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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  February 20, 2017 2:35am-4:00am EST

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your response to that criticism of the administration? >> well, i think it's a good criticism of the media. you know, it's very difficult to separate the truth from the lies. >> mr. priebus, he wasn't -- >> i get it, john. i understand the question. i'm just asking you to do the same thing in regard to the media and what we've been dealing with lately in responding to 24 hours a day, 7 days a week of cable news with one kyron after the next of a lie from another source that doesn't want to name a single person in these bogus stories. and so we would rather talk about the truth and what's happening instead of these bogus stories. and go through the litany of things that we've accomplished, the lobbying ban, de-regulation -- >> i nuunderstand, mr. priebus, but if we could get back to the ques f
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arizona, who made that claim about truth from the white house. what is your response to that? >> my response is that there's -- i don't know what he's referring to. i mean, i didn't see his statement. but he would be wrong in regard to that statement and the white house and president trump. the fact of the matter is, the level of accomplishment that he's put forward so far in the first 30 days has been remarkable, and i've already gone through the litany with you. >> you have. let me ask you about that litany. in conversations i've had with members in the administration, and also republicans on the hill, they have said that while they're on your team, they're on your side, they recognize all those accomplishments you talk about, that the -- when the president says the white house is a fine tuned machine, and when steven miller in the white house says it's an understatement you're in control, what they worry about is, not everything is in control. and there's such an effort to show how
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there may be a mind spot at the white house that need to be fixed. for those people worried about the blind spot, the things that need to be fixed, what is your words to them? >> first of all, there you go again. you're talking about some people, those people, them, they. two are those people? >> you've not heard any -- [ overlapping speakers ] >> this is what you guys do. >> let's put it this way -- on conversations you have with say speaker paul ryan and lots of other leaders on the hill, when they talk to you, do they express no concern that things at the white house are maybe a little ragged on certain issues? is it constant praise that you get on the hill? >> what we hear from people on the hill is the same thing i'm telling you. the media is obsessed with a lot of false, hollow stories without sourcing that
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go to cbs news.com. news.com.
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one of the sticking points on immigration is how to hand it will refugee crisis stemming from syria. our neighbors to the north are taking more steps to welcome more families. arthur teichner has this story. >> passengers, please proceed immediately to boarding. >> reporter: by the time the istanbul/toronto flight landed, jim had been standing around with his sign for hours. all he knew about the syrian brother and sister he was meeting, at 3:00 in the morning, was their names. ahmed and romaff. >> how are
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>> i'm ahmed. this is my sister. >> reporter: all they knew about him is that somehow this jim estel had brought them to canada. even in a country eager to welcome syrian refugees, he's upped the ante. a prominent canadian entrepreneur, he put up his own money, $1.1 million to resettle 58 syrian lifamies. 250 people at a small university city an hour west of toronto. why? because he was haunted by those pictures on television of syrian cities reduced to rubble. and syrian people dying as they
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else. >> you don't want to grow old and say you stood by and did nothing. and it's the right thing to do. >> reporter: 68% of canadians support their government's acceptance of syrian refugees. in contrast, 54% of american voters think the united states has no responsibility to take syrians. the fundamental argument against syrian refugees in the united states is the fear of terrorism. are you afraid? >> i would be wrong to say that there isn't some fear, but statistically, the fear is completely unfounded. i believe actually the best way to breed world citizens is to bring them into our community and give them hope. >> reporter: the e-mails a
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>> i get ten a day, and i've gotten well over a thousand. some of them are three pages long with horror stories. >> help, help, please help, my life in real danger. >> reporter: syrians contact him directly. because in canada, individuals can sponsor refugees, if they agree to fully support them for a year. since november 2015, canada has admitted 40,000 syrians. 16,000 of those privately sponsored. all were vetted by the canadian government. a process that typically takes six to nine months. the hard part is decides who to choose. >> it's actually a terrible process. it's awful. we try to pick people who we think will sell well. being able to support themselves. >> so the ideal refugee situation would be a family with children? >> yeah. mom and dad wit
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also like extended families. >> reporter: each family is assigned an arabic speaking mentor. and at least three english speaking mentors, like dan, from among the 800 volunteers estel has recruited to help the refugees adjust. who gets more out of this experience? >> i do. >> he's like older brother for me. and -- >> older brother? >> yeah. >> reporter: estel likes to say he runs his refugee program like a business. in fact, he puts some of the new arrivals, like ahmed, to work temporarily at the appliance manufacturing company he runs. he even gives them time during the workday to attend english classes at tac
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>> i said thank you what you are doing for us, but i need to work. i need to eat from my hand. i don't want to give me fish every day. i need to fish. >> reporter: don't give me the fish, i need to do the fishing. >> yeah. >> reporter: ahmed and his wife arrived in november. from the city of homs, they are owned a clothing factory. destroyed now. this was their neighborhood. this their apartment. they spent nearly three years in lebanon, living in one room with their two sons. one son is still stuck there. see that sign? the exciting new retailer in this mall is going to
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>> i think this is dream. >> reporter: a dream come true thanks to the backing of jim estel, who believes ahmed and his family can and should be running a business again. you're wearing a little canadian flag on your sweater. why? >> because i love this country. >> already? >> yeah. i'm going to be very good to this country here. she protect me, i protect her. >> reporter: and then there's muhammad. if being sponsored by jim estel wasn't good enough, things got better for him when he was told his family, wife ala, and daughter, would live in this comfortable apartment free, until the end of june. when did you
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>> 12-12-2016. >> a day you'll never forget? >> the golden number. >> reporter: they were handed this notebook. >> emergency, fire, police. >> reporter: a comprehensive directory of useful information. even pictures of mentors. >> his name, his mobile number, e-mails. >> reporter: they couldn't believe it when they found their refrigerator filled with syrian food. were you surprised by the welcome, the friendliness? >> yes. amazing. everywhere you go, you feel you are welcome in canada. >> reporter: he was an oil geologist in syria, ala a teacher. their damascus home in ruins. the war drove them first to the oil fields of iraq, then after isis attacks, to turkey. li
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english now. just over two months after their long flight from istanbul, this syrian family feels safe and grateful and canadian. >> just two or three days ago, i pay the first tax. so i am canadian. >> reporter: they decided to keep their welcome sign.
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the new season of the critically acclaimed series "homeland" premiered last night. it often touches on issues like terrorism and national security. alex wagner got a behind the scenes look at season six during a shoot here in new york city. >> reporter: new york city, how has it been? >> the dreamiest. >> reporter: after spending the last few seasons abroad, the syi thriller "homeland" is refusing on well, the homeland. claire danes has left the cia for a nonprofit legal aid center. >> she was pretty damaged by what was asked of her, and grew to be calloused and cynical and realized that she needed to take a different tact. so she's done that. >> kerry, thank you for coming.
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secretly advising the president-elect. >> reach out to president morris and make sure he knows you're unconvinced. >> reporter: a major new character playing the role of disrupter. >> we decided that our president-elect would be female. >> i will not have my agenda mischaracterized and undermined before i even take office. >> but she is a composite of the three major personalities of this last election cycle. so she's a little rogue. >> problem is not so much destroying isis, madame president. >> madame president-elect. >> reporter: also working with the incoming president in an official capacity is her long-time mentor, saul barenson, a top deputy at the cia. how is saul doing this season? >> he's doing well. he's -- good lord. there's nothing i can tell you without getting in trouble. >> reporter: they understand the
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community, on screen and in real life. you interface a lot with the actual intelligence gathering agencies of washington. how has that changed your perception of who these people are who are fighting this war on terrorsome >> i meet them, have dinner with them, i e-mail them and have a relationship with them. they are concerned beyond imagination. both in the fictional world and in the real world. >> reporter: there is a discussion happening in hollywood about the responsibility of the media in portraying muslims. >> yes. >> reporter: where do you think on that in terms of this show's responsibility? >> i sit right in the middle of it. i'm part of the responsibility. i hope to be part of the cure and i'm without a doubt part of the problem. so we have to work very hard, and we do, at attending to the muslim, islamic community's concerns about how they are portrayed in the media, in the world, and every area imag
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and we must up our game in that area, and we are. >> this is it? >> this is carrie's most lasting relationship has been with saul. her romantic entanglements have not ended well. >> it's very dangerous to date carr carrie. you will most likely end up in a morgue. >> she's a bit of a black widow. maybe it was worth it? >> people really want to see quinn and carrie. they want the little heart over the happy ending. >> yeah, that's not the homelandian way. >> you saved me. >> yes. >> i always wish for a little domestic bliss. a little easy going happiness for my girl, carrie. because he's earned it. she deserves a reprieve. >> amen
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>> "homd"elan
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finally this morning, girl scout cookie season is upon us. scouts across the country are competing to sell the most boxes. >> reporter: of all the things a little girl can aspire to be, 11-year-old charlotte says the most important of these is to be truthful. >> why so important to you? >> if you're not honest, what are you? >> she says the first words of the girl scout code are, i will do my best to be honest. so she decided to tell her customers the whole truth. in this letter to one customer that went viral on the
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she wrote "the girl scout organization can sometimes use false advertisement." she then graded the cookies. she gave the do-si-do a five, saving most of her venom for the tfx toffetastic, that she gave a one. >> my sister and i threw out the box. we tried everything. we tried dunking it in tea and hot chocolate and it's just gross. >> would you like to buy some girl scout cookies? >> reporter: as you might expect, brutal honesty can have a dramatic impact on sales. she was hoping to sell 300 boxes this year, but she got nowhere near that. nowhere near. >> that's you? >> that is all me. >> reporter: when we visited last week, she had told more than 23,000 boxes. a girl scout record. how do you explain this?
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>> reporter: apparently honesty is such an aberration, that when all these people read her letter, they felt compelled to support her. >> i sold thousands of thinments. >> reporter: have you sold my o toffeetact toffeetactics? >> to my grandmother. then she gave them to her friend who -- >> who has a dog? >> no, who has a gluten allergy. >> reporter: so there's your hope, america. even in the world of fake news and alternative facts, honesty can, and will, prevail. >> that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center here in new york city, i'm demarco morgan. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com
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this is the "cbs overnight news." >> hi, everyone. welcome to the "cbs overnight news." i'm demarco morgan. president trump spent sunday focusing on a key job opening in his administration, national security adviser. mr. trump interviewed at least four men on the short list to replace mike flynn who resigned last week. they are acting security adviser keith kellogg, former united nations ambassador john bolton, and lieutenant generals h.r. mcmaster and robert caslen. the president spent the weekend in palm beach, florida. manuel bojorquez is there. >> reporter: the president spent part of sunday at his golf club, chatting up candidates for national security adviser, after the forced resignation of general michael flynn last week,
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vice admiral robert halward turned it down. over concerns of control over staffing. the president's chief of staff, reince priebus, denied a power struggle. >> the president has said very clearly that the new nsa director will have total and complete say over the makeup of the nsc. >> reporter: the shakeup at the national security council includes the removal of a senior director after he made statements critical of the president. but at this campaign style rally in melbourne, florida saturday, mr. trump again targeted the media, blaming reporters for some of the challenges of his first month in office. >> i also want to speak to you without the filter of the fake news. [ applause ] >> reporter: he labeled some news organizations, including cbs news, the enemy of the american people. a statement priebus defended on "face the nation." >> i think that the problem we've got is tha'r
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about bogus stories like the one in "the new york times" that we've had constant contact with russian officials. >> reporter: senator john mccain raised concerns about repeated attacks on the press. >> that's how dictators get started. i'm not saying that president trump is trying to be a dictator. i'm just saying we need to learn the lessons of history. >> reporter: despite the administration's attempts to move past questions about russian interference in the 2016 election, there are new calls for action against the kremlin. even from the president's own party. republican senator lindsey graham. >> the russians were involved to hurt clinton. the bottom line is, it is now time to punish russia. >> reporter: but the president said he would focus on other matters once he returns to washington tomorrow, including signing the new executive order on immigration, after the courts struck down his travel ban. demarco? >> manuel bojorquez, thank you. john dickerson joins us now from washington. john, always good to see you. >> gre
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>> we heard chief of staff reince priebus defend the president's declaration that the press is the enemy. is this part of their strategy? >> it's always been part of donald trump's strategy. he used it very well in the campaign. this is a little bit something new. the idea is to have an opponent, he no longer has a campaign opponent, so the press is useful. the press helps him do that at times by writing stories that then have to be retracted. it's certainly something that thrills his supporters. it's not new for administrations. this has happened in history before. but when the president uses the language he did, that is something that's new. >> john, as the president and many of his staff blame the media, how long can this administration survive with this adversarial relationship? >> it can survive quite a while. it's -- the challenge to this administration will come from the surprise thing that will happen coming from overseas, and if the president can handle it. so far, the president has done a
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lot to both give concern and a lot of hope to his supporters on capitol hill. it's really question of what happens in reality, not so much this battle with the press. >> and priebus asked you to look at the president's accomplishments one month in. how do you look at the early days of the trump presidency and how does it stack up to other administrations? >> well, it's been fast-moving, chaos inviting. some of the chaos is by design. but he's also gotten some big things right. the supreme court, some of his other cabinet picks thrill republicans. his support for the keystone pipeline also, and so on the big things, he's moving in the direction he wants, and the difficulties he's had are, you know, he'll still have to work those out. but it's not all chaos and it's not the finely tuned machine he suggests. >> john dickerson, always good to see you. john, thank you. >> thanks, demarco. folks in california are picking up the pieces after devastating storms slammed t
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at least three people are dead. more dangerous storms are rolling in. here's danielle nottingham. >> reporter: bulldozers cleared muddy debris from neighborhoods and highways buried by rock slides in friday's deadly storm. as fallen trees were removed, dropping water levels revealed another victim in a creek near los angeles. flooding remains a concern in northern california. on saturday, 200 people were evacuated in the town of maxwell, when overflowing creeks flooded roads and homes. jim saso is with the county sheriff's office. >> the water just kind of outran them, and started coming into residences. >> reporter: in morgan hill, the anderson reservoir has reached capacity, leaving the community on edge. >> i've lived here most of my life, and i've never seen the levels of water being so high. >> reporter: meanwhile, crews at lake oroville dam are working around the clock to repair a
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damaged spillway and lower the lake's water level ahead of an approaching storm. the threat of flooding forced the evacuation of 188,000 people last week. here in los angeles, they're patching up a 20-foot sinkhole that swallowed two cars. demarco, even more rain is expected in the area later tonight. >> danielle nottingham, thank you. meteorologist pamela gardner says there's stormy weather ahead not just in the west but in the south. she joins us now from boston. pamela? >> hey, demarco. yeah, more excessive rainfall for the west coast, which is not what they need. they've had record breaking rainfall over the last week, so more landslides, debris flows and excessive mountain runoff can be expected. that flood warning all the way through thursday, and wind gusts exceeding 50 miles per hour for monday afternoon. hour by hour, you see there's an atmospheric river that's going to push more heavy rain across san francisco and northern california through monday morning.
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monday night, you're still not done. additional rainfall will continue to inundate the area, rainfall amounts exceeding 5, perhaps up to 10 inches in isolated spots. and more record-breaking rainfall. meanwhile, we have a chance for some severe weather across texas and the south early tonight. the rest of the week looking fantastic. president's day, it's spring fever across the middle of the country, and to the south and east, while the northeast is just a touch frustratingly cooler. demarco? >> pamela gardner in boston, thank you. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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it was a major success for spacex. an unmanned rocket carrying supplies to the space station blasted off sunday from launch pad 39-a, where moon missions once began. tony dokoupil has the incredible sights and sounds. >> three, two, one, ignition. and liftoff of the falcon nine to the space station. >> reporter: with roaring engines and a cheering crowd, a falcon nine rocket shot through the clouds, beginning a throw-dthrow three-day mission to the international space station. the historic launch marked the first time a private space company lifted off from launch pad 39-a, the government's gateway to space for the apollo and space shuttle missions. >> you can see it descending there with the landing zone in the background. >> reporter: shortly after
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launch, spacex stuck the landing, bringing its rocket back to solid ground for just the third time. this rocket can now be refused. musk posted a picture of the triumph, captioned "baby came back." what is yet to come back is the company's dragon spacecraft, which separated from the rocket and is now bound for the space station, packed with more than two tons of supplies. it's expected to arrive wednesday. spacex has bigger plans to ferry not just supplies but astronauts to the space station, perhaps as soon as next year. but there have been setbacks. last september, an unmanned spacex rocket exploded on a launch pad and in june 2015, on a different nasa mission, another unmanned spacex rocket disintegrated shortly after liftoff. bill harwood is the space consultant for cbs news. >> nasa has high hopes spacex as well as boeing will be able to launch astronauts to and from the space station. the wild card in all of this is what the trump administration plans for nasa. >> reporter: after sunday's
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flying high. tony dokoupil, cbs news, new york. u.s.-backed iraqi forces launched another all-out assault on isis today, trying to drive the terror group out of iraq's largest city, mosul. jonathan vigliotti has the latest. >> reporter: u.s.-backed iraqi troops moved in swiftly sunday, retaking at least five villages in western mosul, setting their sights on the city's airport. leading up to the invasion, iraqi planes dropped millions of leaflets, warning people the assault was imminent and calling on islamic state militants to surrender. the prime minister announced the aggressive operation this morning on state-run television, saying the mission is twofold, to liberate civilians and reclaim territory from the islamic state. "we call on our brave troops to start the push to liberate the rest of the city and people from the oppression and terrorism of isis," he said. as many as 600,000 civilians live in the western part of the city.
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new concerns about the conditions they've been living in. according to those who have escaped, basic supplies like food and water, are scarce. the operation to free mosul began last october, in the city's less populated eastern side. by january, the iraqi government declared east mosul liberated. mosul is symbolic to isis, whose leader proclaimed the group's caliphate there in 2014. earlier this month, the top u.s. commander in iraq said the city could be liberated within the next six months. demarco? >> jonathan vigliotti, thank you. james brown's drummer, clyde stubblefield, passed away this weekend. ♪ that's stubblefield performing in 1968, the day after dr. martin luther king, jr.'s assassination. the godfather of soul dedicated the show to dr. king.
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he's best known for his break of brown's hit "funky drummer." clyde stubblefield was 73 years old. coming up next, businesses on a mission to make money, and a difference.
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some companies are using a new business model. every time a customer buys their product, they're making a donation to charity. jill wagner has more on this story. >> reporter: boundless is a sock company with a soul. >> we found out that socks were the number one most requested clothing item in homeless shelters. so for every pair we sell, we donate a pair to the community. >> reporter: ceo david heath launched the company in 2013. they hold events like this one where they make breakfast for the homeless and give socks to people who need them. >> it's nice that they can hand them out and give them to
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>> reporter: the goal was to give away a million pairs of socks in ten years. it took less than three. is it the mission, the quality of the socks? why do you think that it's caught on so quickly? >> i think that it's a bit of both. you can't have one without the other. you can't have a great mission and a bad product. you can't have a really great product without a mission. >> reporter: he modeled his buy one, give one away business on the success of tom's, which donates a pair of shoes for each one sold. and warby parker which does something similar with eye glasses. a growing number of companies have realized that doing good is good business. >> being charitable is cool down. >> reporter: mavin coleman is the crow of -- ceo of elephant pants, a clothing company that do
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charities that help save elephants. he says they make up that money by charging a bit more than competitors, and he admits the charity aspect creates buzz for the brand, and good will with customers. >> we definitely get a strong return on our investment, because we get strong, loyal customers that keep coming back. >> reporter: businesses on a mission to make money -- >> this is a wonderful thing. >> reporter: and a difference. jill wagner, cbs news, new york. still ahead, burning calories without moving a muscle. it's a modern approach to an ancient practice.
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want to lose weight without lifting a finger? don't sweat it. danielle nottingham is here again, and she has you covered. >> reporter: ryan weiss is getting quite a workout without moving a muscle. >> that comfortable enough for you? >> that's great. >> reporter: l.a. shape house puts a twist on the ancient practice of sweat lodges. instead of tents heated by fire or stones, an attendant tucks you into a 160 degree blanket. >> i notice that i'm just generally less irritable, less stressed. and then there t
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>> reporter: the luxury detox is gaining popularity with its promises of glowing skin and burning calories. >> it has that effect of general wellness, which allows for better sleep, better digestion, better thought process. >> reporter: you stay inside the blanket for up to an hour, but it's the last 10 to 15 minutes that give your body a full workout. but experts say sweating should not replace exercise, and it's not recommended for people that are pregnant or with heart disease. >> when heat demands are excessive and your body cannot cope with it due to your medical condition, due to your age, you will reach a stage where you can get a mild heat stroke at best, or at worst, you can get a fatal heat stroke. >> reporter: heather katanya hits this sweat lodge once a week. >> you can lay down and burn 1,000 calories while watching all your favorite shows on netflix. >> reporter: she's dropped ten poun
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and says her skin is soft and clear. danielle nottingham, cbs news, los angeles. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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finally this morning, girl scout cookie season is upon us. scouts across the country are again competing to sell the most boxes. this year, a new jersey girl included some bitter truth in her cookie offers, which turned out to be a really sweet deal. steve hartman met her on the road. >> reporter: of all the things a little girl can aspire to be, 11-year-old charlotte mccourt of new jersey says the most important of these is to be truthful. >> yes. it's like a core feeling. >> reporter: why so important to you? >> because if you're not honest, then what are you? >> reporter: charlotte says the first eight words of the girl scout law are, i will do my best to be honest. so when it came time to peddle her girl scout cookies this year, she decided to tell her customers the whole truth. in this letter to one customer that went viral on the internet, she wrote, the girl scout
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organization can sometimes use false advertisement. she then graded the cookies. she gave the do-si-dos a five for its unoriginal bland flavor, saving most of her venom for the toffeetastic. she gave it a one for being a bleak, flavorless, gluten free wasteland. it's as flavorless as dirt, she wrote. >> my sister and i threw out the box. we tried everything. we tried dunking it in sea, tried dunking it in hot chocolate and it's just gross. >> would you like to buy some girl scout cookies? >> reporter: as you might expect brutal honestly can have a dramatic impact on sales. she was hoping to sell 300 boxes this year. but she got nowhere near that. nowhere near. that's you? >> that's all me. >> reporter: when we visited last week, she had already sold over 23,000 boxes, a girl scout record.
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>> reporter: apparently honesty is such an aberration, that when all these people read her letter, they felt compelled to support her. >> i sold thousands of thin minting -- mints and samoas. >> reporter: have you told any toffeetastics? >> one to my grandmother. just one box. and she gave it to a friend who -- >> who has a dog? >> no, who has a dplutgluten al. >> reporter: so there's your hope, america. that even in a world of fake news and alternative facts, honestly can, and will, prevail. >> that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center here in new york city, i'm demarco morgan. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com
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hi, everyone. welcome to the "cbs overnight news." i'm demarco morgan. the white house is defending president trump's damning new attack against the press. in a tweet, the president denounced several news organizations, including this one, as the enemy of the american people. and sunday on "face the nation," white house chief of staff reince priebus explained why the president is denouncing the press. here's part of his conversation with john dickerson. >> mr. priebus, welcome. i want to start with a little business before we get to the substance of things. there's been a debate about when to take the president seriously. he recently tweeted that the press was the enemy of the american people. should we take that seriously from him? >> i think you should take it seriously. i think the problem we've got is that we're talking about bogus stories, like the one in the new york times that we've had ta
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officials. the next day, "the wall street journal" had a story that the intel community was not giving the president a full intelligence briefing. both stories grossly inaccurate. overstated, overblown, so it's garbage. so we spend 48 hours on bogus stories. and the american people suffer. so i do think it's a problem and i think that the media needs to, in some cases, not every case, john, but in some cases really needs to get its act together. >> the enemy? >> the theory is the press is supposed to be a free form of information to speak to the american people. i think it ought to be accurate, and i think we've gotten to a place, john, where the media is willing to run with unnamed soushs sources, false, leaked documents to create stories. we deal with one after the next. i think the media should stop with this unnamed source s
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put names on a piece of paper, and print it. if people aren't willing to put their name next to a quote, the quote shouldn't be listed, period. >> what you're describing is something that in all the presidencies i've covered is a familiar complaint from white houses going back a long time. and no previous white house has called the press the enemy. >> i think in our case, we have a total feeding frenzy and something that's gotten so out of control. when you look at the president's accomplishments, let's talk about the fact that we pulled out of tpp, we did a de-regulation executive order that takes two regulations for every one that's been put in place. we nominated neil gorsuch. we signed a bill in saving coal mining jobs. we've met with the uk, canada, israel. we've done so many things that are noteworthy and an accomplishment one day after the next. the story line should not be about bogus russian spy stories, but that this president has accomplished more in the first
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30 days of this presidency than people can possibly remember in a very long time. it's a story of accomplishment. and that's not what we're talking about. >> we're talking about the -- declaring that the press is the enemy. i just wanted to ask you this. in the past when the president was a candidate and he targeted people, say protesters at a rally, some people found that an opportunity to take license and target those people. as a spokesman for the white house here with us today, what would you say to anybody who might take license with the idea when the president says the press is the enemy, and act on that declaration by the president? >> well, i don't know what you mean by "act on." we would certainly never condone violence, but we certainly condone critical thought. if americans put critical thought, which i think they will, into what they're reading into these newspapers and what's being accomplished by the trump administration, they would realize that the press in many cases s
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job in reporting the truth. and the truth is, day after day after day, we have good stories to tell, great accomplishments. business is coming back. the stock market is at an all-time high. companies like gm, ford, chrysler, intel, all across this country are adding jobs by the thousands. it's because president trump is doing the things every day to give confidence to business owners and workers across america that things are getting done positively. instead, we're talking about stupidity and intelligence reporting that is based on facts that's not coming out of the actual heads of these intelligence agencies, and we're sitting here talking about it. and it's a shame and it needs to end. >> let me ask you about something john mccain, senator john mccain said in front of a group of european leaders at the munich security conference. he said that the audience would "be alarmed by the growing inability and even unwillingness to separate truth from lies."
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of the administration? >> well, i think it's a good criticism of the media. you know, it's very difficult to separate the truth from the lies. >> mr. priebus, he wasn't -- >> i get it, john. i understand the question. i'm just asking you to do the same thing in regard to the media and what we've been dealing with lately in responding to 24 hours a day, 7 days a week of cable news with one kyron after the next of a lie from another source that doesn't want to name a single person in these bogus stories. and so we would rather talk about the truth and what's happening instead of these bogus stories. and go through the litany of things that we've accomplished, the lobbying ban, hiring freeze, de-regulation, protecting americans from terrorists -- >> i understand, mr. priebus, but if we could get back to the question from senator mccain of
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about truth from the white house. what is your response to that? >> my response is that there's -- i don't know what he's referring to. i mean, i didn't see his statement. but he would be wrong in regard to that statement and the white house and president trump. the fact of the matter is, the level of accomplishment that he's put forward so far in the first 30 days has been remarkable, and i've already gone through the litany with you. >> you have. let me ask you about that litany. in conversations i've had with members in the administration, and also republicans on the hill, they have said that while they're on your team, they're on your side, they recognize all those accomplishments you talk about, that the -- when the president says the white house is a fine tuned machine, and when steven miller in the white house says it's an understatement you're in control, what they worry about is, not everything is in control. and there's such an effort to show how things are in control,
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there may be a blind spot at the white house that need to be fixed. for those people worried about the blind spot, the things that need to be fixed, what is your words to them? >> first of all, there you go again. you're talking about some people, those people, them, they. who are these people, john? >> you've not heard any -- [ overlapping speakers ] >> this is what you guys do. >> let's put it this way, in conversations you have with say speaker paul ryan and lots of other leaders on the hill, when they talk to you, do they express no concern that things at the white house are maybe a little ragged on certain issues? is it constant praise that you get on the hill? >> what we hear from people on the hill is the same thing i'm telling you. the media is obsessed with a lot of false, hollow stories without sourcing that we have to track down and deal with.
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go to cbsnews.com and click on "face the nation." we'll be right back. make the most of a few minutes with instant moisture from k-y ultragel.
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one of the sticking points on immigration is how to hand it will refugee crisis stemming from syria. as the u.s. debates the balance between immigration and to national security, our neighbors to the north are taking more steps to welcome families fleeing from war. martha teichner introduces us to a man who is changing hundreds of lives in a story for sunday morning. >> passengers, please proceed immediately to boarding. >> reporter: by the time the istanbul/toronto flight landed, jim estel had been standing around with his sign for hours. all he knew about the syrian brother and sister he was meeting, at 3:00 in the morning, was their names. ahmed and romaf. >> how are you? >> i'm ahmed. this is my sister.
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>> good to meet you. >> reporter: all they knew about him is that somehow this jim estel had brought them to canada. even in a country eager to welcome syrian refugees, he's upped the ante. a prominent canadian entrepreneur and businessman, he put up his ow money, 1.5 million canadian dollars, $1.1 million u.s., to resettle 58 syrian families. 250 people at a small university city an hour west of toronto. why? because he was haunted by those pictures on television of syrian cities reduced to rubble. and syrian people dying as they tried to ee
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>> you don't want to grow old and say you stood by and did nothing. and it's the right thing to do. >> reporter: 68% of canadians support their government's acceptance of syrian refugees. in contrast, 54% of american voters think the united states has no responsibility to take syrians. the fundamental argument against syrian refugees in the united states is the fear of terrorism. are you afraid? >> i would be wrong to say that there isn't some fear, but statistically, the fear is completely unfounded. i believe actually the best way to breed world citizens is to bring them into our community and give them hope. >> life is so hard here in syria. >> reporter: the e-mails are heart wrenching.
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gotten well over a thousand. some of them are three pages long with horror stories. >> help, help, please help, my life in real danger. >> please help. >> reporter: syrians contact him directly. because in canada, individuals can sponsor refugees, if they agree to fully support them for a year. since november 2015, canada has admitted 40,000 syrians. 16,000 of those privately sponsored. all were vetted by the canadian government. a process that typically takes six to nine months. the hard part is decides who to choose. >> it's actually a terrible process. it's awful. we try to pick people who we think will settle well, being able to support themselves. >> so the ideal refugee situation would be a family with children? >> yeah. mom and dad with children and i
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>> reporter: each family is assigned an arabic speaking mentor. and at least three english speaking mentors, like dan, from among the 800 volunteers estel has recruited to help the refugees adjust. who gets more out of this experience? >> i do. >> he's like older brother for me. and -- >> older brother? >> yeah. >> reporter: estel likes to say he runs his refugee program like a business. in fact, he puts some of the new arrivals, like ahmed, to work temporarily at danby, the appliance manufacturing company he runs. he even gives them time during the workday to attend english classes at the factory.
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>> i said thank you what you are doing for us, but i need to work. i need to eat from my hand. i don't want to give me fish every day. i need to fish. >> reporter: don't give me the fish, i need to do the fishing. >> yeah. >> reporter: ahmed and his wife rula arrived in november. from the city of homs, they are owned a clothing factory. destroyed now. this was their neighborhood. this their apartment. they spent nearly three years in lebanon, living in one room with their two sons. one son is still stuck there. see that sign? the exciting new retailer in this mall is going to be ahmed. >> i think this is dream.
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>> reporter: a dream come true thanks to the backing of jim estel, who believes ahmed and his family can and should be running a business again. you're wearing a little canadian flag on your sweater. why? >> because i love this country. >> already? >> yeah. i promise my god and myself i'm going to be very good to this country here. she protect me, i protect her. >> reporter: and then there's fira muhammad. if being sponsored by jim estel wasn't good enough, things got better for him when he was told his family, wife ala, and daughter lillian, could live in this comfortable apartment free until the end of june. when did you a
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>> a day you'll never forget? >> the golden number. >> a golden number. >> reporter: they were handed this notebook. >> emergency, fire, police. >> reporter: a comprehensive directory of useful information. even pictures of mentors. >> his name, his mobile number, e-mails. >> reporter: they couldn't believe it when they found their refrigerator filled with syrian food. were you surprised by the welcome, the friendliness? >> yes. amazing. everywhere you go, you feel you are welcome in canada. >> reporter: firas was an oil geologist in syria, ala a teacher. their damascus home in ruins. the war drove them first to the oil fields of iraq, then after isis attacks, to turkey. lillian is speaking mostly english now.
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just over two months after their long flight from istanbul, this syrian family feels safe and grateful and canadian. >> just two or three days ago, i got a salary and paid my first tax. so i am canadian. >> reporter: they decided to keep their welcome sign. i love you so much, that's why i bought six of you for when you stretch out. i want you to stay this bright blue forever, that's why you'll stay in this drawer forever. i can't live without you, and that's why i'll never ever wash you. protect your clothes from stretching, fading and fuzz with downy fabric conditioner. fading and fuzz with downy fabric conditioner. it smooths and strengthens fibers to protect clothes from the damage of the wash. so your favorite clothes stay your favorite clothes. downy fabric conditioner.
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the new season of the critically acclaimed series "homeland" premiered last night. the spy drama often reflects current events while touching on events like terrorism and national security. alex wagner got a behind the scenes look at season six during a shoot here in new york city. >> reporter: new york city, how has it been? >> the dreamiest. >> reporter: after spending the last few seasons abroad, the spy thriller "homeland" is refocusing on well, the homeland. claire danes has left the cia for a nonprofit legal aid center. >> she was pretty damaged by what was asked of her, and grew to be calloused and cynical and realized that she needed to take a different tact. so she's done that. >> carrie, thank you for coming. >>
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>> reporter: carrie is also secretly advising the president-elect. >> reach out to president morris and make sure he knows you're unconvinced. >> reporter: a major new character playing the role of disrupter. >> we decided that our president-elect would be female. >> i will not have my agenda mischaracterized and undermined before i even take office. >> but she is a composite of the three major personalities of this last election cycle. so she's a little rogue. >> problem is not so much destroying isis, madame president. >> madame president-elect. >> reporter: also working with the incoming president in an official capacity is her long-time mentor, saul barenson, a top deputy at the cia. mandy, how is saul doing this season? >> he's doing well. he's -- good lord. there's nothing i can tell you without getting in trouble. >> reporter: they understand the stakes for the intelligence community, on screen and in real life.
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in your experience, you guys interface a lot with the actual intelligence gathering agencies in washington. how has that changed your perception of who these people are who are fighting this war on terror? >> well, i meet them, i have dinner with them, i spend hours talking with them. i e-mail them, i have a relationship with them. they are concerned beyond imagination. both in the fictional world and in the real world. >> reporter: there is a discussion happening in hollywood about the responsibility of the media in portraying muslims. >> yes. >> reporter: where do you think on that in terms of this show's responsibility? >> i sit right in the middle of it. i'm part of the responsibility. i hope to be part of the cure and i'm without a doubt part of the problem. so we have to work very hard, and we do, at attending to the muslim, islamic community's concerns about how they are portrayed in the media, in the world, and every area imaginable. we are one of those portrayers.
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area, and we are. >> this is it? >> this is it. >> reporter: carrie's most lasting relationship has been with saul. her romantic entanglements have not ended well. for nicholas brody, for ian inbrahim and for peter quinn. >> it's very dangerous to date carrie. you will most likely end up in a morgue. >> she's a bit of a black widow. maybe it was worth it? >> people really want to see quinn and carrie. they want the little heart over the happy ending. >> yeah, that's not the homelandian way. >> you saved me. >> yes. >> i always wish for a little domestic bliss. a little easy going happiness for my girl, carrie. because he's earned it. she deserves a reprieve. >> amen. >> yeah.
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>> "homeland" airs sunday nights on showtime, a division of cbs. we'll be right back.
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captioning funded by cbs it's monday, february 20th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." breaking overnight, severe storms sweep across texas, leaving thousands in the dark. today marks one month on the job for president trump. a look at what's still on his to-do list and why he left sweden baffled this weekend. and lift-off of the falcon 9 to the space station. >> a successful lift-off and landing. spacex pulls off what no private company has done before. go

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