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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  May 3, 2016 2:07am-3:59am EDT

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some occupied parliament, demanding an end to corruption. they left on sunday, but they warned they would be back. iraq has had trouble forming a ruling cabinet, and remains in crisis. today, secretary of state john kerry warned that syria's civil war is out of control despite a recent cease-fire. anis is video from poalep. ed th man that you see was the city's last pediatrician. seconds later his hospital was wiped out by a missile fired by the assad dictatorship. 50 people killed including the doctor. toe dictatorship is attempting encircle the rebels in aleppo. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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often a celebration - like these guys here. but if you or someone you love has a food allergy, you may feel anxious about dining out. great job, coach! that's why our friends at food allergy research and education want to spread the word that you can have a safe and enjoyable dining experience. you just need a game plan! and you can find one online at safefare.org. visit safefare.org to learn more - and remember. we're all on the same team! a public service mes fsagerom food allergy research and education. ♪ [female narrator] even if you're not planning on getting pregnant now, you should know that foods rich in folic acid like white bread and leafy greens
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birth defects before you even know you're pregnant. zika virus may spread further in the united states than first thought. the virus which causes crippling birth defects was known to be carried by a mosquito mostly limited to the south. now zika has been discovered in a second species that ranges as far north as maine and minnesota. it is important to remember there have been no cases of mosquito-borne zika in the u.s. health officials believe that time is coming. more now from dr. jon lapook. >> reporter: it was cloudy and cool in connecticut today, but phil armstrong was thinking about warm weather and mosquitoes. he head up mosquito surveillance for state of connecticut. the
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the main species that carries zika could extend into connecticut this summer. armstrong is more concerned about another species, aedes albopictus, also known as the asian tiger mosquito. about two weeks ago, for the first time during the current outbreak, the virus was found in albopictus in mexico. that species is very common in connecticut. >> in the last five years the numbers of aedes albopictus has increased substantially. and the numbers are still relatively low compared to other mosquitoes we have in the state. but the trend are, that, that number, mosquito is increasing. >> reporter: armstrong says mosquito season in connecticut ramps up in june. >> the way it attracts -- >> reporter: when special traps will catch aedes albopictus and his lab will begin testing for zika. but with more than 50 species of mosquitoes in the state, armstrong will not be taking any chances. >>
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all 50 of them, testing them for zika virus. >> reporter: the fact that armstrong plans to test more than 50 species of mosquitoes for zika. health officials want to identify any mosquitoes carrying zika as soon as possible and hit them with full-scale eradication efforts. >> doctor, thank you. when prince died last week he left behind a fortune from all of his hit record plus a vault of unreleased music. but, there was no will at least according to his sister. today family members put in their claims and anna werner is following this. >> reporter: prince's sister, tyka nelson and four of his five half siblings appeared in court to agree on who would manage the future of prince's assets. attorney frank wheaton represents half brother alfred jackson. >> all attorneys met with the judge in his private chambers to
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and we were all quite pleased. ♪ she's got the long >> reporter: prince died of unknown causes at his paisley park compound april 21. his assets including music catalog are said to be worth more than $500 million. if no will is found, minnesota law would govern how it should be divided. says cbs legal analyst rikki klieman. that would be expensive. >> minnesota has a 16% tax rate on estates. the federal government is approximately 40%. so, you are dealing with the heirs getting less than 50%. >> reporter: under minnesota law, half siblings and full siblings are treated the same. all six would divide the potential multimillion dollar pot. unless rumors of prince possibly having a child turn out to be true. >> reporter: the whole idea that there may bea child out there could turn a very
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court proceeding into a circus. and there is the question of what is in prince's vault. reported to hold a valuable collection of unreleased music. potentially worth tens of millions of dollars. a firm that looks for heirs told us it has had hundreds of calls from people who claim to be prince's relatives. but they're only really looking at one. a man in his 30s who claims to be prince's son. if that were true and he were to inherit, scott, the siblings would get nothing. >> tangled up. anna werner, thank you very much. first daughter, malia obama graduates from high school next month. she is going to harvard where her parents attended law school. but she is taking a break from her studies first, a gap year is a popular plan for many who want to travel or those who need to earn money for tuition. here is jan crawford. >> reporter: she spent nearly half her life as first daughter. before she head off to
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malia obama is taking a break from the classroom. a so-called gap year. it is an increasingly common move for high school seniors. not just those like malia graduating from elite washington prep schools. >> made a lot of sense for me to come here and hit the ground running. >> reporter: joe palekas worked in a coffee shop to help pay for a gap year in morocco where he studied arabic before enrolling at american university. >> i figured out generally what i wanted to do. and it, just gave me a whole new perspective. >> reporter: last year, 33,000 high school seniors took a gap year. nearly double the number from 2011. most students focus on special project or travel or enroll in structured programs like one overseen by corolla weil. >> you don't take a gap year program because you are not qualified for college. this is not a remedial program. it is tough. it is demanding. >> reporter: the obamas haven't
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her year. in an interview with affiliate wkrc, the president sounded like any other dad reflecting on how hard it is to say good-bye. >> i'm going to miss her terribly. but -- she is well prepared. she is going to do great things. and -- you know, as michelle remind us, our job is to make sure they don't need us anymore. >> reporter: now there could be a simple reason that malia is taking a gap year. scott, this is what it lookedm like when chelsea clinton enrolled at stanford in 1997. when her father was still president. but by nexty, of course, the obamas will be out of the white house and somewhat out of the spotlight. >> jan crawford for us tonight. jan, thank you very much. two years after disaster struck, a group of americans return to everest. and some big cats finally taste freedom. the cbs overnight news will be right back. ♪ ♪ dishes.
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climbing mt. everest is one of the world's most dangerous challenges of course. there was an avalanche two years ago and earthquake last year. but some americans just cannot stay away. and don dahler has their story. >> reporter: on the treacherous ice fault, enormous crevices can open and close without warning triggering avalanches
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deadly than the avalanche two years ago that killed 16 and injured dozens. mount near garrett madison and his team are back on everest for the first time since that terrible day. but the memory still lingers. >> how many cash all tees there are now over? >> didn't have a cash all tee count. we're working on live body. >> we heard on the radio what happened. couldn't communicate with some of our climbers. we knew we lost teammates. >> a sherpa with a head injury and internal breathing. they're going to keep him there. >> reporter: among the missing one of madison's most trusted sherpas, the nepalese local whose know the mountain best. madison and his team kept searching until they recovered his body. the number of climbers this year is down by 40%. madison is glad to be back in business. and this year, he has chosen a different route to the summit. longer, but safer. >> i would say, we are a little bit more
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and we avoid the ice fall on the west shoulder. the route goes to the center, right side to avoid that hanging ice. >> the sherpa team is very strong. so no problem this year. >> reporter: madison's sherpas are equipped with radio beacons and higher pay part of the reforms for local guides since the avalanche. >> we are looking forward to having a great expedition, getting everybody safely, back with all fingers and toes. don dahler, cbs news, new york. and when we come back, why are these fans delirious? how about an upset for the ages.
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we have new video of the derailment of a csx freight train. look way over on the left side of screen. yesterday.derailed in washingto- 16 cars came off the tracks including one that spilled about 750 gallons of a caustic chemical. a false start caused a huge pileup at a bike race in brooklyn, new york. a motorcycle leading the way
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off on saturday. one of them captured the mayhem on his camera. at least seven people were hurt. none of them seriously. the first cruise ship to sail directly from the united states to cuba in nearly 40 years arrived in havana today. it was greeted by dozens of cubans, some of them driving vintage cars that hit the road before u.s. relations with the communist nation were frozen in 1961. more than 600 americans made the voyage from miami. if ever there was a david vs. goliath story in sports, we saw it tonight in lester, england where a huge celebration is under way after the team clinched their fst title in the top soccer league. leicester began the year as a 5,000:1 outside chance. as unlikely as a minor league baseball team winning the world
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series. freed from their cages, former c
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the king of beasts isn't meant for a cage. tonight, deborah patta has the the story of lions rescued from circuses and returned to their native land. >> reporter: a feeble cry that its the sound of a lifetime of abuse at the hand of circus trainers. this is one of 33 lions rescued by animal activists, jan creama and tim phillips from a cruel caged existence. for two years they raided circuses often going undercover to track down the lions many of whom had fractured teeth, limbs,
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>> to get him out of the circus is one miracle. to get him all the way hem to africa is incredible. he really its the one that escaped the death sentence. >> reporter: the journey to africa has been a grueling one. in the largest air lift of its kind, the lions were transported on especially equipped planes from peru to south africa. then it was another six hour drive. and finally, when the sun rose high in the sky, the lions leapt into the dawn of their new life in africa. >> it's very good. >> reporter: from years of living in circus cages, now, freedom. >> he hasz4 walked out into africa. it is amazing. this is his first experience of -- of grass, trees, bushes. he has never walked in the open air like this. >> reporter: they delighted in rolling in the sand, marking their territory.
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>> yes, yes. she likes him. >> reporter: eventually they will be moved into larger areas where they can run more freely. for jan creama, a bittersweet victory. >> he can't go back into the wild, he has no claws, he can't feed himself. but this is the closest we can get him. >> reporter: for the first time, these old warriors can walk purely for pleasure and not to entertain. deborah patta, cbs news, big cat sanctuary, south africa. that's the "cbs overnight news" for this tuesday morning. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and of course, "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
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hi, everyone, welcome to the "cbs overnight news." i'm demarco morgan. the race for the white house runs through indian inn today. the hoosier state primary is a pivotal moment for republicans. a commanding victory for donald trump would all but assure his path to the nomination. indiana is considered the last best chance for trump's rivals to knock him off course. here's major garrett. >> while trump and cruz slug it out in indiana, campaigns compete ford delegate and gop gatherings in several states. for the first time trump forces beat cruz challenges in massachusetts, delaware and arkansas. a sign that trump's figuring out the rules that he used to scorn. >> reporter: so i am competing against the two guys though the
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it's ridiculous. i don't know what we are doing. >> reporter: campaigning across indi dana,d onaltrump tried to bury ted cruz and all but end the race for the gop nomination. >> ted, lying ted. cruz is so hated. he has such a rotten personality. he was born in canada, folks. >> reporter: john kasich stopped campaigning in indiana, per the awkward pact between him and cruz. the deal apares to have come unclued. even it held, 60% of indiana voters opposed the alliance. to consolidate the anti-trump vote in indiana and elsewhere. >> our country is at the edge of a cliff. this is not a typical election. we risk losing everything. >> reporter: cruz must win indiana and claim most of its 57 delegates to slow trump's momentum and give his campaign a spark. on face the nation, cruz picked up on rubio's failed attempt that trump is a con artist. >> dontr
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perpetuate one of the greatest fraud in the history of modern elections. which is he is trying to convince people he is some sort of outsider. trump's convention manager, paul manifort bit back. >> ted cruz has been part of the mess in washington, ted cruz is the one who has no friend in washington and won't be able to do anything. manifort refused to say if trump would put lobbyists out of business or diminish influence if trump became president, and wouldn't rule out raising money to fund gop committees in the general election. democrats vote in indiana today. front-runner hillary clinton looking ahead to the general election. challenger, bernie sanders is not throwing in the towel just yet. here is nancy cordes. >> hillary clinton had been dipping her toe in the general election pool. last night. warning a win for trump would spell victory for what she called the voices of hatred in this country. >> we cannot let barack a'
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legacy fall into donald trump's hands. at an naacp dinner in detroit, clinton told thousand of african-americans that trump was stoking racial tension and violence. >> the leading republican contender is the man who led the insidious birther movement to discredit the president's citizenship. >> reporter: on cnn, clinton described trump's rhetoric as an insult fest and said she planned to ignore some of his more inflammatory comments about her. >> i have a lot of experience dealing with men who sometimes get off the reservation. >> that is a very demeaning remark to men. in my opinion. >> some in the native american community also took offense at her use of the term off the reservation. clinton's national political director, tweeted an apology saying language has no
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our politics. he insisted sunday he could still win the nomination. >> the convention will be a contested contest. >> on face the nation he urged superdelegates to reconsider their support for clinton. >> our argument is take a look at which candidate is better suited to beat donald trump. every poll that i have seen, national, and statewide, says that bernie sanders is the stronger candidate. >> president obama hinted at the long odds for sanders at the white house correspondents dinner. >> next year this time, someone else will be standing here in this very spot. and it's any one's guess who she will be. >> the president did joke that at 74, sanders is the hip new thing in washington. while clinton seems more like your aunt hillary trying to use facebook for the first time. clinton played along tweeting yesterday, nice
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president. aunt hillary approves. >> first daughter, malia obama announced over the weekend she will attend harvard university. first she is taking some time off. here's jan crawford. >> i don't think it is a huge surprise, malia will be going to the same college her parents attended. a little surprising she will be taking a year off. won't be starting right away in the fall. now everyone is wondering how she is going to spend it. malia obama has spent nearly half her life as first daughter. now she is preparing for a new role, college freshman. but before heading to harvard, the obama's oldest daughter will wait and take a gap year. >> it gives her a little space between being malia obama the first daughter and malia obama the former first daughter. "washington post" columnist says a year off will give the 17-year-old an academic break. >> sidwell friends, the school, that
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tough school. a lot of kids are taking gap years to dial it back. >> reporter: when malia attends harvard, she will be the 23rd presidential child to study at the prestigious university. included john quincy adams, franklin roosevelt jr. and caroline kennedy. president bush's twin daughters were already in college when he took office. jenna at university of texas at austin. barbara at yale. chelsea clinton who attended the same washington high school as malia chose stanford. >> she is a hard worker. >> reporter: the first family openly talked about malia's future, seemingly aren't quite ready to let her go. >> i was asked if i could speak at her graduation, i said absolutely not. because i am going to be sitting there, with dark glasses, sobbing. >> now that malia's college plans are set, the focus turns to her gap year. >> she is not just going to be putting around the house with iom and dad and bo and sunny.
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absolutely be doing something enriching. but that is not necessarily so academically rigorous. >> now, harvard actually encourages students to take that year off to travel, or pursue a special project or work. and about 100 admitted student do so every year. and even though the obamas, they're going to have to say good-bye to malia in the next year or so, sasha will still be at home. she will be a sophomore in high school in the fall. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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new apps and web sites are changing the way we do a lot of things, like shopping, travel and communication to name a few. now technology is chalen bing traditional aspects of the financial world. lesley stahl takes a closer look in a story for "60 minutes." >> which one of you dropped out of harvard? >> that was me. >> which one of you dropped out of mit. >> by elimination. the other one. >> brothers patrick and john collison quit college because they had an idea for modernizing the financial industry they thought needed a shaking up. >> in a world where people can send a facebook message or upload an instagram photo have
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i think the fact that that doesn't work for money is something that seems kind of increasingly unacceptable to people. the question for banks can they get their first in providing services or will it be somebody new. >> reporter: they want to be the some body new. john, 25, and patrick, 27, first noticed the problem when they were in high school in a dot of a town in ireland. >> you were coders? >> we both learned to program growing up. we had been building iphone apps and web services. when they wanted to charge people to buy the apps they hit a snag. they had to go to the bank and file paperwork just to be able to collect the money. >> like really sort of, kind of like getting a mortgage. you have to convince them that you were worth supporting. >> look a mortgage it would have to be approved. >> take weeks for this approval process to happen. just seemed sort of this crazy mismatch. >> reporter: they decided to do someth a
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allows businesses to cut through all of that bureaucracy and instantly accept payments online from countries across the globe. we visited their startup stripe in the mission district, the heart of san francisco's tech scene. where patrick showed me how fast a business could set up a money collection system using stripe. >> street me up. >> reporter: pretend i left 60 minutes to create an on line business. >> what do you want to sell? >> degree food. home made. in five minutes after a few clicks and cut and paste of their code. >> copy it. >> reporter: he said my company would be ready to receive payment for home made dog food online right then and there. >> doesn't need to take any longer. this is, how it should work. >> reporter: this is what would take weeks and weeks and weeks and forms and forms and forms and verification. >> going to the bank branch. waiting for paperwork to be mailed back.
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>> reporter: they developed software for buy buttons, letting companies accept payments online fast and in new ways. stripe charges sellers a small percentage for every transaction. >> reporter: does the buyer pay anything? >> nothing. >> reporter: nothing. their goal is to make money as easy to send as e-mail. for everyone, anywhere, on any device. >> we want to free businesses from just selling via credit card to people who hold bank accounts and enable to purchase on line, what they use, bank account or no. >> reporter: this needed the smartphone. it need this move to mobile? >> for sure. >> reporter: stripe is hardly alone in inventing financial technology or fin-tech, a revolution brewing with thousand of these come pans trying to make banking faster, and cheaper, and increasingly mobile. >> many of the innovative services in financial technology that have come along inhe
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ten years are, are not coming from banks. >> reporter: but by and large the newcomers are not challenging the core function of banks, taking deposits. even the startups themselves park the money they handle at fdic insured banks. >> i think there will be a need for some where to store your money to have if the sit. we think, for all of their flaws they have a lot of experience at being banks right? >> reporter: fin-tech is targeting nearly all the other functions of banking. startups are peeling off one profitable service after another. typically offering them for less. it's called unbundling the banks. say you need a loan? fin-tech sites match borrowers and lenders directly the way uber connects passengers with drivers. need financial planning. algorithms are replacing human advisers and brokers. apps like venmo let people click money to each other similar to
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across borders. >> sending $500. >> reporter: the ceo of a company, transferwise showed us how his app can send money abroad and convert currencies, say dollars into pounds, without bank tellers and high exchange rates. users just swap with each other. >> reporter: a couple clicks and boom. >> click click, done. >> reporter: do you think the big banks today see fintech startups as barbarians at the lake. >> a lot of curiosity. >> reporter: fear? >> there can be. >> reporter: the former ceo of banking giant citigroup says it is the all too familiar tale of david and goliath. >> lot of what you are seeing in fintech, uber, air b & b. you have seen the impact of technology on travel. >> reporter: yeah, travel agents, were thrown out of business. that's what i saw. its that what fin-tech is doing to banking? >> i
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banks are thinking about it. they're trying to understand what all of this new technology can mean? >> reporter: it couldn't mean trouble with millenials willing to ditch brand name companies for new apps on their phone. >> the banks have not realized how different this generation is. >> max lefchin, co-founded paypal and early invest in stripe. cites a survey. 70% of young adults would rather go to the dentist than bank. >> day they don't have problem putting their social security number into a web forum but a problem going up to a teller in a bank and feg yerg out what you are supposed to do. this is so inefficient. why am in this stodgy, outdated room. >> not just about technology. there is also a question of trust. millen ya ee millenials, their formative experience is the financial crisis. they're the one whose really don't trust the banks?
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banks serve their own interest more than those of their consumers. >> reporter: you are criticizing a system basically that you helped create? >> well there is no question the crisis demonstrated the system didn't work. and when you looked at the aftermath of the crisis what needed to be done you had to make sure banks got back to the basics of banking and that they had to address the truster to. >> reporter: in the meantime, fin-tech started taking root. in the last year and a half, investors have poured $20 billion into the sector including this banking insider whose personally invested in a dozen fin-tech startups. he says that beyond making banking more convenient, the co companies can offer options to lower income families that can't afford to bank at banks. 10 million american households don't have a bank account. i have read it is more expensive for a poor
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banking system as it exist s thn for a wealthy person. how is that possible? >> there are bank account fees on your checking accounts. there are commissions. exchange rates. all adds up. >> reporter: that doesn't happen with the new companies? >> the new companies, they're transparent. and they tell you what the fees are. and they are fraction of some of the fees charged by banks. >> to watch the full report go to cbsnews.com and click on 60 minutes. we'll be right back. these pants always smelled like yoga-aroma. i'd wash them, and it'd be back before i even got to class. finally, i discovered the new tide and downy odor defense collection.
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an american missionary who spent two years in a north korean prison is telling his story. kenneth bey writes about his imprisonment in the secretive country in "not forgotten" and spoke with margaret brennan. they called you prisoner 103? >> it is still stuck in my head. i feel like i am carrying this badge of 103 in my chest forever. >> reporter: before he was taken prisoner, korean born kenneth bae was a preacher and missionary and grew up in a tight-knit family in
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and started a tourism business bringing christian groups to north korea. he made a mistake. in 2012 he brought in a computer hard drive with prayers and pictures of starving north korean children. >> they said you attempt to overthrow the government through prayer and worship. and they really took the prayer as a weapon against them. >> reporter: any criticism of the regime is forbidden. supreme leader kim jung-unand his family consider themselves gods. he was arrested, charged with espionage and sentenced to 15 years hard labor. >> one of the prosecutors told me that i was the worst most dangerous american criminal they ever apprehended since the korean war. and i say, why? and they said because you, not only you came to do mission work on your own, you asked others to join. >> reporter: bae's fate in the hands of a young, brutal dictator, scorned by the u.s. for carryiut
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underground nuclear tests. tensions with the u.s. spiked. you were a political pawn? you believe? >> i believe so. >> reporter: you write about the trial. all of america really was on trial with me. >> yes. >> reporter: what did you moon by that? >> i believe that they blame everything wrong with their country to america. they say the reason for poverty, the reason for their suffering is all caused by u.s. foreign policy against them. and therefore, by indicting me, they're indicting the u.s. >> reporter: he spent two years under 24-hour watch by 30 north korean guards. the conditions were dire. he shoveled coal and worked the fields. he lost 50 pound and was briefly hospitalized. >> i'm looking in a mirror in the bathroom every day. and say -- remember your missionary, this is where you are here for. i took it as a --
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or -- or a suffering. >> you are in a labor camp? >> yes. >> reporter: you thought that was a blessing? >> it was very hard to, for me to say that right now. but no one likes suffering. no one will embrace suffering. but with suffering come to you you have to face it. >> reporter: kim jung-un, issued a pardon in 2014 after the white house sent james clapper to pick up bae and a prisoner. bae said he had never been so proud to be american. >> i was just overwhelmed that -- that after being there for 735 days i was finally going home. >> reporter: bae says he is not angry about his imprisonment. he believes it was an opportunity to share his faith and teach his guard what life is look outside of north korea. >> i was there to love the people. let people know that god care about them and the rest of the world care about them. i hope that this book becomes a
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a group of lions are enjoying freedom for the first time after years of abuse. rescued from circuses in colombia and peru and air lifted to a sanctuary in south africa. >> the lions arrived here over the weekend and they have been quarantined in the small enclosures where they will spend at least the next six months before being reunited in bigger groups. this feeble cry far from a lion's roar, is a sound of a lifetime spent abused at the hand of circus trainers in peru. they head up the los angeles based group. animal defenders
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rescued 30 lions and lionesses and organized for them to be air lifted back into their natural habitat. >> the biggest flight of lions i know. also huge to bring them home to africa as well. and it's not just symbolic. it is important to show people that -- that -- animals belong where nature intended. >> reporter: the lions have lived a cruel, caged existence. often starved, beaten, and abused. >> to get them out of the circus is one miracle. to get them all the way him to africa is incredible. >> but the journey back from hell has been a krulg one. nine of the lions traveled four days in kralcrates from colombi where they were joined by 24 in lima, peru. once they touched down in south africa, it was another six-hour drive to the big cat sanctuary.
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the lions take their first steps on to african soil. it's very good. >> from years of living in circus cages to this. their first taste of freedom. the first time they feel grass. the first time they rub against a tree. the first time they roar purely for pleasure and not to entertain. he's walked out into africa. it is amazing. >> reporter: these lions will never hunt. they have missing claws or fractured teeth. but at least the brave old warriors will live the rest of their natural days in a land that should have been their home. >> that's the "cbs overnight news" for this tuesday morning. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the brougas
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rcdemao morgan. a great american city broken to the core. schools closed. water shut off to thousands. also tonight, cruz fights on, but trump eyes a knockout. >> if we win indiana, it's over. >> the zika forecast, the virus may be carried farther north than first thought. and, after a journey out of hell, these lions are rescued from the circus and back in africa. >> it's very good. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." detroit has been breaking down before our eyes. fundamental systems are failing. monday, most of its students could not go tho
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for thousands. dean reynolds tells us why. >> reporter: thousand of detroit teachers walked off their jobs in a wage dispute forcing 94 out of 97 city schools to close leaving more than 47,000 students out of class. >> june 30th, we are being told our school system is basically broke. >> reporter: the one-day sick-out called because the city schools are expected to run out of cash july 1. no money for the teachers, no funding for summer school or special education programs. detroit's school district which has buildings crawling with mold and infested with rodents has been in debt for several years staying afloat asking for short term loans from the state which it now owes $3.5 billion. michigan state legislators are debating the merits of a bailout package that could tide the teache o
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right now the money isn't there. >> they need to put themselves in our shoes. they need to act like they're parent and child goes to detroit public schools. what type of school system would you want your child going to. for the last few days thousands lined up to make sure they're not deprived of a basic necessity of life. water. but starting tuesday, at 8:00 a.m., detroit, city of 700,000 people will turn off the tap for the 20,000 households which still have not paid their bill and not chose tine take advantage of payment plans the city is offering. 53-year-old fay paul lost her nursing job last year and a bad hip left her immobile and unle
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>> i feel destitute, like i'm in a third-world country. >> reporter: tomorrow, of course, most people in detroit will have water and the teachers will be back here on the job. but these issues, scott, underline the fact that the motor city still has a long road to recovery. >> dean reynolds, thanks. well the long road to the republican nomination appears to have run out for ted cruz. the texas senator insists he is still in it. but after being crushed last tuesday, he is likely looking at another loss tomorrow in indiana. there, 57 delegates are at stake. donald trump has the a comfortable lead. major garrett is there. >> reporter: donald trump met diners at a popular indianapolis lunch spot, ordered a ruben and said he was planning to finer off rival ted cruz. >> i would look to get on to hillary. we have beaten all of these folks. indiana is very important.
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>> reporter: senior trump advisers expect him to win 51 of indiana's 57 delegates and say trump could win them all in a cruz crushing sweep. >> i have a great relationship with indiana and the people. >> cruz scheduled five stops around the state today. >> god bless you. >> huh are you doing? >> ma'am, thank you for being here. >> the frantic pace matched anxiety about the campaign standing in the polls. latest survey shows him down by 15 points. the entire country is depending on the state of indiana to pull us back from this cliff. >> reporter: this exchange with a trump supporter illustrate ed what cruz is up against. >> indiana don't want you. >> well, sir, you are entitled. >> reporter: cruz was mathematically eliminated from winning the nomination outright last week and is now hoping for a contested convention to. day he said trump was campaigning on hate and division. >> do we get behind a campaign
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screaming and cursing and insults and anger and hatred? >> no! >> or do we continue to unify behind a positive, optimistic, forward-looking, conservative campaign? >> reporter: cruz strategists believe indiana is a test of organizational muscle and quite possibly their last. scott, over the weekend trump forces outorganized cruz operatives in state gatherings in four places across the county where delegates were assigned. a sign that trump is gathering strength at all levels of the gop nomination fight. >> important to note that trump its not likely to have all delegates until june 7th. major garrett for us tonight. major, thank you. hillary clinton looking beyond the primaries. nancy cordes covering the democrats. nancy. >> scott, clinton often asked what kind of role her husband would play in her administration. well, today, in kentucky coal country she said she would put the former president in charge of reviving jobs in communities hard hit by manufacturing
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>> i told my husband he has got to come out of retirement and be in charge of this. because he has more idea a minute than anybody i know. >> thank you very much. >> reporter: bill clinton was booed in logan west virginia across the border by appalachian voters angry over his wife's stated willingness to let the coal industry die out. bernie sanders is poised to do well in west virginia next week. he is now publicly urging super delegates across the country to rethink their support for clinton because he does better in many polls against trump. so far many super delegates have not been swayed scott. he would have to win over hundred of them to close the gap all. thank you. >> the next president will still have iraq to deal with. today order returned to baghdad's fortified government center, but it looked like a revolution over the weekend. hundreds of protesters, loyal to al-sadr stormed the government
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some occupied parliament, demanding an end to corruption. they left on sunday, but they warned they would be back. iraq has had trouble forming a ruling cabinet, and remains in crisis. today, secretary of state john kerry warned that syria's civil war is out of control despite a recent cease-fire. anis is video from aleppo. e d thman that you see was the city's last pediatrician. seconds later his hospital was wiped out by a missile fired by the assad dictatorship. 50 people killed including the doctor. the dictatorship is attempting to encircle the rebels in aleppo. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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zika virus may spread further in the united states than first thought. the virus which causes crippling birth defects was known to be carried by a mosquito mostly limited to the south. now zika has been discovered in a second species that ranges as far north as maine and minnesota. it is important to remember there have been no cases of mosquito-borne zika in the u.s. health officials believe that time is coming. more now from dr. jon lapook. >> reporter: it was cloudy and cool in connecticut today, but phil armstrong was thinking about warm weather and mosquitoes. he head up mosquito surveillance r
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the cdc says the aedes aegypti, the main species that carries zika could extend into connecticut this summer. armstrong is more concerned about another species, aedes albopictus, also known as the asian tiger mosquito. about two weeks ago, for the first time during the current outbreak, the virus was found in albopictus in mexico. that species is very common in connecticut. >> in the last five years the numbers of aedes albopictus has increased substantially. and the numbers are still relatively low compared to other mosquitoes we have in the state. but the trend are, that, that number, mosquito is increasing. >> reporter: armstrong says mosquito season in connecticut ramps up in june. >> the way it attracts -- >> reporter: when special traps will catch aedes albopictus and his lab will begin testing for
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zika. but with more than 50 species of mosquitoes in the state, armstrong will not be taking any chances. >> we'll be testing all species, all 50 of them, testing them for zika virus. >> reporter: the fact that armstrong plans to test more than 50 species of mosquitoes for zika. health officials want to identify any mosquitoes carrying zika as soon as possible and hit them with full-scale eradication efforts. >> doctor, thank you. when prince died last week he left behind a fortune from all of his hit record plus a vault of unreleased music. but, there was no will at least according to his sister. today family members put in their claims and anna werner is following this. >> reporter: prince's sister, tyka nelson and four of his five half siblings appeared in court to agree on who would manage the future of prince's assets. attorney frank wheaton represents half brother alfred jackson.
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>> all attorneys met with the judge in his private chambers to discuss the lay of the land. and we were all quite pleased. ♪ she's got the long >> reporter: prince died of unknown causes at his paisley park compound april 21. his assets including music catalog are said to be worth more than $500 million. if no will is found, minnesota law would govern how it should be divided. says cbs legal analyst rikki klieman. that would be expensive. >> minnesota has a 16% tax rate on estates. the federal government is approximately 40%. so, you are dealing with the heirs getting less than 50%. >> reporter: under minnesota law, half siblings and full siblings are treated the same. all six would divide the potential multimillion dollar pot. unless rumors of prince possibly having a child turn out to be >>ue.
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could turn a very dignified court proceeding into a circus. and there is the question of what is in prince's vault. reported to hold a valuable collection of unreleased music. potentially worth tens of millions of dollars. a firm that looks for heirs told us it has had hundreds of calls from people who claim to be prince's relatives. but they're only really looking at one. a man in his 30s who claims to be prince's son. if that were true and he were to inherit, scott, the siblings would get nothing. >> tangled up. anna werner, thank you very much. first daughter, malia obama graduates from high school next month. she is going to harvard where her parents attended law school. but she is taking a break from her studies first, a gap year is a popular plan for many who want to travel or those who need to
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earn money for tuition. here is jan crawford. >> reporter: she spent nearly half her life as first daughter. before she head off to harvard, malia obama is taking a break from the classroom. a so-called gap year. it is an increasingly common move for high school seniors. not just those like malia graduating from elite washington prep schools. >> made a lot of sense for me to come here and hit the ground running. >> reporter: joe palekas worked in a coffee shop to help pay for a gap year in morocco where he studied arabic before enrolling at american university. >> i figured out generally what and it, just gave me a whole new perspective. >> reporter: last year, 33,000 high school seniors took a gap year. nearly double the number from 2011. most students focus on special
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structured programs like one overseen by corolla weil. >> you don't take a gap year program because you are not qualified for college. this is not a remedial program. it is tough. it is demanding. >> reporter: the obamas haven't disclosed how malia will spend her year. in an interview with affiliate wkrc, the president sounded like any other dad reflecting on how hard it is to say good-bye. >> i'm going to miss her terribly. but -- she is well prepared. she is going to do great things. and -- you know, as michelle remind us, our job is to make sure they don't need us anymore. >> reporter: now there could be a simple reason that malia is taking a gap year. scott, this is what it looked like when chelsea clinton enrolled at stanford in 1997. when her father was still president. but by next year, of course, the obamas will be out of the white house and somewhat out of the spotlight. >> jan crawford for us tonight. jan, thank you very much. two years after disaster struck, a group of americans return to everest. and some big cats finally taste freedom. the cbs overnight news will be right back. ♪ i pinky promised my little girl a fabulous garden party for her birthday. so i mowed the lawn,
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climbing mt. everest is one of the world's most dangerous challenges of course. there was an avalanche two years ago and earthquake last year. but some americans just cannot stay away. and don dahler has their story. >> reporter: on the treacherous ice fault, enormous crevices can open and close without warning triggering avalanches none more
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deadly than the avalanche two years ago that killed 16 and injured dozens. mount near garrett madison and his team are back on everest for the first time since that terrible day. but the memory still lingers. >> how many casualties there are now over. >> we don't have a casualty count. we're working on live body. >> we heard on the radio what happened. couldn't communicate with some of our climbers. we knew we lost teammates. >> a sherpa with a head injury and internal breathing. they're going to keep him there. >> reporter: among the missing one of madison's most trusted sherpas, the nepalese local whose know the mountain best. madison and his team kept searching until they recovered his body. the number of climbers this year is down by 40%. madison is glad to be back in business. and this year, he has chosen a different route to the summit. longer, but safer. >> i would say, we are a little bit more cni
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and we avoid the ice fall on the west shoulder. the route goes to the center, right side to avoid that hanging ice. >> the sherpa team is very strong. so no problem this year. >> reporter: madison's sherpas are equipped with radio beacons and higher pay part of the reforms for local guides since the avalanche. >> we are looking forward to having a great expedition, getting everybody safely, back with all fingers and toes. don dahler, cbs news, nerkw yo. and when we come back, why are these fans delirious? how about an upset for the ages.
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we have new video of the derailment of a csx freight train. look way over on the left side of screen. the train derailed in washington yesterday. 16 cars came off the tracks including one that spilled about 750 gallons of a caustic chemical. a false start caused a huge pileup at a bike race in brooklyn, new york. a motorcycle leading the way stalled just as the riders took
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off on saturday. one of them captured the mayhem on his camera. at least seven people were hurt. none of them seriously. the first cruise ship to sail directly from the united states to cuba in nearly 40 years arrived in havana today. it was greeted by dozens of cubans, some of them driving vintage cars that hit the road before u.s. relations with the communist nation were frozen in 1961. more than 600 americans made the voyage from miami. if ever there was a david vs. goliath story in sports, we saw it tonight in lester, england, where a huge celebration is under way after the team clinched the first title in the top soccer league. lester began the year as a 5,000:1 outside chance. as unlikely as a minor league baseball team winning the world series.
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freed from their cages, former circus lions experience nature for the very first time. that's next.
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p?p?o?gv the king of beasts isn't meant for a cage. tonight, deborah patta has the the story of lions rescued from circuses and returned to their native land. >> reporter: a feeble cry that its the sound of a lifetime of abuse at the hand of circus trainers. this is one of 33 lions rescued by animal activists, jan creama and tim phillips from a cruel caged existence. for two years they raided circuses often going undercover
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whom had fractured teeth, limbs, or no mane. >> to get him out of the circus is one miracle. to get him all the way hem to africa is incredible. he really its the one that escaped the death sentence. >> reporter: the journey to africa has been a grueling one. in the largest air lift of its kind, the lions were transported on especially equipped planes from peru to south africa. then it was another six hour drive. and finally, when the sun rose high in the sky, the lions leapt into the dawn of their new life in africa. >> it's very good. >> reporter: from years of living in circus cages, now, freedom. >> he has walked out into africa. it is amazing. this is his first experience of -- of grass, trees, bushes. he has never walked in the open
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air like this. >> reporter: they delighted in rolling in the sand, marking their territory. >> yes, yes. she likes him. >> reporter: eventually they will be moved into larger areas where they can run more freely. for jan creama, a bittersweet victory. >> he can't go back into the wild, he has no claws, he can't feed himself. but this is the closest we can get him. >> reporter: for the first time, these old warriors can walk purely for pleasure and not to entertain. deborah patta, cbs news, big cat sanctuary, south africa. that's the "cbs overnight news" for this tuesday morning. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and of course, "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
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hi, everyone, welcome to the "cbs overnight news." i'm demarco morgan. the race for the white house runs through indiana today. the hoosier state primary is a pivotal moment for republicans. a commanding victory for donald trump would all but assure his path to the nomination. indiana is considered the last best chance for trump's rivals to knock him off course. here's major garrett. >> while trump and cruz slug it out in indiana, campaigns compete ford delegate and gop gatherings in several states. for the first time trump forces beat cruz challenges in massachusetts, delaware and
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kansas. a sign that trump's figuring out the rules that he used to scorn. >> reporter: so i am competing against the two guys though they havepa no o th tvictory. it's ridiculous. i don't know what we are doing. >> reporter: campaigning across indiana, donald trump tried to bury ted cruz and all but end the race for the gop nomination. >> ted, lying ted. cruz is so hated. he has such a rotten personality. he was born in canada, folks. >> reporter: john kasich stopped campaigning in indiana, per the awkward pact between him and cruz. the deal appears to have come unglued. even it held, 60% of indiana voters opposed the alliance. to consolidate the anti-trump vote in indiana and elsewhere. >> our country is at the edge of a cliff. this is not a typical election. we risk losing everything. >> reporter: cruz must win indiana and claim most of its 57
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delegates to slow trump's momentum and give his campaign a spark. on face the nation, cruz picked up on rubio's failed attempt that trump is a con artist. >> donald trump is attempting to perpetuate one of the greatest fraud in the history of modern elections. which is he is trying to convince people he is some sort of outsider. trump's convention manager, paul manifort bit back. >> ted cruz has been part of the mess in washington, ted cruz is the one who has no friend in washington and won't be able to do anything. manifort refused to say if trump would put lobbyists out of business or diminish influence if trump became president, and wouldn't rule out raising money to fund gop committees in the general election. democrats vote in indiana today. front-runner hillary clinton looking ahead to the general election. challenger, bernie sanders is not throwing in the towel just yet. here is nancy cordes. >> hillary clinton had been dipping her toe in the general election pool. last night. warning a win for trump would
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called the voices of hatred in this country. >> we cannot let barack obama's legacy fall into donald trump's hands. at an naacp dinner in detroit, clinton told thousand of african-americans that trump was stoking racial tension and violence. >> the leading republican contender is the man who led the insidious birther movement to discredit the president's citizenship. >> reporter: on cnn, clinton described trump's rhetoric as an insult fest and said she planned to ignore some of his more inflammatory comments about her. >> i have a lot of experience dealing with men who sometimes get off the reservation. >> that is a very demeaning remark to men. in my opinion. >> some in the native american community also took offense at her use of the term off the reservation. clinton's national political director, tweeted an apology saying language has no place in our politics. he insisted sunday he could still win the nomination.
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contested contest. >> on face the nation he urged superdelegates to reconsider their support for clinton. >> our argument is take a look at which candidate is better suited to beat donald trump. every poll that i have seen, national, and statewide, says that bernie sanders is the stronger candidate. >> president obama hinted at the long odds for sanders at the white house correspondents dinner. >> next year this time, someone else will be standing here in this very spot. and it's any one's guess who she will be. >> the president did joke that at 74, sanders is the hip new thing in washington.
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facebook for the first time. linton played along tweeting yesterday, nice job, mr. president. aunt hillary approves. >> first daughter, malia obama announced over the weekend she will attend harvard university. first she is taking some time off. here's jan crawford. >> i don't think it is a huge surprise, malia will be going to the same college her parents attended. a little surprising she will be taking a year off. won't be starting right away in the fall. now everyone is wondering how she is going to spend it. malia obama has spent nearly half her life as first daughter. now she is preparing for a new role, collge freshman. but before heading to harvard, the obama's oldest daughter will wait and take a gap year. >> it gives her a little space between being malia obama the first daughter and malia obama the former first daughter. "washington post" columnist says a year off will give the 17-year-old an academic break. >> sidwell friends, the school, that malia and sasha attend,
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tough school. a lot of kids are taking gap years to dial it back. >> reporter: when malia attends harvard, she will be the 23rd presidential child to study at the prestigious university. included john quincy adams, franklin roosevelt jr. and caroline kennedy. president bush's twin daughters were already in college when he took office. jenna at university of texas at austin. barbara at yale. chelsea clinton who attended the same washington high school as malia chose stanford. >> she is a hard worker. >> reporter: the first family openly talked about malia's future, seemingly aren't quite ready to let her go. >> i was asked if i could speak at her graduation, i said absolutely not. because i am going to be sitting there, with dark glasses, sobbing. >> now that malia's college plans are set, the focus turns to her gap year. >> she is not just going to be putting around the house with mom and dad and bo and sunny.
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i think she is going to absolutely be doing something enriching. but that is not necessarily so academically rigorous. >> now, harvard actually encourages students to take that year off to travel, or pursue a special project or work. and about 100 admitted student do so every year. and even though the obamas, they're going to have to say good-bye to malia in the next year or so, sasha will still be at home. she will be a sophomore in high school in the fall. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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new apps and web sites are changing the way we do a lot of things, like shopping, travel and communication to name a few. now technology is chalen bing traditional aspects of the financial world. lesley stahl takes a closer look in a story for "60 minutes." >> which one of you dropped out of harvard? >> that was me. >> which one of you dropped out of mit. >> by elimination. the other one. >> brothers patrick and john collison quit college because they had an idea for modernizing the financial industry they thought needed a shaking up. >> in a world where people can send a facebook message or upload an instagram photo have it available like that. i think the fact that that doesn't work for money is
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something that seems kind of increasingly unacceptable to people. the question for banks can they get their first in providing services or will it be somebody new. >> reporter: they want to be the some body new. john, 25, and patrick, 27, first noticed the problem when they were in high school in a dot of a town in ireland. >> you were coders? >> we both learned to program growing up. we had been building iphone apps and web services. when they wanted to charge people to buy the apps they hit a snag. they had to go to the bank and file paperwork just to be able to collect the money. >> like really sort of, kind of like getting a mortgage. you have to convince them that you were worth supporting. >> look a mortgage it would have to be approved. >> take weeks for this approval process to happen. just seemed sort of this crazy mismatch. >> reporter: they decided to do something about it. they created software that allows businesses to cut through all of that bureaucracy and instantly accept pme
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from countries across the globe. we visited their startup stripe in the mission district, the heart of san francisco's tech scene. where patrick showed me how fast a business could set up a money collection system using stripe. >> set me up. >> reporter: pretend i left 60 minutes to create an on lineo business. >> what do you want to sell? >> degree food. home made. in five minutes after a few clicks and cut and paste of their code. >> copy it. >> reporter: he said m company would be ready to receive payment for home made dog food online right then and there. >> doesn't need to take any longer. this is, how it should work. >> reporter: this is what would ke
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and forms and forms and forms and verification. >> going to the bank branch. waiting for paperwork to be mailed back. and all this stuff. >> reporter: they developed software for buy buttons, letting companies accept payments online fast and in new ways. stripe charges sellers a small percentage for every transaction. >> reporter: does the buyer pay anything? >> nothing. >> reporter: nothing. their goal is to make money as easy to send as e-mail. for everyone, anywhere, on any device. >> we want to free businesses from just selling via credit card to people who hold bank accounts and enable to purchase on line, what they use, bank account or no. >> reporter: this needed the smartphone. it need this move to mobile? >> for sure. >> reporter: stripe is hardly alone in inventing financial technology or fin-tech, a revolution brewing with thousand of these come pans trying to make banking faster, and cheaper, and increasingly
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mobile. >> many of the innovative services in financial technology that have come along in the past ten years are, are not coming from banks. >> reporter: but by and large the newcomers are not challenging the core function of banks, taking deposits. even the startups themselves park the money they handle at fdic insured banks. >> i think there will be a need for some where to store your money to have if the sit. we think, for all of their flaws they have a lot of experience at being banks right? >> reporter: fin-tech is targeting nearly all the other functions of banking. startups are peeling off one profitable service after another. typically offering them for less. it's called unbundling the banks. say you need a loan? fin-tech sites match borrowers and lenders directly the way uber connects passengers with drivers. need financial planning. algorithms are replacing human
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apps like venmo let people click money to each other similar to texting. itch you want to wire money across borders. >> sending $500. >> reporter: the ceo of a company, transferwise showed us how his app can send money abroad and convert currencies, say dollars into pounds, without bank tellers and high exchange rates. users just swap with each other. >> reporter: a couple clicks and boom. >> click click, done. >> reporter: do you think the big banks today see fintech startups as barbarians at the lake. >> a lot of curiosity. reporter: fear? >> there can be. >> reporter: the former ceo of banking giant citigroup says it is the all too familiar tale of david and goliath. >> lot of what you are seeing in fintech, uber, air b & b. you have seen the impact of technology on travel. >> reporter: yeah, travel agents, were thrown out of business. that's what i saw. its that what fin-tech is doing to banking? >> it is early days.
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banks are thinking about it. they're trying to understand what all of this new technology can mean? >> reporter: it couldn't mean trouble with millenials willing to ditch brand name companies for new apps on their phone. >> the banks have not realized how different this generation is. >> max lefchin, co-founded paypal and early invest in stripe. cites a survey. 70% of young adults would rather go to the dentist than bank. >> day they don't have problem putting their social security number into a web forum but a problem going up to a teller in a bank and figuring out what you are supposed to do. this is so inefficient. why am in this stodgy, outdated room. >> not just about technology. there is also a question of trust. millenials, their formative experience is the financial crisis. they're the one whose really don't trust the banks?
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banks serve their own interest more than those of their consumers. >> reporter: you are criticizing a system basically that you helped create? >> well there is no question the crisis demonstrated the system didn't work. and when you looked at the aftermath of the crisis what needed to be done you had to make sure banks got back to the basics of banking and that they had to address the truster to. >> reporter: in the meantime, fin-tech started taking root. in the last year and a half, investors have poured $20 billion into the sector including this banking insider whose personally invested in a dozen fin-tech startups. he says that beyond making banking more convenient, the companies can offer options to lower income families that can't
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afford to bank at banks. 10 million american households don't have a bank account. i have read it is more expensive for a poor person to use the banking system as it exists than for a wealthy person. how is that possible? >> there are bank account fees on your checking accounts. there are commissions. exchange rates. all adds up. >> reporter: that doesn't happen with the new companies? >> the new companies, they're transparent. and they tell you what the fees are. and they are fraction of some of the fees charged by banks. >> to watch the full report go to cbsnews.com and click on 60 minutes. we'll be right back.
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an american missionary who spent two years in a north korean prison is telling his story. kenneth bae writes about his imprisonment in the secretive country in "not forgotten" and spoke with margaret brennan. they called you prisoner 103? >> it is still stuck in my head. i feel like i am carrying this badge of 103 in my chest forever. >> reporter: before he was taken prisoner, korean born kenneth bae was a preacher and missionary and grew up in a
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tight-knit family in california and started a tourism business bringing christian groups to north korea. he made a mistake. in 2012 he brought in a computer hard drive with prayers and pictures of starving north korean children. >> they said you attempt to overthrow the government through prayer and worship. and they really took the prayer as a weapon against them. >> reporter: any criticism of the regime is forbidden. supreme leader kim jung-unand his family consider themselves gods. he was arrested, charged with espionage and sentenced to 15 years hard labor. >> one of the prosecutors told me that i was the worst most dangerous american criminal they ever apprehended since the korean war. and i say, why? and they said because you, not only you cam
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on your own, you asked others to join. >> reporter: bae's fate in the hands of a young, brutal dictator, scorned by the u.s. for carrying out a series of underground nuclear tests. tensions with the u.s. spiked. you were a political pawn? you believe? >> i believe so. >> reporter: you write about the trial. all of america really was on trial with me. >> yes. >> reporter: what did you moon by that? >> i believe that they blame everything wrong with their country to america. they say the reason for poverty, the reason for their suffering is all caused by u.s. foreign policy against them. and therefore, by indicting me, they're indicting the u.s. >> reporter: he spent two years under 24-hour watch by 30 north korean guards. the conditions were dire. he shoveled coal and worked the fields. he lost 50 pound and was briefly hospitalized. >> i'm looking in a mirror in the bathroom every day. and say -- remember
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i took it as a -- blessing. rather than -- a curse. or -- or a suffering. >> you are in a labor camp? >> yes. >> reporter: you thought that was a blessing? >> it was very hard to, for me to say that right now. but no one likes suffering. no one will embrace suffering. but with suffering come to you you have to face it. >> reporter: kim jung-un, issued a pardon in 2014 after the white house sent james clapper to pick up bae and a prisoner. bae said he had never been so proud to be american. >> i was just overwhelmed that -- that after being there for 735 days i was finally going home. >> reporter: bae says he is not angry about his imprisonment. he believes it was an opportunity to share his faith and teach his guard what life is look outside of north korea. >> i was there to love the people. let people know that god care about them and the rest of the world care about them. i hope that this book becomes a reminder to people to not forget the people of north korea.
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prisoners in
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son: it's been more daughter: no, it hasn't. mom: hey, can you two keep it down? son: i want it. it's my turn. daughter: no it isn't. mom: please just keep it down. [tires screeching] mom: i remember days when just driving down the street would give me anxiety. and now look at me. [restaurant sounds] man 1: don't get me wrong, i still don't love crowded places, but it's good to get out again. [restaurant sounds] [plates crashing] man 2: noises like that used to make me hit the deck, but now i can keep going. announcer: transitioning from the military can be tough. we all have unique experiences, but many veterans are facing similar challenges. life goes on, but some things are different now. visit maketheconnection.net to watch our stories and learn ways to create the story you want to live. no one can write it for you.
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visit your weight matters dot org. it's tuesday, may 3rd, 2016. this is "cbs morning news." holding out hope in the hoosier state with donald trump and hillary clinton pulling closer to their party's nomination, ted cruz and bernie sanders stage last-ditch attempts at delegates. a woman is awarded $55 million after ay jurfinds a link between a popular product and ovarian cancer. from worst to first. long-shot leicester city shocks the world, winning the english premier league championship for the firs

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