kind of seeking some help from gladiators. >> tonight, olivia prepares to face congress with marcus by her side about her affair with the president. >> i'm bringing in someone outside of opa. >> good. a man who's his own lawyer has a fool for a client. >> you'll have to testify. >> i have no idea what is going
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to be in store for marcus if, there's a love story, who that might be, where he ends up. i'm finding this out not the same time as you guys but in this moment, i know nothing. >> okay. we gladiators don't just let anybody in the family. so i need marcus to prove a thing or two to me. i'm just saying. >>mi cong up, sarah silverman shows off what she told us about puttiting all out there. >> plus -- 007 daniel craig behind the scenes of the insane stunts. >> there one of the major action sequences of the mov >> that's ahead. but first, tonight on the nfl on cbs, seattle seahawks take on the san francisco 49ers. we know sierra will be watching. >> i'm a full on seahawks fan. >> the sexy singer never misses a chance to cheer on her boyfriend seahawks quarterback russell wilson. >> i always make sure that wherever i am when the game is on, i'm there. >> her videos are steamy. the religious russell says
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they're keeping their relationship sex free and on game day, cc just tries to stay chill. >> i try to get reall because when my love is out, there you feel like you're in the game too.
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>> tomorrow we're with kate had you had soften taking on the fashion is he giving
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look at you sarah silverman. >> there's a reason there's a ribbon over your video. >> you can get arrested if you flash any more cleavage than she did. >> i'm wearing jeans and blouse as soon as i get to the oth end of this carpet. >> sexy and sensible. yeah. i like it. >> i also think you'll like. this the new bond film "specter."
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check out this behind the scenes footage. daniel craig was injured on the set. you know, making bond magic ain't easy. >> here we go. action! >> action! >> what makes a bond movie a bond movie? first of all, the stunts. they don't fake this stuff. helicopters flying ove square and down the street. it's a real helicopter doing the stunts. >> for that, day of the dead scene in mexico city which opens specter, over 1500 extras were in costume. on an austrian mountain top, it was three cars and a plane and then the next bond film must, the cars. the night time streets of rome were completely shut down as this bad guy's jaguar chased bonds' car. >> i haven't wrecked this one yet. i will.
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>> between two of the fast rs in the world. >> sam is the first to direct back to back bond movies in 30 years. >> he's the only guy for the job. >> who did sam cast as the all important bon monica belucci became the oldest ever. and french actress place the daughter of a bond nemesis. >> i'm really excited. >> can't wait for this and the early word is this is vintage bond. >> that's what i twanto hear. i can't wait. okay, up next, we have "dancing's" derrick huff's halloween transforration -- transformation. plus, carrie underwood's halloween obsession. >> and we're with susan lucci and her daughter. why she kept her grandson's disorder secret for seven years. >> one thing that is very important is that she doesn't feel guilty. >> that's on the way. closed captioning provided by --
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derrick goes from dancing to down right creepy. >> pig man? >> yeah. >> derrick is one of 1,000 monsters roaming the theme park for the halloween haunt.
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but scary as he was, it was derrick's reveal that got the bigger sc >> oh, my god! >> yeah! >> that guy got to get back to rehearsals. derrick isn't the only star hyped up for halloween. it is one of carrie underwood's favorite holidays and she's even more excited this year because she has a new little trick or treater in her house. >> this is going to be our first halloween with isaiah. i think i'm going to have a lot of fun trying to find a for him. >> pretty sure 7-month-old isaiah will be adorable no matter what carrie and her husband put him in. who knew she was such a thrill seeker. >> i'm a total horror movie for halloween, our house is the fake head stones in the yard and there's like pumpkins and stuff on the stoop. welcome to my cover shoot for "parade." happy halloween. >> carrie and her pups are getting halloween on early f the cover "parade magazine
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>> ace is horrified of thunder or fireworks. penny, i don't think she's really afraid oo anything. >> and her fifth album "storyteller" drops tomorrow. >> it has that really modern twang to it. >> but the busy mom's biggest job right now -- >> i always buy candy for the trick or treaters. >> it must be weird when you knock on the door and you get the treat of carrie underwood giving you candy. last night taylor swift got back to her country roots bringing mistage in greensboro, north carolina. now you might remember posted this fun clip last month, lip sinking with letter squad to bad blood. i see you, miranda. miranda and taylor clearly are big fans of each other. >> here's my question. am i in your squad? >> you know you're not. >> thanks, kevin. with friends like you, you know? here's a lady who sure does have
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a lot of friends and fans, day time tv legend susan lucci much. she is opening up about her grandson, he suffers cerebral palsy. this little boy is so lucky to have such a loving and caring mother and grandmother. >> he was always responsive. his eyes are like velvet. even as a little baby, when he would recognize you, he would be so happy to see you. and he smiles with his whole face. >> this is the smile of an angel. a loving, bright, first grader. but when his mother, susan's daughter was pregnant with him, she felt something was wrong. brendan was born nine weeks early, weighing just 4 pounds 10 ounces. >> we were in the nicu for six weeks. it was a long road. and so when he came home, you know, we could feel his body was a little tight. and it was a little bit of cause for concern. i just said okay, severing fine. he's alive. he's alive. he's alive.
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>> brendan's crisis is while susan was competing on "dancing with the stars." she never shared how it was affecting her grandson. >> whether he was 10 months old and couldn't sit up on his own. i had to really start thinking about it and we started talking to the doctors. but then at 19 months and he couldn't stand up, i mean, there was just no being in denial anymore. let's face this head on. >> a former soap actress herself, she gave up her career for brendan. he has physical therapy every day and leg braces help him walk. >> when i have watched a tremendous perseverance in brendan. okay, maybe he couldn't go on the trampoline as easily as his brother ands sister, but h whips his braces off and climbs up there and he's bouncing around on that trampoline just like they are. >> they'll tell their story in the new issue of "people." last night susan and liza attended the arthur ashe instituorte f urban health ga both are dedicated to improving
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the lives of all children. >> liza has given brendan a mantra and she will say to him, my legs are tight, so what? she's raising a full total human being. he is such a wonderful boy. >> brendan is doing really well. he is thriving in the cub scouts and his mom liza is the den mother. >> that is a this is a big season for entertainment tonight. we're celebrating our anniversary. we're doing it with all the stars. it's a stbig ory that made us number one for all thes >> 35 years of breaking entertainment news. >> generations have grown up with this as their source of inatformion. >> 35 years of making entertainment news. 35 years of making history. >> i'm mary hart. >> "e.t." always there. and the exclusives keep on
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coming. >> only on "e.t." this is like a dream come true. >> we're celebrating the icons. >> thank you, "e.t.." >> never stop dreaming and hoping and wanting to be bett >> and the stars remember their very first time on "e.t." >> it's hot,y, sex pumping. >> is this a club promoter? >> i like the part where my mom swallows a bug. >> oh, my gosh. >> you have to see. this. >> it all starts next thursday on "entertainment tonight." >> i grew up watching "entertainment tonight" like everyone else. >> i was the one guy at espn that used to sit and watch "entertainment tonight >> which back to the future star ancestor was a passenger on the mayflower? it is michael j. fox, christopher lloyd or leah thompson? >> i got this one. i know. >> okay. we'll find out next in the "e.t." birthdays. desattinfoion r
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entertainment news.
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welcome back. which "back to the fut star's ancestor was on the may flower. >> christopher lloyd. >> he is 77 today. as a matter of fact, christopher and fellow cast mates got together last night to celebrate "back to the future" day. how was he going to celebrate his birthday today? >> i don't know. this it is. nothing is going to top this. >> you know what i think he could be right about. that. >> i hear you. >> join us tomorrow. we're talking with former "charlie's angel" star jacqueline smith. how she's fighting women fighting cancer just like she did feel beautiful. >> it's a great story. we'll see you then. of
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sex bil six bills to toughen drinking and driving laws. >> the assembly passed legislation last time, it came in front of the senate transportation committee, then senator fitzgerald wouldn't sponsor any of the bills. >> scott fitzgerald is leader of the state senate. >> if you had everyone appear before the judge. it would be very difficult for the cyst temperature to deal with that right now. >> what you said if i interpret the numbers correctly. there are so many people drunk out there they can't handle the system. >> if you want to felony conviction not sure what difference that would make. we are traying to take an approach we think would be more measured and the way to do that is get the people clean. >> last time we were all together as a family was in november. >> reporter: beyond the politics often in the debate are the families forced into advocacy. >> you were immediately disrupted in the worst way? >> immediately. >> reporter: judy and paul jenkins lost their daughter jennifer, granddaughter courtney and unborn granddaughter jennifer was carrying in the 200
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# accident. the man who killed them mark benson was sentenced to 30 years in prison the his fourth offense for operating a vehicle while intoxicated. he received among the state's stiffest penalties. >> that is a pretty current picture of them. >> reporter: the jenkins say mandatory minimum sentences on first time offenders may have prevented this tragedy. >> reporter: if you get pulled over for a duchi or owi. >> traffic ticket. >> reporter: don't lose your license, your car, or go to prison? >> no. you don't have to show up in court to answer the ticket. >> reporter: so, fraternity row. julia sherman coordinator for the wisconsin alcohol policy project. despite little action in the state legislature, progress is happening in town after town and through volunteer programs like police saturation patrols. >> these are task force. they let the public know when they're going to be out on the road. >> reporter: a show of force. >> a show of force.
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but also they can pull over any one that breaks any traffic laws. >> reporter: in a state that prohibits police sobriety check points. saturation patrols have shown success. since brown county launched the federally funded program in 2011, year over year reductions have been real ied in alcohol related crashes, injuries and deaths. >> more and more communities are adopting things and it is going to come done to the communities lead the way and then the leaders in madison are going to end up following them. >> tim carpenter in the state legislature for 31 years says any significant change to wisconsin drinking and driving laws will take more time. give me the reality check? is anything ever going to change? >> to be honest with you the i dent see meaningful drunk driving legislation pass this session or next session, probably after the next gubernatorial election in 2018. >> so, you are saying nothing for at lest three years? >> at least. >> the cbs overnight news will be right back. in a world that's trying to turn you into someone new...
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the historical drama suffragette opens in theaters today set in early 20th century london where women of all classes cam together to battle for the right to vote. nearly all the cast and crew are female including oscar nominee carrie mulligan who sat down for
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a chat with nora o'donnell. >> how much did you know about the suffragettes? >> i knew a really basic school version, a paragraph in the history books saying women got the vote eventually. somehow. a couple lines. lots of images. will in with flowers looking very peaceful. history goes down differently on the set of suffragette. a new film about women's fight for voting rights in britain that stars 30-year-old carry mulligan. >> you can't stop us all. >> mulligan best known for her role as daisy buchanan in the great gatsby. and received an oscar nod for her role in "an education." >> mr. and mrs. david goldman. mr. and mrs. david goldman. you are married. now plays the femaude watts, laundry worker, wife and mother whose daily life is dismal before radicalized to fight for
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women's suffrage in 1912. >> this is a film. written. produced and directed by women. how unique is that? >> completely unique. and costume designer. makeup designer. set designer. we're all all women. i have never been a part of anything lick that before. we were a group of women who were very excited to be telling the story. >> i think about maude, very poor. loses her husband. loses her son. she loses her job. she is jailed multiple times. and i think. i don't know that i would have the same courage. >> yeah. >> as her? do you think you would have the same courage? >> it is such a hard thing. because i have been lucky enough to grow up in a life where i haven't had to fight for anything. the point of our film sort of says if you won't throw a rock for yourself man you will throw one for some one else. >> well have been left with no alternative but to defy the government. meryl streep plays the real life
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leader of the militant suffrage movement who called for the use of violent tactics like arson and vandalism. >> this movie is not about peaceful protest for the women aright to vote. these women are militants. thatt ethey're rebellious. >> after 50 years of peaceful campaigning. rejected. pushed away. swept under the carpet. and being denied. denied. denied. >> they don't throw rocks and hold rallies. they set off bombs. >> yeah. yeah. yeah, they blow stuff up. are they terrorists in some ways. >> not in a modern day sense. because they were very clear. and very clear that no human life should be in danger. they only risked their own lives. >> never surrender. never give up the fight. >> these suffragettes they face sexism, police brutality. losing their jobs. force feeding. jailed multiple times. why was it important to show all of that? >> i think because we have had
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such a sanitized version of our history the i left school and vote because my parents voted the i didn't really understand the weight of what i had with my vote. >> the film sparked a string reaction at its uk premiere where protesters lay down on the red carpet. >> you said you thought it was awesome. >> yeah. we felt kind of excited by that. i think, you know. again being part of a film that sparks debate. has people talking. inspired people to, stand up and do something. it is great. how is it personal for you? the first time i felt really proud to be a woman. i grew up with a brother. i was a tomboy as a kid. i was surrounded by really, really great, strong, intelligent thoughtful women making this film we all felt was so important. i felt really proud of that. really proud to be a woman. really proud to be a fm nis. >> inspired by her experience
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making the movie, mulligan got a tattoo, a tribute to emily davidson one of the first martyrs of the movement. >> in this unhappy incident. >> she was killed after she threw herself in front of the king's horse during derby day in 1913. >> what does it say? >> that's old. that says love that overcometh. they had a wk weekly magazine. over her head a halo, love that overcometh. >> i had a feeling with suffragette it was a job that would stay with me forever. it wasn't a job. i think it will be something that will stand out, something really important to me for a long, long time. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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when jon stewart left the daily show. fans were surprised what he would do next. retire to a farm in new jersey with his wife tracy and a house of animals. tracy stewart has a book out, called do unto animals. the couple invited gail king for a visit. >> do you miss it the way people miss you. the daily show, do you miss? >> i miss the people that i worked with. because you know, and so we, e-mail. and we emoji back and forth. >> material galore on your show. do you watch and say i wish i was doing, i wish i was on? >> i hadn't heard. what is going on. >> you don't miss it at all? >> not for a moment. >> where is honey? in the backyard like this. he is just sitting there.
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>> not even a little bit? >> i feel lakeike i completed i. when you feel look you complete a project to the best of your ability. when you have done the best that you think you are able to do, i didn't think so, i can't -- i can't regret all i can do now is be happy that i had that opportunity. the joy is in creating it in growing it and in evolving it, maintaining it is the part that when it becomes wrote or redundant, then i feel like i am not adding value anymore am i. >> are you taking the kids to school. hanging out. reading a good book? >> no, no. i take them to school. pick them up. go to the car wash. i get smoothies. i call her on the road. i am eating a slice in the car. you know? >> that's #happyness for you. >> i am the mayor at the
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smoothie store. >> mayor of the smoothie store. goen there. talk about mango infusion. this is awesome. i still work. i still, i get to write. but you know, the flexibility of schedule. it's not like i don't feel pro dock tiff or creative. >> in the book it says, the stewart family live by the do unto others as you would have them do unto you. the pope just told us the you put the message out to your children as well. >> and put it out to the pope. his original message was something, get it while the getting is good. i think the i told him i didn't think that is going to fly. you might want to try do unto. >> there is no way you don't miss us, jon. you are so damn quick and so damn funny. >> at home. >> you seem convinced. at home this all the time. >> i'm surrounded by manure. what could be better than that? >> that's the "cbs overnight news" for this friday. for some the news continues. for others check back with us
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later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center here in new york city, i'm michelle miller. the battle over benghazi. the chairman versus the secretary. >> i don't know what this line of questioning does to help us get to the bottom of the deaths of four americans. >> i will be happy to help you understand that madam secretary. >> the first american combat death in the war against isis. gun violence claims another child. police say a suspect has confessed to a road rage killing. high honors for world war ii heroes immortalized by hollywood. >> this is the "cbs overnight news." house republicans have been planning this hearing for over a year. former secretary of state and now presidential candidate hillary clinton testified under oath before the benghazi
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committee. the panel is investigating the 2012 attack on u.s. diplomatic buildings in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed. ambassador chris stevens, sean smith, glen doherty and tyrone woods. republicans are searching for any mistakes made on secretary clinton's watch. democrats say the benghazi matter has been thoroughly investigated and the hearing is only designed to damage her. her testimony began at 10:00 in the morning on thursday and lasted all day into the evening. nancy cordes is on capitol hill. >> reporter: the hearings started out cordially with hand shakes. but things quickly grew tense. >> i think if you look at the statement i made i clearly said it was an attack. >> calling it an attack is look calling the sky blue. of course it was an attack. republicans accused clinton of ignoring requests from ambassador chris stevens for security.
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georgia's westmoreland. >> how many instances would it have taken you to say, we need to look at security over there. >> no one ever came to me and said we should shut down our compound in benghazi. >> i'm not saying shut it down. i am saying protect it. >> it was this committee that uncovered clinton's use of a private e-mail system. >> there is 795 e-mails in this pile. >> reporter: the committee chair focused on the dozens of e-mails clinton got from her long time friend sydney bloomenthal. >> did the president know mr. bloomenthal was advising you? >> he wasn't advising me. and you know, mr. chairman -- >> did he know he was your most prolific e-mailer we have fund on the subjects of libya and benghazi? i don't know what this line of questioning does to help us get to the bottom of the deaths of four americans. >> i'll be happy to, i'll be happy to help you understand that, madam secretary. it is relevant because our
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ambassador was asked to read and respond to sydney bloomenthal's, drivel. it was sent to him to read and react to. and on some instances he was asking for security. democrat elijah cummings called it a show trial. >> they set up the select committee, with no rules, no deadline. and an unlimited budget. and they set them loose, madam secretary because you're running for president. california democrat, adam schiff noticed the committee has canceled every hearing the past nine months except for this one. >> i wonder if you would look to comment on what it is like to be the subject of an allegation that you deliberately interfered with security that cost the life of a friend. >> congressman, it is a very
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personally painful accusation. it has been rejected and disproven by nonpartisan, dispassionate investigators, but nevertheless, having it continue to be bandied around is -- is deeply distressing to me. you know, i have, would imagine i thought more about what happened than all of you put together. clinton seems determined not to show the kind of anger that makes great fodder for negative campaign ads. any time her voice raises she quickly self corrects. we are moving into hour nine of the hearing, scott and shows no sign of wrapping up soon. >> nancy cordes, outside the hearing room. thanks. also watching the hearing today was our cbs news political john dickerson. of "face the nation." what was your impression? >> never going to be a great day for her. not a portion as her period of secretary of state she wants to talk a lot about. but there were two political pitfalls. the first was any new revelation that called her leadership into question. as secretary of state.
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the second pitfall a moment where she would look callous and dishonest. so far she has been able to avoid the pitfalls. >> there were no revelations today? >> not so far. >> what about the committee? >> the committee was fighting like cats and dogs, republicans and democrats. the republicans the majority on the committee had a special challenge to keep the questioning focused on the central idea of why did this happen? that was important for substantive reasons. because there have been charges this is a political affair. the eighth investigation. they're just going after hillary clinton. while there were moments that illuminated things we knew about the tragedy, there were also moments where the questioning was quite secondary to that central question of why did this happen? >> john dickerson, see you sunday on "face the nation." thank you. now today, the first american was killed in combat in the war against isis. he died in a daring raid in northern iraq to free dozens of
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prisoners who were about to be executed by the islamic terror group. margaret brennan is following this. >> reporter: just after 2:00 a.m., five american helicopters with 30 u.s. special operations forces along with iraqi kurd commandos landed outside a heavily guarded isis prison in northern iraq. the troops stormed the compound. in an exchange of gunfire killed around two dozen isis fighters. the u.s. serviceman was fatally wounded. the commandos rescued 70 hostages about to be executed including more than 20 iraqi soldiers. the raid raised question as but president obama's vow not to put u.s. soldiers into combat in iraq. pentagon spokesperson peter cook said the special operations forces were only assisting the kurdish fighters. >> in that support role they're allowed to defend themselves and also defend partner forces and to protect against the loss of innocent life.
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>> the raid was launched after u.s. intelligence saw evidence of mass graves being dug inside the walls of that prison compound. some of the hostages later told u.s. officials that isis told them they would all be killed after their morning prayers. >> margaret brennan reporting from the pentagon. margaret. thank you. today west texas got drenched by powerful thunderstorms. nearly 3 inches of rain fell. dozens had to be rescue from their homes and their cars near odessa. forecasters say parts of texas, oklahoma, arkansas, and louisiana, could get a foot of rain by sunday. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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once again this evening, a child's family is asking that something be done about gun violence. lily garcia, of albuquerque, started preschool last month. this past tuesday her dad picked her up along with her brother and a short time later lily was in her father's arms fatally wounded in a road rage shooting. here's maria villareal. >> reporter: it started out as a harmless drive home from school. 4-year-old lily garcia in the back seat of her father's vehicle when police say allen garcia was cut off by tony torres. the two men argued. torres allegedly shot at garcia's truck and hit lily in the head. police say torres fled the
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scene. other drivers called 911. >> it looked like some sort of medical emergency. an adult holding, it looked like an unresponsive child. >> reporter: on social media, garcia called his daughter the light of my life, wiser than i will ever be. >> it was traumatic for them. >> reporter: the officer says the shooting stunned even veteran responders. >> they literally saw a 4-year-old little girl with a severe gunshot wound which she died from. but not only our officers but, the paramedics, the trauma room was just devastated. >> reporter: in less than 24 hours, several tips came in, it was an anonymous caller that led detectives to tony torres. after being questioned. police say torres confessed the killing was a road rage incident. chief gordon eden. >> this should have never happened. this is a complete disrespect of human life. >> reporter: police recovered the gun they believe that was used in the road rage incident at torres' home.
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scott there were also charges filed against torres in 2006 for another road rage incident. there were no injuries in that situation. and the case never went to trial. >> maria villareal, thank you. there is no bail for the man accused of gunning down a new york city police officer. randolph holder. it happened on tuesday night. tyrone howard said nothing as he was charged with murder. he has a rap sheet with 28 arrests. holder is the fourth officer killed in new york city this year. and sharika duncan has found most of the murder weapons have one thing in common. >> reporter: fellow officers lit candles in memory of officer randolph holder. officer holder was shot tuesday by a suspect he was chasing. the police say tyrone howard, a convicted felon, was a legally armed, with a 40 caliber handgun. holder is the fourth nypd officer to die in the line of duty in less than a year. while police haven't yet determined where his shooter's
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gun came from, the guns used to kill the three other officers were purchased or stolen from pawnshops in georgia. brooklyn district attorney, ken thompson. >> we have the strictest gun laws in the country. and when you have lax gun laws, like down in georgia, it's easy for people to buy guns down there, legally, and then send them up here where they're destined to end up in the hand of criminals. >> reporter: last week, thompson announced a gun ring bust that took 112 illegal guns off the streets. investigators say the alleged ringleader, michael bassiler paid people to purchase firearms. authorities took this surveillance photo of bassiler carrying weapons in a bag and secretly recorded him on his cell phone. >> i'm sending them the right way and the wrong way. when i am out of state, atlanta, georgia, all that, it is all legal. new york it is completely illegal. >> does it ever feel like you
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are fighting a losing battle? >> i don't think we are fighting a losing battle. i think it is a very challenging endeavor, because each gun we get off the street we potentially save a lif >> 90% of guns found at new york city crime scenes, thompson told us, originate from out of state. secretary of state john kerry began a new mideast peace mission today when he met with israel's prime minister netanyahu. kerry will meet with palestinians over the weekend. this is following weeks of gun and knife attacks by palestinians and barry peterson is in the west bank. >> this is where the, our terrorist came with the knife and -- >> reporter: she thought she could have been stabbed by an arab on the way to morning prayers. the street bloodstained. the aftermath caught on video. the jewish man and wife shot the arab to death.
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>> i feel it could be my blood here. and i bless god that it is my enemy blood and not me. >> reporter: it is not her first taste of violence. an arab stabbed her father to death in his bed 17 years ago in the same neighborhood. she is among about 800 jews under constant watch, living in the midst of 170,000 arabs in hebron. this one place is so much what the arab-israeli conflict is about. both side vow that their claim to this land goes back thousand of years. just down the road, palestinian protesters face the israeli military protecting the street of the tiny jewish enclave. the kids have no advantage here. they have got rocks. they have israelis with weaponry, grenades and live ammunition. but they are determined as the jews.
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are you afraid of dying? >> no, he said. i want to be a martyr. i want a stamp on the heads of israelis. >> we don't have any other place to live. and for us it's a fighting -- fighting to be. >> the fighting and the explosions. >> to be or not to be. and when someone fight on his life, he won't give up. >> reporter: she says she won't leave here where the jews and the arabs have one deadly thing in common. their vow to never surrender. barry peterson, cbs news, hebron. in sweden today, a masked man with a sword attacked four people in a school. a teacher and a student were killed. police shot and killed the attacker. his motive is not known. some witnesses say they thought it was a halloween prank. devices supposed to help drivers focus on the road may be doing just the opposite. and the skydiving father and his free falling son. cbs overnight news will be right
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back.
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in 14 states and washington, d.c., it is illegal to talk on a hand-held cell phone while driving. but a new triple a study says even hands free phones are dangerously distracting. so, we called in transportation correspondent kris van cleave. >> reporter: j.c. good's life was changed by a driver making a phone call using a hand free device. graduation day, the crash killed her parents and doctors gave her a 10% chance of surviving. >> figuring out how to live without parent is a daily struggle. beyond that the brain injury.
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has left me with, permanent handicaps. >> one in 10 fatal crashes in 2013 involved distraction. distracted drivers were blamed for more than 3100 deaths and estimated 424,000 injuries that year alone. >> oh, my gosh, i guess that is a stop sign. >> reporter: researchers outfitted drivers with devices to measure distraction, brain activity, heart rate. they found many hand free voice command systems in cars are ones built into smart phones can be so complicate they'd leave drivers with a sort of lingering technology hangover. >> that is a mentally demanding task, as demanding as trying to balance your checkbook driving down the road. >> reporter: david strayer found driver distraction lasting up to 27 second after finishing a task. >> lag time, dialing back in. i'm on this street. going this fast. this is what is going on around me. get plugged back in. >> all the things that make you a safe driver are temporarily put on holder when you are
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engaging. you hang up. you have to pick up all the things you have been letting go. >> older drivers tended to do worse. the duration of the distraction depended on how difficult the cyst temperature was to use. scott, at 25 miles an hour, you would cover three football fields of distance during the 27 second of distraction. >> kris van cleave, thank you very much. when police in texas pulled over a driver. they noticed something missing and went into action. that story is next.
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it is frightening for a father to watch his son jump out a dad skydiving over poland saw his son spinning, in danger of becoming disoriented. so dad, swooped in, grabbed him, by the arm and the leg. and steadied him. father and son landed safely. they were dressed in blue, but their hearts were pure gold. cedar park, texas officers, justin and kale used their money to buy three child safety seats. for a needy driver. he had been pulled over. the cops decided he needed the seats for his daughter more than a ticket. the grateful dad called it a miracle. it was trick or meet day at the fort worth zoo, the lion cubs celebrated halloween early with carved pumpkins filled with meat. the zoo says placing novel object in the cub's environment improves their psychological
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well being and boy they sure do look happy. some very special hunters were honored today by congress.
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today congress gave america's highest civilian honor, the congressional gold medal to 345 heroes of world war ii. julianna goldman has the monuments, men and women. >> reporter: harry honored as one of the experts turned military officers who rescued treasures looted by the nazis. the 89-year-old discovered this rembrandt self portrait stashed in a german salt mine. >> i was in charge on what was going on out there. i said let's open the box. >> reporter: before the war the masterpiece had hung in a museum in his home town. because he was jewish he was never allowed to visit it. he and his family fled germany for the u.s. now thanks to him the painting is back in his hometown.
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>> what did you think? >> for me to be able to go into that particular museum and take a look at it, get a photograph of it. made me feel good. made me feel good. you know? my heart. >> monuments men. >> reporter: the 2014 film brought new attention to the monuments men, based on a book by robert ed sal. >> the story from my view was the good guys. who are the men and women? >> reporter: one woman was this woman who worked for the commander. >> aren't you a little old for that? >> yes. >> i think george stiller is handsomer. >> reporter: she was a typist. until last month she didn't real realize the field report she worked on related to the famous group. >> i was absolutely flabbergasted. >> the foundation set up to honor monuments men has run out of money. today's ceremony is bittersweet. >> you are the reason the award
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is happening. >> nine years of work realization of a dream i have held so closely. we struggled to got to this moment. >> reporter: preserves of the past awarded a monumental honor. julianna goldman, cbs news, washington. that's the "cbs overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us just a little bit later for the morning news and of course cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city. i'm scott pelley.
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "cbs overnight news," i'm michelle miller. former secretary of state and democrat presidential candidate hillary clinton spent a long day on capitol hill. she was summoned before the house committee investigating the 2012 attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans died in the attack including ambassador chris stevens. nancy cordes has the story. >> reporter: the hearings started out cordially with hand shakes. but things quickly grew tense. >> i think if you look at the statement i made i clearly said it was an attack. >> calling it an attack is like calling the sky blue. of course it was an attack. >> reporter: republicans accused clinton of ignoring requests from ambassador chris stevens for more security. georgia's westmoreland. >> how many instances would it
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have taken you to say, we need to look at security over there. >> no one ever came to me and said we should shut down our compound in benghazi. >> i'm not saying shut it down. i am saying protect it. >> it was this committee that uncovered clinton's use of a private e-mail system. >> there is 795 e-mails in this pile. >> reporter: the committee chair focused on the dozens of e-mails clinton got from her long time friend sydney bloomenthal. >> did the president know mr. bloomenthal was advising you? >> he wasn't advising me. and you know, mr. chairman -- >> he was your most prolific e-mailer we have found on the subjects of libya and benghazi. i don't know what this line of questioning does to help us get to the bottom of the deaths of four americans. >> i'll be happy to, i'll be happy to help you understand that, madam secretary. it is relevant because our ambassador was asked to read and respond to sydney bloomenthal's,
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drivel. it was sent to him to read and react to. and on some instances he was asking for security. democrat elijah cummings called it a show trial. >> they set up the select committee, with no rules, no deadline. and an unlimited budget. and they set them loose, madam secretary because you're running for president. >> reporter: california >> reporter: california democrat adam schiff noticed the committee has canceled every hearing the past nine months except for this one. >> i wonder if you would like to comment on what it is like to be the subject of an allegation that you deliberately interfered with security that cost the life of a friend. >> congressman, it is a very personally painful accusation. it has been rejected and disproven by nonpartisan, dispassionate investigators, but
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nevertheless, having it continue to be bandied around is -- is deeply distressing to me. you know, i have, would imagine i thought more about what happened than all of you put together. clinton seems determined not to show the kind of anger that makes great fodder for negative campaign ads. any time her voice raises she quickly self corrects. we are moving into hour nine of the hearing, scott and shows no soon of ending soon. will hillary clinton's testimony affect her presidential bid. scott pelley spoke with john dickerson of face the nation. >> john, high stakes day for hillary clinton what was your impression? >> never going to be a great day for her. never as her portion she want to talk about. two political pitfalls. the first was any new revelation that called her leadership into question.
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as secretary of state. the second pitfall a moment where she would look callous and dishonest. so far able to avoid the pitfalls. >> there were no revelation today? >> not so far. no. >> what about the committee? >> the committee was fighting like cats and dogs, republicans and democrats. the republicans the majority on the committee had a special challenge to keep the questioning focused on the central idea of why did this happen? that was important for substantive reasons. because there have been charges this is a political affair. the eighth investigation. they're just going after hillary clinton. while there were moments that illuminated things we knew about the tragedy, there were also moments where the questioning was quite secondary to that central question of why did this happen? >> john dickerson, see you sunday on "face the nation." thank you. a taiwanese woman who gave birth on a flight to the united states has reportedly been denied entry into the u.s. and is separated from her child. it was an heroic delivery aboard a china airlines flight. new details could land the new mother in legal trouble and cost her a fortune.
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>> reporter: taiwanese reports say the woman concealed her pregnancy from airline officials so she could give birth to her baby girl in the united states a move that may have landed her in trouble with officials in native taiwan. on october 8, cell phone video taken on board china airlines boeing 777 shows what passengers describe as a once in a live time moment. a newborn baby girl. born high above the pacific ocean, delivered with the help of the flight crew and fellow passengers including a los angeles physician. >> the flight crew was very helpful bringing me any medical equipment that i needed helping me with the patient. basically like stand in nurses. china airlines flight 8 flying from taipei to los angeles when the woman went into labor two months early. the flight was diverted to alaska. but the baby arrived before the plane touched down. >> they're disinfecting scissors
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collecting buckets. blankets and whatever they can find. >> reporter: this week several news agency reported the woman had been denied admission to the united states and had returned to taiwan without her baby. according to the taipei times, china airlines is seeking compensation from the woman for the cost and delay caused by her baby's birth. >> they may be keeping the child here until the doctors determine it is okay. a california based immigration lawyer, he says that even though the mother was denied entry into the u.s., the baby could still have the right to remain in the country. if she was born within a 123 mile radius of the united states. >> if for some reason the people, custom and border protection, decided she shouldn't be in the united states, they would then send her back on the next plane. and then the child who is an american can stay here until the child is able and -- to be repatrioted back to taiwan. >> cbs news reached out to the alaska office of children services and u.s. immigration
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officials regarding the whereabouts of the baby the they said they would not discuss individual cases. it is unknown when and if the mother and child will be reunited. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. your clever moves won't stop the cold and flu.
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like a little puppy! the award-winning geico app. download it today. many cars may today have technology that is supposed to fight distracted driving. a new study shows that going hand-free can be more dangerous than previously thought. kris van cleave has the details. >> reporter: the aaa study looked at systems they can be mentally taxing akin to balancing your checkbook while driving and leave you distracted after the fact not to go one football field but three. >> reporter: j.c. good's life college graduation from a perfect day to a nightmare in second. thanks to a distracted driver on a hand free device. >> he turned left through the red light. as he did that the 1-wheeler
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served to try to miss him, still clipped the car and slammed full force into the family car. good's parents were killed instantly. she was given a 10% chance of survival. she beat the odds but suffered a lasting brain injury. >> i don't have the brain cells that know how to move my wrists or fingers or ankle or toes. and i'm lucky i can walk. >> reporter: j.c. now advocates against distracted driving which killed 3100 and injured estimated 425,000 in 2013 alone. a study released this morning find new hand free systems that work with voice command leave drivers with a technology hangover. >> you are kind of getting out of the distracted zone into a much more alert driver. that takes time. up to 27 second. >> reporter: university of utah
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professor, david strayer, evaluated 250 adults in 10 vehicle. >> my gosh, i guess that is a stop line. lingering distraction found across the board. how long depend on how hard the system is to use. >> itch you are now talking to your car, talking to your phone, you are now focusing on one task to the exclusion of attending to the driving environment. when you hang up, well you don't come to right away. you now have to say where am i? >> reporter: second of distraction, good knows can be deadly. >> i know whatever that young man was talking about on his phone, absolutely was not more important than my parents' lives. the study also looked at the voice commands by the three leading cell phone platforms. they found those to be just as distracting. bottom line the researchers say just because your car can do all of these things like voice to tweet, doesn't mean you should do it while you are driving. wisconsin is the only state in the nation where you can get caught driving drunk and get away with a slap on the wrist. as peter greenberg reports for "cbs this morning" a policy that costs the state millions. >> first time drunk drivers in
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wisconsin are typically given a fine and released after they sober up. those incidents cost an estimated $6.8 billion each year. that's $1200 for every man, woman and child in the state. >> it is game day at the university of wisconsin. and these badger fans -- are off to an early start. while there is no alcohol in the stadium. the party outside is in full swing before 10:00 a.m. tailgates look this will happen all weekend across the country. but wisconsin is the only state where first time drinking and driving offenders will not be criminally prosecuted. >> we have one of the biggest problems in the nation. yet we have some of the few solutions. >> wisconsin state senator tim carpenter co-authored four of
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six bills to toughen drinking and driving laws. >> the assembly passed legislation last time, it came in front of the senate transportation committee, then senator fitzgerald wouldn't sponsor any of the bills. >> scott fitzgerald is leader of the state senate. >> if you had everyone appear before the judge. it would be very difficult for the system to deal with that right now. >> what you said if i interpret the numbers correctly. there are so many people drunk out there they can't handle the system. >> if you want to felony conviction not sure what difference that would make. we are trying to take an approach we think would be more measured and the way to do that is get the people clean. >> last time we were all together as a family was in november. >> reporter: beyond the politics often in the debate are the families forced into advocacy. >> you were immediately disrupted in the worst way? >> immediately. >> reporter: judy and paul jenkins lost their daughter jennifer, granddaughter courtney and unborn granddaughter jennifer was carrying in the 200
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accident. the man who killed them mark benson was sentenced to 30 years in prison the his fourth offense for operating a vehicle while intoxicated. he received among the state's stiffest penalties. >> that is a pretty current picture of them. >> reporter: the jenkins say mandatory minimum sentences on first time offenders may have prevented this tragedy. >> reporter: if you get pulled over for a dui or owi. >> traffic ticket. >> reporter: don't lose your license, your car, or go to prison? >> no. you don't have to show up in court to answer the ticket. >> reporter: so, fraternity row. julia sherman coordinator for the wisconsin alcohol policy project. despite little action in the state legislature, progress is happening in town after town and through volunteer programs like police saturation patrols. >> these are task force.
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they let the public know when they're going to be out on the road. >> reporter: a show of force. >> a show of force. but also they can pull over any one that breaks any traffic laws. >> reporter: in a state that prohibits police sobriety check points. saturation patrols have shown success. since brown county launched the federally funded program in 2011, year over year reductions have been real ied in alcohol related crashes, injuries and deaths. >> more and more communities are adopting things and it is going to come done to the communities lead the way and then the leaders in madison are going to end up following them. >> tim carpenter in the state legislature for 31 years says any significant change to wisconsin drinking and driving laws will take more time. give me the reality check? is anything ever going to change? >> to be honest with you the i dent see meaningful drunk driving legislation pass this session or next session, probably after the next gubernatorial election in 2018. >> so, you are saying nothing for at lest three years? >> at least. >> the cbs overnight news will
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the historical drama br brgs -- "suffragette" opens in theaters today set in early 20th century london where women of all classes came together to battle for the right to vote. nearly all the cast and crew are female including oscar nominee carrie mulligan who sat down for a chat with nora o'donnell. >> how much did you know about
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the suffragettes? >> i knew a really basic school version, a paragraph in the history books saying women got the vote eventually. somehow. a couple lines. lots of images. will in with flowers looking very peaceful. history goes down differently on the set of suffragette. a new film about women's fight for voting rights in britain that stars 30-year-old carry mulligan. >> you can't stop us all. >> mulligan best known for her role as daisy buchanan in the "great gatsby." and received an oscar nod for her role in "an education." >> mr. and mrs. david goldman. mr. and mrs. david goldman. you are married. now plays the fictional maude watts, laundry worker, wife and mother whose daily life is dismal before radicalized to fight for women's suffrage in 1912. >> this is a film.
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that was written, produced and directed by women. how unique is that? >> completely unique. and costume designer. set designer. we're all all women. i have never been a part of anything like that before. we were a group of women who were very excited to be telling the story. >> i think about maude, very poor. loses her husband. loses her son. she loses her job. she is jailed multiple times. and i think. i don't know that i would have the same courage. >> yeah. >> as her? do you think you would have the same courage? >> it is such a hard thing. because i have been lucky enough to grow up in a life where i haven't had to fight for anything. the point of our film sort of says if you won't throw a rock for yourself an you will throw one for some one else. >> well have been left with no alternative but to defy the
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government. meryl streep plays the real life leader of the militant suffrage movement who called for the use of violent tactics like arson and vandalism. >> this movie is not about peaceful protest for the women aright to vote. these women are militants. that they're rebellious. >> after 50 years of peaceful campaigning. rejected. pushed away. swept under the carpet. and being denied. denied. denied. >> they don't throw rocks and hold rallies. they set off bombs. >> yeah. yeah. yeah, they blow stuff up. are they terrorists in some ways. >> not in a modern day sense. because they were very clear. and very clear that no human life should be in danger. they only risked their own lives. >> never surrender. never give up the fight. >> these suffragettes they face sexism, police brutality. losing their jobs. force feeding.
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jailed multiple times. why was it important to show all of that? >> i think because we have had such a sanitized version of our history the i left school and vote because my parents voted the i didn't really understand the weight of what i had with my vote. >> the film sparked a strong reaction at its uk premiere where protesters lay down on the red carpet. >> you said you thought it was awesome. >> yeah. we felt kind of excited by that. i think, you know. again being part of a film that sparks debate. has people talking. inspired people to, stand up and do something. it is great. how is it personal for you? the first time i felt really proud to be a woman. i grew up with a brother. i was a tomboy as a kid. i was surrounded by really, really great, strong, intelligent thoughtful women making this film we all felt was so important. i felt really proud of that. really proud to be a woman. really proud to be a feminist. >> inspired by her experience making the movie, mulligan got a
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tattoo, a tribute to emily davidson one of the first martyrs of the movement. >> the king's horse in this unhappy incident is running third from last. >> she was killed after she threw herself in front of the king's horse during derby day in 1913. >> what does it say? >> that's old. that one -- that says love that overcometh. when emily davidson died, the suffragettes, they had a weekly magazine. called "the suffragette." over her head a halo, love that overcometh. >> why did you want that is a a tattoo? why did you -- >> i had a feeling with suffragette it was a job that would stay with me forever. it wasn't a job. i think it will be something that will stand out, something really important to me for a long, long time. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. over the years, i have played some characters
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over the years, i have played you could call controlling. but the truth is, there is so much in life we can't control. but here's something we can: colorectal cancer. it affects men and women, and it's the second leading cancer killer in the u.s., which is astouing, considering it's almost entirely preventable! here's how: most colon cancers start as polyps, and screening helps find polyps, so they can be removed before they even turn into cancer. screening also finds this cancer early, when treatment works best. for me, screening was simple and quick. it was no big deal, except for the huge sense of relief you feel afterwards. there are several tests that you can choose from. if you're 50 or older, you should talk to your doctor. decide which one is right for you. but take control. do everything you can to prevent colon cancer. screening saves lives.
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it could really save your life. the unexpected happens at night. the truck flipped. the vehicle landed on me. i realized ... i can't move my legs. i'm looking for one person one contact that can help me. when john arrived at the v-a, there was someone, stephen bush of paralyzed veterans of america. he helped john with his claim and became his advocate to get him back into life. when i approach someone that's newly injured i want them to feel comfortable that they're not alone. for over 65 years, paralyzed veterans of america, through their national service officers, has helped hundreds of thousands of veterans get the care and benefits they've earned. and their service is free toas and their families. if you need help with a claim, or just navigating the system, contact us at p-v-a dot org. paralyzed veterans of america.
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changing lives, building futures. captioning funded by cbs it's friday, october 23rd, 2015. this is the "cbs morning news." marathon testimony for hillary clinton. the former secretary of state is questioned for more than 11 hours! but few new details emerge on the benghazi terror attacks. a suspect shooting a 4-year-old in a road rage incident has admitted to the crime. 22 people are arrested and 12 tons of pot are recovered when authorities uncover a massive underground drug smuggling tunnel. and you'll meet

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