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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  May 18, 2016 2:07am-3:59am EDT

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so i was bothered by it. most of the time when stories are inaccurate they're not discredited. and i will be frustrated by that. but in this case i think they went so far, they had such a strong thesis and created facts to reinforce it, and there's backlash in that regard. >> but "the new york times" stands by its story. you can see more of norah o'donnell's interview with ivanka trump on "cbs this morning." now to a democratic presidential race that's all over but the primaries. there were two yesterday, in oregon and kentucky. and cbs news projects that bernie sanders has won oregon and hillary clinton wins kentucky. sanders has little chance of catching hillary clinton in the delegate count, but he vows to soldier on. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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well, today the isis bombing campaign in baghdad killed 69 people in four blasts. as always, isis was attacking neighborhoods of its rival, the shiite branch of i.
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radicals. in six days bombs have killed nearly 200 baghdad civilians. these attacks are designed to destabilize the u.s.-backed government, which is already teetering in a political crisis. returning now to an epidemic that is taking three lives in this country every hour, the abuse of opioids, including prescription painkillers and heroin. jason amaral could have been a dead man. the boy next door from a boston suburb got hooked in college. he's now 30. and we're telling his story because we want you to know there is both hope and help for addiction. last night we followed amaral as he shot heroin for what he hoped would be the last time. as we left him, he was entering rehab. correspondent demarco morgan and producer jonathan blakely continue our series "in the shadow of death:
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journey." >> reporter: 24 hours into rehab we found an emotional jason amaral fighting through the first critical hours of detox. he just learned his younger brother andrew, who is also an addict, was back on the streets because he could not find an open bed for treatment. >> he's running around boston getting high again. so. you know what i mean? i don't know. can you stop the camera for a second? >> reporter: it had already been a rough first day for jason. he walked into recovery after a drug binge. >> all right. i'll see you in like five minutes. >> reporter: he allowed our cameras to follow him the day before as he roamed the streets of boston in search of drug money and heroin. >> yeah. don't answer your phone, you [ bleep ] dumb [ bleep ]. >> reporter: that morning he crushed and snorted pills from a toilet seat in city hall. he met friends to shoot up in the middle of the day. >> it
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was sick. and now i just did a shot and i'm very, very high. >> reporter: and then that night we watched him inject more heroin laced with a powerful drug fentanyl not once but twice. >> my veins aren't popping like they usually do either. why? >> reporter: before his best friend mike dugins arrived. mike is a recovering addict who's been clean seven years and came to take japs to rehab. >> you will die if you don't get it this time. >> reporter: mike traveled by plane from boston to south jersey to make sure jason made it to recovery centers of america in time. >> we're so glad you're here. >> me and jason ran together. we got involved in a lot of this stuff together. fortunately, i was able to find it a lot sooner because i've been terrified for him for years. >> jason. >> hi, jason. welcome. what brought you in for treatment?
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i don't know how to deal with life. >> reporter: notice how jason was visibly uncomfortable as he's forced to give up the pills he had in his bag. >> we're passionate about recovery. we believe in what we do. and we know that people get well. and you can get well. we can help you get there. >> you've taken everything from me. >> reporter: in one of his first therapy sessions jason was given a bat and told to confront his addiction. >> never, ever put me in an ambulance again. i'm never going to overdose. my brother won't overdose. he's going to survive. he's going to get it this time. his kid, my godson, will never see us high again, ever again. he won't take anything from me or my family again. all right. now i'm like sweating. >> reporter: it was that day's small victory. >> i feel better. i took a lot of anger out on it. i never did that before. >> you had the
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you're getting from heroin. we want to replace that with a natural high, the endorphin kick. okay? >> reporter: to get his mind and body off drugs jason is encouraged to do exercise and yoga. >> good. all right. rest. >> it's going to have to be a bigger part of me wants to get clean than a part of me wants to get high. because there's always going to be a part of me that wants to get high. for the rest of my life. it's a disease. i'll want to get high for the rest of my life. >> are you afraid of dying? >> i'm afraid of getting high and dying. i don't want to die using drugs. i don't want my legacy to be this kid overdosed, you know. >> we weren't allowed to record jason's medication process but he was slowly weaned off heroin with opioid replacement drugs over the first seven days. and scott, you've heard jason talk about his family. in our next report you're going to meet the people who love him most, his family, who've been affected by his drug use. that includes his brother, who is also addicted to heroin. >> great public service reporting. demarco morgan, thank you very much, with producer jonathan blakely. there is more
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journey and information about how to get help fighting addiction. help is possible. and you can find it at cbsnews.com/heroinepidemic. in a much-awaited report today the national academy of sciences said that genetically modified food is generally safe for humans and the environment. tinkering with genetics does not turn crops into frankenfood, as some have claimed. at the same time, the report says that gmos have not led to higher yields, which was one of their selling points. rangers are taking chainsaws to rhinos to save their lives. and her lifelong quest to track down her biological mother. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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thope to see you again soon.. whoa, whoa, i got this. just gotta get the check. almost there. i can't reach it. if you have alligator arms, you avoid picking up the check. what? it's what you do. i got this. thanks, dennis! if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance, you switch to geico. growwwlph. it's what you do. oh that is good crispy duck. (babies crying) narrator: life. dishes. death. (slurping) dishes. every dish, every time, only finish has the powerball to take on anything.
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south africa's rhino population is under siege. poachers are killing three a day to sell the horns. rangers at a private game reserve are now taking drastic and controversial action. debora patta spent time there. >> reporter: these terrified rhinos run for their lives. their horns have placed a deadly bounty on their maepds but the men hunting them are not poachers. simon naylor is phinda ree'
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head ranger. he gives the order to tranquilize the rhinos. the drug quickly takes effect. a drunken stagger before the rhino is blindfolded to dull his senses. it's hard to watch. but dehorning the rhinos could save their lives. they're not in any pain. it's like filing a human nail. this rhino horn is what this war is being fought over. it is still so valuable to poachers that even after it's been removed it is immediately whisked off the property and taken to a secret location out of the reach of criminal syndicates. in some parts of asia the rhinos' horn sells for about $150,000. veterinarian mike toft. >> i'd rather see this little guy upright in two years' time than in a ditch upside down and
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>> reporter: the rhinos are sprayed with a purple disinfectant. the mark of survival. >> okay. right. we're ready to wake up. he's looking. looking 100%. he's nice and relaxed. >> reporter: the horn will grow back in a few years. although it will become increasingly rare to see a rhino with its horn on this reserve. but it may be the only way to save the species. debora patta, cbs news, phinda game reserve, south africa. >> those horns are poached to be used in chinese medicine preparations. we'll have more in just a moment.
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some ferocious storms hit florida's east coast today. a woman driving on i-95 spotted this funnel cloud in st. lucie county. and then came the rain, nearly eight inches in vero beach. some new tests have caught some old cheaters. today the international olympic committee said that retests of urine samples from the 2008 beijing summer games came back positive for doping for 31 athletes in six sports from 12 countries. today the senate voted unanimously to confirm eric fanning as secretary of the army. he will be the first openly gay leader of a military branch. fanning's nomination was held up for eight months by republican pat roberts of kansas. he dropped his opposition when the administration promised not to transfer guantanamo prisoners to fort leavenworth in
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century, but a mother and child reunion is only a moment away. every time the toilet gets cleaned, someone's there to undo it.
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finally tonight, a mother and her daughter, separated decades ago, have been reunited. and barry petersen has their story. >> i'm nervous. i'm excited. i've waited 50 years for this moment. >> reporter: for cyndy burns, the wait is almost over. it started when she was a 10-month-old baby left with a korean adoption agency. amid that country's poverty, this was a chance at a better life in america, believed her korean mother, sun cha. did you believe you would ever see your daughter again? >> no. i don't believe it. i don't know how i'm going to find
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so that's all. >> reporter: cyndy grew up in a connecticut family. she had all but given up finding her birth mother. >> i'd gone to korea last year kind of looking for her, and i made peace with the fact that i'd probably never find her. >> reporter: when a dna sample led her to sun cha. >> it says 99.99% she is your biological mother. i so much wanted it to be true. >> reporter: there was more. her mom had been living on the west coast. they had been in the same country for decades. cyndy flew to tacoma this weekend to meet her mom. >> my daughter cyndy. >> hello. you're so beautiful. >> i always say where can i find her? i don't know where she is. >> we're back together now. >> i know. >> reporter: when w s
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them, they couldn't stop holding each other, as if they were afraid they might lose each other again. what does it say about your mother that she was willing to be open about this secret that all of her life she hadn't shared with her family? >> it's confirmation that she did love me. >> reporter: at sun cha's home there was a family reunion. cyndy with her newly found sisters and brother. >> it's what all of us who are adopted want, is for our existence to be validated. >> here we go. >> and to know that our parents loved us. >> reporter: barry petersen, cbs news, tacoma, washington. >> that's the "overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city i'm scott pelley.
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm don dahler. mosquito season is right around the corner, but the battle against the zika virus continues to be fought in washington. after a three-month delay the senate cleared the way to fund the fight. but it falls far short of the president's request for nearly $2 billion. zika can cause birth defects and is mostly transmitted by mosquitos. david begnaud is in coral springs, florida, which has its fair share of mosquitos. >> reporter: mosquito controllers insist the zika threat is at florida's doorstep. a few infected mosquitos can cause a large outbreak. here in broward county in south florida where we are they're getting 500 calls a day requesting mosquito spraying. that's ten times the amount they're used to.
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mosquitos grow and four or five days from now adults will be flying around. >> reporter: on the u.s. mainland florida is the front line in the zika fight. more than 100 cases have been reported here. more than any other state. you're not going to get zika in the woods while you're hunting or at the lake when you're on your boat. you might get it at your front door. >> that's exactly right. while you're standing next to your car to go on your hunting trip or to the beach or to the park, that's when the mosquitos will fly up and bite you in the ankle. it's not in those typical place that's we as floridians think of as mosquito biting territory. >> reporter: michael doyle of the florida keys mosquito district suspects zika cases will rise as summer approaches. as of now all of florida's zika patients contracted the virus from travel-related exposure. in february the white house requested approximately $1.9 billion in emergency funding. congress is debating it. >> we need to deal with this seriously. >> reporter: republican senator marco rubio represents florida. >> we're going
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this on the front end. if this become a serious outbreak it's not going to cost 1.9 billion. it could cost 4 billion or 5 billion. >> reporter: republican hal rogers, chairman of the appropriations committee, is a critic. >> the request they sent us would allow the $1.9 billion to be used for anything in the government. it's almost like a slush fund. >> mosquitos don't know whether their target is a democrat or a republican. the zika impacts all of us. >> reporter: democratic congresswoman debio wasserman schultz, also from florida, insists part of the money will be used to develop a zika vaccine and raise awareness in a state that thrives on tourism. >> we're now going into the mosquito season. every week the chances of having enough of them to start trans t transmitting it from travelers to local people increases. >> reinforcements are being sent to chicago's o'hare airport, where hundreds of air travelers missed their flights over the past few days because they couldn't get through security. o'hare is getting 50 more security officers and four more bomb-sniffing dogs. but the trouble
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checkpoints is not limited to chicago. kris van cleave reports from los angeles international. >> this airport is telling flyers to be in these lines two and three hours early as the number of passengers are going to go up as the summer travel season gets going. already one airline tells "cbs this morning" l.a.x. makes its top five for missed flights because of tsa lines and now flyers from coast to coast are striking back on social media. security lines that seem to never end are becoming the new normal in chicago. at o'hare international airport we're talking about wait times up to three hours. long enough to strand more than 100 passengers overnight sunday, forcing many to sleep on cots. >> what's the problem? why is this happening? >> this is absurd. >> they need to hire more people. >> reporter: american airlines says 450 customers missed their flights at o'hare sunday alone because of the long lines. this headline dubbed the t
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through security a slow march through hell. the tsa blames the issue at o'hare on increased passenger volume, but it's not just chicago. flyers around the country are blasting the tsa on social media using the hashtag ihatethewait to post pictures of long lines. at least 6,400 american airlines passengers missed their flights at the nation's top 20 airports. and that's in just the last week. >> we are trying to work with the tsa. this is an effort to help flag to the tsa where the massive wait times are. >> reporter: melanie hinton with airlines for america, a trade association representing several major air carriers, created that hashtag. >> let your fellow passengers know if you have an excessive wait time. >> reporter: earlier this month the three new york-area airports joined seattle and atlanta in threatening to drop the tsa for private screeners. >> there will be wait times. >> reporter: friday secretary of homeland security jeh johnson said the tsa is looking to hire hundreds more screeners and will
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authorize overtime for tens of thousands of officers. but that may not be enough. as the peak summer travel rush arrives. >> three hours is not ideal. we want to reduce that as much as possible without compromising the safety of the american public. >> reporter: so how did we get here? well, congress capped the number of tsa screeners, thinking there would be millions of more flyers enrolled in precheck which is expedited screening. enrollment has lagged. you have seen the tsa experience very high turnover, and they've struggled to maintain their staffing numbers. this as the number of flyers has steadily increased. on average, one person is killed each day during a high-speed police chase somewhere in america. but a new device could soon make those chases a thing of the past. dean reynolds reports. >> high speeds, wet roads. >> reporter: adrenaline-pumping cops and robbers pursuits are something of a tv addiction. police departments across the country are looking for a safer way to nab suspects on the run. >> he played a game of mercedes
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>> i'm going to take my loading tool. >> interpreter: a>> reporter: ad now more than 50 agencies are using a system invented by a company called star chase whose president is trevor fishbach. >> we've had zero fatalities, zero injuries, zero property damage and zero liability. >> reporter: this is how it works. compressed air units are installed in the grill of police cruisers, containing two 4 1/2-inch projectiles packed with gps satellite trackers and coated with enough adhesive to make them stick to a fleeing vehicle. when a suspect runs from a traffic stop, an officer can fire the projectiles at the suspect's car and basically relax. no need for sirens or lights or 90-mile-an-hour chases that could kill people. computers read the gps signal and track the vehicle in question. a trial of the star chase system has been under way in milwauk
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since december. >> i've actually had a lot of success with it. >> reporter: officer kim lastrila controls the projectiles from a button on her dashboard or a fob in her hand. >> at this point he's starting to make a break for it. >> yep. >> and you do that. >> reporter: right now the projectiles stick about 50% of the time, though with training milwaukee expects that number to be about 75%. and they do have some trouble in wet conditions. but there's no question that the technology reduces stress for the police and the suspects. >> the longer they go unpursued the more their driving behavior settles down because they don't want to get killed either. >> reporter: but they do get arrested. of 28 successful uses of starchase in its trial period, 17 people were taken into custody, and 26 stolen cars were recovered. each unit costs about five grand. that's a lot of money. but when you consider that the number one cause of death for police officers in
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involves car crashes, it could be money well spent. dean reynolds, milwaukee. just how wet and sticky your current gel antiperspirant is. ♪ and now we're going to show you how degree dry spray is different. degree dry spray. goes on instantly dry for a cleaner feel. degree. it won't let you down. hey spray 'n wash is back...ws? and even better. it's powerful formula removes everyday stains the first time. which is bad news for stains, and good news for you. spray 'n wash. back 'n better.
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we've been looking back on the life and career of legendary newsman morley safer. he's retiring after 52 years at cbs. 46 of those on "60 minutes." one of morley's final reports looked at bearca ingalls, the 41-year-old architect who's getting so famous she's being called a starchitect. >> bearca ingalls is having his moment. >> when you see it from the memorial -- >> reporter: he's not only designing the final tower at the world trade center -- >> we're basically at the middle of the ski slope. it continues all the way down to there. >> reporter: he's trotting the globe with some 60 projects in the works. >> it's still very much a work in progress. >> reporter: there's the
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complex of domes planned for its campus in silicon valley. >> we were quite worried about that distance. >> reporter: at the new lego headquarters in his native denmark. new york city alone he has five major projects under way, including a $3 billion high-rise planned for hudson yards. so weec d tidedo take to the hudson river to ha lve aook. starting with this. a massive almost finished apartment complex for all those young and restless new yorkers striving to make their first millions. >> tell me why you called this court scape. >> it's an unlikely child of a new york skyscraper and if you like a copenhagen courtyard building. >> but it's also a pyramid. could be a sail. >> exactly. eventually we just realized we had to make it much more extreme. so it became a single tower to the east but then drops toward the water. the roof itself is something you called a
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geometric terms you call it a hyperbolic paraboloid. >> say that three times quickly. are you surprised at how good it is or how bad it is, how unique it is? >> it's paradoxical for an architect. the only thing you can see is all the compromises, all the battles, the [ bleep ] that couldn't be fixed. >> reporter: the rise and rise of young mr. ingalls started here in copenhagen where he grew up. his father an engineer. his mother a dentist. >> i wanted to be a cartoonist but there was no cartoon academy. so i enrolled in the danish academy of architecture and i got schmitt nguyen architecture. >> reporter: from the beginning ingels said he set out to disrupt the architecture's tyranny of boring blocks. >> i said can you tell me why
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because people had this idea that in the good old days architecture had like ornament and towers and spires and gargoyles and today it just becomes very practical. >> reporter: after graduation in ingels lasted just two years working for famed architect rem kulhaus before setting off on his own. in 2005 he formed big, for the bjarke ingels group from his tiny apartment in copenhagen. denmark is one of the smallest countries on the planet and there was something funny about calling a company big. i think if i would have started big in america i would have probably never called it big. there was nothing but like a little bit of local small country humor in the idea. >> reporter: almost immediately he began to win design competitions, making a name for himself with inventive whimsical designs for what could often be deadly boring. suburban ame
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>> five years ago we had built a few projects in copenhagen that were in a way ordinary projects like housing and parking and shops and offices but we had put them together in a way that created maybe remarkable results. and suddenly we got an invitation to come to new york and look at the site on 57th street. and in a way i had nothing better to do, so i thought why don't i move to new york and see how it goes? >> reporter: it went pretty well. he now oversees 300 employees between offices in new york and coalen haigen. >> the more it looks like -- >> reporter: ingels believes his success comes from his ability to combine the practical with the fantastical. like this harbor bath in copenhagen where swimmers can swim in the city's harbor. or how about this? the design for the just unveiled new redskins stadium, complete with a moat for all those kayaking tailgaters. >> tailgating literally bec
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a picnic in the park. >> reporter: the culture at big is intense. but in off hours blowing off steam dressed as their favorite comic book hero isn't uncommon. that's the boss, armed with a gun full of tequila. >> the way we work is maybe unlike certain architects that have a very particular style where it is the auteur, it has to be the design principal who makes the strokes of genius. i don't have to come up with the best idea. it is my job to make sure that it is always the best idea that wins. >> i think he's really a wonderful spokesman for himself. and for -- i would say also for the possibility that architecture can really make life better for people. >> michael kimmelman is the architecture critic for the "new york times." he says ingels has combined natural talent with a mastery of marketing, a so-ll
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starchitect. >> it's rare you get architects who are really in their 30s and 40s who get to build big projects. and bjarke's figured that out partly by selling a certain youthful notion of the old starchitect model, which is glamour and spectacle. and he does something that i think is very important nowadays, which is to combine a notion of his own work with and larger social purpose. >> reporter: the thing that strikes me is a hot of people are willing to lay down billions of dollars. >> billions, with a b, yeah. >> reporter: on this kid. >> it's true. it is a gamble. he's got a lot of work coming down the pike. how is he going to make sure that work is not recycled, it's original, that it's finished well? >> there must be criticism by other architects. >> the more you are up to something interesting, the more it's going to inspire prize and criticism. >> reporter: and in your case? >> we have a fair
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sunshine and the opposite. and i think if you would take all of that to heart you wouldn't be able to, you know, draw a line or lay a brick. >> reporter: ingels has become a celebrity at home in denmark where he's designing the new headquarters of the most iconic of toymakers, lego. at the topping off ceremony in october townspeople waited in line in the rain to catch a glimpse of the new building it its architect. >> that's the tieback. >> reporter: that fame has also allowed him to take more risks, to add more spectacle to his creations. this is a chimney that belches steam rings. it will go atop a green garbage incinerating power plant in copenhagen. the roof doubles as a ski slope. >> the building says come and look at me. >> since this power plant is really saving a lot of co2 emissions it's almost a
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chimneys. >> reporter: the idea for the outrageous structure originally started as a joke. >> normally you would want to be as far away from a power plant as possible because it's polluting, it's noisy, it's smelly. but this is so clean that you essentially have clean mountain air on the roof of it and we thought, maybe it would make sense to make it a ski slope. so yeah, great idea, like let's get serious. when you stop laughing it felt like wait a minute, maybe this is not so stupid, maybe it's actually a good idea. >> reporter: never mind the starchitect appelation. you're a activist. >> if you're just reaffirming the status quo, then you are mission the point that the city is never complete. so every project we do somehow has to count. >> reorter: particularly this one. the design for two world trade center, the final tower set to rise on the site. >> 2 world trade center is roughly going to be
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world trade but without the spire. and if you see it from here it would appear as a series of seven city blocks of different proportions stepping up toward the sky. >> you can see the full report along with many other morley cbsnews.com. the "overnight news" will be right back. . can someone read me another story? daddd? mmm coming breyers gelato indulgences it's way beyond ice cream. seems like every time the toilet someone's there to undo it. after a superior clean, apply the lysol click gel. to keep it fresh, flush, after flush, after flush. for a toilet that gets clean, then actually stays that way. lysol that. how are you doing?nne. hi, evelyn. i know it's been a difficult time since your mom passed away. yeah. i miss her a lot, but i'm okay. wow. that was fast.
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million people have been driven from their homes by the war in syria. a million of those are children. many have found refuge in turkey. but a cbs news investigation found many syrian children are being put to work in sweatshops. holly williams has that. >> reporter: in a textile factory in istanbul workers toil over sewing machines. but look closely. because these workers are children. filming with a hidden camera, we found scores of factories using child labor in turkey. most, perhaps all of the children, from syria. some told us they were as young as 11. refugees from a war now easily exploited. a turkish worker on the minimum wage earns about $450 a month. a syrian child working 12 hours a day earns as little as
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at a school for syrian children in istanbul these boys age 10 to 12 are just beginning to learn to read and write because until recently most of them were full-time workers. >> how many of you guys have worked? wow. >> reporter: the school founder, shafiq suleman, told us he offers free tuition to encourage parents to send their children back to class but sometimes that's not enough. >> parents aren't earning enough money to feed their families. >> no. so they have to -- they're being forced to send their kids to work. >> reporter: out of desperation. >> yes. yes. they've got no choice. they have to send their children. >> reporter: layla aqja is a psychologist who treats syrian child refugees and their families and told us many factories prefer to hire children over their parents. >> you can overwork the children and they're not going to be
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oppositional. they're not going to ask for their rights. they don't know their rights. so they're just going to work like slaves. and it's easier to keep them as slaves than doing it to an adult. >> reporter: turkey has taken in around 3 million syrian refugees, spending billions of dollars to shelter and feed them. but while they're safe here, there's very little stable work and not much hope of building a future. that's why so many syrians have risked their lives in rickety boats, to reach europe. but now the european union has promised turkey nearly $7 billion in return for its help stopping the refugees. and the crackdown has worked. for syrians the door to europe has slammed shut. but the factories that prey on them appear to be operating with ipunity. and hundreds of thousands of syrian children in turkey are growing up illiterate and powerless to
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you'd do anything to take care of that spot on your lawn. so why not take care of that spot on your skin? if you're a man over 50 you're in the group most likely to develop skin cancer, including melanoma, the cancer that kills 1 person every hour. check your skin for suspicious or changing spots. go to spotskincancer.org to find out what to look for. a message from the american academy of dermatology
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most of the world's rhinos can be found on game reserves in south africa. but that doesn't mean they're safe. poachers still manage to get in, kill the animals, and take their horns. apparently, they're big business in asia. debora patta is at one game reserve taking an unusual step to protect the rhinos. >> reporter: this rhino is one of dozens at the phinda game reserve that has been sedated. so that their horns can be removed. ranger simon naylor knows his unmarked rhinos, their horns a deadly bounty on their heads. he has made an uneasy peace with the difficult decision to dehorn the rhino population. which some critics say may harm the rhino's ability to live
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>> i think in the last few years we've reached a tipping point in africa and certainly in south africa. there are more deaths now than births. so it's a species that's heading toward extinction if we don't do something drastic. >> reporter: naylor directs veterinarian mike toft on which rhino to dart with a potent tranquilizer. toft must ensure the precise dosage when he fires from the helicopter. too much could be lethal. the rhino is quickly blindfolded. it's hard to watch. but the rhino is not in any pain. although the process is briefly traumatic, toft says it's a bit like filing a human nail. >> i'd rather see this little guy upright in two years' time than in a ditch upside down and bloated dead from having his horn poached. for me it's a no-brainer. >> reporter: this rhino horn is what this war is being fought over. it is so valuable to
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off the property and taken to a secret location out of the reach of criminal syndicates. the appetite for rhino horn powder is so high that organized crime rings can net around $150,000 for an average horn. the trade is driven primarily by vietnam. where it's sold under the delusional belief it cures cancer and enhanses virtual. for this at least three rhino are killed every day in south africa, and toft is on the front lines. the dehorned rhino is sprayed with a purple disinfectant. the mark of survival. and then injected with an antidote to counteract the grogginess. >> 100%. he's nice and relaxed. >> reporter: there is no permanent damage. it will become increasingly rare to see a rhino with its horn still attached to it. but this team believes that it is a price worth paying to save the species. >> the good news for the rhinos is that that horn will grow back. that's the overnight news for this wednesday. for some of you the news
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continues. for others check back with us a little later for the "morning news" and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm don dahler. florida pleads for help fighting zika, but congress offers what amounts to a fly swatter. >> it's not going to cost 1.9 billion. it could cost 4 billion or 5 billion. >> also tonight, a defense of trump by his daughter. >> i found it to be pretty disturbing. our special series tracks one man's battle against opioid addiction. >> i don't want to die using drugs. like i don't want my legacy to be this kid overdosed, you know? >> and dehorning rhinos to save their lives. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." it's a race against time to kill mosquitos that carry zika, the virus linked to birth defects. the senate has approved just over $1 billion for the battle, but that's only about half of what the president has asked
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for. the house majority wants even less, 622 million. all zika cases in the u.s. so far have been in people who traveled from latin america. but health officials expect mosquito-borne infections will occur here soon. david begnaud is in florida. >> reporter: there are over 100 cases of zika in florida, more than any other state in the u.s., and officials say more funding is the key to stopping the spread. florida governor rick scott. >> this is an urgent need. we need to be doing this now. we need to come to the conclusion now. we need to prepare before we have the crisis. >> reporter: republican senator marco rubio represents florida and agrees. >> if this becomes a serious outbreak, it's not going to cost 1.9 billion. it could cost 4 billion or 5 billion. >> reporter: it is money the state needs, for example, for mosquito inspectors. florida does not have enough of them to monitor neighborhoods. so the state is now paying to
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train private pest controllers in emergency zika detection. michael doyle is director of mosquito control in the florida keys. >> the key is going house to house, spraying for the mosquitos under the bushes, under your porch. >> all the calls we're getting are throughout the county. >> reporter: and then there's the demand for spraying. an tan oversees mosquito control in broward county. how many calls a day are you getting for people who would like you to go spray in their neighborhood? >> on average about 400 to 500 a day. >> reporter: is that ten times what you'd normally get? >> it's about ten times what we normally get. >> i like to see that. >> reporter: but it is for expectant mothers here that the fear looms largest. is it a boy or a girl? >> a girl. >> reporter: emergency room nurse laura pratt is expecting her first child next week. >> there are so many risks to worry about. and this is just something else that i could be doing my normal thing and potentially harm my child. >> reporter: here in broward county they're using low-tech but highly effective devices in neighborhoods to lure mosqui
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this is it. essentially, it's dry ice and co2 that lures the mosquito and traps it in this net. there are only eight of these in broward county for nearly 2 million people, scott. it is the federal funding, we're told, that could provide for hundreds more. >> david begnaud for us tonight. david, thank you. our dr. jon lapook has been following zika from the start. jon, as congress debates the funding, what are public health officials telling you? >> scott, dr. tom frieden, who's the head of the cdc, told me just this afternoon it's mind-boggling, this is no way to fight an epidemic. "we're basically nickeling and diming the response when we know there are urgent needs that aren't getting met." i'm hearing similar sentiment at every level of public government. >> what specifically is not being done for lack of money? >> well, local mosquito control efforts. you heard from david begnaud's piece what's going on in florida. i'm hearing similar urgency elsewhere. and in houston the public health officials there told me they are desperately awaiting, desperately need congressional funding. >> and it's already mosquito season in the south. >> you know, it's already mosquito season in the south and
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you have to ask yourself as public health officials are asking, do we really need to wait for the very first mosquito right here in the united states to get infected with zika and spread it locally before springing into action and mounting a full-court press that is so desperately needed? >> dr. jon lapook following zika for us every day. jon, thank you very much. well, there was some improvement today in those airport security lines. the tsa said it was sending 58 more officers and bomb-sniffing dogs to chicago o'hare, where the lines had been as long as three hours. dean reynolds is there. >> reporter: with passengers lined up as far as the eye could see and with so many flights missed, the frustrated travelers were left sleeping in the terminals. tsa administrator peter neffenger today said he was sorry for the inconvenience. >> i always tell people i won't apologize for doing our job well, but i do apologize to the people who found themselves stranded in chicago yesterday.
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>> reporter: and it's not only chicago. airports across the country are seeing more passengers and longer security lines at peak travel times. last week american airlines said 6,400 of their customers missed flights because of the backlog. cybelle jones was traveling through washington's reagan national airport. >> it's not even summer yet, so i can only imagine how bad it will be if this continues into the summer. >> reporter: passengers have taken to social media using the hashtag ihatethewait to voice their frustrations. the public outcry is prompting calls from congress for more reinforcements. illinois senator dick durbin. >> if the airlines would suspend the baggage fees through the summer travel season, it will encourage more people to check their bags and there will be less delay. >> reporter: illinois's other senator, mark kirk, said today that if the problem isn't fixed by memorial day tsa administrator neffenger should resign. and guess what, scott, those long lines that we saw earlier this week at o'hare are now greatly reduced. >> dean reynolds for us tonight.
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well, today donald trump said he is worth more than $10 billion. that was the bottom line in his financial disclosure statement filed with the federal election commission. the statement shows that trump's net worth increased in the past year. his income topped $557 million, not including dividends, interest, capital gains, rents, and royalties. also today, trump told reuters that he would be willing to talk directly to north korean dictator kim jong un about the nuclear program in that country. that would be a major shift in u.s. policy. our norah o'donnell talked to trump's daughter ivanka today. >> i want to ask you about "the new york times." they ran a front-page article this sunday about your father and the treatment of women. did you read it? >> i did. and i found it to be pretty disturbing based on the facts as i know them, both in the
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capacity as a daughter and in the capacity as an executive who has worked alongside of him at this company for over a decade. so i was bothered by it. most of the time when stories are inaccurate they're not discredited. and i will be frustrated by that. but in this case i think they went so far, they had such a strong thesis and created facts to reinforce it, and there's backlash in that regard. >> but "the new york times" stands by its story. you can see more of norah o'donnell's interview with ivanka trump on "cbs this morning." now to a democratic presidential race that's all over but the primaries. there were two yesterday, in oregon and kentucky. and cbs news projects that bernie sanders has won oregon and hillary clinton wins kentucky. sanders has little chance of catching hillary clinton in the delegate count, but he vows to soldier on. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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one in six americans get sick every year from food poisoning. to reduce your risk, follow these four simple steps one: wash your hands and preparation surfaces. two: separate raw meat, poultry, seafood and eggs from ready to eat foods. three: cook foods to the proper temperatures. four: refrigerate perishable foods properly at 40 degrees fahrenheit or below. for more tips to avoid food poisoning,
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people take action against housing discrimination? my co-worker was pressured by her landlord to pay her rent with sexual favors. my neighbor was told she needs to get rid of her dog, even though he's an assistance animal. housing discrimination is illegal. if you think you've been a victim, report it to hud. like we did. narrator: they all reported discrimination and were able to secure their fair housing rights under the law. visit hud.gov/fairhousing or call the hud hotline. fair housing is your right. use it.
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well, today the isis bombing campaign in baghdad killed 69 people in four blasts. as always, isis was attacking neighborhoods of its rival, the shiite branch of islam. isis is made up of sunni
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radicals. in six days bombs have killed nearly 200 baghdad civilians. these attacks are designed to destabilize the u.s.-backed government, which is already teetering in a political crisis. returning now to an epidemic that is taking three lives in this country every hour, the abuse of opioids, including prescription painkillers and heroin. jason amaral could have been a dead man. the boy next door from a boston suburb got hooked in college. he's now 30. and we're telling his story because we want you to know there is both hope and help for addiction. last night we followed amaral as he shot heroin for what he hoped would be the last time. as we left him, he was entering rehab. correspondent demarco morgan and producer jonathan blakely continue our series "in the shadow of death: jason's journey."
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>> reporter: 24 hours into rehab we found an emotional jason amaral fighting through the first critical hours of detox. he just learned his younger brother andrew, who is also an addict, was back on the streets because he could not find an open bed for treatment. >> he's running around boston getting high again. so. you know what i mean? i don't know. can you guys stop the camera for a second? >> reporter: it had already been a rough first day for jason. he walked into recovery after a drug binge. >> all right. i'll see you in like five minutes. >> reporter: he allowed our cameras to follow him the day before as he roamed the streets of boston in search of drug money and heroin. >> yeah. don't answer your phone, you [ bleep ] dumb [ bleep ]. >> reporter: that morning he crushed and snorted pills from a toilet seat in city hall. he met friends to shoot up in the middle of the day.
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was sick. and now i just did a shot and i'm very, very high. >> reporter: and then that night we watched him inject more heroin laced with a powerful drug fentanyl not once but twice. >> my veins aren't popping like they usually do either. why? >> reporter: before his best friend mike duggin arrived. mike is a recovering addict who's been clean seven years and came to take jason to rehab. >> you will die if you don't get it this time. you know what i mean? it's just really what it comes down to. >> reporter: mike traveled by plane from boston to south jersey to make sure jason made it to recovery centers of america in time. >> how are you? >> good. >> we're so glad you're here. >> me and jason ran together. we got involved in a lot of this stuff together. fortunately, i was able to find it a lot sooner because i've been terrified for him for years. >> jason. >> hi, jason.
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welcome. what brought you in for treatment? >> i honestly don't know how to live a normal life sober. i don't know how to deal with life. >> reporter: notice how jason was visibly uncomfortable as he's forced to give up the pills he had in his bag. >> we're passionate about recovery. we believe in what we do. and we know that people get well. and you can get well. we can help you get there. >> you've taken everything from me. >> reporter: in one of his first therapy sessions jason was given a bat and told to confront his addiction. >> never, ever put me in an ambulance again. i'm never going to overdose. my brother won't overdose. he's going to survive. he's going to get it this time. his kid, my godson, will never see us high again, ever again. it won't take anything from me or my family again. all right. now i'm like sweating. >> reporter: it was that day's small victory. >> il
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i took a lot of anger out on it. i never did that before. >> you had the synthetic high you're getting from heroin. we want to replace that with a natural high, the endorphin kick. okay? >> reporter: to get his mind and body off drugs jason is encouraged to do exercise and yoga. >> good. all right. rest. >> it's going to have to be a bigger part of me wants to stay clean than a part of me wants to get high. because there's always going to be a part of me that wants to get high. for the rest of my life. it's a disease. i'll want to get high for the rest of my life. >> are you afraid of dying? >> i'm afraid of getting high and dying is what it is right now. i don't want to die using drugs. i don't want my legacy to be this kid overdosed, you know. >> we weren't allowed to record jason's medication process but he was slowly weaned off heroin with opioid replacement drugs over the first seven days. and scott, you've heard jason talk about his family. in our next report you're going to meet the people who love him most, his family, who've been affected by his drug use. that includes his brother, who is also addicted to heroin. >> great public service reporting. demarco morgan, thank you very much, with producer jonathan blakely. there is more on jason's
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journey and information about how to get help fighting addiction. help is possible. and you can find it at cbsnews.com/heroinepidemic. in a much-awaited report today the national academy of sciences said that genetically modified food is generally safe for humans and the environment. tinkering with genetics does not turn crops into frankenfood, as some have claimed. at the same time, the report says that gmos have not led to higher yields, which was one of their selling points. rangers are taking chainsaws to rhinos to save their lives. and her lifelong quest to track down her biological mother. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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south africa's rhino population is under siege. poachers are killing three a day to sell the horns. rangers at a private game reserve are now taking drastic and controversial action. debora patta spent time there. >> reporter: these terrified rhino run for their lives. their horns have placed a deadly bounty on their heads. but the men hunting them are not poachers. simon naylor is phinda reserve's head ranger.
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he gives the order to tranquilize the rhino. the drug quickly takes effect. a drunken stagger before the rhino is blindfolded to dull his senses. it's hard to watch. but dehorning the rhinos could save their lives. they're not in any pain. it's like filing a human nail. this rhino horn is what this war is being fought over. it is still so valuable to poachers that even after it's been removed it is immediately whisked off the property and taken to a secret location out of the reach of criminal syndicates. in some parts of asia the rhinos' horn sells for about $150,000. veterinarian mike toft. >> i'd rather see this little
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than in a ditch upside down and bloated, dead from having had his horn poached. so for me it's a no-brainer. >> reporter: the rhinos are sprayed with a purple disinfectant. the mark of survival. >> okay. right. we're ready to wake up. he's looking. looking 100%. he's nice and relaxed. >> reporter: the horn will grow back in a few years. although it will become increasingly rare to see a rhino with its horn on this reserve. but it may be the only way to save the species. debora patta, cbs news, phinda game reserve, south africa. >> those horns are poached to be used in chinese medicine preparations. we'll have more in just a moment.
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some ferocious storms hit florida's east coast today. a woman driving on i-95 spotted this funnel cloud in st. lucie county. and then came the rain, nearly eight inches in vero beach. some new tests have caught some old cheaters. today the international olympic committee said that retests of urine samples from the 2008 beijing summer games came back positive for doping for 31 athletes in six sports from 12 countries. today the senate voted unanimously to confirm eric fanning as secretary of the army. he will be the first openly gay leader of a military branch. fanning's nomination was held up for eight months by republican pat roberts of kansas. he dropped his opposition when the administration promised not to transfer guantanamo prisoners to fort leavenworth in kansas. it took more than half a century, but a mother and child
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reunion is only a moment away.
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finally tonight, a mother and her daughter, separated decades ago, have been reunited. and brry petersen has their story. >> i'm nervous. i'm excited. i've waited 50 years for this moment. >> reporter: for cyndy burns, the wait is almost over. i started when she was a 10-month-old baby left with a korean adoption agency. amid that country's poverty, this was a chance at a better life in america, believed her korean mother, sun cha. did you believe you would ever see your daughter again? >> no. i don't believe it. i don't know how i'm going to find her.
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>> reporter: cyndy grew up in a connecticut family. she had all but given up finding her birth mother. >> i'd gone to korea last year kind of looking for her, and i made peace with the fact that i'd probably never find her. >> reporter: when a dna sample led her to sun cha. >> it says 99.99% she is your biological mother. i so much wanted it to be true. >> reporter: there was more. her mom had been living on the west coast. they had been in the same country for decades. cyndy flew to tacoma this weekend to meet her mom. >> my daughter cyndy. >> hello. you're so beautiful. >> i always say where can i find her? i don't know where she is. >> we're back together now. >> i know. >> reporter: when we sat with them, they couldn't stop hol
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each other, as if they were afraid they might lose each other again. what does it say about your mother that she was willing to be open about this secret that all of her life she hadn't shared with her family? >> it's confirmation that she did love me. >> reporter: at sun cha's home there was a family reunion. cyndy with her newly found sisters and brother. >> it's what all of us who are adopted want, is for our existence to be validated. >> here we go. >> and to know that our parents loved us. >> reporter: barry petersen, cbs news, tacoma, washington. >> that's the "overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm don dahler. mosquito season is right around the corner, but the battle against the zika virus continues to be fought in washington. after a three-month delay the senate cleared the way to fund the fight. but it falls far short of the president's request for nearly $2 billion. zika can cause birth defects and is mostly transmitted by mosquitos. david begnaud is in coral springs, florida, which has its fair share of mosquitos. >> reporter: mosquito controllers insist the zika threat is at florida's doorstep. a few infected mosquitos can cause a large outbreak. here in broward county in south florida where we are they're getting 500 calls a day requesting mosquito spraying. that's ten times the amount they're used to.
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>> when it rains it fills up. mosquitos grow and four or five days from now adults will be flying around. >> reporter: on the u.s. mainland florida is the front line in the zika fight. more than 100 cases have been reported here. more than any other state. you're not going to get zika in the woods while you're hunting or at the lake when you're on your boat. you might get it at your front door. >> that's exactly right. while you're standing next to your car to go on your hunting trip or to the beach or to the park, that's when the mosquitos will fly up and bite you in the ankle. it's not in those typical places that we as floridians think of as mosquito biting territory. >> reporter: michael doyle of the florida keys mosquito district suspects zika cases will rise as summer approaches. as of now all of florida's zika patients contracted the virus from travel-related exposure. in february the white house requested approximately $1.9 billion in emergency funding. congress is debating it. >> we need to deal with this seriously. >> reporter: republican senator marco rubio represents florida. >> we're going to spend a lot more money if we don't deal with this on the front end. if this become a serious outbreak it's t
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1.9 billion. it could cost 4 billion or 5 billion. >> reporter: republican hal rogers, chairman of the appropriations committee, is a critic. >> the request they sent us would allow the $1.9 billion to be used for anything in the government. it's almost like a slush fund. >> mosquitos don't know whether their target is a democrat or a republican. the zika impacts all of us. >> reporter: democratic congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz, also from florida, insists part of the money will be used to develop a zika vaccine and raise awareness in a state that thrives on tourism. >> we're now going into the mosquito season. every week the chances of having enough of them to start transmitting it from travelers to local people increases. >> reinforcements are being sent to chicago's o'hare airport, where hundreds of air travelers missed their flights over the past few days because they couldn't get through security. o'hare is getting 58 more security officers and four more bomb-sniffing dogs. but the trouble at the security checkpoints is not limited to chicago.
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angeles international. >> this airport is telling flyers to be in these lines two and three hours early as the number of passengers are going to go up as the summer travel season gets going. already one airline tells "cbs this morning" l.a.x. makes its top five for missed flights because of tsa lines and now flyers from coast to coast are striking back on social media. security lines that seem to never end are becoming the new normal in chicago. at o'hare international airport we're talking about wait times up to three hours. long enough to strand more than 100 passengers overnight sunday, forcing many to sleep on cots. >> what's the problem? why is this happening? >> this is absurd. >> they need to hire more people. they need to figure out the system. >> reporter: american airlines says 450 customers missed their flights at o'hare sunday alone because of the long lines. this headline dubbed the trip
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through security "a slow march through hell." the tsa blames the issue at o'hare on increased passenger volume, but it's not just chicago. flyers around the country are blasting the tsa on social media using the hashtag ihatethewait to post pictures of long lines. at least 6,400 american airlines passengers missed their flights at the nation's top 20 airports. and that's in just the last week. >> we are trying to work with the tsa. this is an effort to help flag to the tsa where the massive wait times are. >> reporter: melanie hinton with airlines for america, a trade association representing several major air carriers, created that hashtag. >> let your fellow passengers know if you have an excessive wait time. >> reporter: earlier this month the three new york-area airports joined seattle and atlanta in threatening to drop the tsa for private screeners. >> there will be wait times. >> reporter: friday secretary of homeland security jeh johnson said the tsa is looking to hire hundreds more screeners and will
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but that may not be enough. as the peak summer travel rush arrives. >> three hours is not ideal. we want to reduce that as much as possible without compromising the safety of the american public. >> reporter: so how did we get here? well, congress capped the number of tsa screeners, thinking there would be millions of more flyers enrolled in precheck which is expedited screening. enrollment has lagged. you have seen the tsa experience very high turnover, and they've struggled to maintain their staffing numbers. this as the number of flyers has steadily increased. on average, one person is killed each day during a high-speed police chase somewhere in america. but a new device could soon make those chases a thing of the past. dean reynolds reports. >> high speeds, wet roads. >> reporter: adrenaline-pumping cops and robbers pursuits are something of a tv addiction. police departments as
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country are looking for a safer way to nab suspects on the run. >> he layed a game of mercedes pinball. >> i'm going to take my loading tool. >> reporter: and now more than 50 agencies are using a system invented by a company called starchase whose president is trevor fishbach. >> we've had zero fatalities, zero injuries, zero property damage and zero liability. >> reporter: this is how it works. compressed air units are installed in the grill of police cruisers, containing two 4 1/2-inch projectiles packed with gps satellite trackers and coated with enough adhesive to make them stick to a fleeing vehicle. when a suspect runs from a traffic stop, an officer can fire the projectiles at the suspect's car and basically relax. no need for sirens or lights or 90-mile-an-hour chases that could kill people. computers read the gps signal and track the vehicle in question. a trial of the starchase system has been under way in milwaukee since december. >> i've actually had a lot of success with it. >>
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lastrila controls the projectiles from a button on her dashboard or a fob in her hand. >> at this point he's starting to make a break for it. >> yep. >> and you do that. >> reporter: right now the projectiles stick about 50% of the time, though with training milwaukee expects that number to be about 75%. and they do have some trouble in wet conditions. but there's no question that the technology reduces stress for the police and the suspects. >> the longer they go unpursued the more their driving behavior settles down because they don't want to get killed either. >> reporter: but they do get arrested. of 28 successful uses of starchase in its trial period, 17 people were taken into custody, and 26 stolen cars were recovered. each unit costs about five grand. that's a lot of money. but when you consider that the number one cause of death for police officers in this country invo c
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be money well spent. dean reynolds, milwaukee.
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nice'n easy: color as real as you are. we've been looking back on the life and career of legendary newsman morley safer. he's retiring after 52 years at cbs. 46 of those on "60 minutes." one of morley's final reports looked at bjarke ingels, the 41-year-old architect who's getting so famous she's being called a starchitect. >> bjarke ingels is having his moment. >> when you see it from the memorial -- >> reporter: he's not only designing the final tower at the world trade center -- >> we're basically at the middle of the ski slope. it continues all the way down to there. >> reporter: he's trotting the globe with some 60 projects in the works.
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>> it's still very much a work in progress. >> reporter: there's the googleplex, google's futuristic complex of domes planned for its campus in silicon valley. >> we were quite worried about that distance. >> reporter: at the new lego headquarters in his native denmark. new york citony al he heas five major projects under way, ininclud$3g a billion high-rise planned for hudson yards. so we decided to take to the hudson river to have a look. starting with this. a massive almost finished apartment complex for all those young and restless new yorkers striving to make their first millions. >> tell me why you called this court scape. >> it's an unlikely child of a new york skyscraper and, if you like, a copenhagen courtyard building. >> but it's also a pyramid. could be a sail. >> exactly. eventually we just realized we had to make it much more extreme. so it became a single tower to
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the east but then drops toward the water. the roof itself is something you called a saddle shape or in geometric terms you call it a hyperbolic paraboloid. >> say that three times quickly. are you surprised at how good it is or how bad it is, how unique it is? >> it's paradoxical for an architect. the only thing you can see is all the battles you lost, all the compromises that had to be made, the [ bleep ] ups that couldn't be fixed. you're going to have to bleep that out. >> reporter: the rise and rise of young mr. ingels started here in copenhagen where he grew up. his father an engineer. his mother a dentist. >> i wanted to be a cartoonist but there was no cartoon academy. so i enrolled in the royal danish academy of architecture and i really got smitten with architecture. >> reporter: from the beginning ingels said he set out to disrupt modern architecture's tyranny of what he calls the
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boring formulaic box. >> i said can you tell me why modern buildings are so boring? because people had this idea that in the good old days architecture had like ornament and towers and spires and gargoyles and today it just becomes very practical. >> reporter: after graduation ingels lasted just two years working for famed architect rem kulhaus before setting off on his own. in 2005 he formed big, for the bjarke ingels group from his tiny apartment in copenhagen. >> denmark is one of the smallest countries on the planet and there was something funny about calling a company big. i think if i would have started big in america i would have probably never called it big. there was nothing but like a little bit of local small country humor in the idea. >> reporter: almost immediately he began to win design competitions, making a name for himself with inventive whimsical
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designs for what could often be deadly boring. suburban apartment buildings. >> five years ago we had built a few projects in copenhagen that were in a way ordinary projects like housing and parking and shops and offices but we had put them together in a way that created maybe remarkable results. and suddenly we got an invitation to come to new york and look at the site on 57th street. and in a way i had nothing better to do, so i thought why don't i move to new york and see how it goes? >> reporter: it went pretty well. he now oversees 300 employees between offices in new york and copenhagen. >> the more it looks like -- >> reporter: ingels believes his success comes from his ability to combine the practical with the fantastical. like this harbor bath in copenhagen where swimmers can swim in the city's harbor. or how about this? the design for the just unveiled new redskins stadium, complete with a moat for all those kayaking tailgaters. >>lg
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a picnic in the park. >> reporter: the culture at big is intense. but in off hours blowing off steam dressed as their favorite comic book hero isn't uncommon. that's the boss, armed with a gun full of tequila. >> the way we work is maybe unlike certain architects that have a very particular style where it is the auteur, it has to be the design principal who makes the strokes of genius. i don't have to come up with the best idea. it is my job to make sure that it is always the best idea that wins. >> i think he's really a wonderful spokesman for himself. and for -- i would say also for the possibility that architecture can really make life better for people. >> michael kimmelman is the architecture critic for the "new york times." he says ingels has combined natural talent with a mastery of marketing, a so-called
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starchitect. >> it's rare you get architects who are really in their 30s and 40s who get to build big projects. and bjarke's figured that out partly by selling a certain youthful notion of the old starchitect model, which is glamour and spectacle. and he does something that i think is very important nowadays, which is to combine a notion of his own work with and larger social purpose. >> reporter: the thing that strikes me is a hot of people are willing to lay down billions of dollars. >> billions, with a b, yeah. >> reporter: on this kid. >> it's true. it is a gamble. he's got a lot of work coming down the pike. how is he going to make sure that work is not recycled, it's original, that it's finished well? >> there must be criticism by other architects. >> the more you are up to something interesting, the more it's going to inspire prize and criticism. >> reporter: and in your case?
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>> we have a fair amount of sunshine and the opposite. and i think if you would take all of that to heart you wouldn't be able to, you know, draw a line or lay a brick. >> reporter: ingels has become a celebrity at home in denmark where he's designing the new headquarters of the most iconic of toymakers, lego. at the topping off ceremony in october townspeople waited in line in the rain to catch a glimpse of the new building it its architect. >> that's the tieback. >> reporter: that fame has also allowed him to take more risks, to add more spectacle to his creations. this is a chimney that belches steam rings. it will go atop a green garbage incinerating power plant in copenhagen. the roof doubles as a ski slope. >> the building says come and look at me. >> since this power plant is really saving a lot of co2 emissions it's almost a complete reversal of the symbolism of chimneys. >> reporter: the idea for the
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started as a joke. >> normally you would want to be as far away from a power plant as possible because it's polluting, it's noisy, it's smelly. but this is so clean that you essentially have clean mountain air on the roof of it and we thought, maybe it would make sense to make it a ski slope. so yeah, great idea, like let's get serious. when you stop laughing it felt like wait a minute, maybe this is not so stupid, maybe it's actually a good idea. >> reporter: never mind the starchitect appelation. you're a activist. >> if you're just reaffirming the status quo, then you are missing the point that the city is never complete. so every project we do somehow has to count. >> reporter: particularly this one. the design for two world trade center, the final tower set to rise on the site. >> 2 world trade center is roughly going to be as tall as 1 world trade but without the spire.
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and if you see it from here it would appear as a series of seven city blocks of different proportions stepping up toward the sky. >> you can see the full report along with many other morley safer stories on our website, cbsnews.com. the "overnight news" will be right back. telling people how switching to geico could save them hundreds of dollars on car insurance. but first, my luggage. ahh, there it is. uh, excuse me, sir? i think you've got the wrong bag. sorry, they all look alike, you know? no worries. well, car's here, i can't save people money chatting at the baggage claim all day. geico®. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. jill and kate use the same dishwasher. same detergent. but only jill ends up with wet, spotty glasses. kate adds finish jet-dry with five power actions that dry dishes and prevent spots and film, so all that's left is the shine.
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the u.n. says more than 5 million people have been driven from their homes by the war in syria. a million of those are children. many have found refuge in turkey. but a cbs news investigation found many syrian children are being put to work in sweatshops. holly williams has that. >> reporter: in a textile factory in istanbul workers toil over sewing machines. but look closely. because these workers are children. filming with a hidden camera, we found scores of factories using child labor in turkey. most, perhaps all of the children, from syria. some told us they were as young as 11. refugees from a war now easily exploited. a turkish worker on the minimum wage earns about $450 a month. a syrian child working 12 hours a day earns as little as $160. a
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in istanbul these boys age 10 to 12 are just beginning to learn to read and write because until recently most of them were full-time workers. >> how many of you guys have worked? wow. >> reporter: the school founder, shafiq suleman, told us he offers free tuition to encourage parents to send their children back to class but sometimes that's not enough. >> parents aren't earning enough money to feed their families. >> no. so they have to -- they're being forced to send their kids to work. >> reporter: out of desperation. >> yes. yes. they've got no choice. they have to send their children. >> reporter: layla aqja is a psychologist who treats syrian child refugees and their families and told us many factories prefer to hire children over their parents. >> you cve
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oppositional. they're not going to ask for their rights. they don't know their rights. so they're just going to work like slaves. and it's easier to keep them as slaves than doing it to an adult. >> reporter: turkey has taken in around 3 million syrian refugees, spending billions of dollars to shelter and feed them. but while they're safe here, there's very little stable work and not much hope of building a future. that's why so many syrians have risked their lives in rickety boats, to reach europe. but now the european union has promised turkey nearly $7 billion in return for its help stopping the refugees. and the crackdown has worked. for syrians the door to europe has slammed shut. but the factories that prey on them appear to be operating with impunity. and hundreds of thousands of
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syrian children in turkey are growing up ill
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♪and one day.... ♪and one day.... speaker 1: noises like that used to make me hit the deck. but now, i can keep going. speaker 2: don't get me wrong, i still don't love crowded places. but it's good to get out again. speaker 3: transitioning from the military can be tough. but many veterans are facing similar challenges. visit maketheconnection.net to watch our stories, and learn ways to create the story you want to live. make the connection. you'd do anything to take care of that spot on your lawn. so why not take care of that spot on your skin? if you're a man over 50 you're in the group most likely to develop skin cancer, including melanoma, the cancer that kills 1 person every hour. check your skin for suspicious or changing spots. go to spotskincancer.org to find out what to look for.
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captioning funded by cbs it's wednesday, may 18th, 2016. this is the "cbs morning news." hillary clinton calls it a win in kentucky, while bernie sanders picks up oregon. the delegates continue to pile up for clinton, but sanders says he's staying in the race. facing calls for his resignation, tsa's top administrator apologizes to hundreds of passengers who missed their flights out of o'hare this weekend. what went wrong? >> i don't know what that was. we're fixing that. that's a great concern to me. and breaking overnight, heavy rain triggers

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