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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  January 16, 2017 2:35am-4:00am EST

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about the possibility of that and i think when you see the cabinet that he's assembled in general mattis and mike pompeo, we're coming at this with realistic expectations. but the president-elect is determined to reengage the world, put america first, and see if we can fake progress for the security and the peace for the world. >> let me ask you about that. because the picture that donald trump puts forward about his view of russia seems quite different than the gentleman you mentioned, incoming secretary of defense mattis and also secretary of state tillerson. mr. tillerson said, russia poses a danger. he called russia an adversary. he said there are a number of areas where america is going to have to confront russia. that's not an opinion, that's confrontation. mr. mattis said, the most important thing to recognize is that putin is trying to break the north atlantic alliance. my question is, if the american
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trump and listening to those men, and more importantly countries overseas are listening, who's driving the bus, mr. trump or those two men? >> well, the great thing about being around donald trump is you never have any confusion about who's driving the bus. and where the buck stops and who will make the final decision. but i think as you hear the testimony of rex tillerson, of general mattis, of mike pompeo, i think the american people should be encouraged by the fact that the president-elect is assembling around him people of extraordinary background and capability, who will bring their own experience and their own perspective to inform the president's decisions where ultimately the president will make the best decision, the best interest for the american people. >> you had mattis and tillerson say confront russia. donald trump does not sound like a guy who wants to confront russia. >> if you list t
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would be -- he said it would be good if we had a better relationship with russia, i hope it gets better, and he said maybe not. >> does donald trump demand that russia get out of ukraine? that would be a confrontation that mattis and tillerson, it sounds like that's what they want. does donald trump want russia out of eastern ukraine? >> let's be very clear whether it's eastern ukraine or crimea, that the action by the russians has demonstrated the absence of american leadership. >> we have new leadership. what does the new leadership want to do? >> i think america is going to be more respected in the world the very moment that donald trump takes the oath of office as the 45th president of the united states. and he'll work through these issues, john. >> we'll have more of john's conversation with the vice president-elect in two minutes. we'll be right back.
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today, the nation honors the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king, jr. over the mlk weekend, president-elect trump fired back at a civil rights icon who stood shoulder to shoulder with dr. king. mr. trump's response came after congressman john lewis questioned the legitimacy of his presidency. "face the nation" host john dickerson asked the vice president-elect about. >> john lewis said he did not consider donald trump a legitimate president. your reaction to that? >> well, look, donald trump won this election fair and square. 30 out of 50 states, including georgia. more counties than any republican candidate since ronald reagan. and to hear john lewis, a man that i served with
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respect, to question the legitimacy of the election and to say that donald trump will not be a legitimate president was deeply disappointing to me. and also to hear that he was not going to attend the inauguration this friday. i hope he reconsiders both statements. >> famous counterpuncher, donald trump said john lewis was all talk and no action. i've got a question, he has every right to defend himself. let me ask you about the wisdom of that. for five years, donald trump questioned the legitimacy of barack obama, said he wasn't born in america. why swing at this pitch? couldn't he be the bigger man and let john lewis do his thing and move on? why swing at this pitch? >> well, as you said, donald trump has every right to defend himself. and to have -- >> but he
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legitimacy of president obama -- >> to have someone like john lewis. i served with john. i disagreed with him on most issues, but i have tremendous respect for him. my family and i watched across the edman pettis bridge with him on the 65th anniversary of bloody sunday. we honor the sacrifice that he made. but part of the result of what happened on bloody sunday and the courage that he showed was the voting rights act. so for someone of his stature, not just in the civil rights movement but in voting rights, to make a comment that he did not consider donald trump to be a legitimate president isee dply disappointing. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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own. it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together. as we look ahead to the beginning of a new presidency, many are also looking back at eight years of the obama administration. martha teichner checked this story. >> because of what we did on this day, in this election, at this defining moment, change has come to america. [ applause ] >> reporter: it was a moment that seemed to hold so much promise. such oim
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cynicism and doubt and those who tell us that we can't, we will respond with that timeless creed that sums up the spirit of a people. yes, we can. [ applause ] >> reporter: barack obama facing that sea of supporters in chicago. on november 4th, 2008. after being elected our first african-american president. what began that night is ending now. the assessment of the obama legacy already under way. >> i think that moment, that grand park moment will be remembered symbolically in history as a moment when america thought, we've done something and we feel good about that. >> reporter: pulitzer prize winning historian doris goodwin. >> we talk about is it the man or the times that makes for a presidential legacy. and that moment in grant park seemed like the man was even bigger than the times.
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>> are you prepared to take the oath, senator? >> i am. >> reporter: but the times set the agenda from day one. as soon as barack obama took the oath of office, he inherited the worst economic crisis since the great depression. the big banks and gm and chrysler were teetering. unemployment was pushing 8%. it's easy to forget how scary it was. now, unemployment is just over 4.5%. since early 2010, more than 15 million jobs have been created. by most accounts, a big check in the plus column of the obama legacy tally. >> it's a huge achievement to say the economy -- it's not just a statistical thing you 'done, you've affected people's lives and futures. and that is real. >> some practice with this,ut
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>> reporter: for president obama, virtually every accomplishment was a struggle. he was blind sided by the partisan ugliness of the opening battles. as he said a year ago. >> in those early months, my expectation was that we could pull the parties together a little more effectively. >> reporter: in 2010, senate minority leader mitch mcconnell defined what democrats called republican obstructionism. >> our top political priority over the next two years should be to deny president obama a >> reporter: not one republican in the house or the senate voted for the affordable care act. what came to be known as obamacare. the president wanted his signature expansion of health care insurance to be the biggest check in his legacy plus column. but republicans are already dismantling it.
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what about president obama's foreign policy legacy? >> tonight, i can report to the american people and to the world that the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden, the leader of al qaeda. >> reporter: the killing of bin laden definitely a plus. the way he pulled out of iraq and afghanistan, the iran nuclear deal, the now dead on arrival transpacific partnership, claimed by the administration as pluses, by his critics not so much. and his handling of syria, according to many policy experts, a big check in the minus column. >> i would argue that the decision not to make good on the american threat on syria and use of chemical weapons was the single biggest flaw and mistake of barack obama's presidency. >> reporter: richard haass is president of the nonpartisan council on northern relations in
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friends and allies, who are inherently dependent on us, that we could not be counted on. i think he had a view of the world that it would sort itself out just fine, even if the united states made the decision to do a lot less. that's simply wrong. what we learned, particularly in the middle east but also elsewhere, is that the united states dials down. benign forces don't spill the space. >> i've lived long enough to know that race relations are better than they were 10 or 20 or 30 years ago, no matter what some folks some say. >> reporter: he changed the conversation about the nation's social issues. >> the idea that people now talk about systemic racism, systemic bias, that it showed up on the campaign trail, that's new. >> reporter: charles blow is an op-ed columnist for "the new york times." >> the
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the top while he is president is a real thing. >> reporter: that can't be undone -- >> you can't put that genie back in the bottle. now that is at the top on the surface. now we have to deal with that. >> reporter: just this past friday, attorney general loretta lynch announced the results of a 13-month investigation of the chicago police department. >> a pattern or practice of use of excessive force in violation of the fourth amendment to the constitution. >> reporter: for chicago, substitute ferguson, baltimore, cleveland to name some of the cities whose police practices have been scrutinized. >> that is hidden. that is the influence that he's having on our discussion, and that comes to the front during the obama years. >> reporter: now, consider this -- >> strangely enough, it's not
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african-american i think that is most remarkable of his eight years. it is the incredible movement on issues like same-sex marriage and kind of gay rights and inclusion, that it has been the civil rights movement of our time and it has changed over his tenure more than at any other time in american history. >> reporter: but what has also changed in obama's eight years devastating democratic party losses at the polls have left republicans firmly in charge. a big minus that will have an impact on his legacy. still, for historians, how a president is judged changes over time. >> when you think about harry truman having left the presidency with such a low level of approval rating, and yet now being considered one of the near great presidents. and
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johnson, having left the presidency with such sadness, feeling like the vietnam war was a car on his legacy, there's no question domestically he did far more than we realized at the time. >> do you think history will be kind to president obama's legacy? >> i do. >> reporter: the symbolism of president obama's legacy can't be ignored. the image of this particular first family. ♪ amazing grace >> reporter: of a president who sang his heart out over the killings in that charleston church. >> for the office of the president, uh-oh, guess who? >> reporter: of a white house that was hip for a change. do you believe that symbolisms
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equal in value as legislative achievement? >> i think absolutely. i believe in image, i believe in representation. i believe that it is a powerful, powerful, powerful thing. i have three kids who have grown up and they have known anything but a black president. their consciousness about a president begins with him. >> i'm asking you to hold fast to that faith written into our founding documents. >> reporter: it is with symbolism in mind that president barack obama returned to chicago where it all began, to say goodbye and to consign his presidency to history. >> a creed at the core of every american whose story is not yet written. yes, we can. yes, we did. yes, we can.
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thank you. god bless you.
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it's last call tonight. jonathan vigliotti tells us about a new wave of spirits made for millennials that's shaking up the whisky business. >> reporter: its amber tones and smoky notes have seduced for centuries and given birth to one of the uk's most lucrative industries. in the rolling hills of scotland, making scotch whiskey is a work of art. the grains are mashed, fermented, then distilled and finally aged in wooden casks. it's a 500-year-old spirit protected by law and drinking it can pack a lot of rules. but in a small london loft whisky blender john glaser is dropping the pretense and adding a new range of flavors.
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>> you know, a lot of people think scotch whisky is high handed, they think there are rules. that you have to drink it a certain way. >> it's a little scary, it's intimidating. >> there are so many different scotch whiskies and how do i choose, so it is intimidating and we try to break all that down. >> reporter: whisper whisky it's being dubbed, mellower and lighter for the millennial palate. the production process borrows from tradition. glaser buys single malts from scottish distilleries. like blenders of the past, he then mixes them. but he goes one step further, maturing the blend again in specially crafted casks that add more flavor. when you're tasting, when you're assessing -- >> you can taste the flavor. >> reporter: it's technique that's won the michigan expat international praise and scottish scorn. his innovative casks led to one of his whiskies being banned by the scotch whisky association, the industry's old guard. the association's rosemary gallagher laid down the law. >> it has to be made in scotland
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and has to be matured for 3 years in oak casks and that makes sure when people buy scotch whisky they know exactly what they're getting. >> reporter: but in 2015, for the first time ever, not a single scotch appeared in the prestigious whisky bible's top three list. a japanese whisky ranked number one. in 2016, scotch was back on the list, but with a lighter, caramel/vanilla blend. >> if you're just doing things the way you've always done, eventually you're going to fall behind. >> but where the old way meets the new wave - whisky hopes to stay on top. jonathan vigliotti, cbs news, london. >> that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. by the end of the workweek, donald trump will be sworn in as the nation's 45th president, with the inauguration just days away, a rehearsal was held in washington sunday with stand-ins for mr. trump and his wife, melania. the inaugural events are expected to draw about a million spectators and demonstrators. jamie you shows how washington is getting ready. >> reporter: the stage is set for president-elect donald trump and vice president-elect mike pence to be sworn in. at a parade practice today, stand-ins tried to make it look like the real deal, with security in place. temporary fences are up around
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much of the city, and homeland security secretary jeh johnson says law enforcement is ready. >> this includes approximately 10,000 individuals from the department of homeland security and some 12,000 other federal personnel, including 7800 members of the national guard. >> reporter: also making preparations for a million people, don's johns. the rent-a-toilet company is making headlines for its cover-up of the company name. it's not clear if "don's johns" name hits too close to home for organizers of donald trump's inauguration or if the company is trying to keep in line with d.c. compliance rules on advertising. meanwhile, there will be glitz and glamour at mr. trump's three official inaugural balls friday night. toby keith, 3 doors down and lee greenwood will headline an inaugural concert thursday night. however, broadway star jennifer holliday backed out this weekend. telling her fans, one of the main reasons she pulled out was
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a backlash from the lgbtq community. the talladega college great tornado marching band isn't bowing to pressure to back out. the band, from an historically black college in alabama, is raising money to join 40 other groups in friday's parade. law enforcement expects about 900,000 spectators at the inauguration ceremony. 99 groups have permits to rally for or against the new president. but elaine, the largest demonstration could come the day after the inauguration when "the women's march on washington" occurs on saturday. >> jamie yuccas, thank you. president-elect trump spent the weekend in new york. it's his final weekend as a civilian, at least for the next four years. errol barnett has more from washington. >> donald trump won by a landslide. the american people spoke decisively. >> reporter: on "face the nation" today, vice president-elect mike pence defended the legitimacy of the incoming commander-in-chief,
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donald trump. >> and i promise them come noon this coming friday, change really begins. >> reporter: a growing number of house democrats are refusing to attend mr. trump's inauguration. including civil rights icon john lewis, who attracted trump's twitter wrath on saturday after questioning his presidential win. >> i think we should have a special commission to get to the bottom of what happened, what role did the russians play in determining the leader of our country? >> reporter: pence says he's deeply disappointed by lewis' comments. comments. and predicts better u.s.-russia ties. >> in the president-elect you have someone who is willing to approach this terrible relationship the united states has with russia today with fresh eyes and to at least be open to a better relationship. >> reporter: this weekend, rallies in support of immigration reform and obamacare
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in an exit interview airing tonight on "60 minutes", president obama lamented divisions in washington. >> to sustain a governing majority, that requires an ability for republicans and democrats to find some common ground. and right now, the structure and the system is such where it makes it really hard for people to work together. >> reporter: president-elect trump will be here in washington monday, the martin luther king, jr. holiday. and in what may be seen as an effort to be more inclusive to african-americans, elaine, justice clarence thomas will swear in the vice president elect pence at the inauguration. >> thank you. now we have a series of exit interviews with key players in the obama administration - beginning with secretary of state john kerry. he will likely be replaced as the top u.s. diplomat by former
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exxonmobil ceo rex tillerson. so far, the passing of the torch between kerry and tillerson has consisted of a five-minute phone call. here's margaret brennan. >> reporter: as he prepares to leave office, secretary kerry is clearly worried that president-elect trump might undo some of his hard-won achievements, namely the historic deal to freeze iran's nuclear program. mr. trump has pledged to rip it up. >> if all of a sudden, you pull out of that, all of our allies who joined us in the effort would have extraordinary questions about america's leadership and american judgement. >> reporter: kerry is also concerned about the middle east where he spent nine months trying to secure peace between the israelis and palestinians. he said the president-elect's campaign to move the u.s. embassy to the disputed city of jerusalem would inflame the arab world. >> you'd have an explosion, an absolute explosion in the region. >> reporter: neighboring syria
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has already exploded, killing thousands of civilians and leaving millions displaced. dictator bashar assad -- whom the administration argued must step down -- has held onto power. kerry advocated using military force but was overruled by president obama and his exhaustive diplomacy led to sharp criticism. >> what's the alternative to that? is the alternative that the secretary of state of the united states, the president of the united states, are gonna be in these important, powerful positions and do nothing about one of the greatest catastrophes, humanitarian catastrophes that's unfolding before our eyes? of course not. >> reporter: kerry says his drive to become a peacemaker was forged while fighting in vietnam, where he deployed in 1968. but he later became an anti-war advocate. back in vietnam nearly 5 decades later, kerry says that experience changed him. >> i feel that it chastene,
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sense of understanding of how people in positions of responsibility can look at something and misunderstand it and make a decision that costs lives. >> reporter: after he steps down, kerry says he'll find another way to serve. but without that the air force 757 that's ferried him over one million miles to ninety-one countries. >> these are your living quarters. >> this is it, home away from home. >> reporter: he'll trade the cabin he's made home for four years for his real home in boston. where he admits, at 73, he's got some catching up to do. >> i've got grandkids and, you know, kids. i'll pay a little more attention. and my wife would love to see me. >> so what are you going to do next? >> have some fun. >> margaret brennan, cbs news, washington. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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now, we turn to the justice department, where vanita gupta has been heading up the civil rights division. under attorney general loretta lynch, gupta worked to hold police departments accountable. gupta's boss will likely be replaced by alabama senator jeff sessions, who is expected to revamp the justice department's priorities. here's paula reid. >> reporter: just weeks after the shooting death of michael brown led to riots in ferguson, missouri, vinita gupta joined the department of justice's civil rights division. over the next two years she would lead investigations into that city's police force as well as police departments in baltimore and chicago. >> the goal is to have a police department that has, where their officers have the support that they need, where they have the trust of every part of the community and where the community feels protected by its
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police department and not antagonized and not hurt by them. >> reporter: the obama justice department has opened 25 investigations into law enforcement agencies across the country. >> let me just say that our investigations are never propelled by a single incident. we have to have a predicate of some notion that there might be a pattern of unconstitutional police practices before we will open an investigation. >> reporter: but the presumptive incoming attorney general, senator jeff sessions, says he would prefer not to pursue so many investigations. >> i think there is concern that good police officers and good departments can be sued by the department of justice when you just have individuals within a department who have done wrong. >> senator sessions has said that is when he wants to get involved, when police departments come and ask for help, is that enough? >> ferguson for example is one example where it did not come at the request of local officials, but it was an important
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investigation that yielded that the michael brown shooting, the tension and resentment between law enforcement and ferguson and the communities they serve had started long before shooting of michael brown. >> reporter: he says the challenge of rebuilding trust between communities and police is not going away. >> i don't think that the climate is going to change. i don't think the videos are going to stop. there's always going to be the potential for unrest no matter who is in the white house and no matter who is in the justice department. >> reporter: while senator sessions doesn't plan to open many civil rights investigations, he says he's leaving existing reform agreements in place. paula reid, cbs news, washington. a deadly ice storm continues to blast the central u.s. dangerous weather stretches for more than a thousand from new mexico to illinois. oklahoma and missouri were hard hit. at least three people have been killed on slippery roads since friday. tens of thousands of homes and businesses lost power this weekend. hundreds of fligha
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delayed or canceled. it was an emotional reunion this weekend between a girl and her parents 18 years after she was stolen at birth. tony dokoupil has the story. >> reporter: this weekend, a young woman finally met her birth parents. >> will you please, please bring me back my child. >> reporter: 18 years ago an infant named kamiyah mobley was snatched from a jacksonville, florida hospital - hours after she was born. father craig aiken met his daughter yesterday inside a police station in walterboro, south carolina --- where she had been living with her accused kidnapper. >> i never gave up hope. i always thought i'd find her. >> reporter: gloria williams faces life in prison for allegedly posing as a nurse and taking the infant from the arms of her mother. >> please, it's really hurting me inside that i can't see and hold her. >> reporter: police say an aupon mouse tip and a dna test cracked the case.
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good person who worked at a v.a. hospital and contributed to charity. kamiyah, who goes by a different name given to her by williams, calls her momma. she pent about 45 minutes with her biological parents and her father said it was beautiful. >> kamiyah's birth parents say it's up to her if she wants to return to jacksonville. her accused abductor faces extradition to florida in the coming weeks, elaine. >> tony dokoupil, thanks. former pro wrestler jimmy "superfly" snuka has died. his high-flying style made him a fan favorite in the 1980s. in recent years, he battled stomach cancer. he was accused of murdering his ex-girlfriend, but earlier this month, the charges were dropped. jimmy snuka was 73. coming up next, the ringling brothers circus is folding up its tents for good.
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>> performing pachyderms! >> reporter: performers with the ringling brothers and barnum and bailey's circuit jumped, flew, and dazzled their way to fans' hearts. just last week, the first female ringmaster made her debut. but despite efforts to update their acts, kenneth feld, ceo of feld entertainment. ringling brothers and barnum and bailey's parent company says financially the show can't go on. >> it's been through every kind of economic cycle, and it's been through a lot of change. it isn't relevant to people in the same way. >> reporter: last year the company decided to retire the elephant show. and the circus saw a dramatic drop in ticket sales. >> there used to be more animals, but there doesn't seem to be much this time. >> reporter: feld entertainment was plagued with years of protests from animal activists. ben williamson is a senior director with peta. >> do you think this will have a bigger impact on other al
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i think this is going to have an enormous impact. we've seen things like seaworld banning orca breeding, and now ringling retiring all of its animals. i think this is a see-change in the way the people view animals in captivity. >> reporter: still, fans are heart broken. >> this is a tradition gone for our family, forever. we're all very upset. >> the circus' last stop will be in new york on may 21st, feld entertainment says all of their existing animals will go to suitable homes once they have their final curtain call. elaine? >> mireya, thanks. we'll be right back. hey, searching for a great used car? yeah! you got it. just say show me millions of used cars for sale at the all new carfax.com. i don't want one that's had a big wreck just say, show me cars with no accidents reported pretty cool i like it that's the power of carfax® find the cars you want, avoid the ones you don't plus you get a free carfax® report with every listing
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many families are heading to the movies on this long holiday weekend. a study released last week warns parents gun violence is on the rise in pg-13 movies. jericka duncan has more on this. >> reporter: for some movie fans, knowing the difference be
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is becoming more difficult. moviegoer kelsy hulbert. >> i have watched movies now and i am like, are you sure this is not rated r? >> reporter: according to a new study by the annenberg public policy center at the university of pennsylvania, gun violence in top grossing pg-13 movies exceeded the violence in the biggest box office r-rated films over the past three years. dan romer is the lead researcher. >> it is even more disturbing because the trend is going upward it is even higher than it was back in the end of 2012. >> reporter: from 2012 to 2015, romer looked at the top 30 grossing movies for each year and found that gun violence was a prominent feature in pg-13 movies. he says action packed movies like g.i. joe: retaliation. avengers, and superhero movies like "antman" leave out the real life consequences of gun violence.
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and that he says is dangerous. >> when movies shows these kinds of behaviors that are harmful without any of the harmful consequences it is more likely children will imitate that kind of behavior. >> a lot of fire power. >> reporter: pg-13 movies are dominating hollywood. they are increasingly popular with families despite the violence. joan graves heads the ratings system for the motion picture association of america. >> do you think parents have become more desensitized to violence? >> i don't think that they have become more desensitized, i think that in the last several years the superhero movies have caught on in a big way and i think that is what is causing a lot of this attention to more violence. >> reporter: researchers say they don't know the effects of repeated exposure to this type of gun violence. but the american academy of pediatrics says repeatedly viewing of violent media content can influence some youth, to become more aggressive.
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jericka duncan, cbs news, new york. >> up next -- the new wave of "whisper whiskeys" - made for millennials.
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it's "last call" for tonight. jonathan vigliotti tells us about a new wave of spirits - made for millennials - that's shaking up the whisky business. >> reporter: its amber tones and smoky notes have seduced for centuries and given birth to one of the uk's most lucrative industries. in the rolling hills of scotland, making scotch whiskey is a work of art. the grains are mashed, fermented, then distilled and finally aged in wooden casks. it's a 500-year-old spirit protected by law and drinking it can pack a lot of rules. but in a small london loft whisky blender john glaser is dropping the pretense and adding a new range of flavors. >> y'know a lot of people think scotch whisky is high handed, they think there are rules. that you have to drink it a certain way. >>s
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intimidating. >> there are so many different scotch whiskies and how do i choose, so it is intimidating and we try to break all that down. >> reporter: whisper whisky it's being dubbed, mellower and lighter for the millennial palate. the production process borrows from tradition. glaser buys single malts from scottish distilleries. like blenders of the past, he then mixes them. but he goes one step further, maturing the blend again in specially crafted casks that add more flavor. when you're tasting, when you're assessing -- >> you can taste the flavor. >> reporter: it's technique that's won the michigan expat international praise and scottish scorn. his innovative casks led to one of his whiskies being banned by the scotch whisky association, the industry's old guard. the association's rosemary gallagher laid down the law. >> it has to be made in scotland
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and has to be matured for 3 years in oak casks and that makes sure when people buy scotch whisky they know exactly what they're getting. >> reporter: but in 2015, for the first time ever, not a single scotch appeared in the prestigious whisky bible's top three list. a japanese whisky ranked number one. in 2016, scotch was back on the list, but with a lighter, caramel/vanilla blend. >> if you're just doing things the way you've always done, eventually you're going to fall behind. >> but where the old way meets the new wave - whisky hopes to stay on top. jonathan vigliotti, cbs news, london. >> that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. in just four days, donald trump will be sworn in as the new president of the united states. leading up to inauguration day, there are new developments in the investigation into russia's meddling in the election. questions also linger over the president-elect's relationship with the intelligence community and the press. "face the nation" moderator john dickerson discussed those issues with the incoming number two, vice president-elect mike pence. >> let's start with some news. the republican chairman of the senate intelligence committee has decided to investigate russian meddling in the investigation, including possible contacts between the russians trying to meddle and the trump campaign. what's your ac
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>> well, i think the president-elect and i both welcome the congress doing its oversight work in this, and any other area. we look forward to the results of their inquiry. but make no mistake about it, i think they'll find what the publicly released intelligence report showed before, that there's no evidence of any impact on voting machines. donald trump won this election fair and square. 30 out of 50 states, more counties than any other republican since ronald reagan. so while we certainly respect the right of the congress to provide oversight to make inquiries where they deem them appropriate, the american people spoke in this election and the peaceful transition of power that will take place this coming friday on a platform where our president-elect will take the oath of office surrounded by four of the five living presidents is a testament to our democracy. and i'm incredibly humble to be a part of it, hn
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>> last week before that intelligence briefing, the president-elect said he felt like all these questions were a part of a witch hunt. he's now had some new information. there's the senate intelligence committee. so he no longer thinks this is a witch hunt, this investigation into russian meddling, is that fair to say? >> well i think that there frankly has just been an effort by many in the national media, present company excepted, since this election to essentially demean and question the legitimacy of this incoming administration. and talk of that, sources within the intelligence community that have been attributed with sharing that information, public officials, i think is a real disservice to our democracy. as i said, donald trump won a landslide election. the american people spoke decisively and wanted change. i promise them this friday come
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we're going to make america great again. >> there's a distinction about that feeling with the press and that the senate intelligence committee is doing. just to button up one question -- did anybody in the trump campaign have any contact with the russians who were trying to meddle in the election? >> of course not. and i think to suggest that is to give credence to some of these -- of these bizarre rumors that have swirled around the candidacy. the fact that a few news organizations, not this one, actually trafficked in a memo that was produced as opposition research and associated that with intelligence efforts, i think could only be attributed to media bias. as i said this week at the press conference, the american people are tired of it. we're coming into this week with a great sense of optimism. the american people know that we can have government in washington, d.c. as good as our people. we can get this economy moving
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again, rebuild our military. we can be standing tall in the world again and those are the reasons why donald trump is going to take that oath of office on friday. >> let's move to the world. what does donald trump feel about vladamir putin and russia? >> well, i think -- i think in the president-elect you have someone who is willing to approach this terrible relationship the united states has with russia today with fresh eyes, and to at least be open to a better relationship with vladamir putin. and with russia. look, we have some common interests that we would be well served if we were able to improve our relationship with russia. most notably the battle to defeat radical islamic terrorism and to defeat isis at its source. i think the president-elect also made it clear this week that while a better relationship with russia would be a good thing, that i think he's realistic about the possibility of that
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and i think when you see the cabinet that he's assembled in general mattis and mike pompeo, we're coming at this with realistic expectations. but the president-elect is determined to reengage the world, put america first, and see if we can make progress for the security and the peace for the world. >> let me ask you about that. because the picture that donald trump puts forward about his view of russia seems quite different than the gentleman you mentioned, incoming secretary of defense mattis and also secretary of state tillerson. mr. tillerson said, russia poses a danger. he called russia an adversary. he said there are a number of areas where america is going to have to confront russia. that's not an opinion, that's confrontation. mr. mattis said, the most important thing to recognize is that putin is trying to break the north atlantic alliance.
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my question is, if the american people are listening to mr. trump and listening to those men, and more importantly countries overseas are listening, who's driving the bus, mr. trump or those two men? >> well, the great thing about being around donald trump is you never have any confusion about who's driving the bus. and where the buck stops and who will make the final decision. but i think as you hear the testimony of rex tillerson, of general mattis, of mike pompeo, i think the american people should be encouraged by the fact that the president-elect is assembling around him people of extraordinary background and capability, who will bring their own experience and their own perspective to inform the president's decisions where ultimately the president will make the best decision, the best interest for the american people. >> you had mattis and tillerson saying confront russia. donald trump does not sound like a guy who wants to confront russia. >> if you listened to the press conference this week, he said it would be --
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relationship with russia, i hope it gets better, and he said maybe not. >> does donald trump demand that russia get out of eastern ukraine? that would be a confrontation that mattis and tillerson, it sounds like that's what they want. does donald trump want russia out of eastern ukraine? >> let's be very clear whether it's eastern ukraine or crimea, that the action by the russians has demonstrated the absence of american leadership. >> we have new leadership. what does the new leadership want to do? >> i think america is going to be more respected in the world the very moment that donald trump takes the oath of office as the 45th president of the united states. and he'll work through these issues, john. >> we'll have more of john's conversation with the vice president-elect in two minutes. we'll be right back.
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today, the nation honors the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king, jr. over the mlk weekend, president-elect trump fired back at a civil rights icon who stood shoulder to shoulder with dr. king. mr. trump's response came after congressman john lewis questioned the legitimacy of his presidency. "face the nation" host john dickerson asked the vice president-elect about. >> john lewis said he did not consider donald trump a legitimate president. your reaction to that? >> well, look, donald trump won this election fair and square. 30 out of 50 states, including georgia. more counties than any republican candidate since ronald reagan. and to hear john lewis, a man that i served with, that i respect, to question the
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legitimacy of the election and to say that donald trump will not be a legitimate president was deeply disappointing to me. and also to hear that he was not going to attend the inauguration this friday. i hope he reconsiders both statements. >> famous counterpuncher, donald trump said john lewis was all talk and no action. i've got a question, he has every right to defend himself. let me ask you about the wisdom of defending himself. for five years, donald trump questioned the legitimacy of barack obama, said he wasn't born in america. was really the chief advocate of the so-called birther idea. given that history, given that he's about to be president, why swing at this pitch? couldn't he be the bigger man and let john lewis do his thing and move on? he's about to be president of the united states, all those challenges, bringing the country together. why swing at this pitch? >> well, as you said, donald trump has every right to defend himself. and to have -- >> but he did question the
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>> to have someone like john lewis. i served with john. i disagreed with him on most issues, but i have tremendous respect for him. my family and i watched across the edman pettis bridge with him on the 65th anniversary of bloody sunday. we honor the sacrifice that he made. but part of the result of what happened on bloody sunday and the courage that he showed was the voting rights act. so for someone of his stature, not just in the civil rights movement but in voting rights, to make a comment that he did not consider donald trump to be a legitimate president is deeply disappointing. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be r bightack.
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it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together. as we look ahead to the beginning of a new presidency, many are also looking back at eight years of the obama administration. martha teichner checked this story for sunday morning. >> because of what we did on this day, in this election, at this defining moment, change has come to america. [ applause ] >> reporter: it was a moment that seemed to hold so much promise. such optimism. >> and where we are met with
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cynicism and doubt and those who tell us that we can't, we will respond with that timeless creed that sums up the spirit of a people. yes, we can. [ applause ] >> reporter: barack obama facing that sea of supporters in chicago, on november 4th, 2008. after being elected our first african-american president. what began that night is ending now. the assessment of the obama legacy already under way. >> i think that moment, that grant park moment, will be remembered symbolically in history as a moment when america thought, we've done something and we feel good about that. >> reporter: pulitzer prize winning historian doris goodwin. >> in history, we always talk about is it the man or the times that makes for a presidential legacy? and that moment in grant park seemed like the man was even bigger than the times. >> are you prepared to take the oath, senator? >> i am.
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>> reporter: but the times set the agenda from day one. as soon as barack obama took the oath of office, he inherited the worst economic crisis since the great depression. the big banks and gm and chrysler were teetering. unemployment was pushing 8%. it's easy to forget how scary it was. now, unemployment is just over 4.5%. since early 2010, more than 15 million jobs have been created. by most accounts, a big check in the plus column of the obama legacy tally. >> it's a huge achievement to say the economy -- it's not just a statistical thing you've done. you've affected people's lives and futures. and that is real. >> some practice with this, but not as much as i would like to. >> reporter: for president
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obama, virtually every accomplishment was a struggle. he was blind sided by the partisan ugliness of the opening battles. as he said a year ago. >> in those early months, my expectation was that we could pull the parties together a little more effectively. >> reporter: in 2010, senate minority leader mitch mcconnell defined what democrats called republican obstructionism. >> our top political priority over the next two years should be to deny president obama a second term. >> reporter: not one republican in the house or the senate voted for the affordable care act. what came to be known as obamacare. the president wanted his signature expansion of health care insurance to be the biggest check in his legacy plus column. but republicans are already dismantling it. what about president obama's foreign policy legacy?
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>> tonight, i can report to the american people and to the world that the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden, the leader of al qaeda. >> reporter: the killing of bin laden definitely a plus. the way he pulled out of iraq and afghanistan, the iran nuclear deal, the now dead on arrival transpacific partnership, claimed by the administration as pluses, by his critics not so much. and his handling of syria, according to many policy experts, a big check in the minus column. >> i would argue that the decision not to make good on the american threat on syria and use of chemical weapons was the single biggest flaw and mistake of barack obama's presidency. >> reporter: richard haass is president of the nonpartisan council on northern relations in new york.
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friends and allies, who are inherently dependent on us, that we could not be counted on. i think he had a view of the world that it would sort itself out just fine, even if the united states made the decision to do a lot less. that's simply wrong. what we learned, particularly in the middle east but also elsewhere, is that the united states dials down, nign forces don't spill the space. >> i've lived long enough to know that race relations are better than they were 10 or 20 or 30 years ago, no matter what some folks some say. >> reporter: which brings us to what may be president obama's most provocative legacy. he changed the conversation about the nation's social issues. >> the idea that people now talk about systemic racism, systemic bias, that it showed up on the campaign trail, that's new. >> reporter: charles blow is an op-ed columnist for "the new york times."
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>> the idea that it bubbles to the top while he is president is a real thing. >> reporter: that can't be undone -- >> you can't put that genie back in the bottle. now that is at the top on the surface. now we have to deal with that. >> reporter: just this past friday, attorney general loretta lynch announced the results of a 13-month investigation of the chicago police department. >> a pattern or practice of use of excessive force in violation of the fourth amendment to the constitution. >> reporter: for chicago, substitute ferguson, baltimore, cleveland to name some of the cities whose police practices have been scrutinized. >> that is hidden. that is the influence that he's having on our discussion, and that comes to the front during the obama years. >> reporter: now, consider this -- >> strangely enough, it's not really him being african-american i think that is most remarkable of his eight
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it is the incredible movement on issues like same-sex marriage and kind of gay rights and inclusion, that it has been the civil rights movement of our time and it has changed over his tenure more than at any other time in american history. >> reporter: but what has also changed in obama's eight years devastating democratic party losses at the polls have left republicans firmly in charge. a big minus that will have an impact on his legacy. still, for historians, how a president is judged changes over time. >> when you think about harry truman having left the presidency with such a low level of approval rating, and yet now being considered one of the near great presidents. and you think about president johnson, having left the presidency with such sadness,
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feeling like the vietnam war was a scar on his legacy, there's no question domestically he did far more than we realized at the time. >> do you think history will be kind to president obama's legacy? >> i do. >> reporter: the symbolism of president obama's legacy can't be ignored. the image of this particular first family. ♪ amazing grace >> reporter: of a president who sang his heart out over the killings in that charleston church. ♪ we watched this whole group, and for the office of the president, uh-oh, guess who ♪ ♪ barack humane obama >> reporter: of a white house that was hip for a change. do you believe that symbolism is equal in value as legislative
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achievement? >> i think absolutely. i believe in image, i believe in representation. i believe that it is a powerful, powerful, powerful thing. i have three kids who have grown up and they have known anything but a black president. their consciousness about a president begins with him. >> i'm asking you to hold fast to that faith written into our founding documents. >> reporter: it is with symbolism in mind that president barack obama returned to chicago where it all began, to say goodbye and to consign his presidency to history. >> a creed at the core of every american whose story is not yet written. yes, we can. yes, we did. yes, we can. thank you.
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may god continue to bless the united state
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captioning funded by cbs it's monday, january 16th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news," four days from the trump administration. he vowed to repeal obamacare and now he's promising insurance for evening plus the war of w d words wiwor words with cia and world icahn. frozen conditions wreaking havoc on the roads and leaving thousands in the dark.

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