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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  March 16, 2017 2:07am-3:59am EDT

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hillary clinton accused mr. trump of not paying any federal income taxes. the president's son, donald jr., wrote, the new disclosure proved how successful donald trump is and that he paid $40 million in taxes. but the document does not explain how the president earned his income or if he paid taxes at similar rates in other years. in january, then-president-elect trump balked at calls to release his tax returns, something all presidents have done since the 1970s. >> well, i'm not releasing the tax returns because, as you know, they're under audit. you know, the only ones that care about my tax returns are the reporters, okay. they're the only ones. >> reporter: of the another topic, a judge in hawaii has issued a temporary restraining order blocking key parts to the president's revived travel ban. the white house press secretary says the white house has no comment. >> major, thanks. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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with easter seals. today, much of the northeast woke up beneath a thick blanket of snow. the totals may have underwhelmed on the coast, but not in the west. 26.2 inches in mt. pocono, pennsylvania. but they got more than that with david begnaud is standing. >> reporter: the picture says it all. cars are either stuck or buried in snow across the city. the fwogovernor said this area the hardest hit by the nor'easter. the governor said i'm sending 100 plows and 100 plows of the national guard as you start to dig out. the snow is still falling in binghamton.
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blizzard that dumped nearly three feet of snow. dozens were stranded. even a plow truck and the national guard was activated. >> mother nature is an unpredictable lady. i don't know what we did to offend her, but she is showing us her wintry fury. >> reporter: the storm largely missed most major cities across the northeast. predictions of up to 16 to 20 inches of snow did not pan out, leading to provocative headlines. back in binghamton, the postmaster did not deliver the mail yesterday, the first time in 25 years. >> our job is to serve the customers. that's what our logo is, that's what our commitment is. >> reporter: across the city, at least 50% of the 100,000 mailboxes city wide are buried in snow. anthony, we're told this area is
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seasonal snowfall record for the season. they're about to hit 128 everyones. >> david begnaud in binghamton, new york. thanks, david. t-mobile sent a team of engineers to dallas today to fix a problem that's jammed the city's 911 system. omar villafranca reports, a young child died while the babysitter struggled to reach an operator. >> i'm mad. i'm hurt. >> reporter: bridget alex is living through a parent's worst fear. the mother had left her son branden at home with the babysitter when the six-month-old fell and stopped breathing. >> i would never want no mother, no father to go through the pain that i'm going through right now. >> reporter: the 40-year-old babysitter called 911 at 5:55 p.m. and again at 5:57, but was put on hold each time. this screen grab of the final call shows she was on hold with 911 for more than 30 minutes and never got through to a dispatcher. >> this is a parent's nightmare, to have toy
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>> it is, especially when he is six months old. >> reporter: the city says the 911 system was jammed by what's referred to as ghost calls from t-mobile users. they are calls made to 911 unintentionally and unknown to the caller, and then appear on a dispatcher's screen as hangups. by law, dispatchers have to call those numbers back, which bottlenecks the system. dallas has been dealing with the problem since november. mayor mike rawlings -- >> i want the problem solved immediately. and if it takes a longer period of time, i want to know why. >> reporter: in a statement, t-mobile says company engineers have been working daily to find a permanent solution to this problem. >> i want them to take responsibility of my son's death. there's nothing they can say. there's nothing they can do to bring my branden back. >> reporter: the city says there is no evidence at this time
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connecting the child's death with the ghost call issue. anthony, there is also no timetable on when the problem will be fixed. >> omar villafranca. thank you, omar. turning overseas, it was six years ago today that syrian protesters took to the streets against the assad regime, leading to civil war. the u.n. says more than 400,000 syrians have been killed in the worst manmade disaster since world war ii. about half the population, 12 million, have fled their homes. in neighboring iraq, the battle for mosul is raging. iraqi troops backed by u.s. special operations forces and air strikes, have isis surrounded. holly williams found some other americans there, playing a role that's every bit as important. >> reporter: a few miles from the frontline, americans treat critically injured iraqis. this woman was hit by shrapnel
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from an isis mortar. and she's losing blood quickly. they need to stop it to save her life. the next ambulance brings an iraqi policeman. he has a gunshot wound to his shoulder. kyle fleher is normally a critical care nurse in santa barbara, california. he's taken vacation to come to the war zone. >> it's scary, and the adrenaline is at its max and its peak, but everything fades away when we get to do what we're trained to do. >> reporter: is it taking a toll on you? >> it is. it's traumatizing, the things that i've seen, that i'm seeing. a lifeless girl linger in my hands, and having to pronounce her dead. >> reporter: they're called new york city medics, and they've been sending teams to natural disasters for over a decade. [ explosion ] but this is the first time they've t
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>> something we have in the states is medications. here -- excuse me. >> reporter: they're on call 24 hours because this war never stops. this time, it's an iraqi soldier hit in the eye by shrapnel. another man has serious brain injuries, and there's nothing they can do. kathy bequary, the group's team leader, held his hand as he passed away. >> i don't know if he knew i was there or if he knew i was holding his hand or felt anything, but i didn't want him to be alone. >> reporter: seeing this war has changed her, she told us. >> they're moms and dads and daughters and sons and sisters and brothers. they're just like us, and i just wish the world really could understand that the way i do now. yeah. >> reporter: holly williams, cbs news, mosul.
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coming up next, did monsanto interfere with research to cover up dangers posed by its round-up weed killer? and later, meet the kellys, stars of the internet. my cold medicines' wearing off. that stuff only lasts a few hours. or, take mucinex. one pill fights congestion for 12 hours. guess i won't be seeing you for a while. why take medicines that only last 4 hours, when just one mucinex lasts 12 hours? let's end this. how are you doing?nne. hi, evelyn. i know it's been a difficult time since your mom passed away. yeah. i miss her a lot, but i'm okay. wow. that was fast. this is the check i've been waiting for. mom had a guaranteed acceptance life insurance policy through the colonial penn program, and this will really help with the cost of her final expenses. is it affordable?
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two kids barfed in class today. it was so gross. lysol disinfectant spray kills 99.9% of bacteria, even those that cause stomach bugs. one more way you've got what it takes to protect.
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company monsanto has fought back against lawsuits claiming the weed killer round up can cause cancer. the documents made public by a federal judge could change everything. here's mireya villarreal. >> okay, good. >> reporter: yolanda mendoza makes the most of time spent with her children, after battling stage four non-hodgkins lymphoma for more than a year. >> i have nerve damage. i don't feel the -- my tips of my fingers. my jaw, i still can't feel it. >> reporter: mendoza blames glyphosate, the main chemical ingredient in the weedkiller round-up, which she used on her lawn every weekend. >> i had a bucket that held two gallons of water, i would strap it on, and just walk around spraying. >> reporter: mendoza is one of hundreds of people around the country suing monsanto, round-up's parent company. they lawyers kri s cite this st that says
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carcinogenic and damaging to d.n.a. in human cells. >> they cherry pick data. >> reporter: last summer we spoke with dr. donna farmer, a monsanto scientist. >> there is no data indicating we should change how the product is used. the data is clear, glyphosate doesn't cause cancer. >> reporter: but now the data is in question. newly released court documents suggest that monsanto planned to ghost write a positive report on glyphosate and get experts to back it up. a scientist wrote in an email, "we would keep the cost down by us doing the writing and they would edit and sign their name." court documents also reveal conversations between a federal director about a federal glyphosate review. "i doubt epa can kill this," the monsanto executive wrote, "but it's good to know they're going to make the effort." in a statement, monsanto says these allegations are false. monsanto scientists did not ghost write the paper, reiterating, no regulatory body in the world considers glyphosate to be a carcinogen.
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this label could soon change and include a warning about cancer, after another federal court ruling. >> mireya, thanks. for borrowers and savers, news of interest, next. where's frank? it's league night! 'saved money on motorcycle insurance with geico! goin' up the country. bowl without me. frank.' i'm going to get nachos. snack bar's closed. gah! ah, ah ah. ♪ ♪ i'm goin' up the country, baby don't you wanna go? ♪ ♪ i'm goin' up the country, baby don't you wanna go? ♪
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the federal reserve raised a key interest rate today for the third time in just over a year. the quarter-point hike is meant to tap the brakes on the economy and head o inflation. it could also increase the cost of borrowing and give savers a better return. the pentagon said today, reports of sexual assaults increased slightly last year at two of the service academies. 26 reports at west point, 28 at annapolis. sexual assaults were down at the air force academy. pirates are holding an oil tanker for ransom off the coast of somalia. the "aris 13" is registered in the united arab emirates. it was seized monday while carrying fuel from dijbouti to mogadishu in waters frequented by arms smuggls
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extremists. up next, the professor and the preciously precocious.
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finally tonight, the title of most-recognized professor may have passed to robert kelly, whose children made him an internet star. today, kelly said he now expects "the interruption seen round the world" to be the first line in his obituary. here's charlie d'agata. >> reporter: marion kelly's four-year-old swagger has been
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watched 86 million times. it's turned her father robert into a global internet sensation. >> it's got to the point where we had to turn off the phones and facebook and twitter. >> reporter: the chaos unfolded friday during a skype interview with the bbc. >> i think one of your children just walked in. >> reporter: as professor kelly tried to keep marion at bay, in waddled nine-month-old james, followed quickly by his mother jung-a kim, in a frantic bid to get the kids out of the shot. kelly later explained that marion had been in a hippity-hoppity mood after celebrating her birthday party. >> i was hoping my daughter would sit down and read a book, even for 30 seconds, so we could cut the interview. but once my son came in, in a little roller, then there was nothing i could do. >> reporter: the video instantly triggered tributes and copycats,
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secretary sean spicer, president trump, ben carson and kellyanne conway. and it lit up the late night shows, like trevor noah. >> this is why i love kids. no matter how seriously you take yourself, kids will mess up your [ bleep ]. sure, your dad is like, "i'm going on the bbc," but the kids are like, "no, we're going on 'ellen'." >> reporter: kelly thought that was the end of his tv career, but it's been the opposite. today, he politely pleaded to be left in peace, and he's happy his family saga has brought laughter to so many. charlie d'agata, cbs news, london. that's the "overnight news" news for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back later for the morning news and of course "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm anthony mason.
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-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight news." i'm michelle miller. the justice department says it now knows who's behind the devastating hack at yahoo that compromised at least 500 million user accounts. and the finger is squarely pointed at moscow. two intelligence russian agents and two high profile hackers have been charged. it's the first time a russian government official has been named in a cyber crime case here in the u.s. jeff pegues has the details. >> reporter: prosecutors say fsb officers dmitry dokuchaev and igor sushkin financed and directed the cyber attack and
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hired one of the world's best-known hackers, alexsey belan, to do most of the work. from 2014 to 2016, court papers say belan and his team used computer code to infiltrate yahoo's database, stealing user names, emails, and passwords. they used that information to access the accounts of russian journalists and politicians, as well as u.s. government officials, including military and white house personnel. belan also used 30 million accounts to facilitate a spam scheme that netted him money. in all, 500 million accounts, half of yahoo's total of one billion, were compromised. acting assistant attorney general mary mccord -- >> we will not allow individuals, groups, nation states or a combination of them to compromise the privacy of our citizens, the economic interests of our companies, or the security of our country. >> reporter: but the hackers were able to go unnoticed because the agents, dokuchaev and sushkin, may have been familiar with u.s. cyber strategy.
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"center 18," the fbi's russian contact for cyber investigations. robert cattanach is a former federal prosecutor. >> they pretend to be collaborating with us to try to do something about the spread of cybercrime in russia, and come to find out, they're fostering it. >> reporter: a canadian who was allegedly part of the operation is in custody. anthony, according to russian media, dokuchaev, one of the fsb officers, was arrested earlier this year by russian authorities and jailed for treason. president trump's unfounded allegation that the prior administration ordered his phone to be tapped is getting the eye roll on capitol hill. republican leaders looking into the charges say they've seen no evidence, and the attorney general says he never told the president he was under surveillance. nancy cordes has the latest. >> i don't think there was abactual tap of trump tower. >> reporter: house intelligence
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toes the party line, but today he concluded that president trump's explosive accusation has no merit. >> are you going to take the tweets literally? and if you are, then clearly the president was wrong. >> reporter: his comments came after 11 days of white house insistence that the commander-in-chief was serious when he tweeted, "just found out that obama had my wires tapped in trump tower." >> i think he's extremely confident. >> reporter: but administration officials, including the attorney general, have provided no evidence to back it up. >> did you ever give him any reason to believe he was wiretapped by the previous administration? >> um, look, the answer is no. >> reporter: president trump refused to back down today, insisting something happened to him. >> "wiretap" covers a lot of different things. i think you're going to find some very interesting items coming to the forefront over the next two weeks. >> reporter: the surveillance, whether real or imagined, has alarmed lawmakers from both sides. >> have you found evidence?
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comey was called up to capitol hill again today to brief two top senators behind closed doors. they were not authorized to share details. >> this briefing was all on sensitive matters, and highly classified. >> reporter: republican lindsey graham said comey should share what he knows with the public. >> the bottom line is, a lot of americans are wondering what's going on here. >> reporter: democrat adam schiff argued there is a reason white house officials can't provide any proof. >> the reality is, i don't think they have the foggiest idea of what was behind the president's claim except maybe something he watched on tv. >> reporter: actually, it was a conservative radio host that first suggested president trump may have been spied on by his predecessor. that accusation made its way into a breitbart article, anthony, about 24 hours before president trump sent those now-infamous tweets. members of the united nations held a moment of silence to mark the six-year a
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the conflict has claimed more than 400,000 lives, reduced entire cities to rubble, and forced millions from their homes. across the border in iraq, allied forces continue to close the noose around islamic state gunmen in the city of mosul. hundreds of thousands of civilians are caught in the cross fire. holly williams is on the front line with some american doctors who are risking their lives to help the wounded. >> reporter: a few miles from the frontline, americans treat critically injured iraqis. this woman was hit by shrapnel from an isis mortar. and she's losing blood quickly. they need to stop it to save her life. the next ambulance brings an iraqi policeman. he has a gunshot wound to his shoulder. kyle fleher is normally a critical care nurse in santa barbara, california.
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he's taken vacation to come to the war zone. >> it's scary, and the adrenaline is at its max and its peak, but everything fades away when we get to do what we're trained to do. >> reporter: is it taking a toll on you? >> it is. it's traumatizing, the things that i've seen, that i'm seeing. a lifeless girl linger in my hands, and having to pronounce her dead. >> reporter: they're called new york city medics, and they've been sending teams to natural disasters for over a decade. [ explosion ] but this is the first time they've come to an armed conflict. >> something we have in the states is medications. here -- excuse me. >> reporter: they're on call 24 hours because this war never stops. this time, it's an iraqi soldier hit in the eye by shrapnel. another man has serious brain injuries, and there's nothing
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kathy bequary, the group's team leader, held his hand as he passed away. >> i don't know if he knew i was there or if he knew i was holding his hand or felt anything, but i didn't want him to be alone. >> reporter: seeing this war has changed her, she told us. >> they're moms and dads and daughters and sons and sisters and brothers. they're just like us, and i just wish the world really could understand that the way i do now. yeah. >> reporter: holly williams, cbs news, mosul. and the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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the golden retriever is one of the most popular breed of dogs in the u.s. overseas not so much. in turkey, hundreds of goldens are roaming the streets as strays, unable to protect themselves against other aggressive breeds. there's an organization in istanbul that's rounding these dogs up and sending them to new homes in the united states. holly williams and berry peterson have been following the story of the turkey dogs. we begin with holly in istanbul. >> reporter: it's been a long, hard winter in istanbul. especially if you're a stray dog. [ barking ] one of thousands in this sprawling middle eastern city. they live on the streets. dodging traffic and begging for scraps. dogs like
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1-year-old golden retriever who was found weak and undernourished. this man helps run a rescue center in istanbul. where many of the dogs are golden retrievers. they told us they're brought as puppies. but some owners discard them when they realize they're so big and energeticic. and they end up throwing them away? >> or giving them to shelters. >> reporter: how do they do on the street, do they cope very well in >> they don't. >> reporter: golden retrievers are famously friendly and playful. >> i need the microphone. the dog's got the microphone! >> reporter: on the streets, though, she told us they're often attacked by more aggressive breeds. but for a few lucky dogs, there's hope for a better life. at a time when the flow of people from the middle east has divided the
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being sent to america and finding new homes. what would happen to them if you guys didn't take them off the streets and find new homes for them? >> i don't even want to think. we can't take all of them. >> reporter: last year, this group sent around 600 dogs to america for adoption, including some disabled animals. like violet here, who's blind. and captain, who has lost a leg. we don't want you to get the idea that dogs aren't loved here in turkey. volunteers spa hundreds of stray dogs every day. and in this wealthy neighborhood, tommy has been fed by so many residents, he's become obese. don't feed the dog, says the sign, tommy is now on a strict diet. but still, there are too many homeless dogs on pul's streets. so last month, valentine, along with 7-year-old romeo, who needs an operation on his
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other golden retrievers, embarked on a journey to a very different life. and that's where barry petersen picks up the story. >> reporter: 6,000 miles later, journey's end, in denver. >> valentine. >> reporter: at a cargo warehouse, hugs from sponsors who donated $2,250 for each dog's airfare. kenny morris found a very skinny romeo. what do you think? >> i think it's atorable and he eats a lot of hamburgers. >> reporter: across town to the golden retriever rescue of the rockies, where every dog will eventually have a home. families like dick and robin looking to adopt suddenly faced doggy disorder. >> i kept looking around, and here's sundance. and i've gone, you know what? that's a sign. >> reporter: in just minutes, a lifetime decision. >> we're
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>> reporter: and off to his first night in america. >> we got our sleeping bags out and we threw them on the floor, took our pillows down, and that dog got to sleep right in between us. >> reporter: so you went to sleep on the floor with the dog? >> yes. >> reporter: why? >> because i think they need to realize that you're there for them. >> reporter: back at golden retriever rescue of the rockies, valentine listened in as director kevin shipley said the turkish dogs who have come here have a nickname. >> turkey dog. operation turkey dog colorado. >> reporter: so they say i've got a turkey dog. >> they say i got a turkey dog and their neighbors look at them sideways. >> reporter: dick and robin's neighbors have a new friend on their street. is he now part of your family? >> yeah, he definitely is. >> reporter: unconditional love? >> it has to be. if you're going to bring a dog like this into your
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mean, it has to be. >> reporter: and about their dog who came from istanbul, a question they couldn't answer -- did they pick sundance or did sundance somehow know these were his people? barry petersen, in denver. neve. new pantene doesn't just wash your hair, it fuels it. making every strand stronger. so tangles don't stand a chance. because strong is beautiful.
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♪ new lysol kitchen pro eliminates 99.9% of bacteria without any harsh chemical residue. lysol. what it takes to protect. a 17-year-old budding scientist from new jersey is now richer after winnilion dollars
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science talent search. it's sometimes referred to as the junior nobel prize. errol barnett has her story. >> from the academy for science technology in hackensack, new jersey -- [ applause ] >> reporter: led on by cheers from her competitors, she was awarded first place for her research on treating brain injuries. >> at the same time, there's more of this in the environment. >> reporter: she was one of 40 high school seniors vying for the title. >> i started looking at desal nation. >> reporter: these young minds -- >> my goal is to streamline this process, maintain the accuracy. >> reporter: -- must explain their projects in a concise way. >> these are the 2,000 lines of code i had to write to get it working. >> reporter: and sell it to the judges. all right, blake, impress me. what did you find? >> i improved on planet
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formation. >> reporter: didn't you discover something during your research? >> i discovered evidence for a forming planet around a nearby star. >> reporter: blake hall trained for this environment by inspiring even younger scientists. >> you're going see the tail alongside it. >> reporter: while engaging these young kids in the wonders of the stars and the planet. >> do you want to be the moon? >> reporter: he's honing in on how to explain his own discoveries. >> to be able to condense knowledge into such small anecdotes has helped me understand my own work better and communicate at the basic level so that i truly do understand what i'm doing. >> reporter: while blake is finding new planets, she's using computer software to find the cure for cancer. so you turn this from the way dna instructs you into algorithms to study them? >> exactly. i think that's really powerful. because rather than trying to use the experimental methods in the lab, this is so much
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>> reporter: isabella greco wants to know more about gender bias, so she put together a survey and found this. >> people were more likely to be falsely remembered by a reader as having not achieved as much. and also people were more likely to have false memories. >> reporter: so this exposes gender bias. >> yeah, and it exposes something about the wage gap. >> reporter: for over 70 years, society for the science and the public has run the competition with a corporate sponsor, first known as the wessi iwestinghous. >> reporter: george was a winner of the westinghouse in 1976. 13 years later, he was the founding scientist for a pharmaceutical company. what does it take to inspire a young teenager's mind to get them to be the next generation of scientists? >> a realization and recognition that it is so
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can get recognized and they can be heroes. >> reporter: now one of those heros is endrani dros. >> i want brain injury to be tackled, brain injury like alzheimer's, traumatic brain injury. i want to see all the people that suffer from these conditions to improve their quality of life. >> reporter: foot soldiers for the future of science. errol barnett, washington. air b&b is a growing force in the global lodging industry. last year the site averaged 200,000 bookings a day, and more than half of the hosts are women. ben tracy reports. >> reporter: michelle is getting her spare bedroom ready for her next guest. she rents a room in her san francisco apartment on air b&b. taking in about $15,000 a year. >> it's been difficult to get by in san francisco, and the additional income has definel
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>> reporter: as a host, she's not the exception, she's the rule. a study commissioned by the company found 1 million female hosts worldwide. that's 55% of all air b&b hosts. >> i think a lot of confidence through hosting. it's basically like running your own business and having a lot of role. >> reporter: brian is the ceo. he co-founded the company in 2008 when he was 26 years old. he says airbnb is inherently more democratic than many male-dominated businesses. >> anyone can be an entrepreneur, anyone can be a host. i think that spirit of anybody has just become a more equalizing notion than neighbor in other industries where it requires connections, references, referrals, which i think have been proven to provide some greater barriers. >> reporter: the study found $1nce 2008, women have earned
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female hosts in the u.s. earn an average of $6600 per year. what surprised you about the findings of this report? >> 50,000 women reported that they use this money to fund businesses or invest in entrepreneurial pursuits. >> reporter: he wants to position airbnb as an economic force for its hosts with less focus how it's disrupting the lodging industry and often battling regulators. this comes as another sharing economy disrupter, uber, has been rocked by allegations to turning ing ing a blind eye to harassment and the behavior of the ceo, 40-year-old travis callanak. >> some people don't like to take responsibility. >> reporter: he was caught on camera arguing with an uber driver. is
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want to happen here? >> i think every company that i admire has had their ups and downs. >> reporter: do you think he can still effectively lead yuber? >> i would assume he only knows best and take him at his word. one of the things i learn, i needed mentors. i wouldn't be here if it wasn't for mentors. i've been shameless about constantly seeking leadership help from people that are smarter than me and more experienced than me. >> reporter: he's not shied away from taking on the leader of the free world. when president trump issued a controversial travel ban, airbnb responded in a super bowl ad. he says he's just standing up for his worldwide host community. one he says is still in its infancy. >> the travel industry is almost the size of the oil industry. it's nearly 10% of global gdp. so i think this iser
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i hope if there was a book
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with the gop controlling the white house and congress, the democrats are now in position to become the party of no. as in no, we're not passing that bill. some democratic leaders are even floating the idea of shutting down the government to block president trump's wall along the mexico border. well, two congressman from texas, one republican, one democrat, are trying to see past their differences. they took a 1600 mile road trip together and streamed it live. chip reid reports. >> reporter: with so many flights cancelled this week because of pad weather, two congressmen from texas decide on an unusual plan to get back here to the capitol here in time for votes this evening. they weren't close friends before the trip started, but that appears to be changing. >> we just stopped in austin at south by southwest.
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♪ on the road again >> reporter: two texas congressmen decided to beat the blizzard. embarking on a cross country road trip from san antonio, texas, to washington, d.c. >> this is the high tech map that i worked on last night. >> reporter: and they're live streaming the 1600 mile journey. but this is no ordinary political car pool. hurd is a republican, o'york is a democrat. >> will is going to want to do something, i might want to do the other thing. we're going to try to come to some compromises and model the bipartisan agreements that we want to see on the hill. >> reporter: their bipartisan road trip is sort of a town hall on wheels. >> answer your questions, solve the country's problems. >> reporter: people are asking questions. >> and somebody wants to talk about child trafficking. >> reporter: they're tackling issues ranging from health care to immigration to education. >> de
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of education? >> no. >> reporter: and they're taking food recommendations. >> mochas and javas is a good coffee shop. let's the that. we're never getting to d.c. >> reporter: they even skyped with me. >> i've learned a lot about bento already, showing that we can disagree without being disagreeable. >> reporter: do you think you can take that back with you to washington? >> i'm going to try. ♪ we're the best of friends >> reporter: and through it all they're finding common ground. >> we're showing people we can work together. >> whataburger unites us. >> reporter: they arrived in nashville about 2:00 a.m., slept for a few hours and hit the road again. and you might be hearing more from the democrat, he's thinking about running for the senate against ted cruz. but he says so far he's not counting on support from his new republican co-pilot. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news
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later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm michelle miller. that trump wiretap claim. the chair of the committee investigating says -- >> we don't have any evidence that that took place. but the president says -- >> you're going to find some very interesting items coming to the forefront over the next two weeks. also tonight, a cellphone glitch causes a dangerous backlog of 911 calls. >> i would never want no mother, nohe fat gr toroo thugh the pain that i'm going through right now. the u.s. indicts russian spies in a massive breec of yahoo accounts. and, the world felt his pain. >> we thought it was a disaster. >> but it turned out to be an internet sensation. ♪
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>> this is the "cbs overnight news." president trump broke his silence today on his accusation that he was wiretapped during the campaign last year by president obama. mr. trump still did not provide any evidence, only a cryptic suggestion that something might be coming out in the next few weeks. but the republican head of the house committee investigating the president's claim minced no words about what the panel has turned up -- nothing. here's congressional correspondent nancy cordes. >> i don't think there was an actual tap of trump tower. >> reporter: house intelligence chairman devin nunes typically toes the party line, but today he concluded that president trump's explosive accusation has no merit. >> are you going to take the tweets literally? and if you are, then clearly the president was wrong. >> reporter: his comments came after 11 days of white house insistence that the commander-in-chief was serious when he tweeted, "just found out o
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in trump tower." >> i think he's extremely confident. >> reporter: but administration officials, including the attorney general, have provided no evidence to back it up. >> did you ever give him any reason to believe he was wiretapped by the previous administration? >> um, look, the answer is no. >> reporter: president trump refused to back down today, insisting something happened to him. >> "wiretap" covers a lot of different things. i think you're going to find some very interesting items coming to the forefront over the next two weeks. >> reporter: the surveillance, whether real or imagined, has alarmed lawmakers from both sides. >> have you found evidence? >> reporter: fbi director james comey was called up to capitol hill again today to brief two top senators behind closed doors. they were not authorized to share details. >> this briefing was all on sensitive matters, and highly classified. >> reporter: republican lindsey graham said comey should share
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what he knows with the public. >> the bottom line is, a lot of americans are wondering what's going on here. >> reporter: democrat adam schiff argued there is a reason white house officials can't provide any proof. >> the reality is, i don't think they have the foggiest idea of what was behind the president's claim except maybe something he watched on tv. >> reporter: actually, it was a conservative radio host that first suggested president trump may have been spied on by his predecessor. that accusation made its way into a breitbart article, anthony, about 24 hours before president trump sent those now-infamous tweets. >> nancy cordes at the capitol. thanks, nancy. today, for the first time ever, the u.s. government charged two members of the russian federal security service, the fsb, with hacking. the attack, aimed at yahoo users, not only stole money from them -- it was an elaborate spying operation. here's jeff pegues. >> reporter: prosecutors say fsb
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officers dmitry dokuchaev and igor sushkin financed and directed the cyber attack and hired one of the world's best-known hackers, alexsey belan, to do most of the work. from 2014 to 2016, court papers say belan and his team used computer code to infiltrate yahoo's database, stealing user names, emails, and passwords. they used that information to access the accounts of russian journalists and politicians, as well as u.s. government officials, including military and white house personnel. belan also used 30 million accounts to facilitate a spam scheme that netted him money. in all, 500 million accounts, half of yahoo's total of one billion, were compromised. acting assistant attorney general mary mccord -- >> we will not allow individuals, groups, nation states or a combination of them to compromise the privacy of our citizens, the economic interests of our companies, or the
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security of our country. >> reporter: but the hackers were able to go unnoticed because the agents, dokuchaev and sushkin, may have been familiar with u.s. cyber strategy. prosecutors say both worked at "center 18," the fbi's russian contact for cyber investigations. robert cattanach is a former federal prosecutor. >> they pretend to be collaborating with us to try to do something about the spread of cybercrime in russia, and come to find out, they're fostering it. >> reporter: a canadian who was allegedly part of the operation is in custody. anthony, according to russian media, dokuchaev, one of the fsb officers, was arrested earlier this year by russian authorities and jailed for treason. >> jeff pegues, thanks, jeff. we finally got a look today at one of the trump tax returns the president refuses to release. someone leaked it. here's major garrett. >> it's cenl
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embarrassing tax return at all. >> reporter: president trump today denounced the leak of part of his 2005 federal tax return. the two-page summary shows he and wife melania earned $153 million that year and paid $36.6 million in income tax, an apparent tax rate of 24%. >> i have no idea where they got it, but it's illegal, and you're not supposed to have it. and it's not supposed to be leaked. >> reporter: the white house confirmed the numbers just before they were reported on msnbc by david cay johnston, a pulitzer prize-winning journalist and trump biographer. johnston said the documents arrived in his mailbox anonymously. >> and by the way, let me point out, it's entirely possible that donald sent this to me. >> reporter: in a statement, the white house said mr. trump had a responsibility to his company, his family, and his employees to pay no more tax than legally required. >> i believe that most of us here have paid a lot more federal income taxes than donald trump has paid.
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>> reporter: during the presidential campaign, democrat hillary clinton accused mr. trump of not paying any federal income taxes. the president's son, donald jr., wrote, the new disclosure proved how successful donald trump is and that he paid $40 million in taxes. but the document does not explain how the president earned his income or if he paid taxes at similar rates in other years. in january, then-president-elect trump balked at calls to release his tax returns, something all presidents have done since the 1970s. >> well, i'm not releasing the tax returns because, as you know, they're under audit. you know, the only ones that care about my tax returns are the reporters, okay. they're the only ones. >> reporter: on another topic, a judge in hawaii has issued a temporary restraining order blocking key parts to the president's revised travel ban. the white house press secretary says the white house has no comment. >> major, thanks. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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today, much of the northeast woke up beneath a thick blanket of snow. the totals may have underwhelmed on the coast, but not in the west. 26.2 inches in mt. pocono, pennsylvania. 22 in syracuse, new york. but they got more than where david begnaud is standing in binghamton, new york. >> reporter: the picture says it all. cars are either stuck or buried in snow across the city. the governor said this area was one of the hardest hit by tuesday's nor'easter. the governor said i'm sending 100 plows and 100 members of the national guard as you start to dig out. the snow is still falling in binghamton. energy crews have toiled around the clock to dig out from a
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three feet of snow. dozens were stranded. even a plow truck and the national guard was activated. governor andrew cuomo -- >> mother nature is an unpredictable lady. i don't know what we did to offend her, but she is showing us her wintry fury. >> reporter: the storm that plank etted central new york, largely missed most major cities across the northeast. predictions of up to 16 to 20 inches of snow did not pan out, leading to provocative headlines. back in binghamton, the postmaster did not deliver the mail yesterday, the first time in 25 years. service resumed today. even though the delivery trucks had to be dug out. >> our job is to serve the customers. that's what our logo is, that's what our commitment is. and it's very disappointing if we can't get to them. >> reporter: across the city, at least 50% of the 100,000 mailboxes city wide are buried in snow. anthony, we're told this area is about to hital
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seasonal snowfall record for the season. they're about to hit 128 inches. >> david begnaud in binghamton, new york. thanks, david. t-mobile sent a team of engineers to dallas today to fix a problem that's jammed the city's 911 system. omar villafranca reports, a young child died while the babysitter struggled to reach an operator. >> i'm mad. i'm hurt. >> reporter: bridget alex is living through a parent's worst fear. the mother had left her son branden at home with the babysitter when the six-month-old fell and stopped breathing. >> i would never want no mother, no father to go through the pain that i'm going through right now. >> reporter: the 40-year-old babysitter called 911 at 5:55 p.m. and again at 5:57, but was put on hold each time. this screen grab of the final call shows she was on hold with 911 for more than 30 minutes and never got through to a dispatcher.
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>> this is a parent's nightmare, to have to bury a child. >> it is, especially when he is six months old. >> reporter: the city says the 911 system was jammed by what's referred to as ghost calls from t-mobile users. they are calls made to 911 unintentionally and unknown to the caller, and then appear on a dispatcher's screen as hangups. by law, dispatchers have to call those numbers back, which bottlenecks the system. dallas has been dealing with the problem since november. mayor mike rawlings -- >> i want the problem solved immediately. and if it takes a longer period of time, i want to know why. >> reporter: in a statement, t-mobile says company engineers have been working daily to find a permanent solution to this problem. >> i want them to take responsibility of my son's death. there's nothing they can say. there's nothing they can do to bring my branden back.
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is no evidence at this time connecting the child's death with the ghost call issue. anthony, there is also no timetable on when the problem will be fixed. >> omar villafranca. thank you, omar. turning overseas, it was six years ago today that syrian protesters took to the streets against the assad regime, leading to civil war. the u.n. says more than 400,000 syrians have been killed in the worst manmade disaster since world war ii. about half the population, 12 million, have fled their homes. in neighboring iraq, the battle for mosul is raging. iraqi troops backed by u.s. special operations forces and air strikes, have isis surrounded. holly williams found some other americans there, playing a role that's every bit as important. >> reporter: a few miles from the frontline, americans treat critically injured iraqis. this woman was hit by shrapnel from an isis mortar.
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and she's losing blood quickly. they need to stop it to save her life. the next ambulance brings an iraqi policeman. he has a gunshot wound to his shoulder. kyle fleher is normally a critical care nurse in santa barbara, california. he's taken vacation to come to the war zone. >> it's scary, and the adrenaline is at its max and its peak, but everything fades away when we get to do what we're trained to do. >> reporter: is it taking a toll on you? >> it is. it's traumatizing, the things that i've seen, that i'm seeing. a lifeless girl linger in my hands, and having to pronounce her dead. >> reporter: they're called new york city medics, and they've been sending teams to natural disasters for over a decade. [ explosion ] but this is the first time
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conflict. >> something we have in the states is medications. here -- excuse me. >> reporter: they're on call 24 hours because this war never stops. this time, it's an iraqi soldier hit in the eye by shrapnel. another man has serious brain injuries, and there's nothing they can do. kathy bequary, the group's team leader, held his hand as he passed away. >> i don't know if he knew i was there or if he knew i was holding his hand or felt anything, but i didn't want him to be alone. >> reporter: seeing this war has changed her, she told us. >> they're moms and dads and daughters and sons and sisters and brothers. they're just like us, and i just wish the world really could understand that the way i do now. yeah. >> reporter: holly williams, cbs news, mosul.
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interfere with research to cover up dangers posed by its round-up weed killer? and later, meet the kellys, stars of the internet. (alarms) where's the car? it'll be here in three...uh, four minutes. are you kidding me? no, looks like he took a wrong turn. don't worry, this guy's got like a four-star rating, we're good. his name is randy. that's like one of the most trustworthy names! ordering a getaway car with an app? are you randy? that's me! awesome! surprising. what's not surprising? how much money erin saved by switching to geico. everybody comfortable with the air temp? i could go a little cooler. ok. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. mthat stuff only lasts a few hours. or, take mucinex. one pill fights congestion for 12 hours. guess i won't be seeing you
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ines that only last 4 hours, when just one mucinex lasts 12 hours? let's end this. six of you for when thyou stretch out.t i want you to stay this bright blue forever, that's why you'll stay in this drawer forever. i can't live without you, and that's why i'll never ever wash you. protect your clothes from stretching, fading and fuzz with downy fabric conditioner. fading and fuzz with downy fabric conditioner. it smooths and strengthens fibers to protect clothes from the damage of the wash. so your favorite clothes stay your favorite clothes. downy fabric conditioner. ♪
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for years the chemical company monsanto has fought back against lawsuits claiming the weed killer round up can cause cancer. the documents made public by a federal judge could change everything. here's mireya villarreal. >> okay, good. >> reporter: yolanda mendoza makes the most of time spent with her children, after battling stage four non-hodgkins lymphoma for more than a year. >> i have nerve damage. i don't feel the -- my tips of my fingers. my jaw, i still can't feel it. >> reporter: mendoza blames glyphosate, the main chemical ingredient in the weedkiller round-up, which she used on her lawn every weekend. >> i had a bucket that held two gallons of water, i would strap it on, and just walk around spraying. >> reporter: mendoza is one of hundreds of people around the country suing monsanto, round-up's parent company. they lawyers cite this study that says glyphosate is probably carcinogenic and damaging to
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>> the data they look at, they cherry pick it. >> reporter: last summer we spoke with dr. donna farmer, a monsanto scientist. >> there is no data indicating we should change any recommendations how this product should be used. the data is clear, glyphosate doesn't cause cancer. >> reporter: but now the data is in question. newly released court documents suggest that monsanto planned to ghost write a positive report on glyphosate and get experts to back it up. a scientist wrote in an email, "we would keep the cost down by us doing the writing and they would edit and sign their name." court documents also reveal conversations between a federal director about a federal glyphosate review. "i doubt epa can kill this," the monsanto executive wrote, "but it's good to know they're going to make the effort." in a statement, monsanto says these allegations are false. monsanto scientists did not ghost write the paper, reiterating, no regulatory body in the world considers
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but anthony, here in california, this label could soon change and include a warning about cancer, after another federal court ruling. >> mireya, thanks. for borrowers and savers, news of interest, next. i'm worried i can't find a safe used car. you could start your search at the all-new carfax.com that might help. show me the carfax? now the car you want and the history you need are easy to find. show me used minivans with no reported accidents. boom. love it. [struggles] show me the carfax. start your used car search and get free carfax reports at the all-new carfax.com.
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tand, our adulte children are here. so, we save by using tide. which means we use less. three generations of clothes cleaned in one wash. those are moms. anybody seen my pants? nothing cleans better. put those on dad! it's got to be tide. ♪ i don't think that's how they're made. klondike hooks up with tasty flavors... the best ice cream bars ever conceived. mthat stuff only lasts a few hours. or, take mucinex. one pill fights congestion for 12 hours. guess i won't be seeing you for a while. why take medicines that only last 4 hours,
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the federal reserve raised a key interest rate today for the third time in just over a year. the quarter-point hike is meant to tap the brakes on the economy and head off inflation. it could also increase the cost of borrowing and give savers a better return. the pentagon said today, reports of sexual assaults increased slightly last year at two of the service academies. 26 reports at west point, 28 at annapolis. sexual assaults were down at the air force academy. pirates are holding an oil tanker for ransom off the coast of somalia. the "aris 13" is registered in the united arab emirates. it was seized monday while carrying fuel from dibouti to mogadishu in waters frequented by arms smugglers and islamic extremists. up next, the professor and the preciously precocious.
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finally tonight, the title of most-recognized professor may have passed to robert kelly, whose children made him an internet star. today, kelly said he now expects "the interruption seen round the world" to be the first line in his obituary. here's charlie d'agata. >> reporter: marion kelly's
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watched 86 million times. it's turned her father robert into a global internet sensation. >> it's got to the point where we had to turn off the phones and facebook and twitter. >> reporter: the chaos unfolded friday during a skype interview with the bbc. >> i think one of your children just walked in. >> reporter: as professor kelly tried to keep marion at bay, in waddled nine-month-old james, followed quickly by his mother jung-a kim, in a frantic bid to get the kids out of the shot. kelly later explained that marion had been in a hippity-hoppity mood after celebrating her birthday party. >> i was hoping my daughter would sit down and read a book, even for 30 seconds, so we could cut the interview. but once my son came in, in a little roller, then there was nothing i could do. >> reporter: the video instantly triggered tributes and copycats,
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like the one featuring press secretary sean spicer, president trump, ben carson and kellyanne conway. and it lit up the late night shows, like trevor noah. >> this is why i love kids. no matter how seriously you take yourself, kids will mess up your [ bleep ]. sure, your dad is like, "i'm going on the bbc," but the kids are like, "no, we're going on 'ellen'." >> reporter: kelly thought that was the end of his tv career, but it's been the opposite. today, he politely pleaded to be left in peace, and he's happy his family saga has brought laughter to so many. charlie d'agata, cbs news, london. that's the "overnight news" news for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back later for the morning news and of course "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm anthony mason. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com
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this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight news." i'm michelle miller. the justice department says it now knows who's behind the devastating hack at yahoo that compromised at least 500 million user accounts. and the finger is squarely pointed at moscow. two intelligence russian agents and two high profile hackers have been charged. it's the first time a russian government official has been named in a cyber crime case here in the u.s. jeff pegues has the details. >> reporter: prosecutors say fsb officers dmitry dokuchaev and igor sushkin financed and directed the cyber attack and hired one of the world's best-known hackers, alexsey belan, to do most of the work. from 201 2
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say belan and his team used computer code to infiltrate yahoo's database, stealing user names, emails, and passwords. they used that information to access the accounts of russian journalists and politicians, as well as u.s. government officials, including military and white house personnel. belan also used 30 million accounts to facilitate a spam scheme that netted him money. in all, 500 million accounts, half of yahoo's total of one billion, were compromised. acting assistant attorney general mary mccord -- >> we will not allw individuals, groups, nation states or a combination of them to compromise the privacy of our citizens, the economic interests of our companies, or the security of our country. >> reporter: but the hackers were able to go unnoticed because the agents, dokuchaev and sushkin, may have been familiar with u.s. cyber strategy.
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"center 18," the fbi's russian contact for cyber investigations. robert cattanach is a former federal prosecutor. >> they pretend to be collaborating with us to try to do something about the spread of cybercrime in russia, and come to find out, they're fostering it. >> reporter: according to russian media, one of the fsb officers was arrested earlier this year and jailed for treason. president trump's unfounded allegation that the prior administration ordered his phone to be tapped is getting the eye roll on capitol hill. republican leaders looking into the charges say they've seen no evidence, and the attorney general says he never told the president he was under surveillance. nancy cordes has the latest. >> i don't think there was an actual tap of trump tower. >> reporter: house intelligence chairman devin nunes typically toes the party line, but today he concluded that president
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trump's explosive accusation has no merit. >> are you going to take the tweets literally? and if you are, then clearly the president was wrong. >> reporter: his comments came after 11 days of white house insistence that the commander-in-chief was serious when he tweeted, "just found out that obama had my wires tapped in trump tower." >> i think he's extremely confident. >> reporter: but administration officials, including the attorney general, have provided no evidence to back it up. >> did you ever give him any reason to believe he was wiretapped by the previous administration? >> um, look, the answer is no. >> reporer: president trump refused to back down today, insisting something happened to him. >> "wiretap" covers a lot of different things. i think you're going to find some very interesting items coming to the forefront over the next two weeks. >> reporter: the surveillance, whether real or imagined, has alarmed lawmakers from both sides. >> have you found evidence?
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>> reporter: fbi director james comey was called up to capitol hill again today to brief two top senators behind closed doors. they were not authorized to share details. >> this briefing was all on sensitive matters, and highly classified. >> reporter: republican lindsey graham said comey should share what he knows with the public. >> the bottom line is, a lot of americans are wondering what's going on here. >> reporter: democrat adam schiff argued there is a reason white house officials can't provide any proof. >> the reality is, i don't think they have the foggiest idea of what was behind the president's claim except maybe something he watched on tv. >> reporter: actually, it was a conservative radio host that first suggested president trump may have been spied on by his predecessor. that accusation made its way into a breitbart article, about 24 hours before president trump sent those now-infamous tweets. members of the united nations held a moment of silence to mark the six-year anniversary of the civil war in syria.
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than 400,000 lives, reduced entire cities to rubble, and forced millions from their homes. across the border in iraq, allied forces continue to close the noose around islamic state gunmen in the city of mosul. hundreds of thousands of civilians are caught in the crossfire. holly williams is on the front line with some american doctors who are risking their lives to help the wounded. >> reporter: a few miles from the frontline, americans treat critically injured iraqis. this woman was hit by shrapnel from an isis mortar. and she's losing blood quickly. they need to stop it to save her life. the next ambulance brings an iraqi policeman. he has a gunshot wound to his shoulder. kyle fleher is normally a critical care nurse in santa barbara, california.
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he's taken vacation to come to the war zone. >> it's scary, and the adrenaline is at its max and its peak, but everything fades away when we get to do what we're trained to do. >> reporter: is it taking a toll on you? >> it is. it's traumatizing, the things that i've seen, that i'm seeing. a lifeless girl linger in my hands, and having to pronounce her dead. >> reporter: they're called new york city medics, and they've been sending teams to natural disasters for over a decade. [ explosion ] but this is the first time they've come to an armed conflict. >> something we have in the states is medications. here -- excuse me. >> reporter: they're on call 24 hours because this war never stops. this time, it's an iraqi soldier hit in the eye by shrapnel. another man has serious brain injuries, and there's nothing th c
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kathy bequary, the group's team leader, held his hand as he passed away. >> i don't know if he knew i was there or if he knew i was holding his hand or felt anything, but i didn't want him to be alone. >> reporter: seeing this war has changed her, she told us. >> they're moms and dads and daughters and sons and sisters and brothers. they're just like us, and i just wish the world really could understand that the way i do now. yeah. >> reporter: holly williams, cbs news, mosul. and the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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♪ new lysol kitchen pro eliminates 99.9% of bacteria without any harsh chemical residue. lysol. what it takes to protect.
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mthat stuff only lasts a few hours. or, take mucinex. one pill fights congestion for 12 hours. guess i won't be seeing you for a while. why take medicines that only last 4 hours, when just one mucinex lasts 12 hours? let's end this.
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the golden retriever is one of the most popular breed of dogs in the u.s. overseas not so much. in turkey, hundreds of goldens are roaming the streets as strays, unable to protect themselves against other aggressive breeds. there's an organization in istanbul that's rounding these dogs up and sending them to new homes in the united states. holly williams and barry peterson have been following the story of the turkey dogs. we begin with holly in istanbul. >> reporter: it's been a long, hard winter in istanbul. especially if you're a stray dog. [ barking ] one of thousands in this sprawling middle eastern city. they live on the streets. dodging traffic and begging for scraps. dogs like valentine, a
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was found weak and undernourished. these two help run a rescue center in istanbul. where many of the dogs are golden retrievers. they told us they're bought as puppies, but then some owners discard them when they realize they're so big and energetic. and they end up throwing them away? >> or giving them to shelters. >> reporter: how do they do on the street, do they cope very well? >> they don't. >> reporter: golden retrievers are famously friendly and playful. >> i need the microphone. the dog's got the microphone! >> reporter: on the streets, though, she told us they're often attacked by more aggressive breeds. but for a few lucky dogs, there's hope for a better life. at a time when the flow of people from the middle east has divith
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being sent to america and finding new homes. what would happen to them if you guys didn't take them off the streets and find new homes for them? >> i don't even want to think. we can't take all of them. there's so many every day. >> reporter: last year, this group sent around 600 dogs to america for adoption, including some disabled animals. like violet here, who's blind. and captain, who has lost a leg. we don't want you to get the idea that dogs aren't loved here in turkey. volunteers feed hundreds of stray dogs every day. and in this wealthy neighborhood, tommy has been fed by so many residents, he's become obese. don't feed the dog, says the sign, tommy is now on a strict diet. but still, there are too many homeless dogs on istanbul's streets. so last month, valentine, along with 7-year-old romeo, who needs an operation on his hips, and 16 other golden retrievers,
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embarked on a journey to a very different life. and that's where barry petersen picks up the story. >> reporter: 6,000 miles later, journey's end, in denver. >> valentine. >> reporter: at a cargo warehouse, hugs from sponsors who donated $2,250 for each dog's airfare. kenny morris found a very skinny romeo. what do you think? >> i think it's adorable and he eats a lot of hamburgers. >> reporter: across town to the golden retriever rescue of the rockies, where every dog will eventually have a home. families like dick and robin looking to adopt suddenly faced doggy disorder. >> i kept looking around, and here's sundance. and i go, you know what? that's a sign. >> reporter: in just minutes, a lifetime decision. >> we're going home.
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first night in america. >> we got our sleeping bags out and we threw them on the floor, took our pillows down, and that dog got to sleep right in between us. >> reporter: so you went to sleep on the floor with the dog? >> yes. >> reporter: why? >> because i think they need to realize that you're there for them. >> reporter: back at golden retriever rescue of the rockies, valentine listened in as director kevin shipley said the turkish dogs who have come here have a nickname. >> turkey dog. operation turkey dog colorado. >> reporter: so they say i've got a turkey dog. >> they say i got a turkey dog and their neighbors look at them sideways. >> reporter: dick and robin's neighbors have a new friend on their street. is he now part of your family? >> yeah, he definitely is. >> reporter: unconditional love? >> it has to be. if you're going to bring a dog like this into your life, i mean, it has to be.
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>> reporter: and about their dog who came from istanbul, a question they couldn't answer -- did they pick sundance or did sundance somehow know these were his people? barry petersen, in denver. ♪ sure! shut-up! ♪ i can do that! ♪ do i have to? i don't want there to be white marks. good bye beautiful dress i never got to wear. nothing! no dust, there's no marks... it's really dry! what is this? oh my god, it's dove! i knew it! it's a 48 hour antiperspirant... no white marks... ...on a 100 colors. i would absolutely use this. i think you converted me! ♪
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♪ lysol max cover kills 99.9% of bacteria, even on soft surfaces. one more way you've got what it takes to protect. two kids barfed in class today. it was so gross. lysol disinfectant spray kills 99.9% of bacteria, even those that cause stomach bugs. one more way you've got what it takes to protect.
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s. or, take mucinex. one pill fights congestion for 12 hours. guess i won't be seeing you for a while. why take medicines that only last 4 hours, when just one mucinex lasts 12 hours? let's end this. yeah, i just saved a whole lot of money by swhuh.ing to geico. we should take a closer look at geico... you know, geico insures way more than cars. boats, motorcycles... even rvs! geico insures rvs? what's an rv? uh, the thing we've been stuck on for five years! wait, i'm not a real moose?? we've been over this, jeff... we're stickers! i'm not a real moose? give him some space. deep breaths, jeff. what's a sticker?!? take a closer look at geico. great savings. and a whole lot more. a 17-year-old budding scientist from new jersey is now a quarter of a million dollars richer after winning a national science talent search.
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the junior nobel prize. errol barnett has her story. >> from the academy for science technology in hackensack, new jersey -- [ applause ] >> reporter: led on by cheers from her fellow competitors, adrani dros was awarded first place for her research on treating brain injuries. >> at the same time, there's more of this in the environment. >> reporter: she was one of 40 high school seniors vying for the title. >> i started looking at desalination. >> reporter: these young minds -- >> my goal is to stremline this process, maintain the accuracy. >> reporter: -- must explain their projects in a concise way. >> these are the 2,000 lines of code i had to write to get it working. >> reporter: and sell it to the judges. all right, blake, impress me. what did you find? >> i improved on a computer simulation of planet formation. >> repor
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didn't you discover something during your research? >> i discovered evidence for a forming planet around a nearby star. >> reporter: blake hall trained for this environment by inspiring even younger scientists. >> you're going see the tail alongside it. >> reporter: while engaging these young kids in the wonders of the stars and the planet. >> do you want to be the moon? so come up here. >> reporter: he's honing in on how to explain his own discoveries. >> to be able to condense knowledge into such small anecdotes has helped me understand my own work better and communicate at the basic level so that i truly do understand what i'm doing. >> reporter: while blake is finding new planets, she's using computer software to find the cure for cancer. so you turn this from the way dna is structured into algorithms to study them? >> exactly. i think that's really powerful. because rather than trying to use the experimental methods in the lab, this is so much faster. >> reporter: isabella greco wato
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bias, so she put together a survey and found this. >> people in feminist jobs were more closely remembered by a reader as having not achieved as much. and also people were more likely to have false memories about a feminine associated job. >> reporter: so this exposes gender bias. >> yeah, and it exposes something about the wage gap. >> reporter: for over 70 years, society for the science and the public has run the competition with a corporate sponsor, first known as the westinghouse. >> i wanted to win a westinghouse. >> reporter: george was a winner of the westinghouse in 1976. 13 years later, he was the founding scientist for a pharmaceutical company. the competition's sponsor now. what does it take to inspire a young teenager's mind to get them to be the next generation of scientists? >> a realization and recognition that it is so important and they
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>> reporter: now one of those heros is endrani dros. >> i want brain injury to be tackled at a fundamental level. and i mean brain injury by amz h h -- alzheimer's, traumatic brain injury. i want to see all the people that suffer from these conditions to improve their quality of life. >> reporter: foot soldiers for the future of science. errol barnett, washington. airbnb is a growing force in the global lodging industry. last year the site averaged 200,000 bookings a day, and more than half of the hosts are women. ben tracy reports. >> reporter: michelle is getting her spare bedroom ready for her next guest. she rents a room in her san francisco apartment on airbnb. taking in about $15,000 a year. >> it's been difficult to get by in san francisco, and the additional income has definitely made it more comfortable.
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>> reporter: as a female airbnb host, she's not the exception, she's the rule. a study commissioned by the company found 1 million female hosts worldwide. that's 55% of all airbnb hosts. >> i get a lot of confidence through hosting. it's basically like running your own business and having a lot of role. >> reporter: brian is the ceo. he co-founded the company in 2008 when he was 26 years old. he says airbnb is inherently more democratic than many male-dominated businesses. >> anyone can be an entrepreneur, anyone can be a host. i think that spirit of anybody has just become a more equalizing notion than maybe in other industries where it requires connections, references, referrals, which i think have been proven to provide some greater barriers. >> reporter: the study found since 2008, women have earned $10 billion by hosting.
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average of $6600 per year. what surprised you about the findings of this report? >> 50,000 women reported that they use this money to fund businesses or invest in entrepreneurial pursuits. to essentially become entrepreneurs. >> reporter: he wants to position airbnb as an economic force for its hosts with less focus how it's disrupting the lodging industry and often battling regulators. this comes as another sharing economy disrupter, uber, has found itself on a role for all the wrong reasons. rocked by allegations to turning a blind eye to sexual harassment, stealing trade secrets and the behavior of its ceo, 40-year-old travis callanek. >> some people don't like to take responsibility. >> reporter: he was caught on camera arguing with an uber driver. they are friends. is there a cautionary tale that you're see thing that you don't want to happen here?
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>> i think every company that i admire has had their ups and downs. >> reporter: do you think he can still effectively lead uber? >> i would, you know, assume that only he knows best the answer to that question, and i would take him at his word that he can become the leader he wants to become. one of the things i learned, i needed mentors. i wouldn't be here if it wasn't for mentors. i've been shameless about constantly seeking leadership help from people that are smarter than me and more experienced than me. >> reporter: he's not shied away from taking on the leader of the free world. when president trump issued a controversial travel ban, airbnb responded in a super bowl ad. he says he's just standing up for his worldwide host community. one he says is still in its infancy. >> the travel industry is almost the size of the oil industry. it's nearly 10% of global gdp. so i think this is literally chapter one.
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written, this interview would be the end of chapter o
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i am the founder and director of slam dunk for diabetes. slam dunk for diabetes is the only day basketball camp in the country and we provide the opportunity for children with pre-diabetes and type 1 and type 2 diabetes to get together, play ball and to learn to manage their diabetes. [olivia] when i first got to the camp, it wasn't like oh it's so sad, all the kids have diabetes, it wasn't that at all, it was happiness, it was kids laughing and running
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and playing and i wanted to be a part of that so much. [monica joyce] coming back year after year, what olivia learned is that she really isn't alone. [olivia] she created a world for diabetic kids to play and be normal and have fun and meet people and meet other kids that have diabetes. i can't thank her enough [monica joyce] i met olivia in 2004 and i said to people, stick around, olivia is going to set the world on fire one day. olivia has really been a marvelous example of what camp can do for children son: it's been more daughter: no, it hasn't. mom: hey, can you two keep it down? son: i want it. it's my turn. daughter: no it isn't. mom: please just keep it down. [tires screeching] mom: i remember days when just driving down the street would give me anxiety. and now look at me. [restaurant sounds] man 1: don't get me wrong, i still don't love crowded places, but it's good to get out again.
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[plates crashing] man 2: noises like that used to make me hit the deck, but now i can keep going. announcer: transitioning from the military can be tough. we all have unique experiences, but many veterans are facing similar challenges. life goes on, but some things are different now. visit maketheconnection.net to watch our stories and learn ways to create the story you want to live. no one can write it for you. make sure it's a good one. make the connection. ople take action against housing discrimination? my friends were told they might be more comfortable in another neighborhood. my co-worker was pressured by her landlord to pay her rent with sexual favors. my neighbor was told she needs to get rid of her dog, even though he's an assistance animal. they all reported these forms of housing discrimination. when you don't report them, landlords and owners
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. if you think you've been a victim, report it. like we did. narrator: if you suspect that you've been discriminated against because of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, familial status or disability, report it to hud or your local fair housing center. visit hud.gov/fairhousing or call the hud hotline at 1-800-669-9777. fair housing is your right. use it.
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captioning funded by cbs it's thursday, march 16th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." president trump calls out a federal judge for blocking the new version of his travel ban. >> you don't think this was done by a judge for political reasons, do you? no. this ruling makes us look weak. as another showdown on capitol hill in an effort to repeal and replace obamacare. and passengers get another unexpected snow blast while waiting for a train.

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