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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  March 24, 2017 3:07am-4:00am EDT

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exhibit a in the trump administration's argument for repeal. but the current house bill to replace obama care could have dire consequences for arizona. with estimates that 380,000 people could lose medicaid coverage if that bill becomes law. republican state representative, heather carter is concerned about what that could mean for her state. >> we have seen what happens in arizona when people don't have health insurance. they show up in emergency room for their care. it is a disaster. >> she supported the expansion of medicaid that was part of obama care and says that part of the law should stay. >> i'm happy to see there are republicans back in d.c. who are really taking the time to understand the implications of this policy on their constituents. >> reporter: and that's what we heard from many trump supporters here, scott. they all want the republican congress to do the right thing on health care. but take more time to do it. >> dean reynolds listening to the people. the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
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the fbi and congress are investigating whether members of the trump campaign colluded with russia to sway the election. no evidence of that has been made public. and no one has been charged with any crime. one potential witness is a former british intelligence officer, hired by trump opponents to find dirt on him in
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russia. he wrote a report of unsubstantiated claims that its now getting new scrutiny. here is jeff pegues. >> i'm really pleased. >> reporter: christopher steel emerged from hiding earlier this month after the dossier he compiled about then candidate trump associations in russia was leaked in january. >> it is all fake news. phony stuff. it didn't happen. >> reporter: despite the president's dismissals of the dossier, sources say it is gaining increasing credibility in both the intelligence community and congress. adam schiff, the top democrat on the house intelligence committee. >> also according to steel's russian sources the campaign is offered documents damaging to hillary clinton. >> now democrats want to call steel to testify about his allegations that donald trump and his associates had business dealings with russian officials. congressman jim heinz. >> gets to something we don't talk a lot about which is really important. which its do the russians have some form of leverage on president trump? either financial or otherwise? >> i briefed the president on the concerns that i had. >> reporter: the committee's investigation was thrown into disarray yesterday when republican chairman devin nunes announced he had seen legal foreign surveillance that involved members of the trump transition team. he angered democrats by first briefing the media and mr. trump.
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committee. >> sometimes you make the right decision, make the wrong ones you, have to stick by the decisions you make. >> reporter: getting steel to testify will take more than just democartic support. scott, committee republicans would have to back the idea as well. after that, there its the possibility steel won't want to appear. >> jeff pegues in our washington newsroom. late today, a fourth victim of the london attack died, 75-year-old man whose name was not released. the others were a police officer, stabbed to death, a british woman, and an american tourist. run down on a bridge near parliament. the attacker was also killed. and today elizabeth palmer learned more about him. >> reporter: the man who left this trail of carnage in the heart of london. >> no, no, no!
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british born, shot by police during yesterday's attack. overnight, officers raid the properties, linked to massoud who had a petty criminal record not under investigation for any links to violent extremism. nonetheless, isis claimed today that he was a soldier of the islamic state. he was also a terrorist. who stabbed policeman keith palmer to death. and murdered aysha frade, a teacher and mother of two of with his car and american kirk cochran from utah in london with wife melissa for their wedding anniversary. she was injured yesterday. and is still in the hospital. the injured came from 11 countries. among them, french high school students, south korean tourists, and a romanian architect, andrea christea, in this security camera video, as the the car barrels along the sidewalk she tumbles off the bridge into the icy river. just a day ago this whole area
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but in the famous british spirit of the "keep calm and carry on" the british authorities are determined things should return to normal soon as possible. less than 24 hours after the attack, westminster bridge was open to traffic. in parliament, politicians observed a minute of silence. and then a heard tough-minded message from prime minister theresa maye. >> we are not afraid. and our resolve will never waiver in the face of terrorism. >> reporter: tonight thousand of londoners gathered in trafalgar square for a vigil led by the muslim mayor sadik kahn. in part they came to honor the dead and in part to bolster solidarity among the living. scott, the identity of khalid masood seems to have take ten the brisht security services by surprise. he was investigated years ago for peripheral links to extrem
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have to have slid right off the radar. >> liz palmer at palace of westminster in london for us tonight. liz, thank you. >> in israel today, a jewish teenager who holds both u.s. and israeli citizenship was arrested in connection with the wave of bomb threats phoned in to jewish community centers around the world. anna werner has his story. >> reporter: the fbi worked with israeli authorities to arrest this 18-year-old man. who covered his face as he appeared briefly in court. a u.s. law enforcement official tells cbs news he is believed to be responsible for most of the 160-plus bomb threats phoned into jewish centers in the u.s., australia, new zealand and canada. israeli police spokesman, mickey
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>> the identification of the suspect, his profile, what were the motives behind him carrying out the threats. >> reporter: the source says agents now believe the suspect used an anonymousizer to mask his phone number and ip addresses and may have programmed calls in rapid succession. the man suffers from a brain tumor that nay have had an effect on his cognitive functions. the lawyer ghalit bosch. >> this is a young person. because of his very, very serious medical condition. didn't sever in the army. didn't go to high school. didn't go to elementary school. >> evan bernstein with the anti-defamation league. >> even though there may be relief there is not time for institutions to ratchet back on security protocols. maintain diligence, not get complacent in any way. >> reporter: that 18-year-old's lawyer says he will be sent for a medical evaluation. scott, not yet clear whether u.s. owe authorities will seek extradition or file charges against him. >> anna werner, thanks. coming up next, why middle-aged, working class, white americans are dying younger.
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a study out today by princeton economist says that white, middle-aged, working-class americans are suffering in a changing economy. they're living shorter lives with a sharp increase in so-called deaths of despair. from suicide, drinking and drugs. here's mark strassmann. >> reporter: tony roach and drew arnold work as mechanics in townville, south carolina. neither finished high school, and neither has health insurance. >> i get sick. i pay in cash. >> roach, now 48, smokes a pack a day. >> we are all getting older? >> true. >> things go wrong? >> yes.
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>> if something goes wrong you are going to wish you hadn't? >> very good. probably so.y. >> arnold is 25 with a significant health worry. >> i was diagnosed with a tumor in my head when i was 18. >> reporter: benign? >> yes, sir, benign. >> reporter: still there? >> treated with medication. >> reporter: pay out of pocket? >> yes, sir. >> how expensive? >> $300 a month. >> reporter: the study of whites with minimal education, they're dying younger than other middle americans. a trend driven by dwindling economic opportunities. john gaylor -- >> education brings opportunity. opportunity in the area of employment, later, opportunity in the skills to overcome obstacles. roach and arnold, both trump supporters, are keeping an eye on health care reform. >> you think it will get better? >> no matter who is --
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>> no matter who is here. everybody makes promises that they don't keep. >> guys like you are -- are, have to learn to do without? >> yeah. a lot of people like me. >> less educated white people overwhelmingly supported president trump. scott, the studies researchers said proposed reforms to obama care with premiums rising for older folk seem perfectly designed to hurt the people who voted for him. >> mike strassmann in the up state for us tonight. mike, thank you. we'll be right back. i'm so frustrated. i just want to find a used car without getting ripped off. you could start your search at the all-new carfax.com that might help. show me the carfax. now the car you want and the history you need are easy to find. show me used trucks with one owner. pretty cool.
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today the senate judiciary committee wrapped up four days of hearings on supreme court nominee neil gorsuch. democratic leader chuck schumer promised to filibuster. >> today a federal agency ruled, president trump's hotel at an historic former post office building in washington is not violating its lease. the lease prohibits government officials from profitting from the property. but the general services administration says, there is no violation, because the president has transferred his businesses to his children, and will not get any money from the hotel. this man was told he would have a few weeks to live. wait until you see how he lived the next few decades.
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we take some unexpected extra steps to raise healthy chickens with no antibiotics ever. like putting oregano in their water. it has natural antioxidants and we don't have to use antibiotics in their diet. perdue. over 200 products no antibiotics ever.
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we take some unexpected extra steps to raise healthy chickens with no antibiotics ever. for example, thyme. it's part of our 100% veggie diet and helps support their immune system.
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ducts no antibiotics ever. many of you will be watching march madness here on cbs in a few minutes. to get you warmed up, jim axelrod brought us the story of one of the greatest come pelt tors you will ever meet. he is 42 and there is no mountain he can't climb. >> reporter: the kind of guy who could easily give the rest of us a complex. >> every morning i wake up. i tell myself this is the best day ever. and you believe that? >> i believe it. >> looking back on my life, how could i not. >> right now, he is training for
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the trip next month to the north pole. having climbed the highest mountain on each continent and trekked to the south pole this will be the last leg of what its known as the explorers grand slam. >> you never know what is possible until you actually are in that situation. to push yourself forward. >> how do you feel, buddy? how do you feel? >> what would be impressive for anyone becomes almost inconceivable when you realize sean swarner its a cancer survivor. how close were you to dying? >> i literally was on death's door. >> reporter: twice as a teenager he was given weeks to live. but he fought back. the radiation that helped save his life ravaged his body. as if surviving cancer, not once, but twice, isn't enough.
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functioning lung. >> i have one big bulldog lung over here apparently. >> reporter: so all that training, pulling tires up slopes, jeep around the neighborhood is done with one lung. so will the trek of more than 100 miles in minus 40 degree temperatures, pulling a sled with 200 pounds of supplies, behind him. >> people are limited by this. not their bodies. if you don't think it's possible, it's not possible. >> reporter: at the north pole he will plant a flag with names of people battling cancer, arranged to spell out hope. >> it's not about me, my story, about people fighting for their lives. and people who need that hope. >> reporter: sean swarner often envisions of the end of the journey. >> get to the north pole, collapse to my knees, cry like a baby. then i think to myself, now what? >> reporter: if simply a matter of desire, hard to imagine anything he can't do. jim axel rod, cbs news, new york. and that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you, the news continues. for others check back with us a little bit later for the morning news, and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
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>> welcome to the "overnight news." a memorial growing on westminster bridge in london, scene of wednesday's deadly terror attack. three people were killed including a local police officer and dozens hurt when a man turned an suv into a tool of jihad. he was killed by police. the islamic state claims the attacker was one of their soldiers. british police can't confirm that. but they do know who he was and have made several arrests. elizabeth palmer has that. >> reporter: the man who left this trail of carnage in the heart of london -- >> no, no, no! >> reporter: was khalid massoud,
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52, british born, shot by police during the attack. overnight officers raided properties linked to massoud who was not currently under investigation for any links to violent extremism. >> nonetheless, isis claimed today that he was a soldier of the islamic state. he was also a terrorist who stabbed policeman keith palmer to death and murdered asha frayed, a teacher and mother of two with his car along with american kurt cochran from utah, who was in london with his wife melissa for their wedding anniversary. she was injured yesterday. and is still in the hospital. the injured came from 11 countries. among them, french high school students, south korean tourists and romanian architect, andrea christea, in this video, as the car barrels along the sidewalk she tumbles off the bridge into the icy river. a day ago the area was strewn with bodies.
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in the famous british spirit of keep calm and carry on. the british authorities are determined things should return to normal soon as possible. less than 24 hours after the attack westminster bridge was open to traffic. in parliament, politicians observed a minute of silence and heard a tough-minded message from prime minister theresa may. >> we are not afraid. our resolve will never waiver in the face of terrorism. tonight, thousands of londoners gathered in trafalgar square for a vigil led by the muslim mayor. in part they came to honor the dead. and in part to bolster solidarity among the living. turns out taking the job as donald trump's campaign manager may have been the worst decision, paul manifort ever made. fbi, treasury department and news organizations continue to dig up evidence of his
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vladamir putin's associates. the latest, a $10 million contract with the russian billionaire. and manafort its not the only friend of donald in the cross hairs of investigators. jeff pegues reports. >> reporter: lawmakers getting closer to formalizing plans for trump associates to testify. at the top of the list are paul manifort and roger stone. democrats in congress have long suspected that stone had advance knowledge of some of last year's disclosures of democratic party e-mails. the u.s. senate sent me a letter. >> cbs news obtained the letter, roger stone mentioned to cbs this morning, earlier this week. the former trump campaign adviser and long time friend of president trump has been asked to preserve e-mails and
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communications he may have had involving russian interests. stone campaigned foreign policy adviser, carter page, former adviser, michael flynn, and former campaign chairman, paul manafort under scrutiny as the the fbi investigates whether there was collusion with russian operatives during the election. >> i don't know if it is true or not. if it is, it is concerning. lawmakers wednesday reacted to a report by associated press that in 2806, manafort signed a $10 million contract with russian billionaire oleg deripaska, as manafort described it, lobbying and influencing news coverage. dep dep -- deripaska has
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solid connections to putin. you have about 20 big business men in russia. >> those are the oligarchies. >> yes. and he is one of them. >> manifort led the trump campaign in the leadup to the convention. this week, the trump white house zwroun played its connection. >> paul was hired, to count delegates. why he was brought in. >> reporter: that its not the impression trump's family gave at the convention. >> we couldn't be more happy with the work he is doing, the way he is tackling these things, the way he is handling the organization of everything going forward. he has done a phenomenal job. >> manafort acknowledges working with the man, but says he never worked for the russian government. he calls the allegations ate smear that is being used to paint a false picture. part of the fbi counterintelligence investigation involves examining financial transactions to see where they may lead. the united nations declared famine emergency in south sudan. the world's youngest nation beset by civil war, corrupt government, and years of drought. all of this has left more than 100,000 people on the brink of starvation. deborata
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in the capital. >> reporter: 11-year-old james able is so malnourished he walks as an old man. thin legs look like they will break every time he takes a step. my parents are dead. its the only thing he said when he arrived at the children's hospital three weeks ago. head nurse, told us, able is severely traumatized after watching his parents being shot. he barely eats the food he desperately need. >> he cries. he says he wants the mother and the father. able its just one more victim of south sudan's three year civil war. and now, there is a new weapon. starvation. one million children are in desperate need of food. but the fierce fighting means aid workers cannot reach the areas that need it most. there are critical food
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country. >> i just feel pain. what can we do? the child is supposed to be in school. school aged child not supposed to be dying just like that. today, 6-month-old monica was admitted she weighs less than nine pounds. when her stick like arms are measured it shows up red on the tape measure. the marker says red what thauz -- what that mean? >> so many children need help, the hospital ran out of bed. monica any mother is given a mattress. here, at least they will get some food and medical care. like 2-year-old, who is so weak, he doesn't even open his eyes to register the rick prick of a needle. hunger has sucked the spirit out of him. just like the war has sucked the hope from the young country. debora patta, cbs news, jubah, south sudan. the cbs "overnight news" will be riba
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one more way you've got what it takes to protect. two kids barfed in class today. it was so gross. lysol disinfectant spray kills 99.9% of bacteria, even those that cause stomach bugs. one more way you've got what it takes to protect.
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president trump says he wants to stop foreign workers from taking americans' jobs. he has taken particular aim at h 1 b visa program. bill whitaker takes a look at the program and how it is some times abused for "60 minutes." last october, robert harrison senior telecon university at university of california san francisco medical center was called to a meeting at the university with about 80 of his it co-workers. >> what did they say to you? >> we are ser to inform you as of february 28th you will no longer have a job. we are going to outsource your position to the company in india. >> to a company in india? >> yes, sir. >> reporter: harrison was told
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he could stay on the job, get paid for four months and get a bonus if he trained his replacement. >> now i'm being told that i am not only going to lose my job, but i have to train the people to take my job. >> reporter: were you angry? >> pissed. that exceeds angry. i am really not a violent guy. i love people. but i envisioned my self, backhanding the guy as he is sitting next to me trying to learn what i know. i said, god, please don't let them send anybody to sit next to me to shadow me. i don't want to do this. really don't. >> reporter: harrison and colleagues staged a protest outside the medical center. his fellow worker, senior systems administrator, curt hough is losing his job too. he had just trained his replacement from india. >> i think for once we are going to stand up as americans and say enough is enough. we are not going to take it anymore. >> thank you for standing up for what you believe in. >> reporter: their rally was
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florida attorney sarah blackwell. >> this its about the companies making the decision that you were worthless to them. >> reporter: she represents hundreds of u.s. workers who were fired and replaced by foreign workers with h 1 b visas. >> when you tell someone the real reason for getting rid of the jobs is for cheap, foreign labor, that should offend everyone. >> reporter: they have to train the worker who is going to take their job? >> right. and they are told by their company, if you don't train this person in a way that we approve of them being trained then you don't get yourself rans. >> reporter: the ucsf medical center highly regarded state run institution. administrators say, outsourcing the it jobs could save $30 million taxpayer dollars over the next five years. that's a fraction of the university's $5.8 billion annual budget. but to robert harrison, it's his job. >> i can't wrap my mind around training somebody to take my position. you know this is my livelihood. how am i suppose to feel? >> reporter: i heard some workers say that -- this is like digging your own grave? is that what it feels like? >> it feels worse than that. it feels like not only am i
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digging the grave, getting ready to stab myself in the gut and fall into the grave. >> reporter: when the h-1-b visa was created in 1990 it was intended to help the u.s. attract and hold on to best and brightest engineers and scientists and provide pathway to citizenship. at the time, members of congress promised u.s. workers would be protected. >> this legislation protects american jobs. >> reporter: former congressman, bruce morrison, then chairman of the immigration committee, authored the bill. >> reporter: you came up with the legislation what do you think of what it has become? >> i'm any outraged, the h 1 b
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bring people from abroad and displace americans. >> reporter: businesses insist the visas are absolutely necessary to compete for the best global talent. and that even more h 1 b workers are needed to fill job shortages. nearly every major high tech company including apple, google, facebook, has employees here on h 1 b visas. media companies too. including cbs. >> the argument from high tech firms its they can't find enough qualified american workers. well there a a lot of qualified american workers, but the companies will do better financially if they hire the foreign worker rather than the american. >> the american workers are just as skilled as you are?
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>> perhaps even more skilled. >> uh-huh. >> yes. that's true. >> rajesh works at major wall street bank on a visa. to protect his job and personal safety he asks that we change his appearance and name. he was placed at the bank by one of the growing number of outsourcing companies. most of the global staffing firms are based in india. they've become multibillion dollar enterprises supplying american companies with h 1 b workers like rajesh to replace american workers. rajesh said he was never told in india he would be taking americans' jobs. >> i have to take all their knowledge. basically i have to steal it. that's my job description. >> and the american worker is let go. >> translator: yeah, the
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american workers lose their job. and they also cry while leaving the job. >> reporter: they cry? >> they have been working there 20 years. suddenly i have taken their job. if i lose a job, i can go back to india. but where can they goal? >> reporter: you must know that when -- most native born americans see this going on, they blame you. >> translator: yes, but i am not the enemy. the main villains are the indian companies and their american corporate clients. they are exploiting us. >> reporter: why can't we just say we will give jobs to americans first? >> well that its what the statute says. but they put in a loophole. and the loophole says, if you pay over $60,000, you can do that. and besides that, you don't have to try to find americans. well, $60,000 is not high pay for this kind of work. people doing this work today, easily make $120,000 to $140,000. >> reporter: who put in the loophole? >> well done by congress. but, obviously the industry lobbied for it. it's really a travesty that should never have been allowed -- to happen. >> it wasn't called training your replacement, it was knowledge transfer. >> he worked foreversource, and was one of 220 it workers replaced by h 1 b visa employees.
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deangelo says his replacement, worker from india, told him he was making half deangelo's salary with no benefits. >> i didn't get laid off for lack of work. i've got laid off because somebody cheaper could do nigh job. to anyone who would say you're anti-imgrant. >> no. >> that is a lie. >> a lie. >> you don't want to have any animosity towards them. they're looking for a better way of life. >> you can see the full report on our web site. cbs news.com. the "overnight news" will be right back. "let life in with new herbal essences bursting with argan oil of morocco and notes of jasmine to put more life in your head. and now with the power of bio:renew to put more life in your hair.
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a famous japanese artist who lives inside a mental institution has a traveling art exhibit working its way across the united states. errol barnett caught up with the show in washington. >> reporter: good morning, welcome to the obliteration room. this is one of the of kusamas's, and the response to this exhibit has been overwhelming. one month ago when the first 9,000 daily time passes were made available, free, snatched up within six minutes. the museum's website crashed. people have been lining up ever since. you could say there was almost no end to the number of people
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wanting to experience kusama's infinite world. one step into the space and the experience is quite literally limitless. >> from her quirky work, all the eternal love i have for the pumpkins. to her earliest mirror display. and on. >> oh, my gosh. >> and on. never before have so many of the kusama captivating infinity mirror rooms been in the same place at the same time. rarely seen outside of japan, kusam established herself in the american art world after her move to new york in 1957. >> in the late 50s, the postwar period in japan, i think it was also very much a period if you wanted to become an artist you had to go to a place like new york. >> reporter: the hirschel museum's director.
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>> i would say it started with her arrival in new york. she became enamored with performance art. >> reporter: as an anti-war activist, she staged happenings against violence at the height of the vietnam war. >> she wanted recognition. she wanted to be known as an artist. >> she has studied her work for years. >> young people who were in her studio also frequented warhol's studio. she was very competitive. she saw male artists like andy warhol's arrive vals. but the pace of her life in new york was unsustainable. >> came back to japan in 1973. and went through -- quite a dark period. >> reporter: she literally worked herself mad. >> yes. 40, 50 hours at a stretch.
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a tokyo mental institution for 40 years. checking herself out to work at a nearby studio every morning and returning to the psychiatric hospital each evening. in a video made for the exhibit, the media shy artist shared her philosophy. the effective infinite constant repetition leads us to fining our ever-expanding hope she says. >> she developed a method or rhythm to stabilize her condition. art really is a way for her, a healing process. >> is she happy? >> that's a hard question, i think. there is a lot of dualities in her work. some of her work is dark. >> reporter: you wouldn't go as far to say happy. she is many ways conflicted. >> she barely smiles when i see her. i think the only time she smiles when she finishes one, one of her paintings. >> reporter: she has described her art as therapy. and her appeal has been profound. >> this is the most visited exhibition in the museum's
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>> reporter: this obliteration room, started out with no color at all. museum goers who are given sheets of stickers, are encouraged to cover the room in polka dots of every size and color. to the thousand who have visited this exhibit. >> what would you compare it to? >> the planet i'm from. >> a trip. >> it is a -- a reality unto itself. >> reporter: an immersive experience. >> a little psychedelic tour, right. >> reporter: created by a tormented artist with a decidedly positive impact. >> it made me very happy. >> reporter: and something like this is prime for social media. #infinite kosoma has appeared on 23 million instagram, twitter accounts. 212 impressions. from here the show continues from washington it head to los angeles, seattle, toronto, cleveland, and, atlanta.
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will be right back. at perdue, we take some unexpected extra steps to raise healthy chickens with no antibiotics ever. like putting oregano in their water. it has natural antioxidants and we don't have to use antibiotics in their diet. perdue. over 200 products no antibiotics ever.
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roducts no antibiotics ever. it's friday, march 24th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." presidential ultimatum. after a day of delays, lawmakers will finally cast a vote on health care. london officials identify the man who plowed into pedestrians in the heart of the city, while several thousand gather to remember the four people killed. why internet providers could soon get the green light to cash in on your private information. and march madness lives up to its name. >> for the elite eight, no! oregon

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