Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  February 14, 2017 2:07am-3:59am EST

2:07 am
discussing sensitive information it posed a security risk. >> they should have gone to a secure space, been able to talk freely about it, been able to strategize about what the u.s. response would be. none of that happened here. >> reporter: presidents normally receive national security briefings in private, often in the white house situation room or, if they are traveling, in a mobile secure communications facility. president obama, for example, was photographed taking secure phone calls in a tent in brazil in 2011. and just last year inside a trailer in havana. the white house denies that there was a security risk. scott, in a statement it says the president was briefed on the north korea situation in a classified setting both before and after dinner. >> jeff pegues in the washington newsroom. jeff, thank you. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
2:08 am
2:09 am
2:10 am
president trump called this a dangerous world in a news conference today with the visiting canadian prime minister. mr. trump was asked whether syrian refugees pose a terrorist threat, but his answer centered on the recent arrests of illegal immigrants, who have committed crimes. >> we're actually taking people that are criminals, very, very hardened criminals in some cases with a tremendous track record of abuse and problems, and we're getting them out. and that's what i said i would do. i'm just doing what i said i would do when we won by a very, very large electoral college vote. well, you never hear of refugees from the united states, but canadian border officials are po
2:11 am
they're refugees from the middle east who were legally admitted into the united states, but now they worry their legal status could be revoked. canada has a more welcoming refugee policy. this syrian family you're seeing now crossed on saturday through the woods into quebec. the canadian border agency says there were 369 such refugees from the united states in november, and in december there were 591. president trump said recently that no one knows whether climate change is real, but he's keeping an open mind. well, mark phillips has something to consider from the bottom of the world. he's in antarctica for our climate diaries. >> reporter: high summer in antarctica. an explosion of life when the deep freezer warms up to become
2:12 am
explosion of scientific research when the antarctic reveals the secrets that have been locked in its ice. >> there's something going on. >> there's something obviously going on. it's very clear. >> reporter: ken taylor runs one of the continent's most ambitious ice research projects. what's going on is the huge crack that's opened up in one of the floating ice shelves that cling to the coast here. >> there's a large berg. it's about to break off. >> reporter: you say large berg. it's the size of delaware. >> and the fraction is breaking off, it jumps about a mile every week or so. >> reporter: it's not the ice from the ice shelf that's worrying. more antarctic ice flowing into the sea would increase the threat to low-lying coastal areas around the world, including in the united states. >> there are several spots around antarctica that are believed to be in this situation wh
2:13 am
going to flow into the sea and there's nothing we can do to stop it at this point. >> reporter: eric gouth is part of a scientific study that is proving antarctic ice is on the move. >> this here is the object of your affection? >> absolutely. >> reporter: he's part of the extreme ice survey that uses time-lapse photography to document what's happening. images snapped every hour and then strung together show how quickly the glaciers are flowing. these pictures aren't just useful for science, they have another purpose. >> much of the general public are visual learners, as am i. i think being able to see that with your own eyes is a very compelling way of communicating information. >> reporter: arguments over the causes of climate change may be raging again at home. here suggestions of a hoax come up against some cold, hard facts. ken taylor, the ice scientist, normally drills miles deep into the icecap for answers.
2:14 am
sometimes, though, they're floating all around you. bubbles trapped in the ice contain the air that was around tens of thousands of years ago when the ice froze. and that air contained a fraction of the warming greenhouse gasses the human race is now pumping into the atmosphere. >> you smell that air, you're smelling ancient air. it's really good air. it's like air before humans messed up the atmosphere. >> yeah. smells like ice. >> reporter: and there is another kind of chill down here, scott, a chill in the scientific community, a fear that the funding it needs will be harder to come by in the future and that there's a less sympathetic ear in government for the kinds of science they do. >> mark phillips for our climate diaries down under. thanks. still ahead, drivers of ford explorers say exhaust fumes are making them sick. new guidelines for treating back
2:15 am
pain. and later, a panda takes her final "baos." (alarms) where's the car? it'll be here in three...uh, four minutes. are you kidding me? no, looks like he took a wrong turn. don't worry, this guy's got like a four-star rating, we're good. his name is randy. that's like one of the most trustworthy names! ordering a getaway car with an app? are you randy? that's me! awesome! surprising. what's not surprising? how much money erin saved by switching to geico. everybody comfortable with the air temp? i could go a little cooler. ok. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more.
2:16 am
ok, it says you apply the blue okone to me.y this. here? no. ah ok, here? maybe you should read the directions. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together. k-y yours and mine.
2:17 am
federal safety investigators are looking into reports that exhaust fus
2:18 am
late-model ford explorers. here's our transportation correspondent kris van cleave. >> reporter: dash camera video shows the moment newport beach police officer brian mcdowell passed out behind the wheel of his 2014 ford explorer police cruiser and crashed into a tree. >> you narrowly missed an suv. >> yeah. >> reporter: this is a matter of inches. >> i just think plus or minus one second i maybe wouldn't be here on this earth for my kids. >> reporter: mcdowell is recovering from multiple injuries but has no memory of the accident. >> i just went out. >> just like that. >> just like that. >> reporter: records show he had no drugs or alcohol in his system. doctors couldn't figure out why he blacked out. >> i had that nauseous feeling and i felt like i had a headache. >> reporter: mcdowell then learned hundreds of drivers had been complaining about exhaust that contains carbon monoxide leaking into the cabin of the explorers typically when the air
2:19 am
this july the nhtsa launched an investigation, citing 154 customer complaints about exhaust in 2011 through 2015 ford explorers, but cbs news discovered that's grown to more than 450 complaints, some involving newer models. nhtsa says there haven't been any serious injuries. >> i was hospitalized several times with uncontrollable headaches, nausea, vomiting. >> reporter: but stacy jones, who has an autoimmune disorder, believes her suv made her sick. >> after i started driving the 2014 explorer, my health started to decline rapidly. >> reporter: ford has known about the problem since 2012 when it issued the first of three repair bulletins to dealers. in a 2015 deposition, a company representative acknowledged it appears to be a design issue that remains unresolved. repairs did not fix the problem for jones, so she traded her
2:20 am
>> the dealers were like, the '17s are fine, no worries. >> reporter: but she still smelled exhaust, even after weeks of repairs. >> it's frustrating, because at this point i don't know what i'm going to do. >> reporter: officer mcdowell is now suing ford. the automaker tells cbs news in rare circumstances there have been instances where customers detected an exhaust odor in explorers. the statement maintains it poses no safety risk. >> kris van cleave investigating for us tonight. thank you, kris. still ahead, new advice for back pain. introducing a deodorant saving millions of clothes. neeedegr ultraclear black + white. w no yellow stains on white clothes. no white marks on black clothes. new degree ultraclear black + white. it won't let you down.
2:21 am
new pantene doesn't just wash i wiyour hair, it fuels it.gain. making every strand stronger. so tangles don't stand a chance. because strong is beautiful. ♪ [joy bauer] two thirds of americans have digestive issues. i'm joy bauer, and as a nutritionist i know probiotics can often help. but many probiotics do not survive your stomach's harsh environment. digestive advantage is different. its natural protein shell is tougher than your stomach's harsh environment, so it surivies a hundred times better than the leading probiotic, to get where you need it most. get the digestive advantage, and enjoy living well.
2:22 am
an adopted son of the notorious child molester jerry sandusky was arrested in pennsylvania today. 41-year-old jeffrey sandusky faces 14 counts of child sexual abuse. he has been suspended from his job as a prison guard. sandusky's lawyer declined to comment. his father, the former assistant football coach at penn state, is serving at least 30 years for abusing ten boys. if you have an achy back, you have got company. as many as 80% of adults will have back pain. and tonight our doctor john lapook runs us through new guidelines from the american college of physicians. >> reporter: 76-year-old berta axelrad has lived with chronic
2:23 am
>> the pain is just so -- well, it's terrible. >> reorter: she swears by exercise, yoga and walking. >> it minimizes the pain. it's not always easy, but it's much better than doing nothing. >> reporter: today's guidelines say the first line of therapy should be non-drug treatment for pain lasting less than three months, those include heat wrap, massage, acupuncture and spinal manipulation. the authors stress that clinicians should avoid costly and potential harmful treatments like narcotics. for pain lasting more than three months, treatments include stretching and strengthening exercises, tai chi, yoga, acupuncture and mindfulness techniques like meditation to relieve stress. if those fail, anti-inflammatories such as ibuprofen should be considered first, then medications that can dull nerve pain like tramadol or duloxetine. >> some of these treatments such as yoga or massage are often offerets
2:24 am
traditional health care system. >> reporter: dr. steven atlas of massachusetts general hospital wrote an editorial about the guidelines. >> some of these may be a shot across the bow to insurers to say, maybe we should be covering them better. >> and rotate once to your left. >> reporter: physical therapist dana rose demonstrated some moves designed to bring relief. >> by activating and using your core muscles, that should lessen the load through our joints to help minimize back pain. >> reporter: the recommendation to use non-drug therapies first is especially relevant when the country is facing an epidemic of opioid abuse. >> jon lapook, thanks, doc. coming up next, a big loss for cub fans.
2:25 am
2:26 am
2:27 am
the national zoo tweets word that the giant panda may shong gave birth this afternoon to her third b, a female. >> the birth of bao bao three and a half years ago. next week chip reid tells us she'll be going to china, for good. >> reporter: from the day she was born millions of bao bao's
2:28 am
grow up on the panda cam. they saw her first check-up. and her first birthday. they watched her fall in love with bamboo, her first encounter with a camera, her first tumble in the snow, her first game of hide and seek, or maybe pretending to be a turtle. and they watched her learn that when mom says, "get down," she means get down now." on every step of the way, trainer marty dearie was there. now he's preparing her for another first. >> hi, lady. come on, bao. good girl. >> reporter: he's getting her used to the crate that will take her to her new home in china next week. >> by giving her honey water, it continues to build this space as somewhere she wants to be. >> reporter: dearie will be traveling with her. >> i'm someone she knows really well. >> reporter: you hold her hand? >> yeah exactly.
2:29 am
when china lent bao bao's mother to the zoo was any cubs would be sent to china to breed before they turned four. brandy smith is the zoo's associate director for animal care sciences. >> i think it's like your kids going off to college. it's hard thing to do. we're a little bit sad. we're a lot worried. but in the end we know it's the right thing to do and it's the best thing for her. >> reporter: you think there are going to be tears? >> yeah. i'm a crier. i can admit that. >> reporter: tears but also the satisfaction of knowing that bao bao will be doing her part to save this vulnerable and adorable species. chip reid, cbs news, washington. and that's the "overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and don't miss "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley. [000:22:55;00]
2:30 am
ca-- ptions by vitac -- www.vitac.com this is the "cbs overnight news." >> hi, everyone. welcome to the "overnight news." i'm demarco morgan. evacuation remains in effect. weeks of torrential rain has the oroville dam in california filled to the brim. two emergency spillways used to handle the overflow are crumbling. with more rain in the forecast, nearly 200,000 people have been forced from their homes. john blackstone has the story. >> reporter: with water thundering out of oroville dam, officials are in a race to lower the lake level, which is at near capacity. california department of water resources director bill croyle.
2:31 am
>> we're move 1g00,000 cubic spillway. we've been doing that for about 16, 17 hours. >> reporter: as the water pours out, crews are preparing to move huge boulders to fortify the dam's spillways. the main concrete spillway that funnels excess water into a floodplain began breaking apart last week. chunks of concrete gave way, and the hole kept getting bigger. engineers decided to use an emergency spillway that had never been needed in the dam's 48-year history. it worked, for a while, but the emergency spillway couldn't handle the excess flow. a wide gash on sunday raised fears the structure could give way, possibly inundating several communities below with a 30-foot wall of water. nearly 200,000 were told to leave immediately, creating grid lock. resident ed hershey. >> miserable. bumper to bumper. it was chaos. everybody was just trying to rush to get out. >> reporter: now residents are waiting for the all clear, which
2:32 am
tt >> this is a dynamic situation. it's a situation we're still trying to assess. we need to have time before we allow people back into those areas it is safe to do so. flynn denied discussing u.s. sanctions with the russian. but u.s. intelligence officials tell a different story. and now, flynn is apologizing. major garrett has the story. >> north korea is a big, big problem. and we will deal with that very strongly. >> reporter: as president trump and canadian prime minister justin trudeau held a news conference, national security adviser michael flynn joined other senior white house officials in the front row. mr. trump ignored shouted
2:33 am
questions about his confidence in flynn as he left the east room. counselor to the president kellyanne conway. >> yes, general flynn does enjoy the full confidence of the president, and this is a big week for general flynn. he's the point of contact for many of these foreign visits. >> reporter: just over an hour later, though, the white house said the president is evaluating the situation. the fbi and other intelligence agencies are investigating conversations flynn had with the russian ambassador to the u.s. before president trump's inauguration. flynn initially denied discussing u.s. sanctions on russia during the calls, a potential violation of federal law, but last week flynn said he couldn't be sure if the topic came up. in january vice president elect pence defended flynn on "face the nation." >> those conversations that happened to occur around the time that the united states took action to expel diplomats had nothing whatsoever to do with those sanctions. >> reporter: the white house now says president trump is speaking
2:34 am
to vice president pence relative to the conversation the vice president had with general multiple sources tell cbs flynn called pence to apologize this weekend. white house policy adviser steven miller was asked yesterday if deceiving the vice president was a fireable offense. >> it's not for me to answer hypotheticals. it wouldn't be responsible. it's a sensitive matter. in ant ashl ark ka, mark phillips is there traveling with scientists from national geographic explorer. >> reporter: this is what summer looks like in anarctica.
2:35 am
an explosion of life when the reveals the secrets that have been locked into its ice. ken taylor is one of america's foremost ice scientists. and what he's talking about is the huge crack that's opened up in one of the floating ice shelves that cling to the coast of antarctica. >> there's a large berg -- >> it's the size of delaware. and the fraction breaking off, it jumps about a mile every week or so. >> reporter: it's not the ice from the ice shelf that's worrying. without the ice shelf to hold it back, the glacial ice on land will flow into the oceans more quickly and drive sea levels up even more than the three feet that is already predicted for the century. >> there are several spots around antarctica that are believed to be in this situation where the ice on the ground is going to flow into the sea and there's nothing we can do to stop it at this point. >> reporter: eric gouth is
2:36 am
trying to get at sce way. >> there are concerns about ice shelf stability, there are concerns about warmer sea temperatures around the antarctica peninsula. >> reporter: what he's producing is an overview, literally. >> tell me what it is. >> reporter: eric is part of the extreme ice survey that's documenting the changes that are happening in pictures. cameras placed at strategic locations snap one shot an hour, year around. and they produce time lapse images showing how the glaciers are moving, looking to see if they're speeding up or getting thinner. >> this type of visual evidence is what people need. much of the general public are
2:37 am
visual learnings, as i am. you need to be able to see that with your own eyes is a very the information. why is all this happening? again, the ice tells the story and it's not in denial. ken taylor normally dills miles deep into the ice to find the answers. sometimes, though, you can find them floating all around you. trapped in the ice are bubbles of the air that was around tens of thousands of years ago when it was frozen. air that had a fraction of the amount of the greenhouse gases in it, compared to what the human race is pumping into the atmosphere now. >> trapped in the ice, and if you release it, you can tell what the atmosphere was like 50,000, 100,000 years ago. >> you break this open and smell that air, it's air before humans messed up the atmosphere. >> smells like ice. >> reporter: there's another kind of chill down here, as well. a chill in the scientific
2:38 am
community that's working here. a fear that the kinds of money they need for the less forth coming in theur fute and there will be a less sympathetic ear in government for the kind of science they do. un-stop right there! i'm about to pop a cap of "mmm fresh" in that washer
2:39 am
with unstopables in-wash scent boosters by downy. which is longer than any relationship i've ever been in. right, freshness for weeks! unstopables by downy.
2:40 am
for a fresh too feisty to quit. there are growing concerns this morning about one of the most popular vehicles in america, the ford explorer. it's the best selling mid-sized suv in the country, bwith about1 million on the road. but hundreds of loyal customers say the ford explorer might be making them sick. >> reporter: many of the complaints auk about a rotten egg smell. it happens while driving and the thought is it may be exhaust, which raises the concern it could be toxic. dash camera video shows the
2:41 am
moment newport beach police officer brian mcdowell's life changed. >> you narrowly missed an suv. >> yeah. >> reporter: this is a matter of inches. >> i just think plus or minus one second i maybe wouldn't be here on this earth for my kids. >> reporter: he has scars from a dislocated shoulder, fractured eye socket and traumatic brain injury, but no memory of the accident. >> i just went out. >> just like that. >> just like that. >> reporter: records show he had no drugs or alcohol in his system. >> i just had that nauseous feeling and i felt like i had a headache. >> reporter: then he learned hundreds of drivers had been complaining about exhaust that contains carbon monoxide leaking into the cabin of the explorers, likely through unsealed seams in the rear of the suv. based on customer complaints,
2:42 am
the issue seems to occur when accelerating while the air after monitoring complaints for two years, the national highway traffic safety administration launched an investigation in july, citing 154 customer complaints about exhaust in ford ex-ploe explore explorers, but that's grown to more than 450 complaints. while declining to comment further, they maintain there haven't been any serious injuries. something mcdowell's attorney disputes. >> when i saw they said there were no injuries, we immediately got them on the phone and gave them all the information we had in the lawsuit. >> reporter: we were taken for a ride in this 2015 explorer, that's been repaired for this issue five times. do you worry about what you're breathing in?
2:43 am
>> of course we do. >> reporter: just a few into the drive -- >> now you can definitely smell the exhaust right now. and we get that all the time. >> reporter: ford's known about the issue since at least 2012, when the company issued its first of three repair bulletins to dealers aimed at fixing the problem. >> ford has tried to fix it and they can't. >> reporter: in a 2015 deposition, a company representative said, we're working on it. they told cbs news, in rare -- >> i bought this about six, seven months ago. >> reporter: booth can't afford a new car, so he's driving on, with a carbon monoxide detector. newport beach police told us
2:44 am
they've implemented new safety measures in vehicles after mcdowell's accident. monoxide detectors have been installed. some of those detectors had gone off. >> reporter: officer mcdowell is suing ford for his injuries. there are at least two other class action lawsuits. ford agreed to settle one in florida, another in new jersey is ongoing. in that case, ford denies wrongdoing. president trump's federal ban remains on hold, but whether or not it's ever reinstated, it's costing the travel industry tens of millions of dollars. bookings were down $185 million in the first week alone. peter greenberg has details on how the immigration dust-up is rippling through the u.s. economy. >> reporter: when president trump signed the travel ban two weeks ago, blocking citizens
2:45 am
from seven nations, that has repercussions industry, which is faced with a loss of revenue as this issue continues to be battled in court. >> let them in! let them in! >> reporter: u.s. international airports have become the hub for thousands protesting president trump's travel ban. >> the leaders of the airline industry to the white house. the industry supports over 10 million jobs and creates almost $1 trillion in economic activity. >> reporter: but uncertainty surrounding the ban is threatening that prosperity. >> there is an immediate and noticeable decline in people coming to the u.s. as a result of the executive order. tourism brings in high valued
2:46 am
dollars to the u.s. and it's an important employer of a lot of people in america. travel data company forwardkeys, flight bookings to the u.s. dropped 6.5% year over year during the week the travel ban was in place. bookings from the seven countries listed on trump's order to the u.s. were down 80%. >> uncertainly is back for business, but it's especially bad for travel. >> reporter: expedia joined washington state's lawsuit against the executive order. he says the ban hurts more than just business. >> i think what people don't understand is just how powerful the american dream is as a brand. >> reporter: he emigrated from iran nearly 40 years ago and hopes america's appeal isn't lost on those looking to visit. >> you take apple and nike and mcdonald's together and put them together and multiply by a thousand. that's the strength of the american dream outside the u.s.
2:47 am
if you believe in democracy a melting part, come on over. that's the spirit of our nation, and we don't want to hurt that brand. >> reporter: and there's another unintended consequence here, and that is that the drop in online searches as much as 17%, and bookings down are creating a global market buyer. >> "cbs overnight news" will be right back. 1...2...3 (elated) woooooo!!! life looks great with tampax pearl. you get ultimate protection on your heaviest days and smooth removal for your lightest. tampax pearl
2:48 am
power over periods. it's league night!? 'saved money on motorcycle insurance with geico! goin' up the country. bowl without me. frank.' i'm going to get nachos. snack bar's closed. gah! ah, ah ah. ♪ ♪ i'm goin' up the country, baby don't you wanna go? ♪ ♪ i'm goin' up the country, baby don't you wanna go? ♪ geico motorcycle,
2:49 am
great rates for great rides. ok, it says you apply the blue okone to me.y this. here? no. ah ok, here? maybe you should read the directions. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together.
2:50 am
k-y yours and mine. an adventure off the beaten path, way off the beaten path. there's a guide to that called atlas secure. and serena altshul took part of the tour. >> reporter: josh and dilan can usually be found looking for adventure. >> we'll let you in here without any sound or without any light. >> reporter: but today, they're just looking for some peace and quiet. >> see you on the other side.
2:51 am
>> reporter: and they've come to the right place. >> you can hear every single minor sound as clear as a bell. >> reporter: used to test the volume of a wide range of products, this room at orfield labs in minnesota is about 16 times quieter than the silence at your local library. >> all right, gentlemen, time to come out. >> reporter: which makes it the quietest place on earth. >> you can hear each other swallow across the room. you can hear your eyebrows move. after that experience, it changes your perception of the world. you think about your own body and sound totally differently. >> reporter: which is exactly their mission, to make people think about the world differently.
2:52 am
the world's quietest room is just one of more than 600 obscure and unique spo "atlas obscura, an explorer's guide to the world's hidden wonders." >> we try and highlight stuff in the world that makes you feel like the world is a bigger, weirder, more wonderful place than you imagined. >> reporter: the book is an offshoot of their website, founded in 2009. it's an online encyclopedia of weird and wondrous places that gets 5 million visitors each month. >> the eiffel tower could never be in atlas obscura. but there's a secret place to entertain guests there. that's atlas obscura. >> reporter: but it was the vast network of users that submitted many of the book's most awe-inspiring destinations. is there one that was really surprising to you? >> the wonderful thing is, they
2:53 am
come in every day. i re submitted the gates of hell in the middle of the turkmanistan desert. >> reporter: closer to home, they found an oregon unlike any you've heard before. virginia's great stalagpipe org organ. >> a guy took an entire cave and set it up to play them. so when he plays the organ, the entire cave was played as a musical instrument. you can still go and they play the gave organ for you. ♪ >> it's blinking, what does that mean. >> reporter: josh and dilan, being an intrepid pair, discover
2:54 am
many of the sites themselves. while exploring south america in 2010, they walked across the last incan grass bridges. and they hiked the top of gafta falls. the peruvian waterfalls wasn't even on any maps until 2006, when it was measured and found to be the third tall nest the world. >> the villagers said we knew it was amazing and beautiful, but we didn't have any sense that it could be that amazing relative to everything else that might exist in the world. that's in a way the lesson of atlas obscura. one of the wonders around us that we don't take the time to knowledge and celebrate and revel in, what are the waterfalls that we're mising? >> reporter: and they're betting by highlighting those wonders, they'll prove that the world still has plenty of surprises. >> everybody's curious about the world.
2:55 am
sometimes they just need a explore. and hopefully we are giving people that spur.
2:56 am
z27mkz z16fz
2:57 am
y27mky y16fy today is valentine's day and steve hartman has one story of unending love. he found it on the road to the emergency room. >> reporter: at st. claire's hospital in denville, new jersey, they still can't stop talking about it. >> you don't forget any call like that. >> reporter: a few months ago, these emergency responders got a call for a man with chest pain. and what a heart they found. >> he said, don't let me die. >> he said he just wanted to take his wife out to dinner. it was pretty cute. >> reporter: those were the final words of 91-year-old joe
2:58 am
lafkin. his last wish before suffering a major heart attack was to take time. >> it seemed as though he loved her a great deal. >> reporter: his wife, margie, can't tell you how hard sit to lose the love of your life. can't tell you, because her husband's death was short-lived. >> oh, you're making me lunch, honey? >> yes. >> reporter: joe was gone ten minutes before his heart was restarted. what amazed them is what he woke up shouting. >> where's chris? >> he said exactly the same thing. >> reporter: joe got his din we are margie. on the house, of course. but they say the greater gift is still giving. >> they're just closer, if that's possible. is that truesome >> >> oh, yeah. [ laughter ]
2:59 am
>> reporter: this weekend, couples across america will go out assuming there will be many more valentine's to come. >> here's something else. >> reporter: but not joe and margie. they will go to dinner appreciating each other more now than ever. >> she's got so many guys. >> don't say that on air. >> he's going to cut that all out. >> i hope so. >> reporter: you've got to love young love. ♪ because you make me feel so young ♪ >> reporter: steve hartman, on the road, in denville, new jersey. >> that's the "overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning
3:00 am
news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm demarco morgan. mixed signals from the white house. >> yes, general flynn does enjoy the full confidence of the president. >> then the president sends word that he's evaluating his national security adviser, who reportedly misled the administration about his contacts with russia. also tonight, after a north korean missile launch, the president convenes his top advisers in a public dining room. cbs inewsnvestigates an exhaust leak in late model ford explorers. this police officer says it almost cost him his life. >> i just went out. >> reporter: just like that? >> just like that. and the national zoo prepares to say bye-bye to bao bao.
3:01 am
>> i think it's like your kids going off to college. it's a hard thing to do. ♪ this is the "cbs overnight news." nearly 200,000 residents of northern california have no idea when they will be allowed to go home. they were evacuated over concern that recent rain could cause a spillway to fail at the nation's tallest dam. three counties downstream could be submerged. john blackstone is there. >> reporter: with water thundering out of oroville dam, officials are in a race to fix the damaged spillway and lower the lake level, which is at near capacity. california department of water resources director bill croyle. >> we're moving 100,000 cubic feet per second down that spillway. we've been doing that for aboute huge boulders to fortify the
3:02 am
dam's spillways. the main concrete spillway that funnels excess water into a floodplain began breaking apart last week. chunks of concrete gave way, and the hole kept getting bigger. engineers decided to use an emergency spillway that had never been needed in the dam's 48-year history. it worked, for a while, but the emergency spillway couldn't handle the excess flow. a wide gash on sunday raised fears the structure could give way, possibly inundating several communities below with a 30-foot wall of water. nearly 200,000 were told to leave immediately, creating grid lock. resident ed hershey. >> miserable. bumper to bumper. it was chaos. everybody was just trying to rush to get out. >> reporter: now residents are waiting for the all clear, which butte county sheriff kory honea is not ready to give. >> this is a dynamic situation. it's a situation we're still trying to assess. we need to have time to make
3:03 am
sure that before we allow people back into those areas, it is safe to do so. >> reporter: officials say this huge dam itself is structurally sound, only spillway repairs are needed. but back in 2005, environmental groups warned of possible severe damage downstream if the main spillway was not reinforced. scott, those warnings went unheeded. >> john blackstone for us tonight. john, thank you. the president's adviser on national security may not have much job security. late today white house counselor kellyanne conway said the president had full confidence in michael flynn, but minutes later the white house rushed out a correction saying mr. trump is evaluating flynn. this is about conversations that flynn had with russia's ambassador to the united states before the president was inaugurated. it can be a crime for a private citizen to negotiate with a foreign government. here's our chief white house correspondent, major garrett.
3:04 am
>> north korea is a big, big problem, and we will deal with that very strongly. >> reporter: as president trump and canadian prime minister justin trudeau held a news conference, national security adviser michael flynn, his job hanging in the balance, joined other senior white house officials in the front row. mr. trump ignored shouted questions about his confidence in flynn as he left the east room. counselor to the president kellyanne conway. >> yes, general flynn does enjoy the full confidence of the president, and this is a big week for general flynn. he's the point of contact for many of these foreign visits. >> reporter: just over an hour later, though, the white house said the president is evaluating the situation. the fbi and other intelligence agencies are investigating conversations flynn had with the russian ambassador to the u.s. before president trump's inauguration. flynn initially denied discussing u.s. sanctions on russia during the calls, a potential violation of federal law, but last week flynn said he couldn't be sure if the topic came up. in january vice president elect
3:05 am
pence defended flynn on "face >> those conversations that happened to occur around the time that the united states took action to expel diplomats had nothing whatsoever to do with those sanctions. >> reporter: the white house now says president trump is speaking to vice president pence relative to the conversation the vice president had with general flynn. multiple sources tell cbs flynn called pence to apologize this weekend. white house policy adviser steven miller was asked yesterday if deceiving the vice president was a fireable offense. >> it's not for me to answer hypotheticals. it wouldn't be responsible. it's a sensitive matter. >> reporter: flynn's attempt to apologize has not satisfied pence or white house chief of staff reince priebus, and his status remains tenuous. scott, today the president, reading from a list provided by white house press aides, called on two members of the u.s. press corps. neither asked about flynn. >> major garrett at the white
3:06 am
house for us tonight. flynn was with the president dining with the japanese prime minister in palm beach, florida, this weekend, when north korea test fired a ballistic missile. guests at mr. trump's golf resort thought they witnessed the national security team deliberating in a public dining room. the white house says not so. here's jeff pegues. >> reporter: shortly after the missile launch, photographs posted on social media show mr. trump's national security adviser michael flynn and chief strategist steve bannon gathered around the president in a public dining room. it's not known what they were discussing, but the president and the japanese prime minister read information by camera lights and made phone calls, all while the first lady and others looked on. mar-a-lago club member richard deagazio posted some of the photos on facebook write, "holy moley" and, "wow, center of the
3:07 am
action." the house intelligence committee said that if the president was discussing sensitive information it posed a security risk. >> they should have gone to a secure space, been able to talk freely about it, been able to strategize about what the u.s. response would be. none of that happened here. >> reporter: presidents normally receive national security briefings in private, often in the white house situation room or, if they are traveling, in a mobile secure communications facility. president obama, for example, was photographed taking secure phone calls in a tent in brazil in 2011. and just last year inside a trailer in havana. the white house denies that there was a security risk. scott, in a statement it says the president was briefed on the north korea situation in a classified setting both before and after dinner. >> jeff pegues in the washington newsroom. thank you.
3:08 am
3:09 am
3:10 am
the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. president trump called this a dangerous world in a news conference today with the visiting canadian prime minister. mr. trump was asked whether syrian refugees pose a terrorist threat, but his answer centered on the recent arrests of illegal immigrants, who have committed crimes. >> we're actually taking people that are criminals, very, very hardened criminals in some cases with a tremendous track record of abuse and problems, and we're getting them out. and that's what i said i would do. i'm just doing what i said i would do when we won by a very, very large electoral college vote. well, you never hear of
3:11 am
refugees from the united states, but canadian border officials are reporting hundreds of them. they're refugees from the middle east who were legally admitted into the united states, but now they worry their legal status could be revoked. canada has a more welcoming refugee policy. this syrian family you're seeing now crossed on saturday through the woods into quebec. the canadian border agency says there were 369 such refugees from the united states in november, and in december there were 591. president trump said recently that no one knows whether climate change is real, but he's keeping an open mind. well, mark phillips has something to consider from the bottom of the world. he's in antarctica for our climate diaries. >> reporter: high summer in antarctica.
3:12 am
an explosion of life when the deep freezer warms up to become just a refrigerator, and an explosion of scientific research when the antarctic reveals the secrets that have been locked in its ice. >> there's something going on. >> there's something obviously going on. it's very clear. >> reporter: ken taylor runs one of the continent's most ambitious ice research projects. what's going on is the huge crack that's opened up in one of the floating ice shelves that cling to the coast here. >> there's a large berg. it's about to break off. >> reporter: you say large berg. it's the size of delaware. >> yes, it's very large. and the fraction is breaking off, it jumps about a mile every week or so. >> reporter: it's not the ice from the ice shelf that's worrying. more antarctic ice flowing into the sea would increase the threat to low-lying coastal areas around the world, including in the united states. >> there are several spots
3:13 am
around antarctica that are believed to be in this situation going to flow into the sea and there's nothing we can do to stop it at this point. >> reporter: eric gouth is part of a scientific study that is proving antarctic ice is on the move. >> this here is the object of your affection? >> absolutely. >> reporter: he's part of the extreme ice survey that uses time-lapse photography to document what's happening. images snapped every hour and then strung together show how quickly the glaciers are flowing. these pictures aren't just useful for science, they have another purpose. >> much of the general public are visual learners, as am i. i think being able to see that with your own eyes is a very compelling way of communicating information. >> reporter: arguments over the causes of climate change may be raging again at home. here suggestions of a hoax come up against some cold, hard facts.
3:14 am
ken taylor, the ice scientist, the icecap for answers. sometimes, though, they're floating all around you. bubbles trapped in the ice contain the air that was around tens of thousands of years ago when the ice froze. and that air contained a fraction of the warming greenhouse gasses the human race is now pumping into the atmosphere. >> you smell that air, you're smelling ancient air. it's really good air. it's like air before humans messed up the atmosphere. >> yeah. smells like ice. >> reporter: and there is another kind of chill down here, scott, a chill in the scientific community, a fear that the funding it needs will be harder to come by in the future and that there's a less sympathetic ear in government for the kinds of science they do. >> mark phillips for our climate diaries down under. thanks. still ahead, drivers of ford explorers say exhaust fumes are
3:15 am
making them sick. new guidelines for treating back pain. and later, a panda takes her final "baos." ok, let's try this. ok, it says you apply the blue one to me. here? no. ah ok, here? maybe you should read the directions. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together.
3:16 am
3:17 am
k-y yours and mine. denew ugreeltraclearnt saving black + white.othes. no yellow stains on white clothes. no white marks on black clothes. new degree ultraclear black + white. it won't let you down. federal safety investigators are looking into reports that exhaust fumes are leaking into
3:18 am
lateel here's our transportation correspondent kris van cleave. >> reporter: dash camera video shows the moment newport beach police officer brian mcdowell passed out behind the wheel of his 2014 ford explorer police cruiser and crashed into a tree. >> you narrowly missed an suv. >> yeah. >> reporter: this is a matter of inches. >> i just think plus or minus one second i maybe wouldn't be here on this earth for my kids. >> reporter: mcdowell is recovering from multiple injuries but has no memory of the accident. >> i just went out. >> just like that. >> just like that. >> reporter: records show he had no drugs or alcohol in his system. doctors couldn't figure out why he blacked out. >> i had that nauseous feeling and i felt like i had a headache. >> reporter: mcdowell then learned hundreds of drivers had been complaining about exhaust that contains carbon monoxide leaking into the cabin of the explorers, likely leaked into
3:19 am
the cabin through in the back of the car typically when the air conditioning was on. this july the nhtsa launched an investigation, citing 154 customer complaints about exhaust in 2011 through 2015 ford explorers, but cbs news discovered that's grown to more than 450 complaints, some involving newer models. nhtsa says there haven't been any serious injuries. >> i was hospitalized several times with uncontrollable headaches, nausea, vomiting. >> reporter: but stacy jones, who has an autoimmune disorder, believes her suv made her sick. >> after i started driving the 2014 explorer, my health started to decline rapidly. >> reporter: ford has known about the problem since 2012 when it issued the first of three repair bulletins to dealers. in a 2015 deposition, a company representative acknowledged it appears to be a design issue
3:20 am
that remains unresolved. repairs did not fix the problem for jones, so she traded her >> the dealers were like, the '17s are fine, no worries. >> reporter: but she still smelled exhaust, even after weeks of repairs. >> it's frustrating, because at this point i don't know what i'm going to do. >> reporter: officer mcdowell is now suing ford. the automaker tells cbs news in rare circumstances there have been instances where customers detected an exhaust odor in explorers. the statement maintains it poses no safety risk. >> kris van cleave investigating for us tonight. thank you, kris. still ahead, new advice for
3:21 am
back pain. ♪ [joy bauer] two thirds of americans have digestive issues. i'm joy bauer, and as a nutritionist i know probiotics can often help. but many probiotics do not survive your stomach's harsh environment. digestive advantage is different.
3:22 am
its natural protein shell is tougher better than the leading probiotic, to get where you need it most. get the digestive advantage, and enjoy living well. an adopted son of the notorious child molester jerry sandusky was arrested in pennsylvania today. 41-year-old jeffrey sandusky faces 14 couts of child sexual abuse. he has been suspended from his job as a prison guard. sandusky's lawyer declined to comment. his father, the former assistant football coach at penn state, is serving at least 30 years for abusing ten boys. if you have an achy back, you have got company. as many as 80% of adults will have back pain. and tonight our doctor jon lapook runs us through new guidelines from the american college of physicians. >> reporter: 76-year-old berta
3:23 am
axelrad has lived with chron >> the pain is just so -- well, it's terrible. >> reporter: she swears by exercise, yoga and walking. >> it minimizes the pain. it's not always easy, but it's much better than doing nothing. >> reporter: today's guidelines say the first line of therapy should be non-drug treatment for pain lasting less than three months, those include heat wrap, massage, acupuncture and spinal manipulation. the authors stress that clinicians should avoid costly and potential harmful treatments like narcotics. for pain lasting more than three months, treatments include stretching and strengthening exercises, tai chi, yoga, acupuncture and mindfulness techniques like meditation to relieve stress. if those fail, anti-inflammatories such as ibuprofen should be considered first, then medications that can dull nerve pain like tramadol or duloxetine. >> some of these treatments such as yoga or massage are often
3:24 am
offered outside of the traditional health care system.f massachusetts general hospital wrote an editorial about the guidelines. >> some of these may be a shot across the bow to insurers to say, maybe we should be covering them better. >> and rotate once to your left. >> reporter: physical therapist dana rose demonstrated some moves designed to bring relief. >> by activating and using your core muscles, that should lessen the load through our joints to help minimize back pain. >> reporter: the recommendation to use non-drug therapies first is especially relevant when the country is facing an epidemic of opioid abuse.
3:25 am
3:26 am
3:27 am
>> jon lapook, thanks, doc. coming up next, a big loss for cub fans. the national zoo tweets word that the giant panda may shong gave birth this afternoon to her third cub, a female. >> the birth of bao bao three and a half years ago. next week chip reid tells us she'll be going to china, for good.
3:28 am
>> reporter: from the day she was born mon devoted fans have watched her grow up on the panda cam. they saw her first check-up. and her first birthday. they watched her fall in love with bamboo, her first encounter with a camera, her first tumble in the snow, her first game of hide and seek, or maybe pretending to be a turtle. and they watched her learn that when mom says, "get down," she means get down now." on every step of the way, trainer marty dearie was there. now he's preparing her for another first. >> hi, lady. come on, bao. good girl. >> reporter: he's getting her used to the crate that will take her to her new home in china next week. >> by giving her honey water, it continues to build this space as somewhere she wants to be. >> reporter: dearie will be traveling with her. >> i'm someone she knows really well. >> reporter: you hold her hand? >> yeah exactly.
3:29 am
not literally, but yes. >> reporter: part of the deal when china lent bao bao's mother to the zoo was any cubs would be sent to china to breed before they turned four. brandy smith is the zoo's associate director for animal care sciences. >> i think it's like your kids going off to college. it's hard thing to do. we're a little bit sad. we're a lot worried. but in the end we know it's the right thing to do and it's the best thing for her. >> reporter: you think there are going to be tears? >> yeah. i'm a crier. i can admit that. >> reporter: tears but also the satisfaction of knowing that bao bao will be doing her part to save this vulnerable and adorable species. chip reid, cbs news, washington. and that's the "overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and don't miss "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
3:30 am
-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com this is the "cbs overnight news." >> hi, everyone. welcome to the "overnight news." i'm demarco morgan. an evacuation order remains in effect around the tallest dam in the nation, parts of which are about to collapse. weeks of torrential rain has the oroville dam in california filled to the brim. two emergency spillways used to handle the overflow are crumbling. with more rain in the forecast, nearly 200,000 people have been forced from their homes. john blackstone has the story. >> reporter: with water thundering out of oroville dam, officials are in a race to fix the damaged spillway and lower the lake level, which is at near capacity. california department of water resources director bill croyle.
3:31 am
>> we're moving 100,000 cubic feet per second down that spillway. 16, 17 hours. >> reporter: as the water pours out, crews are preparing to move huge boulders to fortify the dam's spillways. the main concrete spillway that funnels excess water into a floodplain began breaking apart last week. chunks of concrete gave way, and the hole kept getting bigger. engineers decided to use an emergency spillway that had never been needed in the dam's 48-year history. it worked, for a while, but the emergency spillway couldn't handle the excess flow. a wide gash on sunday raised fears the structure could give way, possibly inundating several communities below with a 30-foot wall of water. nearly 200,000 were told to leave immediately, creating grid lock. resident ed hershey. >> miserable. bumper to bumper. it was chaos. everybody was just trying to rush to get out. >> reporter: now residents are
3:32 am
waiting for the all clear, which butte county sheriff kory honea >> this is a dynamic situation. it's a situation we're still trying to assess. we need to have time to make sure that before we allow people back into those areas, it is safe to do so. national security adviser mike flynn remains in the hotseat over his possibly illegal contacts with a russian envoy in the weeks before president trump took office. flynn at first denied discussions u.s. sanctions with the russian. but u.s. intelligence officials tell a different story. and now, flynn is apologizing. major garrett has the story. >> north korea is a big, big problem. and we will deal with that very strongly. >> reporter: as president trump and canadian prime minister justin trudeau held a news conference, national security adviser michael flynn joined other senior white house officials in the front row. mr. trump ignored shouted questions about his confidence
3:33 am
in flynn as he left the east room. counr kellyanne conway. >> yes, general flynn does enjoy the full confidence of the president, and this is a big week for general flynn. he's the point of contact for many of these foreign visits. >> reporter: just over an hour later, though, the white house said the president is evaluating the situation. the fbi and other intelligence agencies are investigating conversations flynn had with the russian ambassador to the u.s. before president trump's inauguration. flynn initially denied discussing u.s. sanctions on russia during the calls, a potential violation of federal law, but last week flynn said he couldn't be sure if the topic came up. in january vice president elect pence defended flynn on "face the nation." >> those conversations that happened to occur around the time that the united states took action to expel diplomats had nothing whatsoever to do with those sanctions. >> reporter: the white house now says president trump is speaking to vice president pence relative
3:34 am
to the conversation the vice president had with general flynn. multiple sources tell cbs flynn called pence to apologize this weekend. white house policy adviser steven miller was asked yesterday if deceiving the vice president was a fireable offense. >> it's not for me to answer hypotheticals. it wouldn't be responsible. it's a sensitive matter. in antarctica, there's a huge chunk of ice that's threatening to break off the continent and slide into the sea. mark phillips is there for the series and is traveling with scientists from national geographic explorer. >> reporter: this is what summer looks like in anarctica. an explosion of life in a place often thought of a bleak frozen wasteland. and an explosion of scientific research, because this is the time of year when antarctica is accessible and can be studies. this is when it reveals the secrets that have been locked into its ice.
3:35 am
ken taylor is one foremost ice scientists. and what he's talking about is the huge crack that's opened up in one of the floating ice shelves that cling to the coast of antarctica. >> there's a large berg -- it's about to break off the seashell of. >> it's the size of delaware. >> the size of delaware, very large. it jumps about a mile every week or so. >> reporter: it's not so much the floating ice that's worrying. without the ice shelf to hold it back, the glacial ice on land will flow into the oceans more quickly and drive sea levels up even more than the three feet that is already predicted for the century. >> there are several spots around antarctica that are believed to be in this situation where the ice on the ground is going to flow into the sea and there's nothing we can do to stop it at this point. >> reporter: eric gouth is trying to get at science another
3:36 am
way. middle of the conversation right now, because there are concerns about ice shelf stability. there are concerns about warmer sea temperatures around the antarctica peninsula. >> reporter: what he's producing is an overview, literally. >> so this here is the object of your affection, i gather. >> absolutely. >> tell me what it is. >> reporter: eric is part of the extreme ice survey that's documenting the changes that are happening in pictures. cameras placed at strategic locations snap one shot an hour, year round. and they produce time lapse images showing how the glaciers are moving, looking to see if they're speeding up or getting thinner. >> this type of visual evidence is what people need. much of the general public are
3:37 am
visual learners, as am i. being able to see that w own eyes is a compelling way to communicate the information. >> reporter: this is all this happening? again, the ice tells the story and it's not in denial. ken taylor normally drills miles deep into the ice to find the answers. sometimes, though, you can find them floating all around you. trapped in the ice are bubbles of the air that was around tens of thousands of years ago when it was frozen. air that had a fraction of the amount of the greenhouse gases in it, compared to what the human race is pumping into the atmosphere now. >> trapped in the ice, and if you release it, you can tell what the atmosphere was like 50,000, 100,000 years ago. >> you break this open and smell that air, you're smelling ancient air. it's really good air. it's like air before humans messed up the atmosphere. >> smells like ice. >> reporter: there's another kind of chill down here, as well. a chill in the scientific community that's working here.
3:38 am
a fear that the kinds of money they need for their work will be less forthcoming in the future and there will be a less sympathetic ear in government for the kind of science they do. ok, let's try this. ok, it says you apply the blue one to me. here? no. ah ok, here? maybe you should read the directions. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together. k-y yours and mine. mom,on my car insurance of money by switching to geico. i should take a closer look at geico...
3:39 am
you know, geico can help you save money help insure our mountain chalet! how long have we been sawing this log? um, one hundred and fourteen years. man i thought my arm would be a lot more jacked by now. i'm not even sure this is real wood. there's no butter in this churn. do my tris look okay? take a closer look at geico. great savings.
3:40 am
and a whole lot more. there are growing concerns this morning about one of the most popular vehicles in america, the ford explorer. it's the best selling mid-sized suv in the country, with about 1 million on the road. but hundreds of loyal customers say their explorers might be making them sick. transportation editor kris van cleave has details. >> reporter: many of the complaints talk about a sulfur or rotten e.g. smell coming from the back of ford explorers like this one. it happens while driving and the thought is it may be exhaust, which raises the concern it could be toxic. dash camera video shows the moment newport beach police officer brian mcdowell's life changed. he was responding to a non-emergency call when he
3:41 am
passed out behind the wheel of his 2014 ford explorer police ui >> yeah. >> reporter: this is a matter of inches. >> i just think plus or minus one second i maybe wouldn't be here on this earth for my kids. >> reporter: he has scars from a dislocated shoulder, fractured eye socket and traumatic brain injury, but no memory of the accident. >> i just went out. >> just like that. >> just like that. >> reporter: records show he had no drugs or alcohol in his system. >> i just had that nauseous feeling and i felt like i had a headache. >> reporter: but after months of tests, doctors couldn't find any medical reason why he blacked out. then he learned hundreds of drivers had been complaining about exhaust which contains carbon monoxide leaking into the cabin of the explorers, likely through unsealed seams in the rear of the suv. based on customer complaints, and ford's own documents, the issue seems to occur when while accelerating with the air conditioning active and in
3:42 am
circulation mode. you believe the car made you >> i do, yes. >> reporter: after monitoring the complaint for two years, the national highway traffic safety administration launched an investigation in july, citing 154 customer complaints about exhaust in ford explorers. but that's grown to 450 complaints, some involving 2016 and 201 m7 models, which are no part of the investigation. nhtsa maintains there haven't been any serious injuries, something mcdoubt's attorney brian chase, disputes. >> when i saw they said there were no injuries, we immediately got them on the phone and gave them all the information we had in the lawsuit. >> reporter: ron booth took us for a ride in his 2015 explorer that's been in for repairs on this issue five times. most recently in november. do you worry about what you're breathing in? >> of course we do. we worry about it a lot.
3:43 am
>> reporter: just a few minutes into the drive -- >> now you can definitely smell the exhaust right now. that's it. and we get that all the time. >> reporter: ford's known about the issue since at least 2012, when the company issued its first of three repair bulletins to dealers aimed at fixing the problem. >> ford has tried to fix it and they can't. >> reporter: in a 2015 deposition, a company representative acknowledged it appears to be a design issue that remains unresolved, or as he said "we're working on it." the automaker has stopped short of notifying customers but told cbs news in rare circumstances there have been instance where is customers detected an exhaust odor, adding the issue poses no safety risk. >> i bought this about six, seven months ago. >> reporter: booth can't afford a new car, so he's driving on, with a carbon monoxide detector. newport beach police told us they've implemented new safety measures in vehiles after mcdowell's accident.
3:44 am
>> just as a precaution, carbon monoxide detectors have been in all of the patrol vehicles and some of those detectors had gone off. >> reporter: officer mcdowell is suing ford for his injuries. there are at least two other class action lawsuits. ford agreed to settle one in florida, another in new jersey is ongoing. in that case, ford denies wrongdoing. president trump's travel ban remains on hold. but whether or not the executive order is ever reinstated, it's costing the travel industry tens of millions of dollars. the first week alone, bookings were down $185 million and peter greenberg has details how the immigration dust-up is rippling through the u.s. economy. >> reporter: when president trump signed the travel ban two weeks ago, blocking citizens
3:45 am
from seven nations, that has repercussions in the travel industry, which is faced with a loss of revenue as this issue continues to be battled in court. >> let them in! let them in! >> reporter: u.s. international airports have become the hub for thousands protesting president trump's travel ban. >> we welcome the leaders of the airline industry to the white house. >> reporter: the topic was absent during a meeting with president trump and aviation executives at the white house on thursday. >> the industry supports over 10 million well-paying u.s. jobs, and creates almost $1 trillion in economic activity. >> reporter: but uncertainty surrounding the ban is threatening that prosperity. industry analyst henry hardbald. >> there is an immediate and noticeable decline in people coming to the u.s. as a result of the executive order. tourism brings in high valued dollars to the u.s. and it's an important employer of a lot of people in america.
3:46 am
>> reporter: aor travel data company forwardkeys, flight bookings to the u.s. dropped 6.5% year over year during the week the travel ban was in place. bookings from the seven countries listed on trump's order to the u.s. were down 80%. >> uncertainly is back for understand is just how powerful the american dream is as a brand. >> you take apple and nike and mcdonald's together and put them together and multiply by a thousand. that's the strength of the american dream outside the u.s.
3:47 am
if you believe in democracy and you want to be part of the melting part, come oov that's the spirit of our nation, and we don't want to hurt that brand. >> reporter: and there's another unintended consequence here, and that is that the drop in online searches as much as 17%, and bookings down 87% are creating a global market downturn.
3:48 am
>> "cbs overnight news" will be right back. >> important message for residents age 50 to 85. write down this number now. right now, people are receiving this free information kit for guaranteed acceptance life insurance with a rate lock through the colonial penn program. if you are on a fixed income, learn about affordable whole life insurance that guarantees your rate can never increase for any reason. if you did not receive your information, call this number now. your acceptance is guaranteed, with no health questions. stand by to learn more. >> i'm alex trebek, here to tell you about a popular life insurance plan with a rate lock that locks in your rate for life so it can never increase. did you get your free information kit? if not, please call this number now. this affordable plan through the colonial penn program has coverage options for just $9.95 a month. your rate is locked in and can never go up. and your acceptance
3:49 am
is guaranteed, see how much coverage you can get for just $9.95 a month. call now for your free information kit. ♪ i'm worried i can't find a safe used car. you could start your search at the all-new carfax.com that might help. show me the carfax? now the car you want and the history you need are easy to find. show me used minivans with no reported accidents. boom. love it. [struggles] show me the carfax. start your used car search and get free carfax reports
3:50 am
at the all-new carfax.com. let's say you're searching for an adventure that's off the beaten path, way off the beaten path. there's a guide to that called atlas secure. and serena altshul took part of the tour. >> careful. >> reporter: josh and dilan can usually be found looking for adventure. >> we'll let you in here without any sound or without any light. >> reporter: but today, they're just looking for some peace and quiet. >> see you on the other side.
3:51 am
>> reporter: and they've come to the right place. >> you can hear every single minor sound as clear as a bell. >> reporter: used to test the volume of a wide range of products, this room at orfield labs in minnesota is about 16 times quieter than the silence at your local library. >> all right, gentlemen, time to come out. >> reporter: which makes it the quietest place on earth. >> you can hear each other swallow across the room. you can hear your eyebrows move. after that experience, it changes your perception of the world. you think about your own body and sound totally differently. >> reporter: which is exactly their mission, to make people think about the world differently. the world's quietest room is just one of more than 600 obscure and unique spots
3:52 am
featured in their neok "atlas obscura, an explorer's guide to the world's hidden wonders." >> we try and highlight stuff in the world that makes you feel like the world is a bigger, weirder, more wonderful place than you imagined. >> reporter: the book is an offshoot of their website, founded in 2009. it's an online encyclopedia of weird and wondrous places that gets 5 million visitors each month. >> we always joke the eiffel tower could never be in atlas obscura. but there's a little room at the top of the eiffel tower that is a secret place to entertain guests. that's atlas obscura. >> reporter: but it was the vast network of users that submitted many of the book's most awe-inspiring destinations. is there one that was really surprising to you? >> the wonderful thing is, they
3:53 am
come in every day. i remember the first time the middle of the turkmanistan desert. it's this giant flaming hole in the ground, and it was created during an industrial accident in the 1970s. >> reporter: closer to home, they found an organ unlike any you've heard before. virginia's great stalagpipe organ. >> this guy took an entire cave and attached little mallets to different sta llagtites and sett up to play them. so when he plays the organ, the entire cave was played as a musical instrument. you can still go and they play the gave organ for you. ♪ >> it's blinking, what does that mean? >> reporter: josh and dilan, being an intrepid pair, discover many of the sites themselves. while exploring south america in
3:54 am
2010, they walked across one of and they hiked to the top of gafta falls. the peruvian waterfall wasn't even on any maps until 2006, when it was measured and found to be the third tallest in the world. >> we got a chance to talk to villages and they said, we knew it was amazing and beautiful, but we didn't have any sense that it could be that amazing relative to everything else that might exist in the world. that's in a way the lesson of atlas obscura. one of the wonders around us that we don't take the time to knowledge and celebrate and revel in, what are the waterfalls that we're missing? >> reporter: and they're betting by highlighting those wonders, they'll prove that the world still has plenty of surprises. >> everybody's curious about the world.
3:55 am
sometimes they just need a little spur to go out and explore.
3:56 am
3:57 am
3:58 am
and hopefully we are giving people that spur. ♪ ♪ take a good look at yourself. ♪ oh, yeah. ♪ and turn. ♪ oh! ♪ very nice. ♪ check that smooth backside one more time. ♪ no, really check it.
3:59 am
♪ do you see any changing or suspicious spots? ♪ it's your skin. ♪ and it's important. ♪ if you're a man over 50, you're in the group most likely ♪ to develop skin cancer, including melanoma, the cancer ♪ that kills one person every hour. ♪ ♪ when detected early, skin cancer is highly treatable. ♪ check yourself out. ♪ and find someone else to help. ♪ learn more about what to look for at spotskincancer.org.
4:00 am
♪ a message from the american academy of dermatology. ♪ it's tuesday, february 14th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." breaking overnight -- michael flynn has resigned. the president's national afcurity adviser steps down seter lvera days of damaging reports. in northern california, choppers drop massive rocks from overhead,vacuees are watching and waiting hoping it works. dominance defined.

86 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on