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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  November 13, 2015 2:07am-4:01am EST

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f oklahoma was widely reported last spring. but several students at yale told us the reason they're marching is what happens when there are no headlines. senior alicia ponce diaz. >> i definitely felt like there was no one to turn to, no one to talk to about it or nowhere to report it, which i think is one of the crucial problems that the university has. >> reporter: the young man arrested at the university of missouri for making those threats, scott, is facing up to seven years in prison. >> anna werner reporting. anna, thank you. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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the next democratic debate is saturday, and today, a new cbs news/"new york times" poll has hillary clinton far ahead of bernie sanders, 52% to 33%. nancy cordes is on the campaign trail. >> reporter: clinton's 19-point advantage really only tells part of the story. she leads among democratic women by 28 points, among older democrats by 41 points, and 76% of democratic voters says clinton has the best chance of winning next november compared to 18% for sanders. >> thank you, senator sanders. >> reporter: he excels, though, with younger voters. sanders has a six-point lead among democrats under 45, even though he's the oldest candidate in the race. and democratic primary voters, who consider themselves
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independents, favor sanders by 27 points. >> you are not going to continue to have it all. >> reporter: clinton is seen as better equipped to handle an international crisis and to deal with gun issues. sanders has a slight edge when it comes to closing the gap between the rich and the poor, but she's seen as strong on the economy as a whole. >> we have to have an economy that works for everybody again. >> reporter: which republican would be hardest to beat next november? it was no contest. 31% of democratic voters said businessman donald trump, and he clearly feels the same way. >> you'll be happy to hear that head to head, i beat hillary very easily. isn't that nice? [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: democratic voters are also worried about marco rubio and ben carson but not nearly as worried as they are about trump. and, scott, our politics may be
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polarized but a full three- quarters of the democratic voters we spoke to said they want a candidate who will compromise with republicans in congress. >> nancy cordes tonight. nancy, thank you. john dickerson will moderate that democratic presidential debate on saturday night. that's at 9:00 here on cbs. twitter is one of our partners for this debate, and so we invite you to tweet us your questions for the candidates using the hashtag #demdebate. donald trump's plan to deport 11 million illegal immigrants could never pass congress, according to the new republican speaker of the house. in an interview for "60 minutes," paul ryan said he couldn't imagine how that plan could ever happen. ryan told us that he's been in touch with the president often since he became speaker two weeks ago, and while he opposes mr. obama on many issues, they have found common ground. >> i think you can walk and chew gum at the same time. i think you can oppose the president on some issue that you
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fundamentally disagree with, but also work with the other party on issues you do agree with. that's what i've been doing. look, if we can find common ground, we can on highways, we will on funding the government. hopefully we can on tax policy. those are three things that will produce certainty in this country in the next few months. let's go do that. >> there was a time on capitol hill when the other guy had a bad idea. and now on capitol hill, the other guy's a bad guy. >> yeah, i think that's right. >> how do you heel that animosity? it's your job now? >> leadership by example is the way i look at it. i have friends on the other side of the aisle. i have shown we can negotiate and compromise without compromising principle, that people with different ideas aren't bad people. they just have different ideas. somewhere in this we got into impugning people's character and motives if we didn't like their ideas. we've got to get back to just debating ideas and not impugning people's motives and character. >> sunday on "60 minutes"
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speaker ryan will tell us how he'd like to change taxes and social security, and his wife, janet, explains why she didn't want him to take the job. there was an outbreak of laser strikes on aircraft across the country overnight. laser pointers, sold at sporting goods stores, were aimed at planes and helicopters in 16 cities. here's kris van cleave. >> the laser was pointed at the pilot. >> reporter: three new yortyk ci news choppercas beme the story st laht nigth as ey were targetedby pl peo te onrohe gwiund th dangerously bright green lasers. the news crews directed new york police to the location of one of the incidents and two people were taken into custody. the faa says more than 20 aircraft were hit with lasers last night flying over cities from new york to california, michigan to kentucky. in dallas, three pilots reported laser sightings while on approach to land. last night is part of a record- setting surge of laser strikes
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on aircraft. as of the middle of october, pilots had reported more than 5,300 incidents. that's nearly a 40% increase over all of 2014. in los angeles, it's enough of a problem that the l.a. police department's air support division equips its 88 airborne officers with special protective glasses. >> it's incapacitating for a few moments. >> reporter: lapd pilot kevin cook has been hit at night while flying low over the city. >> you want to turn away from the light source. except when it illuminates the helicopter you can't turn away from the light source. >> reporter: no one was injured in last night's incident. and no accidents have ever been attributed to a laser strike. scott, it is a crime to shine a laser at an airplane punishable by a maximum of 20 years in prison. >> kris van cleave, kris, thanks. in utah tonight, a lesbian couple is fighting a judge's ruling to remove their foster baby. carter evans spoke with them.
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>> reporter: beckie pierce and april hoagland have just five days to hold on to the baby girl they've nurtured for months. >> knowing that, that's what we've done and it's been taken away from us is heartbreaking. >> reporter: the couple is legally married in utah and plan to adopt the child. but tuesday, according to lawyers present in the courtroom for utah child welfare agency, judge scott johansen ordered the couple to give up the baby for just one reason.dies that say children do worse in homosexual homes than in heterosexual homes. >> reporter: the judge wouldn't tell you what studies he was referring to? >> no, he told the lawyers to do their own research. >> reporter: hoagland and pierce say the judge also ignored pleas from the baby's biological mother to grant them custody. they believe the judge, a bishop in the mormon church, is imposing his religious beliefs over the law. >> this is all about sexual orientation, not what is best for the child. >> he has no other grounds but that. >> reporter: child and family services say the couple passed rigorous background checks and state law is on their side, according to director brent
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platt. >> any legally married couple in utah can become licensed as foster parents, same-sex couples, heterosexual couples. it's very simple, very straightforward. >> reporter: there's not much time. >> there's not much time at all. she's happy, she bonded and now you're going to take that away from her. she has to start over. >> reporter: the couple is appealing the judge's decision, and child and family services is still trying to determine if it's even legal. we wanted to speak directly with judge johansen but the court told us he is not permitted to talk about pending cases. >> carter evans in salt lake city. carter, thanks. did a mix-up by the maker of birth control pills lead to unwanted pregnancies? and a swarm of tornadoes leaves devastation when the "cbs news campaign update is sponsored by farmers insurance.
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113 women in 28 states claim that they got pregnant even though they were on birth control, and in a lawsuit, they blame drug makers for mixing up
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their pills. here's michelle miller. >> reporter: qualitest pharmaceuticals and two other companies recalled eight different kinds of oral contraceptives. more than three million packets, after discovering that the rose rows of pills inside the box were placed upside down. women who did not notice the mistake would have taken a placebo during the week they should have been taking a hormone, increasing their risk for conception. 41 states allow women to sue for unwanted pregnancies. the case seeks millions of dollars in damages and in some cases, the costs of raising children born from these alleged unplanned pregnancies to adulthood. cindy pearson is the head of the national women's health network. >> generations of women have trusted that when they pick up their packet of pills at the pharmacy that it's going to be put together in the right way and when companies mess up, they need to do the right thing. >> reporter: pearson says
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winning will be tough. it's difficult to prove the women got pregnant because of the mistake. qualitest says the number of affected packets was small. of the 500,000 packs returned in the recall, only 53 were improperly packaged in the reverse order. in an e-mail to cbs news, the company says it has only been able to confirm the sale of one defective pill pack to a patient. and there have already been multiple settlements for this packaging defect, scott. we spoke to several of the women who tell us that those unplanned births were life altering. >> michelle miller, thanks, michelle. there was a surprise verdict today in the so-called "goodfellas" mob trial, and we'll have that next.
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winds are howling across the great lakes tonight. thousand have lost power. gusts topping 60 miles an hour hit lake michigan today. the system unleashed a swarm of tornadoes yesterday, at least 11 of them reported in iowa. monroe county was hit hard but there were no serious injuries. an aging mobster was found not guilty today of helping plan the 1978 lufthansa heist in new york. it was retold in the movie "goodfellas." 80-year old vincent asaro said he was shocked. prosecutors who had asaro's cousin as a prime witness were just as stunned. on hi worst day, an army captain summoned his best, a story of heroism next.
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an army captain stood tall as he choked back tears today when the president awarded him the country's highest honor. david martin introduced us. >> reporter: ever wonder what's going through a soldier's mind when he receives the medal of honor? >> it feels like something that you don't deserve. >> reporter: we asked army captain florent groberg. >> the army and the government and the president decided to award me this medal for the worst day of my life. >> reporter: so how does that feel? >> overwhelming, confusing, not exciting. >> reporter: on august 8, 2012, in afghanistan, groberg was in charge of protecting his brigade commander and a couple other vips as they made a short march to the provincial governor's compound.
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>> it's just one of those weird moments that you get in combat where as soon as you get on the ground, things just don't feel right. >> reporter: groberg would normally have been at the rear of a protective diamond around the vips. this time, he went to the front. >> i wanted to see where we were walking. i wanted to have eyes on. >> reporter: groberg spotted a man coming towards them from the left. >> he's a threat, and my only thing in the world i have to do that's that specific moment is eliminate the threat, no matter what it takes. >> reporter: why don't you shoot him? >> you can't just start shooting anyone. didn't see a weapon on him. you know, i can't pick up my rifle and shoot him. >> reporter: so groberg, followed by sergeant andrew mahoney, rushed him. >> i dropped my rifle, grabbed him, and realized that at this point, he's got plates on his chest. >> reporter: a suicide bomber. groberg and mahoney threw him to the ground. >> when he blew up, his chest first blew up into the ground
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and took the impact, which is probably the reason why i'm here talking to you here today. >> reporter: and why so many other soldiers who were there were in the audience today. but moments later, a second suicide bomber hiding inside a nearby building detonated his vest, and between them, the bombers killed four men, which made it the worst day of groberg's life. >> this medal that i will be receiving, i'd-- i'd turn it right back in right now, say no thank you. bring my guys back right here. >> reporter: that's what it feels like to be a war hero. david martin, cbs news, washington. and that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
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this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." the islamic state is claiming responsibility for a pair of suicide bombings in the heart of beirut. the target -- a shiite neighborhood that's a stronghold for hezbollah. the bombers detonated their explosives at the height of rush hour. the blast killed about four dozen people and wounded hundreds. hezbollah has been battling the islamic state in syria. this isn't the first time isis has struck back at hezbollah inside lebanon. and the u.s. stepped up air strikes against the islamic state in iraq. warplanes are supporting kurdish troops trying to recapture the town of sinjar. charlie d'agata is on the ground with kurdish forces. >> reporter: good morning. some of what you see is smoke rising from a series of the
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latest air strikes targeting isis militants around the city of sinjar. we've lost count of the number of air strikes this morning and overnight that have been launched in that vicinity. this is all part of a major offensive to retake sinjar. we understand 7,500 kurdish peshmerga forces are closing in on three sides of the city, trying to push isis out. one of the reasons it sits between the two isis strongholds of raqqa in syria and mosul in iraq, so they're trying to cut off supply routes between those two cities, but it's not going to be easy. kurdish peshmerga forces said they fear snipers. now the city may be life with booby traps, home made bombs beneath the roads and inside buildings. and there's always the concern of suicide bombers. if not on foot then traveling in vehicles.
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the latest cbs news "new york times" poll shows hillary clinton maintaining her commanding lead over bernie sanders heading into saturday's debate in iowa. 52% of likely primary voters support clinton. nancy cordes reports from drake university in des moines where cbs new also be hosting saturday's debate. >> reporter: good morning. our poll finds that clinton supporters are more likely to say they have made up their minds, so she'll walk on this stage saturday night as the undisputed front-runner. her republican opponents are locked in a serious debate over immigration after tangling over that issue in their debate tuesday night. >> we're going to have a deportation force. >> reporter: donald trump doubled down wednesday on his vow to deport all 11 million undocumented immigrants. in iowa jeb bush said that would overwhelm the u.s. judicial system. >> i think there's a better approach a conservative
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approach that solves this and does it in a way that doesn't cost an arm and a leg and respects american values. >> reporter: clinton chimed in on twitter, calling trump's plan absurd, inhumane and un-american. >> we are a country of laws. >> reporter: it's a touchy issue for a party worried about a re repeat of 201. >> the answer is self-deportation. people decide they can do better by going home. >> repoter: when they weren't debating tuesday, republicans were talking about hillary clinton. in an online video, her campaign mocked her for mentioning her more than a middle class in a debate focused on the economy. we just learned that bernie sanders has won the endorsement of the postal workers union, the largest union to back him so far. and interestingly, charlie, in our new poll he leads among
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democratic voters under the age of 45. he's got 46 points to clinton's 40. "face the nation" host john dickerson will host the debate saturday night at 9:00 right here on cbs. federal investigators in akron, ohio are digging through the wreckage of a plane crash that left nine people dead. they still don't know what caused the jet to drop from the sky right outside of akron. don dahler is there. >> reporter: video shows the jet skimming the tree line and then crashing parking a massive fire and destroying up to four homes. >> he was very rainy, foggy, overcast. power lines on the ground. >> reporter: on wednesday, investigators examined the charred rubble. >> the left wing hit the ground first and left a witness mark. then the aircraft hit half of an apartment building destroying it before running up an
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embankment behind the building and coming to rest. >> reporter: officials confirm all nine people on board the jet, including both pilots were killed. denny lukowicz is the ceo of the charter company that operated the plane. >> they were very well seasoned pilots both of them. >> reporter: the seven passengers on the jet worked for a family run property development company in boca raton. the group was in their second day of a multicity business trip. a message hung on the door of their office on monday. our hearts are broken, it said. investigators talked to a pilot who landed at the pilot before the accident. he was on the same radio frequency as the hawker 700 and said he did not hear any distress calls. the ntsb expects to be on site a total of four or five days. newly released videos are sparking outrage in virginia where a man died after being tased by police. >> reporter: this confrontation
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was caught on a police cruiser and hospital surveillance cameras in south boston virginia. police picked up 46-year-old linwood lambert, jr., for causing a disturbance. >> they placed him in handcuffs. they did not put him under arrest. he was not charged with any crime. >> reporter: the officers brought him to halifax regional hospital for medical evaluation. but when they arrived, lambert kicked out the window and bolted to the emergency room doors. three officers responded by tasing lambert multiple times. >> while he was on the ground he was repeatedly tased again and placed in shackles on his legs. >> reporter: lambert was then placed under arrest charged with disorderly conduct and destruction of property. >> instead of being brought into the emergency room they put him
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back into the police cruiser. >> reporter: an officer tased lat mberagain as he sat in the back seat of the police car and warned he wasn't done. >> it appears he's no longer responsive and they drove him pack back to the jail. >> reporter: an ambulance then transported him from the jail back to the hospital where he was pronounced dead. an autopsy said the cause of death was acute cocaine intoxication. his sister has filed a lawsuit. >> to see what had happened to him was just devastating. >> reporter: her lawyer says the amount of cocaine in lambert's body was low, and the actual cause of death is now clear. >> i think it's obvious on the videotape that here's a man who was tased repeatedly. it's going to cause him to into
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into cardiac arrest. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. unfortunately, many people who spread it may not know they have it. it's called whooping cough. and the cdc recommends everyone, including those around babies, make sure their whooping cough vaccination is up to date. understand the danger your new grandchild faces. talk to your doctor or pharmacist about you and your family getting a whooping cough vaccination today. the beast was as long as the boat. for seven hours, we did battle. until i said... you will not beat... meeeeee!!! greg. what should i do with your fish? gary. just put it in the cooler. if you're a fisherman, you tell tales. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance you switch to geico. it's what you do. put the fish in the cooler! it's judgment day. the in-laws, the
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the view doesn't get much better than this. lee cowan went for a ride with a photographer who captures new heights every time he reaches for his camera. ♪ >> reporter: at first glance his images look more like circuit boards. they have been centers surging with energy. but while these are hubs of activity they're not in our computers. these are the world's great cities photographed the way the heavens see them. sparkling spectacles below. >> you're feeling the arteries the blood flow of the city. you literally perceive the depth and the three dimensionality of
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the earth and you see distances in a different matter. they look much smaller, much more within reach. >> reporter: vincent has taken aerial photography to new heights. a glittering strip of sin city and made london's big ben look nor like a big jewel. >> it was almost an out of body experience, because it's just so beautiful from up there. >> reporter: and just a few of his god-like glimpses that he's publishing in a new book. fittingly called "air." >> since i was 13 years old, like everyone else, i look out of the windows of the commercial aircraft and i'm fascinated. i see every little intersection the police cars the stadiums and you wonder what's going on. you can see this incredible activity. >> reporter: vince spends a lot of time in helicopters but not the way you might expect. he just doesn't hover a few
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hundred feet above as you do with most choppers. vince asks his pilots to take him up to 9,000, 10,000 11,000 feet and higher altitudes helicopters rarely fly. >> some veteran helicopter pilots refuse to go up there. they're just not comfortable. the first time i went up it was scary, because i had never been that high with an open window or door and leaning out and you see planes going underneath you. your heart skips a beat. >> reporter: so he asked us to join him in a recent flight over the city of miami. how could we resist? >> best seat in the house. >> reporter: we took off just before sunset and headed east towards miami. with a brief spot hovering over a couple in a pool. >> what the heck are you really looking for? >> i'm trying to make order out of chaos. i'm looking for patterns beyond
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the street color and light. >> reporter: what is it like when you're leaning out over the emg of the choper? >> you forgot about it after a while. you're so focused on getting that image. >> ever think about the fall? >> the only time i thought about it is that high altitude over new york. >> reporter: that's when a physicist says a fall from that high up could last a terrifying 41 seconds. >> i was like thanks for telling me. now i know. >> reporter: too long. >> way too long. >> once it got dark we started going higher. helicopters can be like flying blenders. they vibrate wildly and vince has to hold the camera steady shooting at low shutter speeds often as the chopper goes into steep banking turns. >> beautiful.
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>> reporter: the hot florida air got cool and crisp, until we were about 8,000 feet. nothing between us and downtown miami except air. >> as a photographer as an official communicator you try to get images no one has seen before. that's the goal and that's a pretty tall order in 2015 when everyone has a camera on their phone. >> reporter: he's used to breaking ground although he's usually on the ground to do it. back in 2008 he was one of the first to shoot video on a 35 millimeter digital camera. his mini movie called "reverie" is something few had ever seen. certainly not from what most could consider a still camera. but that's just him. ever since he was a child, something about the visual just clicked. >> when i was 15 i asked my father, who was a photographer can i borrow your camera?
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i picked it up i took a picture and i was done. >> reporter: he was rarely without a camera after that. and he soon became the youngest staff photographer efficient hired by "the new york times." >> i would always say i want to find something that people can't see or don't want to see. >> reporter: he once scaled the antenna on the empire state building just to get a shot like this. >> this is about 1475 feet up. >> reporter: in the days after the attacks of 9/11 he was dispatched to pakistan much to his surprise. >> i was not a war photographer. >> reporter: you didn't want to be on the front lines? >> no. when the bullets fly, i hit the ground and stay down. >> reporter: but staying downturned out had been his secret capturing not so much the war but the victims of it. >> these were real people just as afraid as people back in the states. >> reporter: he shared the pulitzer condoleezza riceprize for
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creature photography that year. he was only 27. >> when you see what happened in new orleans to americans, you know, in our country, that really shakes your foundation up pretty seriously. >> reporter: so seriously, that laforet needed a change. he quit his job as a photo journalist and decided to pull away for a while. now you're doing something where there aren't people or perhaps emotions in your pictures anymore. >> there's something very odd that happens when you go up in the air. it's kind of intimate. i can't explain it. >> reporter: vincent laforet has always pushed the envelope. but it's not about being a daredevil. it's about finding and capturing what we often lose on the ground. a sense of peace and perspective. >> i think when you take a step back from anything you see the things more clearly. and in a visual way, i think
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"air" is a representation of that, to take some distance from the street level view and you see we're all in this together. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. well, things in the bedroom have always been pretty good. yeah, no complaints. we've always had a lot of fun, but i wanted to try something new. and i'm into that. so we're using k-y love. it's a pleasure gel that magnifies both of our sensations. right, i mean, for both of us, just... yeah, it just takes all those awesome feelings you usually feel and it just makes them... rawr... dare to feel more with new k-y love.
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i absolutely love my new york apartment but the rent is outrageous. good thing geico offers affordable renters insurance. with great coverage it protects my personal belongings should they get damaged, stolen or destroyed. [doorbell] uh, excuse me. delivery. hey. lo mein, szechwan chicken chopsticks soy sauce and you got some fortune cookies. have a good one. ah, these small new york apartments... protect your belongings. let geico help you with renters insurance. grace jones has made entertainment history in a career that's spanned more than 50 years.
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supermodel actress, pop icon. now she's a writer too. her book is called "i'll never write my memoirs" and she sat down for a chat with michelle miller. >> reporter: after being two hours late to our interview, it's hard to stay mad at grace jones. even when she won't answer your questions. do you realize most 67-year-olds don't look like this? >> i'm not 67. >> how old are you? >> i'm not telling you. my spirit is my spirit. you know, spirits just bounce around. >> bouncing and behaving? >> no, i ain't behaving. no. behaving is boring. >> reporter: that attitude made jones fascinating, frustrating and ultimately famous. they have one to be shy, jones is detailing more than 50 years of sex, drugs, and disco. you said you were a great keeper of secrets. >> uh-huh.
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and i still am. >> reporter: even after writing this book this >> absolutely. >> reporter: beverly grace jones was born in jamaica. the child of conservative religious parents. but when they moved to the u.s. jones was left in the care of her grandmother. and her boyfriend, who grace says was abusive. >> it's just a roller coaster ride of joy, seeing myself as a small child and being defined. >> reporter: by 18 jones moved to manhattan and tried modeling. but agencies weren't interested. so when they told you that you were too told too skinny. >> your mouth is too big, your nose is too small. >> reporter: did you ever want to change yourself? >> god no. no way. i just had to change everybody else. >> reporter: in the '70s, jones
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moved to paris. european designers loved her chiselled features physique, and exotic persona. when she returned to new york a few years later, disco was in full swing. her regular appearances at legendary dance club studio 54 were a fix of drug fueled antics and inspired productions. photographers loved her. she was a muse of andy warhol's. >> he was a constant -- did you feel that he was looking at you in a way no one else did? >> yeah. >> how would you define your own sexuality? >> that is such a complicated place. i have a lot of feelings around sex. i started feeling like i'm going to burn in hell i'm not supposed to be enjoying this and that makes me even more
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fighting against it. >> reporter: yet that sexuality helped fuel her career. ♪ she abandoned disco in the '80s and recorded six new albums. ♪ and took her boldness to the big screen. in 1985 jones played the first female bond villain in "a view to kill." >> someone will take care of you. >> and starred alongside hollywood's famously strong and funny men. >> stop that. stop it! >> reporter: did society catch up to grace jones? >> in pop culture, all of these women who are daring to push the envelope. >> i do but i want them to do it in an individual way.
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i just want them to dare themselves to do something different. >> reporter: shock sells now. >> shock always sells, you know? but shock in good taste. ♪ >> reporter: taste is relative. but at 67 shock is what keeps grace jones dancing. michelle miller, new york. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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you know the rules. eggs and sausage. hotcakes and butter. morning fare right? well mcdonald's has thrown away those rules and opened a new world of possibilities. now, you're free to start enjoying the breakfast you love any time you wish. no way. yes way.
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the biggest game in the nfl is being played off the field. three teams are all vying to move to los angeles. that's got fans in their current cities calling foul. john blackstone reports. >> reporter: in san diego -- >> it really is hard for us to hear when everybody is shouting. >> reporter: st. louis. >> i am a passionate football fan. >> reporter: and oakland. >> stay in oakland! >> reporter: football fans are voicing their anger and their sadness over proposals to move their respective football teams to los angeles. >> when i hear about the chargest moving i get emotional. >> reporter: does it make sense to put all of this emotion into a sports team? >> absolutely. >> reporter: in town halls, emotional fans who have invested
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in their hometown team for years, in some cases decades, foal a sense of betrayal. >> we will always love our team. please do not take it away from us. >> reporter: many contend team owners have made up their minds to move. and that these town halls are just for show. the league's point man on relocation disagrees. >> i think the fans can affect the outcome just as i think fans in the stadium can affect the outcome of a game. people think of it based on nuts and bolts and dollars and scents. but without the fans there's no game, without the game there's no business. >> reporter: for fans in san diego, one man in particular has come to represent calculated business interests over their consistent team loyalty. that's the chargers' special counsel, mark fabiani. >> he have to protect the future of the franchise. >> reporter: and if they decide to move, you're going to break
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the hearts oh after lot of fans. >> if you had an opportunity to move your business to move to a bigger market, why wouldn't you fight for that market? >> reporter: each team has troubles at home. the league wants upgraded cities but the cities don't want the tax burden that comes with them. los angeles is promising world class stadiums. all privately funded. >> there is among people an understandable concern about spending money on a sports facility when you have potholes in the streets and you have the police department underfunded. >> reporter: the nfl is expected to make a decision on relocation as early as january. the three cities say they want more time to score points with owners before the clock runs out. john blackstone san diego. >> that's "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you, the news continues. for others check back with us a little later.
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today, u.s. air strikes and kurdish troops pound isis in iraq, while at home, an alleged isis sympathizer is charged in a plot to murder u.s. service members. also tonight, a judge orders a baby removed because the foster parents are lesbians. tornadoes ripped through the midwest. >> seeing that we have nothing, it's scary. >> and, an army captain is awarded the medal of honor for an extraordinary act of heroism. >> i would turn that right back in, right now, and say, no thank you, bring my guys back. this is the "cbs overnight news" with scott pelley. this is our western edition. >> u.s. warplanes hammered the forces of isis in iraq today, opening an offensive that the pentagon hopes will be a breakthrough against the islamic
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extremists who are occupying much of syria and iraq. iraqi kurdish troops, backed by 36 american air strikes, moved to retake the town of sinjar, and they cut a highway that is used by isis to carry supplies from raqqa, its stronghold in syria, to mosul, the largest city that isis holds in iraq with more than a million residents. charlie d'agata is with the kurdish peshmerga forces. >> reporter: the battle to reclaim sinjar began in the air. u.s. air strikes pounded suspected isis targets throughout the day. thick smoke hung over the city as isis fighters lit banks of tires to try to block the bombers' visibility. dug in on the mountainside, kurdish peshmerga forces searched for targets, passing the coordinates to u.s. advisers. this is one of the forward fighting position where they're helping to pick targets for air strikes.
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soldiers here told us with aircraft overhead all the time, sometimes it's just five minutes from the moment they call it in, to the time it's delivered. kurdish fighters are so close to isis militants, they can hear their conversations on simple two-way radios. "there's an airplane in the air" the voice said. "stop, hide." sniper mazan maraq is watching.j. "they're inside houses," he told us. "they move from house to house. they're behind the rubble." maraq and his family fled sinjar when isis militants overran the city 15 months ago. tens of thousands were uprooted in the terror that followed as isis murdered, raped, and enslaved members of the yazidi sect. today, the 22-mile stretch of highway that kurdish forces took control of, breaks a key isis supply route from syria. but the fight is only starting. as the day wore on, kurdish
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soldiers spotted more isis militants on the move and scrambled into position. maraq says he hopes isis will be defeated and his family can return home. and when do you think you will liberate sinjar? "hopefully tonight," he said. this fight is going to go house to house, scott. and peshmerga soldiers told us they expect to face snipers, car bombs, and booby traps, not only roadside bombs, but inside buildings, as they push further into the city. >> charlie d'agata on the battlefield tonight. charlie, thank you. an ohio man accused of being an isis supporter was arrested today and charged with trying to recruit people to kill u.s. service members. jeff pegues is following this. jeff. >> reporter: scott, based on what investigators say terrance mcneil posted online, he was the type of troubled soul that they are concerned about, someone easily influenced by isis'
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social media propaganda. prosecutors say 25-year-old terrance mcneil, shown here in hospital scrubs, got the fbi's attention this year when he promoted what was essentially an isis hit list of members of the u.s. military. isis' so-called "hacking division" published the list, complete with photographs, names, and addresses. prosecutors say in late september, using his tumblr account, mcneil reblogged the list and tried to solicit others to kill the service members, "wherever you find them." his twitter account was suspended numerous times but he off opened another account using the words "lone wolf." we reached out to his attorney for comment but we have not heard back. >> jeff, thank you. in an extraordinary move tonight, the secretary of defense has fired his top military adviser, a three-star general, over allegations of misconduct.
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ash carter fired lieutenant general ron lewis, who before his pentagon assignment, had been an attack helicopter pilot in iraq and afghanistan. carter did not spell out the allegations, but he said the defense department is investigating. today, the university of missouri appointed an african american as interim president. michael middleton takes over for tim wolfe, who resigned on monday after students protested that he was insensitive to racial complaints. as other campuses joined the protest today, police are now investigating a threat at howard university in washington, d.c., and here's anna werner. >> reporter: additional officers were sent to checkpoints into and out of howard university this afternoon after a threat to students was found on social media. this comes after a 19-year-old student at the university of
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missouri was arrested this week, charged with making terroristic threats after he posted online he was going to shoot black students on campus. tensions are rising on campuses across the country after the student protests led to the president's resignation at mizzou. hundreds of students gathered today at syracuse and yale universities to stand in solidarity with those demonstrators. >> we stand with mizzou!! >> reporter: and just yesterday at ithaca college in upstate new york, students called for their school's president to step down due to a perceived lack of response to racial incidents. the department of education reports the number of racial complaints on college campuses has increased from 555 in 2009 to 939 last year. this video of racist chants by fraternity members of the university of oklahoma was widely reported last spring.
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but several students at yale told us the reason they're marching is what happens when there are no headlines. senior alicia ponce diaz. >> i definitely felt like there was no one to turn to, no one to talk to about it or nowhere to report it, which i think is one of the crucial problems that the university has. >> reporter: the young man arrested at the university of missouri for making those threats, scott, is facing up to seven years in prison. >> anna werner reporting. anna, thank you. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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the next democratic debate is saturday, and today, a new cbs news/"new york times" poll has hillary clinton far ahead of bernie sanders, 52% to 33%. nancy cordes is on the campaign trail. >> reporter: clinton's 19-point advantage really only tells part of the story. she leads among democratic women by 28 points, among older democrats by 41 points, and 76% of democratic voters says clinton has the best chance of winning next november compared to 18% for sanders. >> thank you, senator sanders. >> reporter: he excels, though, with younger voters. sanders has a six-point lead among democrats under 45, even though he's the oldest candidate in the race. and democratic primary voters, who consider themselves independents, favor sanders by 27 points.
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>> you are not going to continue to have it all. >> reporter: clinton is seen as better equipped to handle an international crisis and to deal with gun issues. sanders has a slight edge when it comes to closing the gap between the rich and the poor, but she's seen as stronger on the economy as a whole. >> we have to have an economy that works for everybody again. >> reporter: which republican would be hardest to beat next november? it was no contest. 31% of democratic voters said businessman donald trump, and he clearly feels the same way. >> you'll be happy to hear that head to head, i beat hillary very easily. isn't that nice? [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: democratic voters are also worried about marco rubio and ben carson but not nearly as worried as they are about trump. and, scott, our politics may be polarized but a full three- quarters of the democratic voters we spoke to said they want a candidate who will
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compromise with republicans in congress. >> nancy cordes tonight. nancy, thank you. john dickerson will moderate that democratic presidential debate on saturday night. that's at 9:00 here on cbs. twitter is one of our partners for this debate, and so we invite you to tweet us your questions for the candidates using the hashtag #demdebate. donald trump's plan to deport 11 million illegal immigrants could never pass congress, according to the new republican speaker of the house. in an interview for "60 minutes," paul ryan said he couldn't imagine how that plan could ever happen. ryan told us that he's been in touch with the president often since he became speaker two weeks ago, and while he opposes mr. obama on many issues, they have found common ground. >> i think you can walk and chew gum at the same time. i think you can oppose the president on some issue that you fundamentally disagree with, but also work with the other party on issues you do agree with. that's what i've been doing.
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look, if we can find common ground, we can on highways, we will on funding the government. hopefully we can on tax policy. those are three things that will produce certainty in this country in the next few months. let's go do that. >> there was a time on capitol hill when the other guy had a bad idea. and now on capitol hill, the other guy's a bad guy. >> yeah, i think that's right. >> how do you heel that animosity? it's your job now? >> leadership by example is the way i look at it. i have friends on the other side of the aisle. i have shown we can negotiate and compromise without compromising principle, that people with different ideas aren't bad people. they just have different ideas. somewhere in this we got into impugning people's character and motives if we didn't like their ideas. we've got to get back to just debating ideas and not impugning people's motives and character. >> sunday on "60 minutes" speaker ryan will tell us how he'd like to change taxes and social security, and his wife, janet, explains why she didn't
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want him to take the job. there was an outbreak of laser strikes on aircraft across the country overnight. laser pointers, sold at sporting goods stores, were aimed at planes and helicopters in 16 cities. here's kris van cleave. >> the laser was pointed at the pilot. >> reporter: three new york city news choppbeers tcametohe sry last night as they were targeted by people on the ground with dangerously bright green lasers. the news crews directed new york police to the location of one of the incidents and two people were taken into custody. the faa says more than 20 aircraft were hit with lasers last night flying over cities from new york to california, michigan to kentucky. in dallas, three pilots reported approach to land. last night is part of a record- setting surge of laser strikes on aircraft. as of the middle of october, pilots had reported more than 5,300 incidents.
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that's nearly a 40% increase over all of 2014. in los angeles, it's enough of a problem that the l.a. police department's air support division equips its 88 airborne officers with special protective glasses. >> it's incapacitating for a few moments. >> reporter: lapd pilot kevin cook has been hit at night while flying low over the city. >> you want to turn away from the light source. except when it illuminates the helicopter you can't turn away from the light source. >> reporter: no one was injured in last night's incident. and no accidents have ever been attributed to a laser strike. scott, it is a crime to shine a laser at an airplane punishable by a maximum of 20 years in prison. >> kris van cleave, kris, thanks. in utah tonight, a lesbian couple is fighting a judge's ruling to remove their foster baby. carter evans spoke with them. >> reporter: beckie pierce and april hoagland have just five days to hold on to the baby girl they've nurtured for months.
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>> knowing that, that's what we've done and it's been taken away from us is heartbreaking. >> reporter: the couple is legally married in utah and plan to adopt the child. but tuesday, according to lawyers present in the courtroom for utah child welfare agency, judge scott johansen ordered the couple to give up the baby for just one reason. >> he said he's seen studies that say children do worse in homosexual homes than in heterosexual homes. >> reporter: the judge wouldn't tell you what studies he was referring to? >> no, he told the lawyers to do their own research. >> reporter: hoagland and pierce say the judge also ignored pleas from the baby's biological mother to grant them custody. they believe the judge, a bishop in the mormon church, is imposing his religious beliefs over the law. >> this is all about sexual orientation, not what is best for the child. >> he has no other grounds but that. >> reporter: child and family services say the couple passed rigorous background checks and state law is on their side, according to director brent platt. >> any legally married couple in
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utah can become licensed as foster parents, same-sex couples, heterosexual couples. it's very simple, very straightforward. >> reporter: there's not much time. >> there's not much time at all. she's happy, she bonded and now you're going to take that away from her. she has to start over. >> reporter: the couple is appealing the judge's decision, and child and family services is still trying to determine if it's even legal. we wanted to speak directly with judge johansen but the court told us he is not permitted to talk about pending cases. >> carter evans in salt lake city. carter, thanks. did a mix-up by the maker of birth control pills lead to unwanted pregnancies? and a swarm of tornadoes leaves devastation when the "cbs news campaign update is sponsored by farmers insurance. on. wow mary, is like, every mom from the neighborhood here? look at them all... ...'judgie'. see? you are looking good! using bounce dryer sheets is paying off. your clothes have fewer wrinkles, and static cling... ...ain't bringing you down. oh! and look, it's that
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113 women in 28 states claim that they got pregnant even though they were on birth control, and in a lawsuit, they blame drug makers for mixing up their pills. here's michelle miller. >> reporter: qualitest pharmaceuticals and two other
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companies recalled eight different kinds of oral contraceptives. more than three million packets, after discovering that the rose rows of pills inside the box were placed upside down. women who did not notice the mistake would have taken a placebo during the week they should have been taking a hormone, increasing their risk for conception. 41 states allow women to sue for unwanted pregnancies. the case seeks millions of doll cases, the costs of raising children born from these alleged unplanned pregnancies to adulthood. cindy pearson is the head of the national women's health network. >> generations of women have trusted that when they pick up their packet of pills at the pharmacy that it's going to be put together in the right way and when companies mess up, they need to do the right thing. >> reporter: pearson says winning will be tough. it's difficult to prove the women got pregnant because of the mistake. qualitest says the number of affected packets was small.
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of the 500,000 packs returned in the recall, only 53 were improperly packaged in the reverse order. in an e-mail to cbs news, the company says it has only been able to confirm the sale of one defective pill pack to a patient. and there have already been multiple settlements for this packaging defect, scott. we spoke to several of the women who tell us that those unplanned births were life altering. >> michelle miller, thanks, michelle. there was a surprise verdict today in the so-called "goodfellas" mob trial, and we'll have that next.
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winds are howling across the great lakes tonight. thousand have lost power. gusts topping 60 miles an hour hit lake michigan today. the system unleashed a swarm of tornadoes yesterday, at least 11 of them reported in iowa. monroe county was hit hard but there were no serious injuries. an aging mobster was found not guilty today of helping plan the 1978 lufthansa heist in new york. it was retold in the movie "goodfellas." 80-year old vincent asaro said he was shocked. prosecutors who had asaro's cousin as a prime witness were just as stunned. on his worst day, an army captain summoned his best, a story of heroism next.
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an army captain stood tall as he choked back tears today when the president awarded him the country's highest honor. david martin introduced us. >> reporter: ever wonder what's going through a soldier's mind when he receives the medal of honor? >> it feels like something that you don't deserve. >> reporter: we asked army captain florent groberg. >> the army and the government and the president decided to award me this medal for the worst day of my life. >> reporter: so how does that feel? >> overwhelming, confusing, not exciting. >> reporter: on august 8, 2012, in afghanistan, groberg was in charge of protecting his brigade commander and a couple other vips as they made a short march to the provincial governor's compound. >> it's just one of those weird moments that you get in combat
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where as soon as you get on the ground, things just don't feel right. >> reporter: groberg would normally have been at the rear of a protective diamond around the vips. this time, he went to the front. >> i wanted to see where we were walking. i wanted to have eyes on. >> reporter: groberg spotted a man coming towards them from the left. >> he's a threat, and my only thing in the world i that's that specific moment is eliminate the threat, no matter what it takes. >> reporter: why don't you shoot him? >> you can't just start shooting anyone. didn't see a weapon on him. you know, i can't pick up my rifle and shoot him. >> reporter: so groberg, followed by sergeant andrew mahoney, rushed him. >> i dropped my rifle, grabbed him, and realized that at this point, he's got plates on his chest. >> reporter: a suicide bomber. groberg and mahoney threw him to the ground. >> when he blew up, his chest first blew up into the ground and took the impact, which is probably the reason why i'm here talking to you here today.
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>> reporter: and why so many other soldiers who were there were in the audience today. but moments later, a second suicide bomber hiding inside a nearby building detonated his vest, and between them, the bombers killed four men, which made it the worst day of groberg's life. >> this medal that i will be receiving, i'd-- i'd turn it right back in right now, say no thank you. bring my guys back right here. >> reporter: that's what it feels like to be a war hero. david martin, cbs news, washington. and that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you, the news continues. for others check back with us just a little later for the morning news. of course, "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley. this is the "cbs overnight news."
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welcome to the "overnight news." the islamic state is claiming responsibility for a pair of suicide bombings in the heart of beirut. the target -- a shiite neighborhood that's a stronghold for the militant group hezbollah. the bombers detonated their explosives at the height of rush hour. the blast killed about four dozen people and wounded hundreds. hezbollah has been battling the islamic state in syria. sends troops to fight alongside the army of bashar al assad. this isn't the first time isis has struck back at hezbollah inside lebanon. and the u.s. stepped up air strikes against the islamic state in iraq. warplanes are supporting kurdish troops trying to recapture the strategic town of sinjar. charlie d'agata is on the ground with kurdish forces. >> reporter: good morning. some of what you see is smoke rising from a series of the latest air strikes targeting isis militants around the city of sinjar. we've lost count of the number of air strikes this morning and overnight that have been
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launched in that vicinity. they've also been firing artillery into the city. this is all part of a major offensive to retake sinjar.ku peshmerga forces are closing in on three sides of the city, trying to push isis out. one of the reasons it sits between the two isis strongholds of raqqa in syria and mosul in iraq, so they're trying to cut off supply routes between those two cities, but it's not going to be easy. kurdish peshmerga forces said they fear snipers. now the city may be rife with booby traps, home made bombs beneath the roads and inside buildings. and there's always the concern of suicide bombers. if not on foot, then traveling in vehicles packed with explosives. the latest cbs news, "new york times" poll shows hillary clinton maintaining her commanding lead over bernie sanders heading into saturday's
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presidential debate in iowa. 52% of likely primary voters support clinton. 33% support sanders. 5% like martin o'malley. nancy cordes reports from drake university in des moines where cbs news will be hosting saturday's debate. >> reporter: good morning. our poll finds that clinton supporters are more likely to say they have made up their minds, so she'll walk on this stage saturday night as the undisputed front-runner. her republican opponents are locked in a serious debate over immigration after tangling over that issue in their debate tuesday night. >> we're going to have a deportation force. and you're going to do it humanely. >> reporter: donald trump doubled down wednesday on his vow to deport all 11 million undocumented immigrants. in iowa, jeb bush said that would overwhelm the u.s. judicial system. >> i think there's a better approach, a practical approach a conservative approach that solves this and does it in a way that doesn't cost an arm and a leg and respects american values. >> reporter: clinton chimed in
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on twitter, calling trump's plan absurd, inhumane and un-american. >> we are a country of laws. >> reporter: it's a touchy issue for a party worried about a repeat of 2012 when mitt romney's milder proposal turned off hispanic voters. >> the answer is self-deportation. people decide they can do better by going home. >> reporter: when they weren't debating tuesday, republicans were talking about hillary clinton. in an online video, her campaign mocked them for mentioning her more than a middle class in a debate focused on the economy. we just learned that bernie sanders has won the endorsement of the postal workers union, the largest union to back him so far. and interestingly, charlie, in our new poll, he leads among democratic voters under the age of 45. he's got 46 points to clinton's 40. "face the nation" host john
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dickerson will host the debate saturday night at 9:00 right here on cbs. federal investigators in akron, ohio are digging through the wreckage of a plane crash that left nine people dead. they still don't know what caused the jet to drop from the sky right outside of akron. don dahler is there. >> reporter: video shows the jet skimming the tree line and then crashing, sparking a massive fire and destroying up to four homes. >> it was very rainy, foggy, overcast. power lines on the ground. >> reporter: on wednesday, investigators examined the charred rubble. >> the left wing hit the ground first and left a witness mark. then the aircraft hit half of an apartment building, destroying it before running up an embankment, behind the building and coming to rest. >> reporter: officials confirm all nine people on board the jet, including both pilots, were killed. denny lukowicz is the ceo of the
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charter company that operated the plane. >> they were very well seasoned pilots, both of them. >> reporter: the seven passengers on the jet worked for a family run property development company in boca raton. the group was in their second day of a multi city business trip. a message hung on the door of their office on monday. our hearts are broken, it said. investigators talked to a pilot who landed at the pilot before the accident. he was on the same radio frequency as the hawker 700 and said he did not hear any distress calls. the ntsb expects to be on site a total of four or five days. newly released videos are sparking outrage in virginia where a man died after being tased repiecedly by police. jeff pegues reports. >> reporter: this confrontation was caught on a police cruiser and hospital surveillance cameras in south boston, virginia. police picked up 46-year-old linwood lambert, jr., for
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causing a disturbance at a hotel. tom sweeney is the lambert family lawyer. >> they placed him in handcuffs. they did not put him under arrest. he was not charged with any crime. >> reporter: the officers brought him to halifax regional hospital for medical evaluation. but when they arrived, lambert kicked out the window and bolted toward the emergency room doors. three officers responded by tasing lambert multiple times. >> while he was on the ground, he was repeatedly tased again and placed in shackles on his legs. >> reporter: lambert was then placed under arrest, charged with disorderly conduct and destruction of property. >> instead of being brought into the emergency room, they put him back into the police cruiser. >> reporter: an officer tased lambert again as he sat in the ba ck seat of the police car and warned he wasn't done.
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>> it appears he's no longer responsive and they drove him back to the jail. >> he ain't moved since we left. >> reporter: an ambulance then transported him from the jail back to the hospital where he was pronounced dead. an autopsy said the cause of death was acute cocaine intoxication. lambert's sister has filed a $25 million civil lawsuit against the officers the chief of police, the deputy chief of police, and the town of south boston. >> to see what had happened to him was just devastating. >> reporter: her lawyer says the amount of cocaine in lambert's body was low, and the actual cause of death is now clear. >> i think it's obvious on the videotape that here's a man who was tased repeatedly. it's going to have him have a cardiac arrest. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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the view doesn't get much better than this. lee cowan went for a ride with a photographer who captures new heights every time he reaches for his camera. ♪ ♪ >> reporter: at first glance, his images look more like circuit boards. nerve centers surging with energy. but while these are hubs of activity, they're not in our computers. these are the world's great cities, photographed the way the heavens see them. sparkling spectacles below. >> you're feeling the arteries, the blood flow of the city. you literally perceive the depth and the three dimensionality of the earth in a different way, and you see distances in a different manner. they look much smaller, much more within reach.
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>> reporter: vincent laforet has taken aerial photography to new heights. his images have transformed l.a. freeways. a glittering strip of sin city and made london's big ben look nor like a big jewel. >> it was almost an out of body experience, because it's just so beautiful from up there. >> reporter: and just a few of his god-like glimpses that he's publishing in a new book. fittingly called "air." >> since i was 13 years old, like everyone else, i look out of the windows of the commercial aircraft and i'm fascinated. i see every little intersection, the police cars, the stadiums and you wonder what's going on. you can see this incredible do activity. >> reporter: vince spends a lot of time in helicopters but not the way you might expect. he just doesn't hover a few hundred feet above as you do with most choppers. vince asks his pilots to take him up to 9,000, 10,000, 11,000
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feet and higher, altitudes helicopters rarely fly. >> some veteran helicopter pilots refuse to go up there. they're just not comfortable. the first time i went up, it was scary, because i had never been that high, with an open window or door in a harness leaning out and you see planes going out underneath you. your heart skips a beat. >> reporter: so he asked us to join him in a recent flight over the city of miami. how could we resist? >> best seat in the house. >> reporter: we took off just before sunset and headed east toward miami beach. with a brief spot hovering over a couple in a pool. >> what the heck are you really looking for? >> i'm looking down there trying to make order out of chaos. i'm looking for patterns beyond the street color and light. >> reporter: what is it like when you're leaning out over the edge of the chopper?
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>> you forgot about it after a while. you're so focused on getting that image. >> ever think about the fall? >> the only time i thought about it is that high altitude over new york. >> reporter: that's when a physicist says a fall from that high up could last a terrifying 41 seconds. >> i was like, thanks for telling me. now i know. >> too long. >> way too long. >> reporter: once it got dark, we started going higher. helicopters can be like flying blenders. they vibrate wildly and vince has to hold the camera steady shooting at low shutter speeds often as the chopper goes into steep banking turns. >> beautiful. >> reporter: the hot florida air
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got cool and crisp, as we climbed even more. until we were about 8,000 feet. nothing between us and downtown miami except air. >> as a photographer, as an official communicator, you try to get images no one has seen before. that's your goal rngs and -- and that's a pretty tall order in 2015 when everyone has a camera on their phone. >> reporter: he's used to breaking ground, although he's usually on the ground to do it. back in 2008, he was one of the first to shoot video on a 35 millimeter digital camera. his mini movie called "reverie" is something few had ever seen. certainly not from what most could consider a still camera. but that's just him. ever since he was a child, something about the visual just clicked. >> when i was 15, i asked my father, who was a photographer, can i borrow your camera? i picked it up, i took a picture and i was done. >> reporter: he was rarely without a camera after that.
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and he soon became the youngest staff photographer efficient hired by "the new york times." >> i would always say i want to find something that people can't see or don't want to see. >> reporter: he once scaled the antenna on the empire state building, just to get a shot like this. >> this is about 1475 feet up. >> reporter: in the days after the attacks of 9/11, he was dispatched to pakistan, much to his surprise. >> i was not a war photographer. >> reporter: you didn't want to be on the front lines? >> no. when the bullets fly, i hit the ground and stay down. >> reporter: but staying down turned out had been his secret, capturing not so much the war but the victims of it. >> these were real people, just as afraid as people back in the states. >> reporter: he shared the pulitzer prize for feature photography that year. he was only 27. >> that and katrina are the two stories that formed me as a journalist. when you see what happened in
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new orleans to americans, you know, in our country, that really shakes your foundation up pretty seriously. >> reporter: so seriously, that laforet needed a change. he quit his job as a photo journalist and decided to pull away for a while. now you're doing something where there aren't people or perhaps emotions in your pictures anymore. >> there's something very odd that happens when you go up in the air. it's kind of intimate. i can't explain it. >> reporter: vincent laforet has always pushed the envelope. but for him, it's not about being a daredevil. it's about finding and capturing what we often lose on the ground. a sense of peace and perspective. >> i think when you take a step back from anything, you see the things more clearly. and in a visual way, i think "air" is a representation of that, to take some distance from the street level view and you see we're all in this together.
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>> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. well, things in the bedroom have always been pretty good. yeah, no complaints. we've always had a lot of fun, but i wanted to try something new. and i'm into that. so we're using k-y love. it's a pleasure gel that magnifies both of our sensations. right, i mean, for both of us, just... yeah, it just takes all those awesome feelings you usually feel and it just makes them... rawr... dare to feel more
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with new k-y love. i take prilosec otc each morning for my frequent heartburn because you can't beat zero heartburn! ahhh the sweet taste of victory! prilosec otc. one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. curing a yeast infection can take days. relieving the itch... can happen instantly. vagisil max strength anti-itch wipes relieve itch and odor instantly as they cleanse. so why wait to feel comfortable? trust vagisil. the number one wipe for itch. i'm lucky to get through a shift without a disaster. my bargain detergent couldn't keep up. so i switched to tide pods. they're super concentrated so i get a better clean.
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15% cleaning ingredients or 90%. don't pay for water, pay for clean. that's my tide. grace jones has made entertainment history in a career that's spanned more than 50 years. supermodel, actress, pop icon. now she's a writer, too. her book is called "i'll never write my memoirs" and she sat
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down for a chat with michelle miller. >> reporter: after being two hours late to our interview, it's hard to stay mad at grace jones. even when she won't answer your questions. do you realize most 67-year-olds don't look like this? >> i'm not 67. >> how old are you? >> i'm not telling you. my spirit is my spirit. you know, spirits just bounce around. >> bouncing and behaving? >> no, i ain't behaving. no. behaving is boring. >> reporter: that attitude made jones fascinating, frustrating and ultimately famous. never one to be shy, jones is detailing more than 50 years of sex, drugs, and disco. you said you were a great keeper of secrets. >> uh-huh. and i still am. >> reporter: even after writing this book?
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>> absolutely. >> reporter: beverly grace jones was born in jamaica. the child of conservative, religious parents. but when they moved to the u.s., jones was left in the care of her grandmother. and her boyfriend, who grace says was abusive. >> it's just a roller coaster ride of joy, seeing myself as a small child and being defined. >> reporter: by 18, jones moved to manhattan and tried modeling. but agencies weren't interested. so when they told you that you were too told, too skinny. >> your mouth is too big, your nose is too small. >> reporter: did you ever want to change yourself? >> god no. no way. i just had to change everybody else. >> reporter: in the '70s, jones moved to paris. european designers loved her chiselled features, physique,
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and exotic persona. when she returned to new york a few years later, disco was in full swing. her regular appearances at legendary dance club studio 54 were a mix of drug fueled antics and inspired productions. photographers loved her. she was a muse of andy warhol's. >> he was a constant prayful person. >> did you feel that he was looking at you in a way no one else did? >> yeah. >> how would you define your own sexuality? >> that is such a complicated place. i have a lot of feelings around sex. i started feeling like i'm going to burn in hell, i'm not supposed to be enjoying this, and that makes me even more fighting against it. >> reporter: yet that sexuality helped fuel her career. ♪ ♪
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she abandoned disco in the '80s and recorded six new albums. ♪ ♪ and took her boldness to the big screen. in 1985, jones played the first female bond villain in "a view to kill." >> someone will take care of you. >> and starred alongside hollywood's famously strong and funny men. >> what's the matter with you? stop that! stop it! >> did society catch up to grace jones? in pop culture, all of these women who are daring to push the envelope. >> i want them to do that. >> you do? >> i do, but i want them to do it in an individual way. i just want them to dare themselves to do something different.
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>> reporter: shock sells now. >> shock always sells, you know? but shock in good taste. ♪ ♪ >> reporter: taste is relative. but at 67, shock is what keeps grace jones dancing. michelle miller, new york. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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ould i get tested for colon ncer? i don't have any symptoms. [female announcer] of cancers affecting both men and women colorectal cancer is the 2nd leading cancer killer in the united states.
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and it doesn't always cause symptoms especially early on. but i'm only 53. i'm too young. [announcer] screening is recommended for men and women beginning at 50. but no one in my family had colon cancer. it doesn't run in my family. [announcer] most colorectal cancers occur in people with no family history of the disease. but. that test... [announcer] there are several kinds of screening tests for colorectal cancer... talk to your doctor about which one is right for you. i've been screened...and it turned out i had polyps. and the doctor removed them before they had a chance to turn into cancer! [announcer] no buts about it... this is one cancer you can prevent! if you're 50 or older, talk to your doctor and get screened for colorectal cancer. screening saves lives! ♪
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[female narrator] even if you're not planning on getting pregnant now, you should know that foods rich in folic acid like white bread and leafy greens can help prevent some birth defects before you even know you're pregnant.
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captioning funded by cbs
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. it's friday, november 13th, 2015. this is the "cbs morning news." the united states goes after one of the most on recognizable figures within isis. the executioner known as jihadi john is targeted in a u.s. air strike. donald trump unloads in a profanity laced speech in iowa the presidential contender has his sharpest words yet with ben carson, comparing his opponent to a child molester. a child custody case in utah. a judge takes a stand against a lesbian couple

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