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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  April 24, 2017 2:35am-4:00am EDT

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morocco. does the prospect of president marine le pen scare you? >> i may not be scared, but i'm worried. >> reporter: they will be head to head on a runoff on the 7th of may. marine le pen who only recently came into the mainstream, and emmanuel macron, a former investment banker with no official party backing but with wide appeal to the center and the establishment. homeland security secretary john kelly addressed the recent terror attack in paris. he also offered a blunt assessment of america's ability to stop home-grown terrorists. here's part of secretary kelly's conversation on "face the nation." >> in a recent paris attack, a policeman was killed. is there anything in the paris attack that sends any message about american policy or policy that should be put in
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>> obviously, you have the home-grown terrorist. i don't know how to stop that or detect that. you have other terrorist threats that come across the border. i believe in the case of the paris shooting, i believe he was home-grown, but, again, there are so many threats that come in from across border, and it's essential, absolutely, to control one's border. the other thing that has me, keeps me literally awake at night is the threat against aviation. we know that would be the super bowl for the terrorists to knock down an airplane in flight, technicall particularly if it was full of americans. we have taken measures overseas to reduce that threat. but it's something i watch every day, because there are a number of plots we are watching very, very closely, and they're very sophisticated and very threatening. the number one thing in my mind is to protect the american people. so we'll do that. >> you said on the home-grown threat, a lot of people think ppart of the san bernardino as shooting and theto
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to stop that. if that's the biggest threat and you don't know how to stop it, that seems like a big problem. >> it is a big problem. it is number, it, you know, depending on where you sit is where you stand on this. it is a big threat, is it the number one threat? i think it's the most common threat. unfortunately, there are other similar-type terrorist threats that could come from outside the border. you know, the cia, nsa, all the grade m great men and women of d.o.d. are doing a great job. i focus on this aviation threat that's very real, and if successful, they will kill hundreds and hundreds of people in one, fell swoop. so the appeal i would make on the home-grown threat, if you see something, say something, whether you're a parent, a sibling, an imam. and this
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>> frankly, to white supremacists as well. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. i did everything i could to make her party perfect. almost everything. you know, 1 i n 10 houses could get hit by an expensive septic disaster. but for only $7 a month, rid-x helps break down waste. avoid a septic disaster with rid-x. with tampax pearl. you get ultimate protection on your heaviest days and smooth removal for your lightest. tampax pearl and pocket pearl for on the go. the following ad for your viewing convenience. i finally switched to geico. oh yeah? ended up saving a ton of money on car insurance. i hear they have a really great mobile app.
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people around the world celebrated earth day over the weekend, raising awareness about the signs of climate change. as many sound alarms about threats facing mother nature, the trump administration wants to cut back on environmental programs. barry peterson traveled to alaska for a closer look. >> reporter: with temperatures soaring this winter to 50 degrees above normal, the area around the north pole is melting, and the arctic sea ice is shrinking at a rate never seen before. >> we're talking about something that's going to happen in the next decade. >> reporter: jeremy mathis is director of arctic research for noaa. >> it is warming twice as fast as other parts of the
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>> reporter: we met him in alaska in the farthest-north city in the united states. here in the polar ice, it's not what you see but what's hidden below. the ice is thinning. it used to be 9 feet thick in some areas, now it's more like 3. why do i care about what's happening ot there? >> we care about the arctic, because it has connections to the entire northern hemisphere, to people down in the lower 48 states. >> reporter: the warming arctic is helpinghe t jet stream to wobble across america. causing massive events, and as weather becomes more destructive, early warnings become more critical. tat they may use satellites edrget by the trump administration. nick mulvaney is the director. >> we're not spending any money on that
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of your money. >> reporter: john walsh is chief scientist at the university of alaska in fairbanks. >> we're basically ignoring threats to the well-being of future generations. >> reporter: villages are literally disappearing. and scientists say alaska today is fair warning of the climate change future for the rest of america. barry peterson, alaska. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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president trump's first budget proposal calls for cuts in federal funding for the arts. the cuts would hurt communities both large and small. some art programs could even be forced to shut down. erin mo erin more yarty shows us what's at stake in a show for sunday morning. >> reporter: there's something surprising happening in the pine mountains of kentucky, like most mining communities, ledger county has lost thousands of jobs, and yet, how do you account for the new whiskey distillery and restaurant, the renovated buildings, the
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what has helped breathe new life into the decimated coal economy here has little to do with mining. >> we have 18 hufull-time employees, a million dollar payroll annually. >> reporter: this is apple stop. short for appalachian community film workshop, a non-profit center on the edge of town that exists largely because of federal founding. >> appalshop has been in this town for 48 years, and i think it has been an example of the diversified economy we really need in this region. we say appalachian here, but -- >> reporter: 29-year-old ada smith grew up here. her grandfather worked in the mines. but, because of appalshop, her father didn't have to. >> so this is my dad and my mom here.
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>> reporter: appalshop was a seed that grew out of lyndon johnson's war on poverty in the 1960s. programs were established in impoverished areas to encourage young people to discover new skills in the arts, like film making. >> by working on this film it helps me learn more about the place i'm a part of, and i think it will cause people to respect other cultures. ♪ >> reporter: the film workshop has grown into a diverse and thriving art center. where picks and shovels have been replaced by picks and bows. but now what was started by the 36th president has suddenly been put in doubt by the 45th. >> this is what we call the america first budget. >> reporter: last month, the trump administration unveiled a proposedud
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national endowment for the arts, the national endo youment for the humanities, the corporation for public broadcasting, all provide critical funding for appalshop. many of these agencies have been threatened with extinction before. >> in the 1990s, when members of congress accused the nea of supporting offensive art, the agency's budget was cut nearly in half. but the trump administration says this time the cuts aren't about taste but about taxes and struggling taxpayers. budget director nick mulvaney. >> can i really go to those folks, look them in the eye and say, look, i want to take money from you and give it to the corporation for public broadcasting. that is a hard sell and something we don't think we can defend anymore. >> reporter: this, despite the fact that all together
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than .02% of the federal budget. >> to me, again, it is really short-sighted and silly. >> reporter: ada smith says that in fact these federal budget cuts will hurt the people struggling the most in areas that helped length the president. ledger county voted 4-1 for president donald trump. >> the people working on this budget haven't spent enough time understanding where these federal resources go and how much they're needed in communities like this. >> reporter: with grants from the nea, appalshop film makers have turned the local culture into indelible images. >> started out farming. bought a mule for $125 then. >> reporter: appalshop archivist, carolyn rubins. >> these are the holyfields. he worked in the coal mines. and they
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it's about 20 minutes from here. >> reporter: without federal funding, will this important part of american history and hair dama heritage be lost? >> for 27 years, we've been making art. that streak is not going to end in 2018 if the nea goes away. >> reporter: david marcus is the director for a theater company in new york. surprisingly, he supports the cuts. marcus says even small government brands interfere with the free market by giving recipients an unfair edge. >> so when the federal government comes in and gives $10,000 or $15,000 to one company and not other companies, they're really putting a heavy thumb on the scale. >> reporter: yes, theaters may fail, marcus says, but others will simply take their place. but what guarantee do you have that in a place like whitesburg, kentucky, what guarantee do you ha
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>> reporter: so it will just go. >> things go. yes. this is the nature of the world. this is the nature of art. >> art needs subsidy to be alive. we cannot just have the marketplace determining what is done. >> reporter: rocco landisman is a former chairman of the nea. he worries that without subsidies, challenging, daring art will never be produced. case in point? >> you came to me and said i've got this hot idea for a musical about alexander hamilton and the founding fathers, and it's going to be done in rap and help hip- my first take would be, really? the reality is, i'm a puerto rican guy who writes musicals, and that's not very common. >> reporter: lynn manuel miranda pulled off the impossible. he's the creator of that
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perhaps the greatest theater sensation of the decade. >> as an artist, you're grateful for any opportunity, any crack in the door. >> reporter: miranda credits the success of "hamilton", and his first musical to federally subsidized theaters that took a chance. >> as we form a stage i can point to public funding and the arts making that possible. my first job was as an intern for wnet, that's a pbs affiliate in new york city. my first musical was "workshop" at the old musical theater center which is partially funded by the nea. >> reporter: and it wasn't just the nea. >> i grew up loving musicals by parents who loved musicals, and we never had money to do to broadway shows. i think i saw three maybe before i an
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i saw "into the woods." and that changed my life. >> reporter: and that, says miranda, is the point, to give kids who otherwise wouldn't have it, access to the arts. like this 11-year-old and his older sisters samantha and grace in lecher county, kentucky. ♪ appalshop is the reason they've been able to take music lessons. >> if you hand me an instrument, i want to learn how to play it. so i was excited when i could learn to play the fiddle. >> reporter: the costs of these f programs are only a tiny portion of the budget but not funding them would cost americans much more. >> we try to tell the stories of americans and amplify their voices, their lives, their stories. when you take away that type of federal support you start leaving out tons, millions of voices in this country that are
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unheard. ♪ the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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as we approach 20 years since the death of princess diana, her sons are opening up about their private struggle after losing their mother. prince william and prince harry are now talking about their own men it wi mental health. here's mark phillips. >> it's friday, the 21st of april. >> reporter: at last, a duke and duchess may have found their true calling. >> harry styles went straight to number one with his debut single. can he do it again? >> reporter: william and kate as deejays, promoting their mental health charity but clearly taking to their new role. >> on radio one. he had 13 weeks at number one before harry
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sounds familiar. >> reporter: prince harry, it turns out is part of the mental health charity pitch as well. >> almost like a form of medical. >> reporter: joining his sister-in-law and brother in a discussion about bottling emotions up. this is what the two sons of princess diana said they did to repress the pain of her death for years. >> we never really talked about losing our mom at such a young age. when you speak to other families and kids and stuff, you think, wow, i don't want them to have to go through the same thing. >> even hearry and i have not talked enough about our mother. >> reporter: they're talking now so everyone can hear. >> i equate it to like a boiling pan of soup with the lid on. we've effectively taken the lid off. >> reporter: the royals were once the epitome of the british stiff upper lip. not anymore. i'm mark philli
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since the death of princess diana in a two-hour special. gayle king will host princess diana here on cbs on may 22nd. that's the overnight news for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us for cbs this morning. i'm elaine quijano.
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this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm elaine quijano. it's a busy week in washington. after a two-week break. congress will be back in session. facing a friday deadline for a possible government shutdown. the showdown comes as a new poll out sunday shows president trump's approval rating at record low. while those who voted for mr. trump remain satisfied with his performance. next saturday marks the official 100th day of the administration. and our chief correspondent, john dickerson will be sitting down with the president. errol barnett has more from the white house. >> reporter: you will be interviewing mr. trump on his 100th day. what are you curious about? >> i'm curious about what he's learned in office.
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>> reporter: john dickerson will be with president trump next weekend as he reaches the 100-day milestone. >> the president can be incredibly blunt. he was during the campaign. so i'd like to have him bring that to his own presidency seen if he can be as blunt about washington and his role in it as he was as a candidate. >> reporter: today the president took his case for a wall along the mexican border to twitter. it will stop drugs and ms-13 gang members, he wrote, and mexico will be paying in some form for the badly-needed border wall. next week congress returns from its break. with a possible government shutdown looming friday. democrats and republicans are expecting a few days of negotiations before passing a spending bill. paying for the border wall is an issue, but he's optimistic. >> i'm pretty confident that
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we're going to get something that's sa that's sa that's satisfactory to the president. >> it's a political stunt. >> reporter: dick durbin. >> to think that he would consider shutting down the government of the united states of america over this outlandish proposal of a border wall. that would be the height of irresponsibility. >> reporter: as the president suggests tax reform and another repeal of obamacare are also in the works, a new "washington post" abc news poll shows mr. trump with the lowest approval rating at this point in a presidency of any commander in chief in the modern era. and while his base still sees him favorably, he has yet to expand that appeal. >> so for this president, the solidity of his base may be something that pushes him on to behave as he's behaving. >> reporter: president trump is staging counter programming on saturday. instead of attending the annual
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white house correspondents dinner he will be holding a rally in pennsylvania. he is the first president to skip the dinner since ronald reagan, who was at the time recovering from an assassination attempt. in another important story, it was election day in france. america's oldest ally. the vote took place days after a paris police officer was killed in an attack. today voters narrowed down a field of 11 presidential candidates to just two who will face off in a runoff election two weeks from now. they are independent centrist, emmanuel macron and marine le pen. elizabeth palmer has the latest from paris. >> reporter: many french voters didn't know who to cast a ballot for until they were actually in the booth.
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ranging from the far right, through the center to the committed left. but ann sophie wasn't one of the late deciders. she wouldn't tell us who she voted for other than it was a centrist candidate whose priority was the economy. >> someone who can get us out of the mess we are in today. >> reporter: unemployment is top of the list for supporters of the right wing candidate, marine le pen, too, but they hope she will address it by closing france's borders and shutting down immigration. ♪ >> reporter: le pen's brand of flag waving made her a front runner in this race, especially among young people in smaller towns who can't find work. analysts predict that thursday's terrorist attack in central paris might give le pen an extra boost. but that also galvanized voters determined to stop it. this is a french citizen who emigrated from morocco, a muslim country. does the prospect of marine le
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pen in the runoff scare you? >> i am worried. i may not be scared, but i am worried. >> reporter: tonight's result is going to send two relative outsiders head to head in the runoff on the 7th of may. marine le pen who only recently came into the mainstream. and emmanuel macron with no official party backing but with wide appeal to the center and the establishment. elaine? >> elizabeth palmer, thank you. we learned today another american is being detained in north korea. his name is kim sang duck. he also goes by tony kim. he's an accounting professor. he was detained at the airport in pyongyang as he was leaving the country. two other americans are known to be held by north korea. meanwhile, the communist dictatorship is threatening to sink a u.s. aircraft carrier as the "uss carl vinson" joins
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exercises in the pacific. israel is marking its annual holocaust memorial day. and at holocaust memorials around the country, survivors and descendants lit candles to remember the jews killed in the holocaust. here in the u.s. more than 100 wildfires continue to burn across florida. the governor declared a state of emergency almost two weeks ago. roxana saberi has the latest. >> reporter: for two days, flames raged across florida's collier county, forcing thousands of residents, including jack burrson, to pack up and head for safety. >> this is my farm. my family farm that's burning down as we speak. >> reporter: rain is bringing some relief to florida's army of firefighters. even the national guard is pitching in. >> take this time. make sure your home is safe. this won't be the last fire of the fire season. >> reporter: firefighters
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control, allowing people to go home. >> our whole street, kearney avenue is engulfed. as a tunnel of flame. >> reporter: anthony's back yard was completely torched. >> four boats and about nine vehicles. but the house is still there, all of our animals are safe and we're safe. >> reporter: smoke is still a danger. >> i know it's very toxic, and it's kind of hard for me to breathe. >> reporter: 125 fires are blazing across florida. firefighters have contained another massive fire in polk county. >> it's amazing what they can do. >> reporter: so far, no homes or lives have been lost there. polk county officials think arson was the cause. and they have a warning for whoever's responsible. >> don't sleep, don't relax, because we are on you, and it will be hotter than this fire until you are locked up in this >>il.
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investigators say a cigarette sparked
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fans are mourning the death of a beloved "happy days" star, erin moran, best known as joanie cunningham. chris martinez looks back on her leave and career. ♪ sunday, monday, happy days >> reporter: at just 13 years old, erin moran was launched to stardom on "happy days", as joanie, the loveable sister of richie cunningham. >> if i get my head chopped off, i'm going to tell mom on you. >> reporter: her acting career began at age 6, appearing in shows like "family affair" and "gunsmoke". but it was her role on "happy days" that made her a household name.
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moran's joanie cunningham, was also the focus of a spinoff, ""joanie loves chachi". she would go on to star in "the love boat." but she fell on hard times, reportedly struggling with depression and homelessness. on saturday, her body was found in southern indiana. dispatchers receiving a 911 call of an unresponsive female. upon arrival of first responders, it was determined that erin moran fleischmann was deceased. some of her former co-stars are expressing grief on twitter. ron howard tweeting, i'll always choose to remember you on our show making scenes better and lighting up tv screens. henry winkler saying oh, erin, now you will finally have the peace you wanted here on earth. rest in tse -- it, serenely now, too soon. and scott baio says, i a
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her life. god has you now, erin. erin moran was 56 years old. authorities so far have not released her cause of death. elaine, an autopsy is pending. >> chris martinez, thank you. former president george h.w. bush is spending another night in the hospital. he's been at houston's methodist hospital since april 14th, being treated for pneumonia. he spent two weeks in the hospital in january also for pneumonia. he is 92 years old. this year's royal marathon got a royal boost. the duke and duchess handed out water to runners before the race along with prince harry. they stuck around to watch the marathon and hand out medals afterwards. coming up. ivanka trump's brand is booming in china. but her overseas success is raising ethics concerns. that's next.
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last week when it was revealed her business won trademark approvals in china, the same day she met the president at her father's mar-a-lago resort. adrianna diaz has more on this from beijing. >> reporter: april 6 was a busy day for ivanka trump. she helped host a dinner for president xi jinping in mar-a-lago and looked on as her daughter charmed him with a chinese folk song. but what happened that day in china is what's grabbing headlines. her lifestyle brand won provisional approval for three lucrative trademarks. the timing raises questions whether mrs. trump is personally profiting from her white house roam. but according to four independent trademark experts interviewed by cbs news, the approvals were standard. dan plain isn
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property consultant in hong kong. >> there isn't any indication that they shouldn't have been approved. and if you treat them as applications by any other applicant, i don't think there's a smoking gun here. >> reporter: a cbs news analysis showed that ms. trump has been applying for trademarks in china sense 2008, including one of her name in mandarin. while her father was running for president, she applied for 34, nearly twice the amount she applied for in the previous eight years. so far six were rejected. four have been approved. the three green lit on april 6th for ivanka trump spa services, jewelry and handbags took nearly 11 months to process, falling within the typical time frame. in addition, rulings only come out on certain days, including the sixth of every month. in a statement, the company's president said, the trademark filings are part of the normal course of business, especially in regions
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infringement is rampant. china is a major abuser. we found more than 300 chinese trademark applications for ivanka trump's name that were not filed by her. others may be trying to profit from her celebrity, like the man who tried to profit from michael jordan's name. and sold sports gear. the legal practice is known as trademark squatting. trademarks are reviewed on a first-come, first-serve basis. she won't profit unless she sells those items in china, a country with nearly 1.4 billion potential customers. adrianna diaz, cbs news, beijing. still ahead, we go town hall hopping with a congressman from alabama. voters weigh in on the trump administration's plan.
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as we mentioned earlier, congress is back in session this week. during their two-week break, many congress members got an
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at town hall meetings in their districts. our chief congressional correspondent, nancy cordes rode along with one congressman. >> this is authentic, rural alabama. >> reporter: we travelled to three town halls. >> why are you guys trying to do with president obama's health care bill? >> reporter: health care was the number one topic. >> we're down to one carrier on the exchange in alabama. >> reporter: franny james drove two hours. >> she was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. >> reporter: to tell him about her daughter. >> are you willing to commit to opposing any bill that allows the insurance companies to discriminate against preexisting conditions? >> the bill that i support today has the exact same wording that we have in the law today with regard to preexisting conditions. how are you? >> reporter: some constituents noted that the new draft supposedly gaining steam does eliminate some protections for the sick. >> there are some press reports out today that there's a new
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compromise, don't be so quick to believe that. >> reporter: this is republican country. >> we had very few democrats that showed up to town halls before the election. >> reporter: even now, the confrontation is often served with a side of cordiality. >> i think you've been thoughtful about things on this issue. >> reporter: you've heard from a lot of people who seem to have concerns that the republican replacement plan for obamacare will not be better for them than what they have now. >> yes, and you heard me respond to that. i disagree with them. but i do think we have to listen to what they're saying. >> reporter: that's why he held 11 town halls this week alone, even as some of his colleagues are steering clear. nancy cordes, cbs news, alabama. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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as we approach 20 years since the death of princess diana, her sons are opening up about their private struggle after losing their mother. prince william and prince harry are now talking about their own mental health. >> go, it's friday, the 21st of april. it's 4:00 p.m. >> reporter: at last, a duke and duchess may have found their true calling. >> straight to number one with a debut single. can he do it again. >> reporter: william and kate as deejays, promoting their mental health charity but clearly taking to their new roles. >> on radio one. 13 weeks in number one before harry came along.
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sounds familiar. >> reporter: prince harry, it turns out is part of the mental health pitch as well. joining his brother and sister-in-law in a discussion of the risks of bottling emotions up. this is what the two sons of princess diana say they did to repress the pain they endured for years after her death. >> we never really talked about it, we never really talked about losing our mom at such a young age and you think wow, you know, i don't want them to have to go through the same thing. >> even harry and i have not talked enough about our mother. >> reporter: they're talking now so everyone can hear. >> i equate it to a boiling pan of soup with the lid on. we've effectively just taken the lid off. >> reporter: the royals were once the epitome of the british stiff upper lip. not anymore. i'm mark phillips. >> cbs will mark 20 years since the death of princess diana.
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in a two-hour, prime time special, gayle king will host princess diana at 8:00/7:00 central. check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm elaine quijano. it's a busy week in washington. after a two-week break, congress will be back in session facing a friday deadline for a possible government shutdown. the showdown comes as a new poll out sunday shows president trump's approval ratings at record lows. while those who voted for mr. trump remain satisfied with his performance. next saturday marks the official 100th day of the trump administration. and our chief washington correspondent john dickerson, will be sitting down with the president. errol barnett has more from the white house. >> reporter: you will be interviewing president trump on his 100th day. what are you most curious about? >> i'm curious about what the president has actually learned in office.
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correspondent and "face the nation" host john dickerson will be with president trump next weekend as he reaches the 100-day milestone. >> the president can be incredibly blunt. he was during the campaign, so i'd like him to bring that to his own evaluation of his own presidency and really see if he can be as blunt about washington and his role in it as he was as a candidate. >> reporter: today the president took his case for a wall along the mexican border to twitter. it will stop drugs and very bad ms-13 gang members, he wrote. and mexico will be paying in some form for the badly-needed border wall. next week congress returns from its break with a possible government shutdown looming friday. democrats and republicans are expecting a few days of negotiations before passing a spending bill. trump's chief of staff says paying for border security is an issue, but he's optimistic. >> i'm pretty confident we're going to get something that's satisfactory to the president in
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>> reporter: dick durbin, the number two ranking democrat in the senate. >> to think that he would consider shutting down the government of the united states of america over this outlandish proposal of a border wall, that would be the height of irresponsibility. >> reporter: as the president suggests tax reform and another repeal of obamacare are also in the works, a new "washington post" abc news poll shows mr. trump with the lowest approval rating of any commander in chief in the modern era. at this point in the presidency. while his base still sees him favorably, he has yet to expand that appeal. >> normally, if your base is the only group that loves you, that's a problem. for this president, the solidity of his base may very well be something that pushes him on to behave just as he's behaving. >> reporter: president trump is staging counter programming on saturday. instead of attending the annual white house correspondent's dinner, he will be holding a campaign-style rally in pennsylvan
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he is the first president to skip the dinner since ronald reagan, who was at the time recovering from an assassination attempt. elaine? >> errol barnett, thank you. in another important story, it was election day in france. america's oldest ally. the vote took place days after a paris police officer was killed in a terrorist attack. today voters narrowed down the field of candidates from 11 to two. they will face off in a runoff election two weeks from now. they are emmanuel macron and marine le pen. elizabeth palmer has the latest from paris. >> reporter: many french voters who showed up today didn't know who to vote for until they were in the booth. it was a crowded field. 11 candidates ranging from the far right, to the center to the committed left. but ann sophie wasn't want of the last-minute deciders.
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she wouldn't tell us who she voted for, except it was a centrist candidate whose priority was the economy. >> we need someone who can get france out of the mess we are in today. >> reporter: so unemployment is at the top of your list. >> yes. >> reporter: unemployment is top of the list for supporters of marine le pen, too. but they hope she will address it by closing france's borders and shutting immigration. ♪ >> reporter: le pen's brand of flag-waving, anti-islamic nationalism made her a frontrunner in this race, especially among young people in smaller towns who can't find work. analysts predicted that thursday's terrorist attack in central paris might give le pen an extra boost. but it also galvanized voters determined to stop it. this
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citizen who emigrated from morocco. does the prospect of president marine le pen scare you? >> i may not be scared, but i'm worried. >> reporter: they will be head to head on a runoff on the 7th of may. marine le pen who only recently came into the mainstream, and emmanuel macron, a former investment banker with no official party backing but with wide appeal to the center and the establishment. elaine? >> elizabeth palmer, thank you. homeland security secretary john kelly addressed the recent terror attack in paris. he also offered a blunt assessment of america's ability to stop home-grown terrorists. here's part of secretary kelly's conversation on ""face the nation"." >> in a recent paris attack, a policeman was killed. is there anything in the paris attack that sends any lessons about american policy or policy that should be put in place? >> obviously, you have the home-grown terrorist.
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detect that. you have other terrorist threats that come across the border. i believe in the case of the paris shooting, i believe he was home-grown, but, again, there are so many threats that come in from across border, and it's essential, absolutely, to control one's border. the other thing that has me, keeps me literally awake at night is the threat against aviation. we know that would be the super bowl for the terrorists to knock down an airplane in flight, particularly if it was full of americans. we have taken measures overseas to reduce that threat. but it's something i watch every day, because there are a number of plots we ae watching very, very closely, and they're very sophisticated and very threatening. the number one thing in my mind is to protect the american people. so we'll do that. >> you said on the home-grown threat, a lot of people think that is the biggest threat, as part of the san bernardino shooting and the boston bombing, but you say you don't know how if stop that.
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you don't know how to stop it, that seems like a big problem. >> it is a big problem. it is number, it, you know, depending on where you sit is where you stand on this. it is a big threat, is it the number one threat? i think it's the most common threat. unfortunately, there are other similar-type terrorist threats that could come from outside the border. you know, the cia, nsa, all the great men and women of d.o.d. are doing a great job. keeping them away from the homeland. i focus on this aviation threat that's very real, and if successful, they will kill hundreds and hundreds of people in one, fell swoop. so the appeal i would make on the home-grown threat, if you see something, say something, whether you're a parent, a sibling, an imam. and this extends frankly, to
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white supremacists as well. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. no matter who was in there last. protection. new lysol power & fresh 6 goes to work flush after flush for a just-cleaned feeling that lasts up to 4 weeks. lysol. what it takes to protect. because your carpet there's resolve carpet care. it lifts more dirt and pet hair versus vacuuming alone.
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people around the world celebrated earth day over the weekend, raising awareness about the signs of climate change. as many sound alarms about threats facing mother nature, the trump administration wants to cut back on environmental programs. barry peterson traveled to alaska for a closer look. >> reporter: with temperatures soaring this winter to 50 degrees above normal, the area around the north pole is melting, and the arctic sea ice is shrinking at a rate never seen before. >> we're talking about something that's going to happen in the next decade. >> reporter: jeremy mathis is director of arctic research for noaa. >> it is warming twice as fast as other parts of the planet. >> reporter: we met him in alaska in the fart
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city in the united states. where noaa has a lonely outpost monitoring the sea ice. here in the polar ice, it's not what you see but what's hidden below. the ice is thinning. it used to be 9 feet thick in some areas, now it's more like 3. why do i care about what's happening ot there? >> we care about the arctic, because it has connections to the entire northern hemisphere, to people down in the lower 48 states. >> reporter: the warming arctic is causing the jet stream to wobble across ama,eric helping spawn massive weather events. and, as america's weather becomes more destructive, early warnings become more critical. but scientists may lose their vital tools like moninitorg satellites targeted by the trump administration. nick mulvaney is the director. >> we're not spending any money on that anymore. we consider that to be a waste of your money. >> reporter: john walsh is chief
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scientist at the university of alaska in fairbanks. >> we're basically ignoring threats to the well-being of future generations. >> reporter: in alaska, warmer temperatures are melting the permafrost. villages are literally disappearing. and scientists say alaska today is fair warning of the climate change future for the rest of america. barry peterson, alaska. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. new lysol power & fresh 6 goes to work flush after flush for a just-cleaned feeling that lasts up to 4 weeks. lysol. what it takes to protect. [car engine failing to start] [wind blows] yo- wh- ah- he-
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president trump's first budget proposal calls for cuts in federal funding for the arts. the cuts would hurt communities both large and small. some art programs could even be forced to shut down. erin moriarty shows us what's at stake in a story for sunday morning. >> reporter: there's something surprising happening in the pine mountains of kentucky, like most mining communities, letcher county has lost thousands of jobs, and yet, how do you account for the new whiskey distillery and restaurant, the renovated buildings, the 15,000-watt radio station? what has helped breathe new life into the decimated coal economy
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here has little to do with mining. >> we have 18 full-time employees, a million dollar payroll annually. >> reporter: this is apple stop. short for appalachian community film workshop, a non-profit center on the edge of town that exists largely because of federal founding. >> appalshop has been in this town for 48 years, and i think it has been an example of the diversified economy we really need in this region. we say appalachian here, but -- >> reporter: 29-year-old ada smith grew up here. her grandfather worked in the mines. but, because of appalshop, her father didn't have to. >> so this is my dad and my mom here. >> reporter: appalshop was a seed that grew
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johnson's war on poverty in the 1960s. programs were established in impoverished areas to encourage young people to discover new skills in the arts, like film making. >> by working on this film it helps me learn more about the place i'm a part of, and i think it will cause people to respect other cultures. ♪ >> reporter: the film workshop has grown into a diverse and thriving art center. where picks and shovels have been replaced by picks and bows. but now what was started by the 36th president has suddenly been put in doubt by the 45th. >> this is what we call the america first budget. >> reporter: last month, the trump administration unveiled a proposed budget that defunds the national endowment for the arts,
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the national endownment for the humanities, the corporation for public broadcasting, all provide critical funding for appalshop. many of these agencies have been threatened with extinction before. >> in the 1990s, when members of congress accused the nea of supporting offensive art, the agency's budget was cut nearly in half. but the trump administration says this time the cuts aren't about taste but about taxes and struggling taxpayers. budget director nick mulvaney. >> can i really go to those folks, look them in the eye and say, look, i want to take money from you and give it to the corporation for public broadcasting. that is a hard sell and something we don't think we can defend anymore. >> reporter: this, despite the fact that all together funding for these agencies make up less than%
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>> to me, again, it is really short-sighted and silly. >> reporter: ada smith says that in fact these federal budget cuts will hurt the people struggling the most in areas that helped elect the president. letcher county voted 4-1 for president donald trump. >> the people working on this budget haven't spent enough time understanding where these federal resources go and how much they're needed in communities like this. >> reporter: with grants from the nea, appalshop film makers have turned the local culture into indelible images. >> started out farming. bought a mule for $125 then. >> reporter: appalshop archivist, carolyn rubins. >> these are the holyfields. he worked in the coal mines. and they raised 11 children and
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lived innen -- in jenkins. it's about 20 minutes from here. >> reporter: without federal funding, will this impotant part of american history and heritage be lost? >> for 20,000 years, we've been making art. that streak is not going to end in 2018 if the nea goes away. >> reporter: david marcus is the director for a theater company in new york. surprisingly, he supports the cuts. marcus says even small government grants interfere with the free market by giving recipients an unfair edge. >> so when the federal government comes in and gives $10,000 or $15,000 to one company and not other companies, they're really putting a heavy thumb on the scale. >> reporter: yes, theaters may fail, marcus says, but others will simply take their place. but what guarantee do you have that in a place like whitesburg, kentucky, what guarantee do you
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place? >> i don't have a guarantee. >> reporter: so it will just go. >> things go. yes. this is the nature of the world. this is the nature of art. >> art needs subsidy to be alive. we cannot just have the marketplace determining what is done. >> reporter: rocco landisman is broadway producer and a former chairman of the nea. he worries that without subsidies, challenging, daring art will never be produced. case in point? >> you came to me and said i've got this hot idea for a musical about alexander hamilton and the founding fathers, and it's going to be done in rap and hip-hop, i would say, as a commercial producer, my first take would be, really? >> the reality is, i'm a puerto rican guy who writes musicals, and that's not very common. >> reporter: lynn manuel miranda pulledff
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broadway musical "hamilton", perhaps the greatest theater sensation of the decade. >> as an artist, you're grateful for any opportunity, any crack in the door. >> reporter: miranda credits the success of "hamilton", and his first musical to federally subsidized theaters that took a chance. >> as we form a stage i can point to public funding and the arts making that possible. my first job was as an intern for wnet, that's a pbs affiliate in new york city. my first musical was "workshop" at the old musical theater center which is partially funded by the nea. >> reporter: and it wasn't just the nea. >> i grew up loving musicals by parents who loved musicals, and we never had money to do to broadway shows. i think i saw three maybe before i was an adult. but because of pbs perform
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and that changed my life. >> reporter: and that, says miranda, is the point, to give kids who otherwise wouldn't have it, access to the arts. like this 11-year-old and his older sisters samantha and grace in letcher county, kentucky. ♪ appalshop is the reason they've been able to take music lessons. >> if you hand me an instrument, i want to learn how to play it. so i was excited when i could learn to play the fiddle. >> reporter: the costs of these programs are only a tiny portion of the budget but not funding them would cost americans much more. ada smith says. >> we try to tell the stories of americans and amplify their voices, their lives, their stories. when you take away that type of federal support you start leaving out tons, millions of voices in this country that are unheard. ♪
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the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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captioning funded by cbs it's monday, april 24th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." it's shaping up to be a whirlwind week. with his 100th day in office fast approachinging, president trumps to lock down an obamacare replacement and a budget for the border wall while keeping the government from shutting down. and there were two making their presidential picks setting a stage for a runoff on marine le pen and the newcomer jean-luc

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