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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  March 28, 2017 2:07am-3:59am EDT

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gambling capital that it had shunned for decades. but football won't be happening in vegas until a domed stadium is built, so the raidiers intend to play at least two more seasons as lame ducks in oakland. coming up next, we'll take you to the border where the president is getting ready to build his wall.
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attorney general jeff sessions warned that cities that don't help enforce immigration laws may lose federal grant money. ben tracy has more about the trump administration's efforts and who's being targeted. >> he stepped out, and he never came back in. >> reporter: 19-year-old e-stephanie ortiz says agents came to her house in pasadena last month looking for someone who did not live there. they arrested her father, carlos ortiz instead. he was in the country illegally but had no criminal record. >> why did we open the door? nobody's going to want to open the door. everybody's scared. >> reporter: the los angeles police department says aggressive ice enforcement tactics are also having
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chilling effect on latinos report being crimes. since the beginning of the year, reports of sexual assault by latinos dropped 25%. >> they start to clam up. they no longer come to court. >> reporter: california supreme court justice says latinos tell up at courthouses. so she wrote a letter to attorney general jeff sessions, accusing agents of stalking undocumented immigrants to make arrests. >> i feel like they are being targeted in a way that's unprecedented. >> reporter: what is your concern if ice agents are in courthouses? >> victims aren't going to come to court. witnesses aren't going to come to testify against bad guys in violent communities, because they're afraid they're going to get arrested in court. >> reporter: in a statement, ice said, while ice does arrest targets at courthouses, generally, it's only after
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exhausted other options. but in response to ice actions, a proposed bill in california would bar state and local police from aiding fedal immigration enforcement, including turning over criminals when they're released from jail. l.a. county sheriff mcdonnell says that's a bad idea. >> by not allowing them access to the jails, the likelihood is they're going to go into the communities looking for the individual, and they're not going to limit themselves to that individual. >> reporter: and to give you an idea just how much federal money is now at stake, san francisco and new york could lose nearly $25 billion combined, scott, if the trump white house follows through and cuts off funding for sanctuary cities. >> ben tracy, thank you. the president's failure to repeal and replace the affordable care act at least on his first try has been a disappointment to many who support mr. trump but has been a relief to those who depend on obamacare. don dahler has been
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that. >> reporter: her 2-year-old son has been in the hospital a lot these days. he's covered under the aca, but wynter voted for trump. and although she sees problems with the aca, she's grateful for some of the benefits. >> well, the main thing for the aca for me is of course the preexisting conditions, that is huge. i mean, he has two major life-altering conditions that if i had to go and shop for it, it, i wouldn't be able to afford it. >> reporter: wynter lives in quakertown, pennsylvania, whose congressman, brian fitzpatrick was one of dozens of republicans who planned to vote no on the new health care bill before it got pulled. he opposed the bill because it didn't do enough to address opioid addiction treatment. pennsylvania has over 700,000 enrolled in medicaid expansion and more than 426,000 in the aca marketplace. had the aca been repealed, the
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pennsylvania budget and policy center estimated over 1 million pennsylvanians would lose their coverage, like brian kline who was diagnosed with cancer last year. >> the aca saved my life and saved me from medical bankruptcy. >> reporter: kline is a democrat who voted for clinton, but he and wynter have gone thing in common. >> stop fighting, stop arguing, stop holding your arms and saying, i'm a republican, i'm a democrat, come together. that's why we elected you. >> reporter: both wynter and kline say they want the democrats to cooperate with the president in order to make the problems with obamacare better. >> don dahler, thanks. today the white house condemned the mass arrests in moscow during rallies against vladimir putin's government. the protests were organized by one of putin's fiercest political opponents, and elizabeth palmer is following this. >> reporter: united in anger. russians from across the count
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marched to protest against official corruption. in moscow, it was the biggest demonstration since the anti-kremlin rallies of 2012. but, without a permit, authorities called the gathering illegal and soon the police had moved in. hundreds were arrested. including alexei navalny, an opposition leader and ferocious critic of president putin and his famously corrupt administration. >> translator: earlier this month, navalny released a video alleging that the prime minister had amassed a fortune in mansions, yachts and vineyards, all through corrupt deals. the video went viral. and here's the reaction. the protesters message to the government? shame on
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navalny's now an opposition icon. after his arrest, supporters surrounded the police van, shouting "don't let them through"! and police were forced to lift cars left as obstacles out of the way. navalny appeared in court today and was handed a fine and a short jail sentence. scott, these arrests have raised eyebrows in washington. they're seen as more heavy-handed stifling to any opposition to president putin. but alexander navalny's not going anywhere. in fact, he says he's going to run against mr. putin next year for the presidency. >> liz palmer, thank you. "cbs overnight news" will be right back. where's frank? it's league night! 'saved money on motorcycle insurance with geico! goin' up the country. bowl without me. frank.' i'm going to get nachos. snack bar's closed. gah! ah, ah ah. ♪ ♪ i'm goin' up the country, baby don't you wanna go? ♪
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. degree. it won't let you down. a deadline is fast approaching for one of mr. trump's pet projects, the wallop t -- wall on the mexican border. bids are due wednesday. >> reporter: the border is roughly 2,000 miles long, and for about 654 miles, there is this fence. it costs about $2.3 billion to build, and i want to show you that it drops off in some places, like where we are in brownsville, it stops here before you get to a retirement community. president trump wants a wall that would be 30 feet. 30 feet is twice the height of this fence. more than 600 companies have put in bids to work onhe
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president trump says the cost of the wall will be $12 billion. but many analysts and researchers say it will be much higher, between $15 billion and $40 billion. here's what the president wants, aside from being 30 feet, the wall has to prevent digging or tunneling below it for a minimum of six feet. a person must not be able to climb to the top of the wall or access the top of the wall from either side unassisted. the wall has got to be so tough that it would take someone an hour to break through it if they're using a sledge hammer, pick ax or chisel. and on top of that, it must be aesthetically pleasing. mr. trump wants a beautiful wall. now one of mr. trump's most recent tweets trumpeted the figure of border crossings being down. that's a fact, it's true. but border patrol says the number is down because it usually is this time of year. they expect it to go back up as the weather gets warmer. >> david begnaud for us at the southern border.
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up next, doctors tell us what they would do to fight the opioid epidemic. at the all-new carfax.com your h that might help. show me the carfax. now the car you want and the history you need are easy to find. show me used trucks with one owner. pretty cool. [laughs] ah... ahem... show me the carfax. start your used car search and get free carfax reports at the all-new carfax.com. you knmegared omega-3s... but did you know your eyes, your brain, and your joints really love them too? introducing megared advanced 4in1... just one softgel delivers mega support. or how high the pollen count, flonase allergy relief keeps your eyes and nose clear. flonase helps block 6 key inflammatory substances that cause nasal congestion and itchy, watery eyes. for relief beyond the nose. flonase.
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clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours. wow! but what other teen problems can it fix fast? will clearasil act fast to help this teen concentrate on his math test? darn! it only worked on the acne. can it hel... nope. no. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things. and now there's new clearasil overnight spot patches with patented technology for faster healing. today, an influential group of doctoring demanded a top to bottom change in the way america handles addiction. it 22.5 million americans need treatment for drugs or alcohol, but just 18% are getting it. here's dr. jon lapook. >> reporter: he has spent his entire l
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abuse. >> i was given alcohol at a young age, like maybe 4, 5 years old. >> reporter: he graduated to marijuana, cocaine, heroin and pain pills, but he's been off drugs for more than three years. one of the lucky few to get treatment. with less than 20% of those needing treatment getting it, today, the american college of physicians published broad new recommendations, including requiring health insurers to cover addiction. in one survey, only about half covered the prescription drugs needed for treatment. improving the training of clinicians when it comes to pain management to reduce prescription dr prescription drug abusef b and expanding availability of naloxone. it has led to a harmful stigma. the medical community understands that addiction involves changes in the brain requiring medical treatment. >> you've got to help
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you know, you've got to not just throw me away. >> reporter: for davis, it includes counseling and medication. dr. ward is his physician. she supports the new recommendations, including a comprehensive approach to care. >> the old traditional model of sending patient to detox and hope that they will get better is really, we know that it doesn't work. there's no evidence. >> reporter: and we were struck by this. more than 70% of people with hypertension, diabetes or major depression get treatment, scott, for substance abuse it's less than 20%. >> and yet treatment works. dr. jon lapook. thank you, doctor. in new york city, the fearless girl will stand her ground a little while longer. the statue staring down wall street's charging bull has become a huge hit with tourists. it was placed there temporarily to highlight gender disparity in the boardroom. but today the mayor said she can stay until february. in a moment, a young girl
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inspiring the world with her
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we end tonight with a little girl who possesses incredible power to lift spirits. here's maria via rial. ♪ >> reporter: 4-year-old leah carroll is lip synching her heart
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it's a bold choice for a little girl who has spent more time inside the hospital than she has outside. ♪ >> reporter: some of her closest playmates are the nurses treating her for severe congenital knew troe pina. this doctor was one of the first to treat her. >> she has issues with just normal feeding. so she's required many different treatments. >> reporter: to distract leah from boredom and sometimes pain, the mother looked for songs on the internet. that's how leah became a fan of gospel singer man desa. it was this video that transformed the pint sized patient into an internet sensation with 37 million views. lindsey is leah's mother. what do you think resonates with people? >> the world needed some joy
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united states. i think leah has this pure joy about her. >> reporter: leah has survived two bone marrow transplants and numerous side effects. >> and the song itself is really fitting for her life. ♪ you're an overcomer >> reporter: lilley ttle leah'se has inspired comments from around the world, even inspiring man desa herself. >> one, two, three! we love you, leah! >> reporter: doctors say her knew troe pina is closed to being cured, earning her the nickname, leah, the overcomer. oakland, california. that's overnight news for this tuesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and cbs this morning.
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york city, i'm scott pelley. this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. the republican claireman of the house intelligence committee, devin nunes is used to asking tough questions, but now he's the one on the hot seat over the way he's been handling classified information about russian ties to the white house. jeff pegues reports. >> reporter: devin nunes, the chairman of the house intelligence committee says he was at the white house grounds to meet a source. >> i've been working this for a long time with many different sources and needed a place that i could actually finally go, because i knew what i was looking for, and i could actually get access to what i
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>> reporter: tuesday's visit to the white house complex was the start of several days of unusual meetings and conflicting disclosures. on wednesday, nunes revealed to the press that he had seen evidence that the obama administration had intercepted communications involving members of the trump transition team. nunes then returned to the white house to personally brief the president before disclosing the information to members of his own committee. on thursday, he was forced to apologize for keeping them in the dark. by friday, nunes seemed less certain of his claims. >> it's hard to know where the information came from until you get the reports and have time to go through them and see all the sourcing of the documents. >> reporter: nunes has denied that his source is from the white house. today white house spokesman seisean spicer said even he doesn't know where the information came from. >> i can't say 100% that i know anything he briefed him on. >> it's possible. >> anything's possible.
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nunes's behavior makes it impossible for him to continue to lead an impartial investigation into russian involvement with trump associates. senator chuck schumer. >> claihairman nunes is falling down on the job and seems to be more interested in protecting the president than in seeking the truth. >> reporter: it is unclear why nunes chose to view the classified information at a secure location on white house grounds. there are similar facilities in other government buildings. nunes says that he needed access to a specific computer network that was not available on capitol hill. the latest trump administration official to be hauled before congress is the president's son-in-law, jared kushner. he's agreed to be interviewed by the senate intelligence committee. major garrett has that story. >> reporter: the previously undisclosed meeting took place during the trump transition, before jared kushner stepped down as headf
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firm. in december, kushner sat down with russian ambassador to the u.s., sergei kislyak at trump tower, a meeting the trump team had previously confirmed. but afterward, kislyak asked kushner to meet the head of a russian bank known as veb which has deep ties to president putin and russian intelligence agencies. the bank is run by sergey gorkov who once trained at the spy agency known as fsb. another official was sentenced to 30 months for using his banking job to disguise efforts to recruit u.s. spies for russia. the veb itself was sanctioned by the u.s. government after russia's 2014 annexation of crimea. >> i had nothing to do with it. i have nothing to do with russia. i told you. i have no deals there. i have no anything. >> reporter: the president has long denied ties to russia, but the
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investigation even closer to the oval office. they say he acted as a conduit to foreign governments during the transition. >> he met with countless individuals. that was part of his job. that was part of his role. and he executed it completely as he was supposed to. >> reporter: and so he doesn't believe he owes the american public an explanation about this. >> doing his job? you're acting as though something nevfarious. >> if there's nothing there, we'll say nothing there. if there is something there, we'll follow the intel wherever it leads. >> also on capitol hill, republicans continue to play the blame game over their failure to repeal and replace the affordable care act. after seven years of promises, the gop came up empty. so what's next? don dahler has a look. >> reporter: jennifer wynter's 2-year-old son is in the
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hospital a lot these days. he's covered under the aca, but she voted for donald trump. >> i'm a republican. >> reporter: and even though she sees problems with the aca, she's grateful for some of the benefits. >> well, the main thing for the aca did for me is of course the preexisting conditions. that is huge. i mean, he has two major life-altering conditions that if i had to go and shop for it, it, i wouldn't be able to afford it. >> reporter: wynter lives in quakertown, pennsylvania whose congressman, brian fitzpatrick was one of dozens of republicans who planned to vote no on the new health care bill before it got pulled. a moderate republican, fitzpatrick opposed the bill because it didn't do enough to address opioid addiction treatment. pennsylvania has over 700,000 enrolled in medicaid expansion and more than 426,000 in the aca marketplace. had the aca been repealed it was estimated over
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pennsylvanians would lose their coverage, like brian kline who was diagnosed with cancer last year. >> the aca saved my life and saved me from medical bankruptcy. >> reporter: kline is a democrat who voted for clinton. but he and wynter have one thing in common. their message to congress on health care. >> stop fighting, stop arguing, stop folding your arms and going, i'm a republican, i'm democrat. come together. that's why we elected you. overseas, alexei navalny will spend the next two weeks in jail. he was arrested during a wave of protests over corruption in the kremlin. elizabeth palmer has that story. >> reporter: united in anger. russians across the country marched against official corruption. in no, sir cmoscow, it was the demonstration sense the anti-kremlin rallies of 2012. but without a permit,
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authorities call the gathering illegal, and soon the police had moved in. hundreds were arrested. including alexei navalny, an opposition leader and ferocious critic of president putin and his famously corrupt administration. earlier this month, navalny released a video, alleging that russia's prime minister had amassed a fortune in mansions, yachts and vineyards, all through corrupt deals. the video went viral. and here's reaction. the protesters' message to the government? shame on you. navalny's now an opposition icon. after his arrest, supporters surrounded the police van, shouting "don't let them through"! and police were forced to lift cars left as obstacles out of the way. navalny appeain
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the failure of republicans to make good on their seven-year-long promise to repeal obamacare is just the latest example of the political gridlock facing our nation. senior contributor, ted koppel reports on the great divide in american politics. >> reporter: increasingly, we americans occupy alternate universes. >> to be honest, i inherited a mess. it's a mess. >> no, you inherited a fortune. we elected a mess. >> reporter: there is very little common ground left. only battling perceptions of reality. >> y'all, are y'all happy with the last 30 days? >>teeporr: nei s
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and in this age of the internet and cable tv, very little is out of bounds. >> donald trump, america's wealthiest hemorrhoid. >> democrats want to dissolve the borders. >> reporter: there are legions, driving the country further and further apart. >> president trump has still done more for this country in the last 40 days than barack obama did in eight years. >> reporter: a pugh study finds 81% of voters say they cannot agree with the other side on basic facts. which may owe something to the president's campaign against fake news. >> of all of the media outlets, which one was the worst? which one? >> cnn! >> cnn, the most trusted name in news. >> just because the attack of fake news and attacking our network, i just want to ask you, sir. >> i'm changing it from
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news, though, very fake news. >> but aren't you -- >> reporter: there's nothing new about simmering whohostility between the president and the press. >> the president should treat the press as fairly as the press treats him. >> reporter: in march of 1974, t the nixon presidency was lurching to destruction from water gate, and there was an ongoing tension between the president and the white house correspondent. >> thank you, mr. president, dan rather, cbs news. mr. president, a -- >> are you running for something? [ applause ] >> flono, sir, mr. president. are u?
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>> reporter: norm lowenstein was this and remains now a student of our political system and our media. >> we would watch network news shows, and we would sit there and we would have basically a common set of facts that would emerge from them. as we've moved to the new media world, the more we've got this cacophony of voices the more you cut through it by basically shock value. and that's why people now are driven, not by their own attachment to their own parties. they're driven by a hatred for those on the other side. >> democrats, the alt left, destroy propaganda, a political witch hunt. >> reporter: sean hannity's television program on fox has a nightly audience of 2.9 million
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donald trump and a highly-partisan agenda. >> honestly, i think liberalism has to be defeated. socialism has to be defeated in a political sense. this is not a, we don't want a revolution in this country. >> what more do you want? you've got the white house, the house, the senate. >> and we have angry snowflakes and a democratic establishment. i say the press in this country is out to destroy this president. >> while the president's real troubles today were not with the media but with the facts. >> it's absolutely crazy. he keeps repeating ridiculous, throw-away lines that are not true at all. >> i think the president is somewhat indifferent to things that are true or false. he has spent his whole life, he has succeeded by both -- >> they live in two separate worlds. and they don't understand trump's. >> reporter: rush limbaugh had a lot to do with creating those two separate worlds, but he couldn't have done it until
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1987, when the federal communications commission did away with the so-called fairness doctrine. which was what? >> the fairness doctrine basically said people on radio and television, if they presented one political point of view had to balance it with the opposite political point of view. >> welcome to the rush limbaugh program, a program exclusively designed for rich republicans. >> reporter: rush limbaugh and conservative talk radio exploded into a political force of nature. >> now you take conservative talk radio, move that forward to tribal, cable television, and then layer onto that e-mail and social media. and all of a sudden, we live in a world where people can get information and believe it's absolutely true and not have to get any kind of opposing point of view. and once they believe it, they will
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it's utterly false. >> weigh ha have to give some c to the american people and that they know the difference between an opinion show and a news show. you're cynical. you think i'm bad for america? >> reporter: yeah. >> you do? >> reporter: in the long haul, i think you -- >> really. >> reporter: because you're very good at what you do, and because you have, you have attracted a significantly more -- let me finish the sentence before you do that. >> with all due respect. go ahead. >> reporter: you have attracted people who are determined that ideology is more important than facts. it is, says white house press secretary sean spicer, a media landscape that his boss, president trump well understands. >> he doesn't
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washington norms or political standards about saying the right thing all the time or conforming to this. he understands he has a direct voice to the american people. he has over 100 million plus people who follow him on different social media channels when you combine facebook, twitter and instagram. >> reporter: you've heard the line in the atlantic, the press takes him literally as followers take him seriously but not literally. are we at the point where we are told we shouldn't take the president of the united states literally? >> no, i think you should take him literally. he wants to be taken literal limit and also you have to understand that when you have 140 characters that someone trying to look at that and say this means the following is a little bit too much. >> reporter: that's one good reason for not using twitter. >> i know, it's not, but i think a lot of times folks in the media feel threatened by the fact that he has a d
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>> grab them by the [ bleep ]. >> reporter: last fall, after the release of the infamous "access hollywood" tape, the "new york times" quoted donald trump in full, spelling out his obscenities on its front page, seemingly heedless of the paper's slogan -- all the news that's fit to print, the executive editor calls it a clear decision. >> it wasn't much of a debate, surprisingly. >> reporter: if you just put f asterisk, asterisk? >> i think that's coy. to have the video with him having said it and f dot, dot, dot k, just seemed coy. >> reporter: if i were a donald trump supporter, i would be seething every day, these guys are out to do him in one way or another. it's going to be us or them.
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questions about the largest revolution in government we've seen in my lifetime as a journalist. not to attack him but to ask really hard questions about him and also to ask hard questions of a completely new cast of government officials who we know very little about. i think if we don't do that, meaning the press, i don't think anybody else will. some of what's happening in the country is healthy. there's an ability now for people to talk to each other. we're all focussed on the people who say nasty things to each other and who say nasty things out loud, but that's not all that's going on. call me a naïve southerner, but you can't convince me that this is not a more open wide world, and that as much as it sort of throws us off our game a little bit, meaning the press,
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need to have ourselves thrown off our game a little bit, you know? >> reporter: it needs to be said that our bitter political divide didn't begin in the age of trump, but it has evolved. last spring in june of 2016, a pugh study discovered that 49% of republicans and 55% of democrats say they are afraid. yes, afraid of the other party. as president trump might say, sad. make the most of a few minutes with instant moisture from k-y ultragel.
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the rusty patched bumble bee has been put on the endangered species list. and their decline is one sign of dangers facing america's fruit farmers. >> reporter: in eastern tennessee's great smoky mountains national park, the only place you can now see a rusty patched bumble bee is inside this drawer, part of the park's nature collection. >> these two boxes here. >> reporter: entomologist becky nichols. >> we haven't seen them here in the park since 2001. >> reporter: not a single one? >> no. >> reporter: important pollinators for tomatoes, nest underground. over the last20 years, the species has suffered a 90% decline in population and han at that time --
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that just stretched into 28 states. >> pesticides, diseases, all of these things contribute to the overall decline of pollinators. >> reporter: in all, about 40% of so-called invertebrate pollinators face extinction. about 75% of the world's food supply demands at least partly on what they do. professor sydney cameron teaches ents moll ji at the university of illinois. >> one of every third bite of food is pollinated by bees. if that's not important, i don't know what is. >> reporter: but she sees new hope. >> the first bumble bee to be listed on the endangered species list will be a wake up call, hopefully that we need to pay attention to the pollinators and what they're doing for us. >> reporter: with help, these bees could rear
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like this where they were once
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more than 600,000 americans find themselves homeless this morning. and many of them are suffering health problems with no access to medical care. well, there's a team of street doctors in boston who've taken up the calling to care for the less fortunate, jim axelrod took a walk with the doctor in charge. h . >> reporter: it's friday morning in boston, which means dr. jim o'connell is making his rounds. he might be a little me
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examining room. >> i got colder than bone here. >> reporter: but that's not where his patients are. o'connell is boston's only doctor left still making house calls to the homeless. >> anything changed since last night? i feel like i'm a country doctor in the middle of the city. >> reporter: he was a 30-year-old medical student at harvard when he passed up an oncology scholarship. one year turned into a career. >> started to realize i'm just a doctor, and what i can do is get to know you and ease your suffering just as i would as an oncologist. >> reporter: what better population to heal. >> you could not find a more gratefu grateful population. >> reporter: 32 years later it's the largest of its kind. >> ooh, that hurt, didn't it? >> reporter: o'connell dispenses just about everything, from stitches to the
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for the soul. >> will you come in? >> reporter: if they can no longer be treated on the street, o'connell finds them a temporary treatment bed in a shelter. >> this man is unbelievable. >> this is my doctor,'s been my doctor for life. >> reporter: do you ever sit and think, i know what i'd be making 30 years into an oncologist's career? >> no, i never think about it anymore. it was a great soul move. >> reporter: some things are more valuable than money. just ask the doctor who gets everything from patients. >> you're on our team. >> reporter: who have nothing at all to give. jim axelrod, cbs news, boston. >> that's the overnight news for this tuesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news, and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city,
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the kushner connection, the president's son-in-law is set to testify about his russian contacts, which included a bank that is a cover for russian spies. >> he said hey, we've made some contacts. i'll be glad to explain them. also tonight, the web that grows more tangled. the republican chair of house committee reveals he had a secret meeting with a secret source on the white house grounds. >> chairman nunes is falling down on the job and seems to be more interested in protecting the president than in seeking the truth. a violent crackdown on protests against russian corruption. and, a child will lead them in song, an inspiring internet
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sensation. this is the "cbs overnight news." a notorious bank is now part of the investigation into contacts between the trump campaign and the russian government. this time it's the president's son-in-law and senior adviser, jared kushner who will be questioned by senators about his connections with russia's veb bank. it used to be chaired by president putin and has so many pet projects it had to be bailed out by the russian government. already two trump officials, the president's national security adviser and his former campaign chairman have been forced to resign over contacts with russia. major garrett has details on
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this new revelation involving trump's son-in-law. >> reporter: the previously undisclosed meeting took place before jared stepped down as head of his real estate firm. in december, he sat down with sergei kislyak at trump tower, a meeting the trump team had previously confirmed. but afterward, kislyak asked him to meet the head of a bank of veb which has deep ties to president putin and intelligence agencies. it is run by a man who was trained at fsb. in 2016, another veb official was sentenced to 30 months in jail for using his banking job to disguise efforts to recruit u.s. spies for russia. the veb itself was sanctioned by the u.s. government after russia's 2014 annexation of crimea. >> i had nothing to do with it. i have nothing to it
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russia. i told you, i have no deals there, i have nothing. >> reporter: the president has long denied ties to russia, but the kushner investigation moves it closer to the oval office. sean spicer says kushner acted as a conduit during the transition. to foreign governments. >> he met with countless individuals. that was part of his job. that was part of his role, and he executed it completely as he was supposed to. >> reporter: and so he doesn't believe he owes the american public an explanation. >> for doing his job? you're acting as if there's something nefarious -- >> reporter: mark warner is the top democrat on the senate intelligence committee. >> if there's nothing there, the administration should want us to get this right. if there's nothing there, we'll follow it where it leads. >> reporter: no decisions have been made whether kushner's testimony would be given in public or under oath. the senate offered no opinion on explanations that kushner's
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interactions with the russians were routine. the spy posing in new york as a veb officer was arrested in 2015. he pleaded guilty to spying and was sentenced to 30 months, but we learned burokov is being released this saturday, having served ten months. the house is also investigating connections into the trump campaign. today the republican committee chairman revealed he had a secret meeting with a secret source on the white house grounds. we have more about that from jeff pegues. >> reporter: devin nunes said he was at the white house grounds last tuesday to meet a source and look at highly classified information in a secure
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long time with many different sources and needed a place that i could actually finally go, because i knew what i was looking for, and i could actually get access to what i needed to see. >> reporter: tuesday's visit to the white house complex was the start of several days of unusual meetings and conflicting disclosures. on wednesday, nunes revealed to the press that he had seen evidence that the obama administration had intercepted communications involving members of the trump transition team. nunes then returned to the white house to personally brief the president before disclosing the information to members of his own committee. on thursday, he was forced to apologize for keeping them in the dark. by friday, nunes seemed less certain of his claims. >> it's hard to know where the information came from until you get the reports and have time to go through them and see all the sourcing of the documents. >> reporter: nunes has denied that his source is from the white house. today white house spokesman sean spicer said even he doesn't know where the information came from. >> i can't say
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>> possible, as far as you know right now. >> anything's possible. >> reporter: democrats say nunes's behavior makes it impossible for him to lead an impartial investigation into russian involvement with trump associates. >> chairman nunes is falling down on the job. and seems to be more interested in protecting the president than in seeking the truth. >> reporter: it is unclear why nunes chose to view the classified information at a secure location on white house grounds. there are similar facilities in other government buildings. scott, nunes says that he needs access at the a specific computer network that was not available on capitol hill. >> jeff pegues in the washington newsroom tonight. the nfl is betting on las vegas. today owners approved the oakland raiders' move to the
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but football won't be happening in vegas until a domed stadium is built, so the raiders intend to play at least two more seasons as lame ducks in oakland. coming up next, we'll take you to the border where the president is getting ready to build his wall.
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attorney general jeff sessions warned that cities that don't help enforce immigration laws may lose federal grant money. ben tracy has more about the trump administration's efforts and who's being targeted. >> he stepped out, and he never came back in. >> reporter: 19-year-old estephanie ortiz says agents came to her house in pasadena last month looking for someone who did not live there. they arrested her father, carlos ortiz instead. he was in the country illegally but had no criminal record. >> why did we open the door? nobody's going to want to open the door. everybody's scared. >> reporter: the los angeles police department says aggressive ice enforcement tactics are also having a chilling effect on latinos report being crimes.
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reports of sexual assault by latinos dropped 25%. domestic violence reports fell 10%. >> they start to clam up. they no longer come to court. >> reporter: california supreme court justice says latinos tell her they are now afraid to show up at courthouses. so she wrote a letter to attorney general jeff sessions, accusing agents of stalking undocumented immigrants to make arrests. in our courthouses. >> i feel like they are being targeted in a way that's unprecedented. >> reporter: what is your concern if ice agents are in courthouses? >> victims aren't going to come to court. witnesses aren't going to come to testify against bad guys in violent communities, because they're afraid they're going to get arrested in court. >> reporter: in a statement, ice said, while ice does arrest targets at courthouses, generally, it's only after investigating officers have exhausted other options. but es
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a proposed bill in california would bar state and local police from aiding federal immigration enforcement, including turning over criminals when they're released from jail. l.a. county sheriff mcdonnell says that's a bad idea. >> by not allowing them access to the jails, the likelihood is they're going to go into the communities looking for the individual, and they're not going to limit themselves to that individual. >> reporter: and to give you an idea just how much federal money is now at stake, san francisco and new york could lose nearly $25 billion combined, scott, if the trump white house follows through and cuts off funding for sanctuary cities. >> ben tracy, thank you. the president's failure to repeal and replace the affordable care act at least on his first try has been a disappointment to many who support mr. trump but has been a relief to those who depend on obamacare. don dahler has been looking into that. >> reporter: her 2-year-old son has ben
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he's covered under the aca, but wynter voted for trump. >> i'm a republican. so i stay true to my party and our principles. >> reporter: and although she sees problems with the aca, she's grateful for some of the benefits. >> well, the main thing for the aca for me is of course the preexisting conditions, that is huge. i mean, he has two major life-altering conditions that if i had to go and shop for it, it, i wouldn't be able to afford it. >> reporter: wynter lives in quakertown, pennsylvania, whose congressman, brian fitzpatrick was one of dozens of republicans who planned to vote no on the new health care bill before it got pulled. he opposed the bill because it didn't do enough to address opioid addiction treatment. pennsylvania has over 700,000 enrolled in medicaid expansion and more than 426,000 in the aca marketplace. had the aca been repealed, the pennsylvania budget and policy center estat
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pennsylvanians would lose their coverage, like brian kline who was diagnosed with cancer last year. >> the aca saved my life and saved me from medical bankruptcy. >> reporter: kline is a democrat who voted for clinton, but he and wynter have one thing in common. their message to congress on health care. >> stop fighting, stop arguing, stop holding your arms and saying, i'm a republican, i'm a democrat, come together. that's why we elected you. >> reporter: both wynter and kline say they want the democrats to cooperate with the president in order to make the problems with obamacare better. >> don dahler, thanks. today the white house condemned the mass arrests in moscow during rallies against vladimir putin's government. the protests were organized by one of putin's fiercest political opponents, and elizabeth palmer is following this. >> reporter: united in anger. russians from across the country marched to protest against fi
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in moscow, it was the biggest demonstration since the anti-kremlin rallies of 2012. but, without a permit, authorities called the gathering illegal and soon the police had moved in. hundreds were arrested. including alexei navalny, an opposition leader and ferocious critic of president putin and his famously corrupt administration. earlier this month, navalny released a video alleging that the prime minister had amassed a fortune in mansions, yachts and vineyards, all through corrupt deals. the video went viral. and here's the reaction. the protesters message to the government? shame on you. navalny's now an opposition icon.
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surrounded the police van, shouting "don't let them through"! and police were forced to lift cars left as obstacles out of the way. navalny appeared in court today and was handed a fine and a short jail sentence. scott, these arrests have raised eyebrows in washington. they're seen as more heavy-handed stifling to any opposition to president putin. but alexander navalny's not going anywhere. in fact, he says he's going to run against mr. putin next year for the presidency. >> liz palmer, thank you. "cbs overnight news" will be right back. we should take a closer look at geico... you know, geico insures way more than cars. boats, motorcycles... even rvs! geico insures rvs? what's an rv? uh, the thing we've been stuck on for five years! wait, i'm not a real moose?? we've been over this, jeff... we're stickers!
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made with silky vanilla bean ice cream and rich belgian chocolate. ♪ discover magnum. a deadline is fast approaching for one of mr. trump's pet projects, the wall on the mexican border. bids are due wednesday. and david begnaud is in brownsville, texas tonight. >> reporter: the border is roughly 2,000 miles long, and for about 654 miles, there is this fence. it costs about $2.3 billion to build, and i want to show you that it drops off in some places, like where we are in brownsville, it stops here before you get to a retirement community. president trump wants a wall that would be 30 feet. 30 feet is twice the height of this fence. more than 600 companies have put in bids to work on the wall. president trump says the cost of
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but many analysts and researchers say it will be much higher, between $15 billion and $40 billion. here's what the president wants, aside from being 30 feet, the wall has to prevent digging or tunneling below it for a minimum of six feet. a person must not be able to climb to the top of the wall or access the top of the wall from either side unassisted. the wall has got to be so tough that it would take someone an hour to break through it if they're using a sledge hammer, pick ax or chisel. and on top of that, it must be aesthetically pleasing. mr. trump wants a beautiful wall. now one of mr. trump's most recent tweets trumpeted the figure of border crossings being down. that's a fact, it's true. but border patrol says the number is down because it usually is this time of year. they expect it to go back up as the weather gets warmer. >> david begnaud for us at the southern border. thank you. up next, doctors tell us what they would do to fight the
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no matter who was in there last... protection. new lysol power & fresh 6 goes to work flush after flush for a just-cleaned feeling that lasts up to four weeks. lysol, what it takes to protect. of doctors demanded a top to bottom change in the way america handles addiction. it 22.5 million americans need treatment for drugs or alcohol, but just 18% are getting it. here's dr. jon lapook. >> reporter: 51-year-old anthony davis ha
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fighting substance abuse. >> i was given alcohol at a young age, like maybe 4, 5 years old. >> reporter: he graduated to marijuana, cocaine, heroin and pain pills, but he's been off drugs for more than three years. one of the lucky few to get treatment. with less than 20% of those needing treatment getting it, today, the american college of physicians published broad new recommendations, including requiring health insurers to cover addiction. in one survey, only about half covered the prescription drugs needed for treatment. improving the training of clinicians when it comes to pain management to reduce prescription drug abuse and expanding availability of naloxone. which can save the life of somebody who is overdosing. labeling substance abuse a moral failing has led to a harmful stigma. the medical community understands that addiction involves changes in the brain requiring medical treatment.
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>> if you call it a disease, now you've got to help me out. you know, you've got to not just throw me away. >> reporter: for davis, it includes counseling and medication. dr. ward is his physician. she supports the new recommendations, including a comprehensive approach to care. >> the old traditional model of sending patient to detox and hope that they will get better is really, we know that it doesn't work. there's no evidence. >> reporter: and we were struck by this. more than 70% of people with hypertension, diabetes or major depression get treatment, scott, for substance abuse it's less than 20%. >> and yet treatment works. dr. jon lapook. thank you, doctor. in new york city, the fearless girl will stand her ground a little while longer. the statue staring down wall street's charging bull has become a huge hit with tourists. it was placed there temporarily to highlight gender disparity in the boardroom. but today the mayor said she can stay until february. in a moment, a young girl who's inspiring the world with her si
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this portion i
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we end tonight with a little girl who possesses incredible power to lift spirits. >> reporter: 4-year-old leah carroll is lip synching her heart out to "overcomer." it's a bold choice forit
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girl who has spent more time inside the hospital than she has outside. ♪ >> reporter: some of her closest playmates are the nurses treating her for severe congenital neutropenia. it's a rare blood disorder. this doctor was one of the first to treat her. >> she has issues with just normal feeding. so she's required many different treatments. >> reporter: to distract leah from boredom and sometimes pain, the mother looked for songs on the internet. that's how leah became a fan of gospel singer man desa. it was this video that transformed the pint sized patient into an internet sensation with 37 million views. lindsey is leah's mother. what do you think resonates with people? >> the world needed some joy right now, especially in the united states.
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about her. >> reporter: leah has survived two bone marrow transplants and numerous side effects. >> and the song itself is really fitting for her life. ♪ you're an overcomer >> reporter: little leah's voice has inspired both theic sk and healthy who have posted comments from around the world, even inspiring man desa herself. >> one, two, three! we love you, leah! >> reporter: doctors say her neutropenia is closed to being cured, earning her the nickname, leah, the overcomer. oakland, california. that's overnight news for this tuesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
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this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm jericka duncan. the republican chairman of the house intelligence committee, devin nunes is used to asking tough questions, but now he's the one on the hot seat over the way he's been handling classified information about russian ties to the white house. jeff pegues reports. >> reporter: devin nunes, the chairman of the house intelligence committee says he was at the white house grounds last tuesday, to meet a source and look at highly classified information in a secure location. >> i've been working this for a long time with many different sources and needed a place that i could actually finally go, because i knew what i was looking for, and i could actually get access to what i needed to see.
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the white house complex was the start of several days of unusual meetings and conflicting disclosures. on wednesday, nunes revealed to the press that he had seen evidence that the obama administration had intercepted communications involving members of the trump transition team. nunes then returned to the white house to personally brief the president before disclosing the information to members of his own committee. on thursday, he was forced to apologize for keeping them in the dark. by friday, nunes seemed less certain of his claims. >> it's hard to know where the information came from until you get the reports and have time to go through them and see all the sourcing of the documents. >> reporter: nunes has denied that his source is from the white house. today white house spokesman sean spicer said even he doesn't know where the information came from. >> i can't say 100% that i know anything he briefed him on. >> it's possible. >> anything's possible. >> reporter: democrats say
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impossible for him to continue to lead an impartial investigation into russian involvement with trump associates. senator chuck schumer. >> chairman nunes is falling down on the job and seems to be more interested in protecting the president than in seeking the truth. >> reporter: it is unclear why nunes chose to view the classified information at a secure location on white house grounds. there are similar facilities in other government buildings. nunes says that he needed access to a specific computer network that was not available on capitol hill. the latest trump administration official to be hauled before congress is the president's son-in-law, jared kushner. he's agreed to be interviewed by the senate intelligence committee. major garrett has that story. >> reporter: the previously undisclosed meeting took place during the trump transition, before jared kushner stepped down as head of his real estate firm.
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in december, kushner sat down with russian ambassador to the u.s., sergei kislyak at trump tower, a meeting the trump team had previously confirmed. but afterward, kislyak asked kushner to meet the head of a russian bank known as veb which has deep ties to president putin and russian intelligence agencies. the bank is run by sergey gorkov who once trained at the spy agency known as fsb. in 2016, another veb official, evgeny buryakov was sentenced to 30 months for using his banking job to disguise efforts to recruit u.s. spies for russia. the veb itself was sanctioned by the u.s. government after russia's 2014 annexation of crimea. >> i had nothing to do with it. i have nothing to do with russia. i told you. i have no deals there.
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>> reporter: the president has long denied ties to russia, but the kushner disclosure moves the investigation even closer to the oval office. they say he acted as a conduit to foreign governments during the transition. >> he met with countless individuals. that was part of his job. that was part of his role. and he executed it completely as he was supposed to. >> reporter: and so he doesn't believe he owes the american public an explanation about this. >> doing his job? you're acting as though something nefarious. >> reporter: virginia's mark warner is the top democrat on the committee. >> if there's nothing there, we'll say nothing there. if there is something there, we'll follow the intel wherever it leads. >> also on capitol hill, republicans continue to play the blame game over their failure to repeal and replace the affordable care act. after seven years of promises, the gop came up empty. so what's next? don dahler has a look. >> reporter: jennifer wynter's 2-year-old son is in the hospital a lot these days. he's covered under the aca, but she voted for donald trump.
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so i stay true to my party and our principles. >> reporter: and even though she sees problems with the aca, she's grateful for some of the benefits. >> well, the main thing for the aca did for me is of course the preexisting conditions. that is huge. i mean, he has two major life-altering conditions that if i had to go and shop for it, it, i wouldn't be able to afford it. >> reporter: wynter lives in quakertown, pennsylvania whose congressman, brian fitzpatrick was one of dozens of republicans who planned to vote no on the new health care bill before it got pulled. a moderate republican, fitzpatrick opposed the bill because it didn't do enough to address opioid addiction treatment. pennsylvania has over 700,000 enrolled in medicaid expansion and more than 426,000 in the aca marketplace. had the aca been repealed it was estimated over 1 million pennsylvanians would lose their coverage, like brian kline who
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year. >> the aca saved my life and saved me from medical bankruptcy. >> reporter: kline is a democrat who voted for clinton. but he and wynter have one thing in common. their message to congress on health care. >> stop fighting, stop arguing, stop folding your arms and going, i'm a republican, i'm democrat. come together. that's why we elected you. overseas, alexei navalny will spend the next two weeks in jail. he was arrested during a wave of protests over corruption in the kremlin. elizabeth palmer has that story. >> reporter: united in anger. russians across the country marched against official corruption. in moscow, it was the biggest demonstration since the anti-kremlin rallies of 2012. but without a permit, authorities call the gathering illegal, and soon the police h
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hundreds were arrested. including alexei navalny, an opposition leader and ferocious critic of president putin and his famously corrupt administration. earlier this month, navalny released a video, alleging that russia's prime minister had amassed a fortune in mansions, yachts and vineyards, all through corrupt deals. the video went viral. and here's reaction. the protesters' message to the government? shame on you. navalny's now an opposition icon. after his arrest, supporters surrounded the police van, shouting "don't let them through"! and police were forced to lift cars left as obstacles out of the way. navalny appeared in court today and was handed a fine and a
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the failure of republicans to make good on their seven-year-long promise to repeal obamacare is just the latest example of the political gridlock facing our nation. senior contributor, ted koppel reports on the great divide in american politics. >> reporter: increasingly, we americans occupy alternate universes. >> to be honest, i inherited a mess. it's a mess. >> no, you inherited a fortune. we elected a mess. >> reporter: there is very little common ground left. only battling perceptions of reality. >> y'all, are y'all happy with the last 30 days? >> reporter: neither side seems to have much use for the other,
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and cable tv, very little is out of bounds. >> donald trump, america's wealthiest hemorrhoid. >> democrats want to dissolve the borders. is that what they want? is that what the snake obama did? >> reporter: there are legions, driving the country further and further apart. >> president trump has still done more for this country in the last 40 days than barack obama did in eight years. >> reporter: a pugh study finds 81% of voters say they cannot agree with the other side on basic facts. which may owe something to the president's campaign against fake news. >> of all of the media outlets, which one was the worst? which one? >> cnn! >> cnn, the most trusted name in news. >> just because the attack of fake news and attacking our network, i just want to ask you, sir. >> i'm changing it from fake news, though, very fake news. >> but aren't yo--
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>> reporter: there's nothing new about simmering hostility between the president and the press. >> the president should treat the press as fairly as the press treats him. >> reporter: in march of 1974, the nixon presidency was lurching to destruction from water gate, and there was an ongoing tension between the president and the white house correspondent. >> thank you, mr. president, dan rather, cbs news. [ applause ] mr. president -- >> are you running for something? [ applause ] >> no, sir, mr. president. are you? >> reporter: norm lowenstein was
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then and remains now a student of our political system and our media. >> we would watch network news shows, and we would sit there and we would have basically a common set of facts that would emerge from them. as we've moved to the new media world, the more we've got this cacophony of voices the more you cut through it by basically shock value. and that's why people now are driven, not by their own attachment to their own parties. they're driven by a hatred for those on the other side. >> democrats, the alt left, propaganda, destroy trump media continue to ignore facts in what has clearly now become a witch-hunt. >> reporter: sean hannity's television program on fox has a nightly audience of 2.9 million
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viewers. he has from the first promoted donald trump and a highly-partisan agenda. >> honestly, i think liberalism has to be defeated. socialism has to be defeated in a political sense. this is not a, we don't want a revolution in this country. >> what more do you want? you've got the white house, the house, the senate. >> we do for now. >> reporter: okay. >> and we have angry snowflakes and a democratic establishment. i say the press in this country is out to destroy this president. >> while the president's real troubles today were not with the media but with the facts. >> it's absolutely crazy. he keeps repeating ridiculous, throw-away lines that are not true at all. >> i think the president is somewhat indifferent to things that are true or false. he has spent his whole life, he he has succeeded by bullying. >> they live in two separate worlds. and they don't understand trump's. >> reporter: rush limbaugh had a lot to do with creating those two separate worlds, but he couldn't have done it until
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communications commission did away with the so-called fairness doctrine. which was what? >> the fairness doctrine basically said people on radio and television, if they presented one political point of view had to balance it with the opposite political point of view. >> welcome to the rush limbaugh program, a program exclsively designed for rich conservatives and right-minded republicans. >> reporter: rush limbaugh and conservative talk radio exploded into a political force of nature. >> now you take conservative talk radio, move that forward to tribal, cable television, and then layer onto that e-mail and social media. and all of a sudden, we live in a world where people can get information and believe it's absolutely true and not have to get any kind of opposing point of view. and once they believe it, they will always believe it, even if it's utterly false. >> we have to give some credit
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they know the difference between an opinion show and a news show. you're cynical. you think i'm bad for america? >> reporter: yeah. >> you do? >> reporter: in the long haul, i think you -- >> really. that's sad, ted, that's sad. >> reporter: because you're very good at what you do, and because you have, you have attracted a significantly more -- let me finish the sentence before you do that. >> with aldue respec go ahead. >> reporter: you have attracted people who are determined that ideology is more important than facts. it is, says white house press secretary sean spicer, a media landscape that his boss, president trump well understands. >> he doesn't conform to washington norms or political
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thing all the time or conforming to this. he understands he has a direct voice to the american people. he has over 100 million plus people who follow him on different social media channels when you combine facebook, twitter and instagram. >> reporter: you've heard the line in the atlantic, the press takes him literally as followers take him seriously but not literally. are we at the point where we are told we shouldn't take the president of the united states literally? >> no, i think you should take him literally. the president's very aauthoritati authoritative when he speaks. he wants to be taken literal and also you have to understand that when you have 140 characters that someone trying to look at that and say this means the following is a little bit too much. >> reporter: that's one good on
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a lot of times folks in the media feel threatened by the fact that he has a direct pipeline to the american people. >> grab them by the [ bleep ]. >> reporter: last fall, after the release of the infamous "access hollywood" tape, the "new york times" quoted donald trump in full, spelling out his obscenities on its front page, seemingly heedless of the paper's slogan -- all the news that's fit to print, the executive editor calls it a clear decision. >> it wasn't much of a debate, surprisingly. >> reporter: if you just put f asterisk, asterisk? >> i think that's coy. i think that there was something about the sentences themselves, the force of it, to have the video with him having said it and f dot, dot, dot k, just seemed coy. >> reporter: if i were a donald trump supporter, i would be seething every day, these guys are out to do him in one way or another. it's going to be us or them. >> i think my job is to ask hard questions about the largest
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revolution in government we've seen in my lifetime as a journalist. not to attack him but to ask really hard questions about him and also to ask hard questions of a completely new cast of government officials who we know very little about. i think if we don't do that, meaning the press, i don't think anybody else will. some of what's happening in the country is healthy. there's an ability now for people to talk to each other. we're all focussed on the people who say nasty things to each other and who say nasty things out loud, but that's not all that's going on. call me a naïve southerner, but you can't convince me that this is not a more open wide world, and that as much as it sort of throws us off our game a little bit, meaning the press, maybe we need to have ourselves thrown off our game a little bit, you
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>> reporter: it needs to be said that our bitter political divide didn't begin in the age of trump, but it has evolved. last spring in june of 2016, a pugh study discovered that 49% of republicans and 55% of democrats say they are afraid. yes, afraid of the other party. as president trump might say, sad. your brain, and your joints really love them too? introducing megared advanced 4in1... just one softgel delivers the omega-3 power of two regular fish oil pills... so give your body mega support with megared advanced 4in1.
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the rusty patched bumble bee is the first insect in the continental united states to be put on the endangered species list. and their decline is one sign of dangers facing america's fruit farmers. mark strassmann reports. >> reporter: in eastern tennessee's great smoky mountains national park, the only place you can now see a rusty patched bumble bee is inside this drawer, part of the park's nature collection. >> these two boxes here. >> reporter: entomologist becky nichols. >> we haven't seen them here in the park since 2001. >> reporter: not a single one? >> no. >> reporter: rusty patched bumble bees, important pollinators for tomatoes, nest underground. over the last 20 years, the species has suffered a 90% decline in population and habitat, a range that just stretched into 28 states.
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stretched into the upper midwest and northeast. they face many threats. >> pesticides, diseases, all of these things contribute to the overall decline of pollinators. >> reporter: bumble bees, honey bees, butterflies. in all, about 40%& of so-called invertebrate pollinators face extinction. about 75% of the world's food supply demands at least partly on what they do. professor sydney cameron teaches entomology at the university of illinois. >> one of every third bite of food is pollinated by bees. if that's not important, i don't know what is. >> reporter: but nichols sees new hope. >> the first bumble bee to be listed on the endangered species list will be a wake up call, hopefully that we need to pay attention to the pollinators and what they're doing for us. >> reporter: experts say, with help, these b
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in parks like this where they were once so
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(crows crowing) you'd do anything to take care of that spot on your lawn. so why not take care of that spot on your skin? if you're a man over 50 you're in the group most likely to develop skin cancer, including melanoma, the cancer that kills 1 person every hour. check your skin for suspicious or changing spots and ask someone you trust to check areas you can't see. early detection can put you in a better spot. go to spotskincancer.org to find out what to look for. a message from the
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2017. this is the "cbs morning news". a secret meeting at the white house rattles democrats. now they are calling for the head of the house intelligence committee to recuse himself from the russia investigation. officer shot. two undercover miami police officers are targeted in an ambush-style attack. the oakland raiders are getting a nation. they are making a move to sin city. good morning from the studio 57 newsroom at cbs news headquarterse

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