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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  April 14, 2016 2:07am-3:59am EDT

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suburb injuring children who live there. the syrian government is determined to reconquer this whole area and consolidate the toll militarily. while it uses the election to strengthen its political hand going into a new round of peace talks in geneva. most of the people who turned out to vote today, scott, do support president assad. either because they have done all along or because they believe that after five years of war, he is better than any of the alternatives. >> elizabeth palmer in damascus. thank you, liz. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. ♪ ♪
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we have been telling you about lawmakers in state after state, passing bills to protect people who cite religious beliefs for refusing to serve or employ gay or transgender people. we wondered why so many of these laws including some that limit ak tess to public restrooms are surfacing right now. well dean reynolds found out. >> being transis not a crime. >> reporter: demonstrators against the so-called bathroom bills were out in force in south carolina chants echoing those in other states where they say legislatures have enacted laws allowing bigotry. while they protested, the conservative group that helped author many of those measures prti
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orientation was working at the orlando area office on new ways to uphold what it says is really at sta. >> it is only about being free to pursue your faith. we have no interest in discriminating against any one. >> reporter: the founder and chairman of liberty council which is affiliated attorneys in 50 states drafting bills advising lawmakers and defending clients in what they believe to be the great cultural clash of our time. >> you are a strong people! >> reporter: we met him when he defended clerk kim davis who said it was against her religion to hand out marriage licenses to same-sex couples lately liberty council has been helping draft legislation for conservative law makers in at least 20 states. >> there is certainly a threat of information that is similar and the same. they all have the same intent. that is to protect religious freedom. >> reporter: opponents say liberty's handy work actually protects those who for religious reasons decline to
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transgender people. their bills began cropping of in state legislatures soon after the supreme court legalized same-sex marriage last year. >> an objective observer could conclude that you want to push back against that ruling. >> well i certainly want to push back against the ruling. it was a wring ruling. has no basis in the constitution. >> reporter: he is unfazed by corporate threats to pull out of states in protest against his work. >> reporter: money talks, right? >> they're not going to follow through. >> reporter: it is a bluff? >> it is a bluff. they're not leaving. >> but now comes word that ringo star its the latest entertain r to cancel a concert in north carolina in protest. scott, the beatles' old drummer said he is sorry to disappoint his fans, but, we need to take a stand against this hatred. >> dean reynolds on the story for us tonight. dean, thank you. now in the presidentia
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front-runner donald trump hired veteran g.o.p. strategist rick wily to be his new national political director. trump is adding professionals to his team because he is being outmaneuvered for delegates. trump complained last night that the system is rigged. gop chairman, reince priebus responded the rules are the rules. six days before the primary in new york, hillary clinton picked up the endorsement of "the new york daily news." the latest poll today has her leading bernie sanders by ten points. sanders got his first endorsement from a senate colleague, jeff merkley of oregon. >> to tonight we are continuing our investigation into the epidemic of prescription painkiller addiction. ground zero is west virginia, where doctors write 138 prescriptions for every 100 people. seven doctors have lost their
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licenses since january. 15 more are being investigated. one of them sat down to explain his practice to jim axelrod. meet dr. michael kostenko. he has written 40,000 prescription for oxycodone in the last two years. how many patients do you have? >> at any given time, 800 to 1,000 active patients. >> reporter: what percentage of your patients get prescriptions for oxycodone? >> nearly 100%. >> reporter: according to court documents. dr. kostenko is one of west virginia's top ten prescribers of painkillers. did you write 325 prescriptions the first week of january for more than 19,000 oxycodone pills? >> possibly. >> reporter: you don't know how many prescriptions you wrote? >> it may well be. >> reporter: operating at the end of thisir
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unpaved, pot-hole filled two-mile logging road. >> some times it is hard to keep your eyes open. >> reporter: the doctor hosts group sessions at his coal country clinic seen here in videos he posts on you tube he explains his approach to treating disease and pain through changes indict and behavior. then bacteria and fungi particle are going to get through into the lymph areas. after filling out a medical self assessment, each patient pays $120 cash. as the the video shows the at the end of each class. they're then handed their prescription for pain meds. there are hardly ever private exams. >> there is very little we need to do in private in our office. >> reporter: you don't need to conduct a conversation, confidential about my use of pain medication? that wouldn't occur in private? >> everyone is on the same pain medication. >> reporter: in the last two years, three of do
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patients have died after overdosing on a kick tail of pills. including oxycodone prescribed by kostenko with pills prescribed by other physicians. are you in contact with their primary care physicians to coordinate care? >> no. >> reporter: don't you have an obligation to talk to the other doctors? to make sure that cocktail isn't fatal? >> if the conversation would be productive, absolutely. >> reporter: well the patient is dead. how could the conversation be any less productive than what happened? >> there should be better communication between all physicians dealing with these drugs. there just its not. >> reporter: the state has suspended dr. kostenko's license while they investigate the deaths and decide whether to revoke his license. the board of medicine's executive director. >> is it hard to got a doctor's license revoked or suspended in
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>> it is some what difficult, yes. with prescription drugs, physicians can prescribe them. they're legal. it's not like cocaine or heroin. >> did she get eight prescriptions? dr. kostenko didn't help his case when discussing a death with us, a woman being medicated by another physician, a doctor kostenko never consulted with. do you bear any responsibility for that death? >> yes, i do. >> reporter: as he explains it, dr. kostenko wishes the hospital where his patient was being treated reached out to him. he tells us he didn't know how bad her condition was. how to investigations have been opened into the overdose deaths of two other patients of dr. kostenko. >> remarkable interview. jim axelrod with the story tonight. jim, thank you. higher speed limits are killing thousand. and a chip in the brain gives a paralyzed man the use of his hands. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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according to a new study this week. we asked transportation correspondent kris van cleave to fill us in. montgomery county maryland police captain, thomas didone sees the danger of speed daily. >> speed is determining whether a crash is an injury or property damage. the faster someone is going the more likely that someone is going to get hurt. >> reporter: for didone it is personal. his 15-year-old son ryan died in a crash where the driver was going at least 20 miles over the limit. >> reporter: if he had been going the speed limit there is not a doubt in my mind every kid would have been home safe. >> reporter: speed limits across the country have been going up since the federal government repealed mandatory maximum of 55 in 1995. the insurance institute for highway safety found those increases have caused at least 33,000 deaths over a 20-year period. with every five miles the speed limit rose, deaths grew by 4%. on freeways, it jumped 8%. charles farmer, authored the
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study. >> for this few minutes that you are saving by going faster, you are increasing your risk quite a bit. there are people dying out there. >> reporter: but the national motorist association says speed limits work best when approximating the natural flow of traffic which hey be higher than posted limit. gary biller. >> fatality rates overall have dropped dramatically to the point in the last couple years they're the lowest on record. as states have continually been raising speed limits their safety statistics have actually gotten better. >> reporter: researchers estimate 1900 people lost their lives in 2013 because of the higher speed limits. that is all most as many lives as were saved by frontal airbags that year. scott, seven states have speed limits of 80 miles an hour or higher, in parts of texas the limit is 85. >> kris van cleave. thank you, kris. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪
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president obama met budding inventers at the white house science fair. he marvelled at a robotic vacuum built to pick up subway trash. works like a charm with ping-pong balls. he blew bubbles using a wand made by a 3-d printer. the operator, 9-year-old jacob leggette got a fist bump from the fan in chief. and a break through in treating paralysis. ian burkehart paralyzed below his shoulders is now able to play video games, swipe a credit card, and play the guitar. researchers at ohio state implanted a chip in his brain that transmitts his thoughts directly to his hand muscles. bypassing his damaged
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we end with the voice of heaven. vin scully, the longest serving broadcaster for a single team in history. last night he began his final season with the dodgers and carter evans was there. >> it's time for dodger baseball! >> reporter: over nearly seven decade, vin scully called some of baseball's most famous moments, including hank air run's historic home run. it broke babe ruth's record. and sandy koufax's pitching gem. >> a perfect game. >> reporter: now 88 years old, scully called every dodger season since 1950 w
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was still dodging trolleys in brooklyn. jackie robinson was hinz prime. and harry truman was in the white house. he has called more than 9,000 games. >> he's hit another one. sportscaster al michaels. >> he is remarkable in so many ways. how many people can you say in their late 80s are at the top of their game? >> reporter: earlier this week the road leading to dodger stadium was renamed. vin scully avenue. >> some one asked me the other day what would you miss the most when you leave the job? and i thought a moment, and i said "the roar of the crowd." that's what i'm going to miss the most. >> reporter: these days those cheers are more scully. >> maybe on the final day of my final broadcast, i will somehow come up with the magic words that you deserve. as for now, i have only two c
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>> reporter: no, say scully's fans, thank you. carter evans, cbs news, los angeles. and that's the "cbs overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
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this is the "overnight news" welcome to the "overnight news" i'm michelle miller. a federal assault on the zika virus will likely have to wait until the fall. house republicans say they will not vote on president obama's request for $2 billion to fight the virus until they return from their summer recess. instead, congress forced the administration to divert $600 million in unspent ebola fund. zika is usually transmitted by mosquitoes. it is especially dangerous for pregnant women often infecting the unborn child. dr. jon lapook has the latest. >> reporter: working on zika for the last y
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catchup. >> it was thought it was benign virus that wouldn't cause any significant harm to human disease. and it turns out it causes all kinds of problems that we never imagined. >> reporter: the problems in newborns include microcephaly, abnormally small brain at birth, and damage to nerve tissue in the eye. but there is emerging evidence of neurological problems in adults too. including inflammation of the brain and guillain-barre syndrome, a form of paralysis. and a week ago, a case of a 15-year-old girl with inflammation of the spinal cord. these new reports of rare complications are surprising researchers. after a study of zika infected patients in brazil, the author concluded there is strong evidence that this epidemic has different neurological manifestations than those referred to in the existing literature. cdc deputy director says
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learn why the virus may be so dangerous. >> in animal studies of the zika virus it seems that the virus its attracted to nerve tissue or brain tissue. and so we worry that in humans that this -- this virus may destroy nerve tissue or attack brain cells. >> reporter: to keep this inner speck ti perspective most who get zika recover after a mild illness. dr. jon lapook, cbs news, new york. on the presidential campaign tra trail, the candidates are counting the days until tuesday's new york primary. hillary clinton and bernie sanders will hold a debate tonight in brooklyn. polls show clinton with a double digit lead in the empire state. for the republicans, donald trump continues to blast the gop establishment calling the delegate process corrupt. major garrett
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donald trump. he often tells voters if he is elected president he will bring an intensity and shrewdness about rules to cut better deals for the country. suddenly rules have become mysterious to trump, a source of frustration. so for the second day in a row he are ggued about delegate rul with the chairman of the party he hopes to some day lead. >> this was a dirty trick. >> reporter: donald trump continued unloading on the republican establishment tuesday. this time taking direct aim at the rnc chairman. reince p rich. ebus should be ashamed of himself in an interview. he should be ashamed of himself he knows what is going on. >> reporter: priebus stayed above the fray, but fired back last night on twitter. nomination process known for a year. complaints now. give us all a break. trump is hoping come of plants about party rules will fire up his loyal supporters. >> the party is playing dirty. and we got to show our republican party you have been disenfran choose itted,
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>> you are saying you don't think the rnc wants you to get the nomination? >> no, i don't think so. i really don't. >> ted cruz's campaign outorganized trump for stray delegates. perhaps representative of trump's ground game his children eric and ivanka missed the dead lo . >> new york has one of the most onerous rules. >> it was our first for ray into politics. >> house speaker paul ryan tried to injecte somclarity into the imagined chaos of a contested convention. saying he will not accept the nomination. >> i simply believe that if you want to be the nominee for our party, to be the president, you should actually run for it. i chose the not to do this. therefore, i should not be considered period end of story. >> reporter: cruz won the lukewarm semiendorsement of former riva
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marco rubio. rubio said he hopes the convention in july nominates a conservative. he said cruz is the only conservative left. the summer travel season is fast approaching. there are growing concerns about the long lines at airport security check points. at some itairports it can take longer to get through security. the people who runt air ports are blaming the tsa. kris van cleave has the story from reagan national. major concern from airlines, airports and fly ears but what the summer travel season will look like based on what they saw during the spring break rush. it cause made your backups from airports from carolina to california. and now mounting calls for the tsa to fix the problem now. extremely strong tsa lines and wait times hitting up to 90 minutes caused spring break chaos. american airlines says in just one week last month, nearly 6,800 passengers missed their flights because of those
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lines. at seattle tacoma international airport, setac, the waits stretched over an hour. the director announced hiring of private contractors to help with administrative duties freeing up tsa to focus solely on screening as the airport explorz dropping the agency altogether. >> we are going to investigate what it would take to privatize, looking at other air ports that have been, that have privatized. 22 u.s. airports including san francisco and kansas city international use private firms for security screening. nationally the number of transportation security administration screeners is down 15% since 2011. and the agency has been taking fire from congress. >> we have a problem. >> major airports tell cbs news they have seen their security wait times swell. lines at phoenix sky are bar can be 45 minutes or longer. in atlanta, minneapolis, st. pa paul, clock an hour before tsa inspects your carry-on. >> we have very high p
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>> tsa administrator -- >> i do have consaernz but long wait times. it gathers people up. inconvenience for the traveler no small problem it pose a potential problem with respects to large crowd of people. >> earlier this year the nation's busiest, atlanta hartfield jackson fed up with the tsa woefully understaffed said it is considering privatizing the security screening process. >> we are working very hard to dramatically improve our ability to move people through, shifting resources to, to the highest volume airports. front loading our, our hiring to those airports. train more people than we have ever trained before. >> reporter: so how did we get here? one the number of fliers has grown substantially over the last couple years. the tsa has shifted its focus to enhanced screening at checkpoint instead of efficiency of moving people through the lines. also the number of screeners is capped by congress. administrator neffinger says the agency is hiring as ft
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acknowledged he may have to go back to congress to ask for screeners. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. stronger when it's hydrated. that's why dove men+care bodywash has a unique hydrating formula to leave skin healthier and stronger.
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the obama administration has come in fire for its handling of the investigations into the 2008 financial crisis. the big banks who helped fuel the mortgage meltdown and pay billions in fines. only one bank official has ever seen the inside of a jail cell. contrast that to iceland, the great recession forced its three biggest banks out of business. and more than two dozen bankers ended up in prison. martha tichner reports. >> reporter: in iceland, a volcanic eruption of the political kind. angry protesters demanded the resignation of their prime minister when last week's sensational data leak r
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his millions of dollars of undisclosed holdings in iceland's three biggest banks which collapsed during the world financial meltdown in 2008. prime minister stepped aside. iceland is known for its volcanic eruptions. among its many exotic natural wonders. and now for something else, after the crash, it let its banks fail and put its bankers in jail. >> when the big three iceland banks collapsed, all three among the biggest bankruptcies in u.s. histories had they been u.s. companies. this man conducts walking tours explaining what went wrong when iceland's bankers and businessmen set out to turn a country of only 330,000 people into a world financial capital. >> these guys theyty
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themselves as corporate vikings. sort of laying claim to the mantel of the original vikings that settled iceland. the banks borrowed massive sums of money then loaned it out again at much higher rates of interest to entrepreneurs who like the ancient vikings plundered, buying up companies worldwide. money rolled in. and a nation of fishermen began believing in the so-called icelandic miracle. >> a lot of people seemed to be getting very rich, very fast. and ape lot of people wanted to join in on that. she is one of the members of parliament who decided on iceland's hard line response when this whole house of cards built on debt came tumbling down. >> even though the banks were also responsible as a whole, i think it was the convict, that also the individuals within the
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>> reporter: there were huge daily protests then too. it was called the pots and pans revolution. the entire economy was in free fall. inflation skyrocketed. unemployment more than quadrupled. and the big three banks were not too big to fail. they were too big to save. valued at 10 1/2 times iceland's gdp. >> why are the 99%. >> at the same time americans were angry too. in the united states more than 8 million jobs were lost. more than 5 million people lost their homes. but congress spent $700 billion in taxpayer monies to bail out the banks. and their executives kept right on collecting their high salaries and bonuses. exactly one u.s. bank went t
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jail. trader kareem saragelden. not so in iceland. oliver houksen was special prosecutor, a hefty budget and a mandate. >> the question here in iceland was, was criminality involved? and if there was criminality involved, there would be a, there should be a prosecution. outside his office, something not seen elsewhere. the country's top bankers facing charges of market manipulation and fraud. ambushed by media. how many bankers are in jail? >> between 20 and 30 have been -- gotten sentence thousands of jail. >> reporter: the former ceo of the bank will begin serving a five year prison sentence in the fall. >> reporter: his lawyer dismisses the
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political theater. >> kind of a witch-hunt. >> witch-hunt? >> yeah. >> people were angry. so you had to convert it to some sort of political solution. >> reporter: the bankers are sent to prison. no bars, but hours from anywhere. an icelandic journalist allowed in for an interview was told -- >> translator: we never did anything that wasn't in the interest of the bank or its clients. >> the worst thing was the broken trust. >> reporter: information security consultant was one of thousand of property owners who lost homes. >> and that's -- that's why nobody feels pity for the ba bankers in the jail. because they -- they cheated on us. you know they told us lies. they, they -- covered up.
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were paying for it. >> reporter: iceland's economy has recovered. and how it dealt with its banks and bankers has taken on a kind of neat mythical "they did it right" quality for many people. cascade platinum... powers... through... your toughest stuck-on food. so let your dishwasher be the dishwasher. see? told you it would work. cascade. ♪ everyone loves the way dark clothes make them feel. and no one wants that feeling to fade. that's why there's woolite darks. it's free of harsh ingredients, keeping dark clothes looking like new for 30 washes so your love for dark clothes will never fade. woolite darks.
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to their biological sex. a similar law in north carolina has sparked some businesses and musicians to boycott that state. the transformation in attitudes is also playing out in college sports. the harvard swim team is now the first division i men's team in the nation to include an openly transgender young man. lesley stahl has the story for "60 minutes." how different are you? if i met you a couple years ago and then saw you today? >> physically you would say, yeah, you may not recognize me. >> reporter: you look that different? >> i'd say, so, yeah. >> reporter: we'd say so too. this is what skylar baylar looked like in high school. from the outside, skylar appeared to be a young woman who had it all. outstanding grades in school. plus all-american times in the pool. an attractive combination to swim coaches from topnotch colleges. >> she was a very strong
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breaststroker. and those times were fast. >> reporter: harvard's women's coach traveled to d.c. to recruit skylar. >> reporter: first impressions? >> engaging. energetic. somebody i really thought would do well at harvard. >> reporter: harvard was skylar first choice. but this fairy tale had a little wrinkle. one that may have started before skylar even learned to swim. when you were a little girl were you a typical little girl? >> definitely not. >> reporter: 3, 4, 5. >> reporter: my parents dressed me in pink dresses, bow ties, i had a doll. i don't think i was typical. i would look to rip them off didn't want to wear the dresses. >> i'm not wearing a dress. >> reporter: gregor and terry baylar are skyla's parents. >> did people think skylar was a boy? >> they thought skylar preferred short hair.
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transgendered never occurred to them. though there were clues. in middle school, skylar's class had to make self portraits in the present and the future. she came home with this. it made no sense at the time. why the future meant becoming an old man with a mustache. and the confusion only worsened when puberty hit. and things like breasts began to appear. >> i was like that's not something i don't want. i don't know why. i know i don't want that. >> reporter: though it felt wrong, skylar saw no choice but to try to make it work as a girl with long hair and dresses. but, it backfired. she developed major eating disorders. >> bulimia, anorexia. >> both. >> reporter: both. >> it was serious. >> we fear ford his life. >> reporter: they postponed skylar's going to harvard and got her help at an eating disorders program. when she want to hear some transgender men speak at a local
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church, wham, everything started to make sense. awe thought was like, holy crap this is me. this is 100%, everything that they're saying that's me. i just melted down i started crying. sobbing. my dad was picking me up. he was coming to visit me. >> reporter: that very day. >> yeah, i walked out to him. sobbing. and he just hugged me. >> he came out -- you know in tears. and -- >> eventually. he said what is wrong, skylar. i said dad, i think i am transgender. >> reporter: how did you handle it? >> i hugged him. and he cried. and cried. >> it made me realize i wanted that so badly but i knew how hard it was going to be. and, it was look what about swimming? what about my body? what about surgery? what about the money? what about people? what are we going to say? my grandparents? my brother. everything at once? but i want this. i know i
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>> reporter: skylar's mental health improved quickly. there was still the matter of telling coach marosky her new women's swimmer would be coming to college as a man. >> reporter: so what was your reaction? >> i was surprised. but the real big question skylar had was can i still swim on your team? >> what did you think? did you think some one who identified as main could swim on the women's team. >> i thought logistically we might have some issues that we would have to work out. >> reporter: like ncaa rules. turns out ncaa has a policy that allows for athletes who identify as male, but were born female to compete on a women's team as long as they don't take male hormones. so, stephanie marosky said yes. skylar started making plans to live something of a double life. to be a man on harvard's campus the next fall, but a woman on harvard's swim team.
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meanwhile, skylar came out as transgender on facebook. and posted on instagram that he had so-called top surgery. a double mastectomy to remove the breasts he hadn't wanted. the whole situation started to worry coach marosky. i think stephanie was the first to realize that skylar's plan of being a woman in the water but a man outside was going to be totally detrimental to her psyche. >> when you enroll in college it is an opportunity to start over again. >> reporter: reinvent yourself. >> you can reinvent yourself. and i was -- struggling watching skylar, because he wanted to reinvent himself as skylar as a male, but was being held back by the athletic piece of it. >> reporter: she discuss herd concerns with her friend and colleague, harvard men's swim coach kevin turrell. >> kevin kind of looked at me and said, i don't, i agree with you. i don'in
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nfc, afc, offensive lineman, defensive tackles, quarterbacks and cornerbacks are all living united. to ensure the academic success of millions of kids in our communities. all the way to graduation day. but that won't happen without you. so take the pledge at unitedway.org. make a difference in the life of a child. suit up like your favorite nfl players, and become a volunteer reader, tutor or mentor with united way.
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there is a new high tech doorbell that allows you to see who is on your front stoop even if you are at work. chris martinez has a look. >> yes, fire department. >> reporter: false alarms. >> we're not home. we're down in florida. >> reporter: deliveries. >> should i place it on the hook? >> we are going to be out. >> reporter: stolen packages. attempted burglaries. and romantic serenades. ♪ ♪ all captured by rings video doorbell. >> what kind of damn doorbell is this. >> reporter: when visitors press the doorbell or set off the motion detector it send an alert to the homeowner smart phone. last year ring partnered with lapd as part of pilot to reduce
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doorbell, it tells me someone is at the door. there we are. robbie o'donnell is one of the program's participants. she and her husband are survivors of a violent 1980 home invasion. >> you can adjust the sensitivity to have a smaller radius or a narrower focus. >> reporter: how far is yours going out? >> going out to the sidewalk. 30 feet. and i can pull it back to as much as five feet. >> reporter: this is what robbie o'donnell sees when i ring her doorbell. a clear view of her front porch from her home. we can talk back and forth. los angeles police since the ring neighborhood program began they have seen an estimated 55% drop in crime. >> reporter: brings you into the home no matter where you are. since starting the company in 2012, jamie siminof received $100 million in funding, from investors like richard branson. devices powered by traditional electric wiring or battery but do require an
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connection. >> the biggest problem is if you have substandard internet it is hard to set up. >> you are seeing a lot of concerns about the internet of things. >> reporter: cnn anchorman, like all systems dependent on wi-fichlt there is room for error. >> biggest vulnerability, all of this technology, not everything is fully baked yet. you have to test all the hardware, software configurations. >> ring says abut half of all home robberies occur during the day when no one is there. >> i am a criminal coming to the house, the idea i am hearing a voice. >> motion detection goes off. why is there some one at my front door at 3:00. i can say to the person can i help you? they have noied where tie am. they leaf. hoping the mysterious voice that answers the door is enough. get lost or i'm calling the cops. to deter unwanted visitors home or away. chris mar teens, los angeles. >> that's the "cbs overnight news" for this thursday. for some the news nt
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for others check back with us a bit later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm michelle miller. shades of the cold war. russian war planes buzz a u.s. navy destroyer over and over. also tonight, zika virus, no longer just a suspect in birth defects. the cdc today confirmed it is the cause. cbs news investigates the role of doctors in the epidemic of painkiller abuse. >> what percentage of your patients get prescriptions for oxycodone? >> nearly 100%. and the man who talked his way into the baseball hall of fame. >> it's time for dodger baseball! >> announcer: this is the "overnight news".
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the cdc has confirmed what has long been suspected. zika virus does in fact cause severe birth defects. mosquitoes in the united states are soon likely to carry and spread the virus. this map shows the 27 states where the particular type of mosquito thrives. here's dr. jon lapook. >> reporter: the cdc said confirmation the zika virus causes microcephaly, is undeveloped brain at birth, is unprecedented. it is the first time in history a virus transmitted by mosquito bite has been found to cause birth defects. dr. sonja rasmussen -- with the cdc. >> what we are learning is they have a severe form of microcephaly often associated with problems in the brain seen on imaging on ct scans or mris. that make us really concerned. >> reporter: the cdc made determination on mounting evidence from many studies. images released to day by researchers in brazil where the
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virus is widespread shows severe brain damage in babies with microcephaly. the white areas are signs of calcium. felt to represent destruction, inflammation and scarring in tissues of the nervous system. the researchers said the damage was extremely severe, indicating poor prognosis for neurological function. obstetrician dr. jennifer wu with lenox hill hospital. >> this is not something that will go away and something they have to live with for the rest of their lives. >> reporter: researchers are just at the beginning of learning of the dangers of zika infection. >> typically we find out about the tip of the iceberg first. then we learn more. some times it takes years to learn the full spectrum. >> reporter: today's news reinforces the cdc recommendation for pregnant women to avoid travel to areas where zika virus is spreading and for their partners who have traveled there to abstain from sex or use latex condoms. scott, the latest guidelines are at cbsnews.com. >> we want to emphasize there have been no cases of mosquito-borne zika in the un s
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dr. jon lapook. thank you. russian president vladamir putin pitched a military brush back to the united states. over the past two days, his war planes buzzed a u.s. destroyer in the baltic sea in what the white house calls "a provocation." david martin at the pentagon on what is behind it. >> look at the guy to port. look at left one. >> reporter: coming so low and fast at first you can't make them out. >> below the deck. below the bridge wing. >> reporter: the russian planes carried no weapons under their wings, but they were flying what the commander of the "uss donald cook, "a sim late e simulated a profile. not once or twice, 31 times over two days. it started monday. the cook was preparing to conduct helicopter flight operations in the baltic sea in international waters 70 miles off the coast of the russian enclave. a pairru
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flew 20 close passes on the ship coming as close as 1,000 yards at altitude of 100 feet. ignoring radio calls from "the cook" and forcing the ship to cancel flight operations. on tuesday, a russian helicopter circled "the cook" seven times taking photographs. another pair of attack jets showed up and buzzed "the cook" 11 times this time coming within an estimated 30 feet of the ship and again ignoring attempts to contact them. the latest in a series of incidents over the past two years in which russian aircraft have challenged nato ships and planes. and the obama administration is planning to lodge a diplomatic prott. white house spokesman, josh earnest. >> we have seen a pattern on the part of the russians in undertaking these kinds of actions that they at least i think intend to be provocative. >> reporter: u.s. will file its protest. russia will have made its point. it resents american forces operating close to russian territory and intends to push back. scott.
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david, thank you. the russian fighters may have come out of the blue, but the tension has been rising for years. along the old borders of the soviet union. in 2014, russia took crimea from the ukraine which the u.s. supports. then the u.s. hit russia's weak economy with economic sanctions. and the obama administration moved tanks into the baltic states near today's incident. in syria, rush bombed rebels at u.s. supports. and recently the u.s. staged military maneuvers in latvia. the russian bombing campaign in syria has turned the tide for the syrian regime of bashar al assad who embroiled his country in a five-year civil war. well today, assad held elections ignoring u.s. demand that he step down. elizabeth palmer is in damascus. >> reporter: moran
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candidates vied for seats in syria's parliament. but none represented genuine opposition. so every vote was really an endorsement of president bashar al assad who along with his wife made a personal appearance today to cast his ballot. this election with its thousand of candidates. bam lot boxes and polling stations is a surreal exercise considering that syria is very much at war and the cease-fire that had held for just over a month is now collapsing. so to say this election is flawed is an understatement. there was no voting for the millions of syrian whose fled the country. or those who live in areas controlled by opposition groups. and none in the many active battle zones, some close to the center of the capital. and the fiercest fighting right now is a round aleppo where opposition activists say on the weekend.
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barrel bombs on a northern suburb injuring children who live there. the syrian government is determined to reconquer this whole area and consolidate the toll militarily. while it uses the election to strengthen its political hand going into a new round of peace talks in geneva. most of the people who turned out to vote today, scott, do support president assad. either because they have done all along or because they believe that after five years of war, he is better than any of the alternatives. >> elizabeth palmer in damascus. thank you, liz. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. ♪
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has been actually quite recently just a year ago when i met donna. because she was so motivated and ready to lose weight and to get healthier. well since i met sue and listened to her guidance i've lost about 80 pounds and i have been taken off almost all my medications. to me, i mean that's something to shout about. i just see the future getting better and better and better.
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♪ we have been telling you about lawmakers in state after state, passing bills to protect people who cite religious beliefs for refusing to serve or employ gay or transgender people. we wondered why so many of these laws including some that limit access to public restrooms surfacing right now. well dean reynolds found out. >> being trans is not a crime. >> reporter: demonstrators against the so-called bathroom bills were out in force in south carolina chants echoing those in other states where they say legislatures have enacted laws ab
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while they protested, the conservative group that helped author many of those measures protecting religion over sexual orientation was working at the orlando area office on new ways to uphold what it says is really at stake. >> it is only about being free to pursue your faith. we have no interest in discriminating against any one. >> reporter: the founder and chairman of liberty counsel, which is affiliated attorneys in 50 states drafting bills advising lawmakers and defending clients in what they believe to be the great cultural clash of our time. >> you are a strong people! >> reporter: we met him when he defended kentucky county clerk, kim davis, who said it was against her religion to hand out marriage licenses to same-sex couples lately liberty council has been helping draft legislation for conservative law makers in at least 20 states. >> there is certainly a threat of information that is similar and the same. they all have the same intent. that is to protect religious freedom.
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liberty's handy work actually protects those who for religious reasons decline to employ for serve gays, lesbians or transgender people. their bills began cropping of in state legislatures soon after the supreme court legalized same-sex marriage last year. >> an objective observer could conclude that you want to push back against that ruling. >> well i certainly want to push back against the ruling. it was a wrong ruling. has no basis in the constitution. >> reporter: he is unfazed by corporate threats to pull out of states in protest against his work. >> reporter: money talks, right? >> they're not going to follow through. >> reporter: it is a bluff? >> it is a bluff. they're not leaving. >> but now comes word that ringo star is the latest entertain r to cancel a concert in north carolina in protest. scott, the beatles' old drummer said he is sorry to disappoint his fans, but, we need to take a >> dean reynolds on the story for us tonight. dean, thank you.
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now in the presidential campaign today, republican front-runner donald trump hired veteran g.o.p. strategist rick wily to be his new national political director. trump is adding professionals to his team because he is being outmaneuvered for delegates. trump complained last night that the system is rigged. gop chairman, reince priebus responded the rules are the rules. six days before the primary in new york, hillary clinton picked up the endorsement of "the new york daily news." the latest poll today has her leading bernie sanders by ten points. sanders got his first endorsement from a senate colleague, jeff merkley of oregon. >> to tonight we are continuing our investigation into the epidemic of prescription painkiller addiction. ground zero is west virginia, where doctors write 138 prescriptions for every 100 people.
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seven doctors have lost their licenses since january. 15 more are being investigated. one of them sat down to explain his practice to jim axelrod. meet dr. michael kostenko. he has written 40,000 prescription for oxycodone in the last two years. how many patients do you have? >> at any given time, 800 to 1,000 active patients. >> reporter: what percentage of your patients get prescriptions for oxycodone? >> nearly 100%. >> reporter: according to court documents. dr. kostenko is one of west virginia's top ten prescribers of painkillers. did you write 325 prescriptions the first week of january for more than 19,000 oxycodone pills? >> possibly. >> reporter: you don't know how many prescriptions you wrote? >> it may well be. >> reporter: operating at the
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end of this narrow, unpaved, pot-hole filled two-mile logging road. >> some times it is hard to keep your eyes open. >> reporter: the doctor hosts group sessions at his coal country clinic seen here in videos he posts on you tube he explains his approach to treating disease and pain through changes indict and behavior. then bacteria and fungi particle are going to get through into the lymph areas. after filling out a medical self assessment, each patient pays $120 cash. as the the video shows the at the end of each class. they're then handed their prescription for pain meds. there are hardly ever private exams. >> there is very little we need to do in private in our office. >> reporter: you don't need to conduct a conversation,
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confidential about my use of pain medication? that wouldn't occur in private? >> everyone is on the same pain medication. >> reporter: in the last two years, three of doctor's patients have died after overdosing on a cocktail of pills. including oxycodone prescribed by kostenko with pills prescribed by other physicians. are you in contact with their primary care physicians to coordinate care? >> no. >> reporter: don't you have an obligation to talk to the other doctors? to make sure that cocktail isn't fatal? >> if the conversation would be productive, absolutely. >> reporter: well the patient is dead. how could the conversation be any less productive than what happened? >> there should be better communication between all physicians dealing with these drugs. there just its not. >> reporter: the state has suspended dr. kostenko's license while they investigate the deaths and decide whether to revoke his license. the board of medicine's executive director. >> is it hard to got a doctor's license revoked or suspended in west virginia?
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>> it is some what difficult, yes. with prescription drugs, physicians can prescribe them. they're legal. it's not like cocaine or heroin. >> did she get eight prescriptions? dr. kostenko didn't help his case when discussing a death with us, a woman being medicated by another physician, a doctor kostenko never consulted with. do you bear any responsibility for that death? >> yes, i do. >> reporter: as he explains it, dr. kostenko wishes the hospital where his patient was being treated reached out to him. he tells us he didn't know how bad her condition was. how to investigations have been opened into the overdose deaths of two other patients of dr. kostenko. >> remarkable interview. tonight.rod with the story jim, thank you. higher speed limits are killing thousand. and a chip in the brain gives a paralyzed man the use of his hands. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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so we got our new he washing machine but it took forever turns out it wasn't the machine, it was our detergent. so we switched to tide turbo clean. now we get way cleaner clothes way faster he turbo clean. 6x the cleaning power in 1/2 the time higher speed limits are
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killing thousand of americans according to a new study this week. we asked transportation correspondent kris van cleave to fill us in. montgomery county maryland police captain, thomas didone sees the danger of speed daily. >> speed is determining whether a crash is an injury or property damage. the faster someone is going the more likely that someone is going to get hurt. >> reporter: for didone it is personal. his 15-year-old son ryan died in a crash where the driver was going at least 20 miles over the limit. >> reporter: if he had been going the speed limit there is not a doubt in my mind every kid would have been home safe. >> reporter: speed limits across the country have been going up since the federal government repealed mandatory maximum of 55 in 1995. the insurance institute for highway safety found tho
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33,000 deaths over a 20-year period. with every five miles the speed limit rose, deaths grew by 4%. on freeways, it jumped 8%. charles farmer, authored the study. >> for this few minutes that you are saving by going faster, you are increasing your risk quite a bit. there are people dying out there. >> reporter: but the national motorist association says speed limits work best when approximating the natural flow of traffic which hey be higher than posted limit. gary biller. >> fatality rates overall have dropped dramatically to the point in the last couple years they're the lowest on record. as states have continually been raising speed limits their safety statistics have actually gotten better. >> reporter: researchers estimate 1900 people lost their lives in 2013 because of the higher speed limits. that is all most as many lives as were saved by frontal airbags that year. scott, seven states have speed limits of 80 miles an hour or higher, in parts of texas the limit is 85. >> kris van cleave. thank you, kris. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪
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president obama met budding inventers at the white house science fair. he marvelled at a robotic vacuum built to pick up subway trash. works like a charm with ping-pong balls. he blew bubbles using a wand made by a 3-d printer. the operator, 9-year-old jacob leggette got a fist bump from the science fan in chief. adult scientists showed off a breakthrough in treating paralysis. ian burkehart paralyzed below his shoulders is now able to play video games, swipe a credit card, and play the guitar. researchers at ohio state implanted a chip in his brain that transmits his thoughts. directly to his hand muscles. bypassing his damaged nerves. up next, he holds a record that may never be broken. >> a very pleasant good afternoon to you.
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we end with the voice of heaven. vin scully, the longest serving broadcaster for a single team in history. last night he began his final season with the dodgers and carter evans was there. >> it's time for dodger baseball! >> reporter: over nearly seven decade, vin scully called some of baseball's most famous moments including hank aaron's historic home run. it broke babe ruth's record. >> a black man is getting a standing ovation in the deep south. and sandy koufax's pitching gem. >> a perfect game. >> reporter: now 88 years old, scully called every dodger season since 1950 when the team was still dodging trolleys in brooklyn.
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jackie robinson was in his prime. and harry truman was in the white house. he has called more than 9,000 games. >> he's hit another one. sportscaster al michaels. >> he is remarkable in so many ways. how many people can you say in their late 80s are at the top of their game? >> reporter: earlier this week the road leading to dodger stadium was renamed. vin scully avenue. >> someone asked me the other day what would you miss the most when you leave the job? and i thought a moment, and i said "the roar of the crowd." that's what i'm going to miss the most. >> reporter: these days those cheers are more scully. >> maybe on the final day of my final broadcast, i will somehow come up with the magic words that you deserve. as for now, i have only two magic word. thank you. >> reporter: no, say scully's ,
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angeles. and that's the "cbs overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
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this is the "overnight news" welcome to the "overnight news" i'm michelle miller. a federal assault on the zika virus will likely have to wait until the fall. house republicans say they will not vote on president obama's request for $2 billion to fight the virus until they return from their summer recess. instead, congress forced the administration to divert $600 million in unspent ebola fund. zika is usually transmitted by mosquitoes. it is especially dangerous for pregnant women often infecting the unborn child. dr. jon lapook has the latest. >> reporter: working on zika for the last year has meant playing catchup. >> it was thought it was benign
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virus that wouldn't cause any significant harm to human disease. and it turns out it causes all kinds of problems that we never imagined. >> reporter: the problems in newborns include microcephaly, abnormally small brain at birth, and damage to nerve tissue in the eye. but there is emerging evidence of neurological problems in adults too. including inflammation of the brain and guillain-barre syndrome, a form of paralysis. and a week ago, a case of a 15-year-old girl with inflammation of the spinal cord. these new reports of rare complications are surprising researchers. after a study of zika infected patients in brazil, the author concluded there is strong evidence that this epidemic has different neurological manifestations than those referred to in the existing literature. cdc deputy director says researchers are just starting to learn why the virus may be so dangerous. >> in animal studies of thka
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its attracted to nerve tissue or brain tissue. and so we worry that in humans that this -- this virus may destroy nerve tissue or attack brain cells. >> reporter: to keep this inner perspective most who get zika recover after a mild illness. the focus remains on preventing pregnant women from getting infected. dr. jon lapook, cbs news, new york. on the presidential campaign trail, the candidates are counting the days until tuesday's new york primary. hillary clinton and bernie sanders will hold a debate tonight in brooklyn. polls show clinton with a double digit lead in the empire state. for the republicans, donald trump continues to blast the gop establishment calling the delegate process corrupt. major garrett reports.
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>> reporter: rules matter to donald trump. he often tells voters if he is elected president he will bring an intensity and shrewdness about rules to cut better deals for the country. suddenly rules have become mysterious to trump, a source of frustration. so for the second day in a row he argued about delegate rules with the chairman of the party he hopes to some day lead. >> this was a dirty trick. >> reporter: donald trump continued unloading on the republican establishment tuesday. this time taking direct aim at the rnc chairman. reince priebus should be ashamed of himself in an interview. he should be ashamed of himself he knows what is going on. >> reporter: priebus stayed above the fray, but fired back last night on twitter. nomination process known for a year. complaints now. give us all a break. trump is hoping come of plants about party rules will fire up his loyal supporters. >> the party is playing dirty. and we got to show our republican party you have been
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disenfranchised. everybody has. >> you are saying you don't think the rnc wants you to get the nomination? >> no, i don't think so. i really don't. >> ted cruz's campaign outorganized trump for stray delegates. perhaps representative of trump's ground game his children eric and ivanka missed the dead . >> new york has one of the most onerous rules. >> it was our first for ray into politics. >> house speaker paul ryan tried to inject some clarityo intthe imagined chaos of a contested convention. saying he will not accept the nomination. >> i simply believe that if you want to be the nominee for our party, to be the president, you should actually run for it. i chose the not to do this. therefore, i should not be considered period end of story. >> reporter: cruz won the lukewarm semiendorsement of former rival, senate colleague marco rubio. rubio said he hopes the
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conservative. he said cruz is the only conservative left. the summer travel season is fast approaching. there are growing concerns about the long lines at airport security check points. at some airports it can take longer to get through security. than it takes to fly to your destination. the people who run the airports are blaming the tsa. kris van cleave has the story from reagan national. major concern from airlines, airports and fliers about what the summer travel season will look like based on what they saw during the spring break rush. it caused major backups from airports from carolina to california. and now mounting calls for the tsa to fix the problem now. extremely strong tsa lines and wait times hitting up to 90 minutes caused spring break chaos. american airlines says in just one week last month, nearly 6,800 passengers missed their flights because of those long lines.
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at seattle tacoma international airport, setac, the waits stretched over an hour. the director announced hiring of private contractors to help with administrative duties freeing up tsa to focus solely on screening as the airport explores dropping the agency altogether. >> we are going to investigate what it would take to privatize, looking at other air ports that have been, that have privatized. 22 u.s. airports including san francisco and kansas city international use private firms for security screening. nationally the number of transportation security administration screeners is down 15% since 2011. and the agency has been taking fire from congress. >> we have a problem. >> major airports tell cbs news they have seen their security wait times swell. lines at phoenix sky harbor can be 45 minutes or longer. in atlanta, minneapolis, st. paul, clock an hour before tsa inspects your carry-on. >> we have very high passenger volumes. >> tsa administrator --
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peter neffinger. >> i do have concerns about long wait times. it gathers people up. it end up being an inconvenience for the traveler no small problem it pose a potential problem with respects stew large crowds of people. >> earlier this year the nation's busiest, alanta hartfield jackson fed up with the tsa woefully understaffed said it is considering privatizing the security screening process. >> we are working very hard to dramatically improve our ability to move people through, shifting resources to, to the highest volume airports. front loading our, our hiring to those airports. train more people than we have ever trained before. >> reporter: so how did we get here? one the number of fliers has grown substantially over the last couple years. the tsa has shifted its focus to enhanced screening at checkpoint instead of efficiency of moving people through the lines. also the number of screeners is capped by congress. administrator neffinger says the
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can for open positions but acknowledged he may have to go back to congress to ask for screeners. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. hehe feels nice this is very very smooth. i am not messing around it's soft. your antiperspirant should give you more... than just protection. try dove advanced care. for softer, smoother underarms. how are you doing?nne. hi, evelyn. i know it's been a difficult time since your mom passed away. yeah. i miss her a lot, but i'm okay. wow. that was fast. this is the check i've been waiting for. mom had a guaranteed acceptance life insurance policy through the colonial penn program, and this will really help with the cost of her final expenses. is it affordable? it costs less than 35 cents a day-- that's pretty affordable, huh? that's less than the cost of a postage stamp. so, you said it was guaranteed acceptance? yes. it's for people ages 50 to 85. there's no medical exam or health questions. you can't be turned down because of your health. it fit right into mom's budget
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the obama administration has come in fire for its handling of the investigations into the 2008 financial crisis. the big banks who helped fuel the mortgage meltdown and pay billions in fines. only one bank official has ever seen the inside of a jail cell. contrast that to iceland, the great recession forced its three biggest banks out of business. and more than two dozen bankers ended up in prison. martha tichner reports. >> reporter: in iceland, a volcanic eruption of the political kind. angry protesters demanded the resignation of their prime minister when last week's sensational data leak revealed
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his millions of dollars of undisclosed holdings in iceland's three biggest banks which collapsed during the world financial meltdown in 2008. prime minister stepped aside. iceland is known for its volcanic eruptions. among its many exotic natural wonders. and now for something else, after the crash, it let its banks fail and put its bankers in jail. >> when the big three iceland banks collapsed, all three among the biggest bankruptcies in u.s. histories had they been u.s. companies. this man conducts walking tours explaining what went wrong when iceland's bankers and businessmen set out to turn a
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country of only 330,000 people into a world financial capital. >> these guys they styled themselves as corporate vikings. sort of laying claim to the mantel of the original vikings that settled iceland. the banks borrowed massive sums of money then loaned it out again at much higher rates of interest to entrepreneurs who like the ancient vikings plundered, buying up companies worldwide. money rolled in. and a nation of fishermen began believing in the so-called icelandic miracle. >> a lot of people seemed to be getting very rich, very fast. and ape lot of people wanted to join in on that. she is one of the members of parliament who decided on iceland's hard line response when this whole house of cards built on debt came tumbling down. >> even though the banks were also responsible as a whole, i think it was the convict, that also the individuals within the
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>> reporter: there were huge daily protests then too. it was called the pots and pans revolution. the entire economy was in free fall. inflation skyrocketed. unemployment more than quadrupled. and the big three banks were not too big to fail. they were too big to save. valued at 10 1/2 times iceland's gdp. >> why are the 99%. >> at the same time americans were angry too. in the united states more than 8 million jobs were lost. more than 5 million people lost their homes. but congress spent $700 billion in taxpayer monies to bail out the banks. and their executives kept right on collecting their high salaries and bonuses. exactly one u.s. bank went to jail.
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trader kareem saragelden. not so in iceland. oliver houksen was special prosecutor, a hefty budget and a mandate. >> the question here in iceland was, was criminality involved? and if there was criminality involved, there would be a, there should be a prosecution. outside his office, something not seen elsewhere. the country's top bankers facing charges of market manipulation and fraud. ambushed by media. how many bankers are in jail? >> between 20 and 30 have been -- gotten sentence thousands of jail. >> reporter: the former ceo of the bank will begin serving a five year prison sentence in the fall. >> this was a part of show. >> reporter: his lawyer dismisses the prosecution's as
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political theater. >> kind of a witch-hunt. >> witch-hunt? >> yeah. >> people were angry. so you had to convert it to some sort of political solution. >> reporter: the bankers are sent to prison. no bars, but hours from anywhere. an icelandic journalist allowed in for an interview was told -- >> translator: we never did anything that wasn't in the interest of the bank or its clients. >> the worst thing was the broken trust. >> reporter: information security consultant was one of thousand of property owners who lost homes. >> and that's -- that's why nobody feels pity for the bankers in the jail. because they -- they cheated on us. you know they told us lies. they, they -- covered up. and, and we were the one that
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were paying for it. >> reporter: iceland's economy has recovered. and how it dealt with its banks and bankers has taken on a kind of neat mythical "they did it right" quality for many people. in south carolina, the state . forever. let's be clear. clearasil works fast. how can this have been washed 1like springtime...in paris. unstopables in-wash scent boosters. the more you pour the more scent you'll savor. toss into your wash before your clothes for luxurious scent for up to 12 weeks. and introducing unstopables fabric conditioner by downy giving your laundry a bold, captivating scent with luxury you can feel. for long-lasting scent, just pair with your in-wash scent booster. unstopables by downy. the ultimate in long lasting scent. thope to see you again soon..
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keep those darks from fading... there's woolite darks. it's free of harsh ingredients, keeping dark clothes looking like new for 30 washes so your love for dark clothes will never fade. woolite darks. in south carolina, the state legislature is considering a bill to force transgender people to use restrooms corresponding
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a similar law in north carolina has sparked some businesses and musicians to boycott that state. the transformation in attitudes is also playing out in college sports. the harvard swim team is now the first division i men's team in the nation to include an openly transgender young man. lesley stahl has the story for "60 minutes." how different are you? if i met you a couple years ago and then saw you today? >> physically you would say, yeah, you may not recognize me. >> reporter: you look that different? >> i'd say, so, yeah. >> reporter: we'd say so too. this is what skylar baylar looked like in high school. from the outside, skylar appeared to be a young woman who had it all. outstanding grades in school. plus all-american times in the pool.
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swim coaches from topnotch colleges. >> she was a very strong breaststroker. and those times were fast. >> reporter: harvard's women's coach traveled to d.c. to recruit skylar. >> reporter: first impressions? >> engaging. energetic. somebody i really thought would do well at harvard. >> reporter: harvard was skylar first choice. but this fairy tale had a little wrinkle. one that may have started before skylar even learned to swim. when you were a little girl were you a typical little girl? >> definitely not. >> reporter: 3, 4, 5. >> reporter: my parents dressed me in pink dresses, bow ties, i had a doll. i don't think i was typical. i would look to rip them off didn't want to wear the dresses. >> i'm not wearing a dress. >> reporter: gregor and terry baylar are skyla's parents. >> did people think skylar was a boy? >> they thought skylar preferred short hair. that their daughter may be transgendered never occurred to them. though there were clues.
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in middle school, skylar's class had to make self portraits in the present and the future. she came home with this. it made no sense at the time. why the future meant becoming an old man with a mustache. and the confusion only worsened when puberty hit. and things like breasts began to appear. >> i was like that's not something i don't want. i don't know why. i know i don't want that. >> reporter: though it felt wrong, skylar saw no choice but to try to make it work as a girl with long hair and dresses. but, it backfired. she developed major eating disorders. >> bulimia, anorexia. >> both. >> reporter: both. >> it was serious. >> we fear ford his life. >> reporter: they postponed skyl g
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got her help at an eating disorders program. when she want to hear some transgender men speak at a local church, wham, everything started to make sense. awe thought was like, holy crap this is me. this is 100%, everything that they're saying that's me. i just melted down i started crying. sobbing. my dad was picking me up. he was coming to visit me. >> reporter: that very day. >> yeah, i walked out to him. sobbing. and he just hugged me. >> he came out -- you know in tears. and -- >> eventually. he said what is wrong, skylar. i said dad, i think i am transgender. >> reporter: how did you handle it? >> i hugged him. and he cried. and cried. >> it made me realize i wanted that so badly but i knew how hard it was going to be. and, it was look what about swimming? what about my body? what about surgery? what about the money? what about people?
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my grandparents? my brother. everything at once? but i want this. i know i want this. >> reporter: skylar's mental health improved quickly. there was still the matter of telling coach marosky her new women's swimmer would be coming to college as a man. >> reporter: so what was your reaction? >> i was surprised. but the real big question skylar had was can i still swim on your team? >> what did you think? did you think some one who identified as main could swim on the women's team. >> i thought logistically we might have some issues that we would have to work out. >> reporter: like ncaa rules. turns out ncaa has a policy that allows for athletes who identify as male, but were born female to compete on a women's team as long as they don't take male hormones. so, stephanie marosky said yes. skylar started making plans to live something of a double life. to be a man on harvard's campus the next fall, but a woman on harvard's swim team. meanwhile, skylar came out as
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and posted on instagram that he had so-called top surgery. a double mastectomy to remove the breasts he hadn't wanted. the whole situation started to worry coach marosky. i think stephanie was the first to realize that skylar's plan of being a woman in the water but a man outside was going to be totally detrimental to her psyche. >> when you enroll in college it is an opportunity to start over again. >> reporter: reinvent yourself. >> you can reinvent yourself. and i was -- struggling watching skylar, because he wanted to reinvent himself as skylar as a male, but was being held back by the athletic piece of it. >> reporter: she discuss herd concerns with her friend and colleague, harvard men's swim coach kevin turrell. >> kevin kind of looked at me and said, i don't, i agree with you. i don't think that you can have
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a dual identity. why doesn't he swim for my team? ♪
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p?p?o?gv captioning funded by cbs it's thursday, april 14th, 2016. this is the "cbs morning news." are are the race. the race for the white house heats up in new york. the democrats talk tough ahead of tonight's defeat and john kasich picks you an endorsement but could fall on deaf ears. without a doubt, the zika virus causes severe birth defects and now the race is on to determine who is at risk and when. a medical breakthrough when a quadriplegic moves his hand with the power o

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