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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  June 5, 2017 2:35am-4:00am EDT

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in barking on london's east side. early sunday police swarmed a aptd building in this working class neighbor hoochltd residents heard the controlled bangs of controlled sbloegss and saw officers take four men and several women into custody. medics put another woman into an ambulance. some told us they thought they recognized one of the three men killed in the attacks as their neighbor. in part, because he appeared to be wearing the same clothes they saw him in on saturday. ken lives in the same building. >> he had a young wife, from what i could see and two children. so a toddler and a recently born baby. >> reporter: he said saturday he'd been loading a van to move out when the neighbor he knew only by the nickname abs approached him to ask him about the van. >> he started speaking to me very friendly, asking me where i got my van from, how much, this, that and the other, and yeah. it wasn't until now that it starts sinking in, really. >> reporter: several of the
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knew who lived in this ground floor apartment as very friendly. someone they'd see outside on the patio, playing with kids, even hosting barbecues. >> the first thing i heard the news this morning, and i said it can't be that man. i saw him walking around with his mrs. >> reporter: police have not said anything about the results of their early morning raids or what they may have found. >> thanks to our team in london. in other news, much of washington is focussed on thursday when former fbi director james comey goes before the senate intelligence committed ey committee. two of those members spoke to john dickerson. >> he won't be brings those memos, though, that he wrote. why can't you -- >> we want to get a look at those memos as well. i believe former fbi director mueller will have to agree whether comey can look at those
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a chance to look at them. i think it's very important. >> is there a key question you want comey to answer? >> i want him to reenforce, one, that the russians directly intervened in our elections which everybody accepts except for the president and maybe vladimir putin, and two, i want to know what kind of pressure, appropriate, inappropriate, how many conversations he with the president about this topic. did some of these conversations take place even before the president was sworn in, and i think james comey deserves to have his day in court since the president has disparaged him so much. >> if the president said, look, i just fired the guy, i feel bad for home, wh for him, what do you think's going to happen. if on the other hand the president said i want you to end this investigation of general flynn, i want it ended now, and if you don't do so, you're going to be in trouble, that is a whole different nature of a conversation. and that's why the tone, the exact words that were spoken and the context are s
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roger waters is part of rock 'n roll royalty, selling millions of albums with his former group pink floyd. he walked away decades ago but has never stopped making music, and now he has a new album and has kicked off a world tour that he says will likely be his final act. here's anthony mason. >> reporter: for much of may, roger waters' stage crew was setting up his new show. >> as you can see there's a lot of -- >> reporter: this is all your gear. >> yeah. >> reporter: working out the staging in a vacant arena in the new jersey meadowlands. you've basically booked a 20,000-seat arena, just to rehearse. >> yeah. >> reporter: waters' las
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an epic production of "the wall". ♪ all in all ♪ you're just another brick in the wall ♪ >> reporter: the rock opera he wrote for his former band, pink floyd. ♪ we don't need no education >> reporter: ended in 2013, after taking in nearly $500,000, the highest-grossing tour by a solo artist in history. his new show? another spectacular. in terms of scale, how does this show compare to the wall? >> this is even more complex and bigger. >> reporter: really? the us and them tour kicked off last week in kansas city. and it may be the 73-year-old musician's last lap. ♪ i'll see you on the dark side of
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>> i can't imagine i'll do another one after this. but i'm going for it. i'm going all over the world % with this thing. >> reporter: you think this is the last one? >> oh, i would think so, yeah. ♪ how i wish >> reporter: it's simply a matter of time, says waters. it's been 50 years since pink floyd released their debut album. waters formed the band in college with his cambridge friend sid barron and nick mayson and rick wright. but barret, the band's creative force soon had a mental break down. >> it happened so fast, we just turned pro. we just had a song in the top ten in the uk. and suddenly, the guy who wrote all the songs disappeared. >> reporter: were you guys a bit lost for a while. >> yeah, we were. and of course what you do, everybody who can starts trying to write, because
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write, you're dead. ♪ >> reporter: waters emerged as the band's main songwriter. ♪ >> reporter: the force behind two of rock's most influential albums. 1973's "the dark side of the moon." which spent a record 14 years on the chart. ♪ >> reporter: and 1979's "the wall." the fifth best-selling album. its theme, the walls that divide us. ♪ all in all, it's just another brick in the wall ♪ >> reporter: but a wall was rising within pink floyd, as waters and guitarist, david gilmore, battled for control. in 1985, in one of the ugliest
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breakups in rock history, waters walked away. >> there's a large kind of body of people, fans, i guess, of the band who sort of blame me for having destroyed something that is precious to them. and i guess i can understand it to some extent. but i regret it. >> reporter: while the other members continued on as pink floyd, waters went out on his own. >> i was doing gigs in, you know, 4,000-seat arenas to 1500 people when they were playing to 70,000 people in local football stadiums. all the same songs, still playing all my songs, but. and that was very character for me. very character for me. >> reporter: the bass player suddenly had to come out of the shadows. >> i was so scared. i was just tear pied. >> reporter: what w
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terrified of? >> failure, being found out. >> reporter: what were you afraid of being found out? >> if people find out you're a wanker, you know. >> do you think everybody has that feel on some level? >> i'm sure that's right. mine is very much connected to the whole father/son thing. >> reporter: waters was just five months old when his father eric waters was killed during world war ii. after a recent concert, a veteran came up to him. >> and he said to me, your father would be proud of you. and i just -- >> reporter: you lost it. >> i lost it completely. i was just, and i realized it was a uniquely kind of important moment to recognize, i could still be that needy of my father's approval, if you like. but also emotionally entangled in that loss. >> reporter: at the end of his last tour, for the documentary about the wall, he went to
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beach in italy where his father died in battle. you'd never been. >> no. i'd never followed to his death, if you like. i'd never stood on that beach staring out to sea. thinking about that. >> reporter: and in the other war that altered waters' life, with his former band mates, especially david gilmore, he's declared a fragile truce. there's kind of a peace with you guys these days? >> sort of. yeah. david and i, we don't see each other, kind of ever. >> reporter: which is not slamming each other. >> yeah, which is a very good thing. >> reporter: why did that happen? >> well, it's kind of a waste of time. you know, it's a real waste of time and energy to butt-heads about things that
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>> reporter: this past friday, waters released his first solo album in 25 years. is this the life we really want? a question he asks again in his new tour. >> the whole show is really a kind of musical protest against the acceptance of the state of perpetual warfare. >> reporter: when you take an overtly political show like this into the polarized environment. >> mm-hm. >> reporter: of this country, what sort of reaction are you expecting? >> i'll let you know in a few weeks' time. >> reporter: at a time when the american president wants to build a wall, roger waters is still trying to tear them down. is there still a role for the protest song? >> absolutely. of course, you
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if one isn't protesting this what's going on now? i think i'd rather be dead. one of the most famous guitars in music history was recently sold at an auction for $ $2 million. the new owner is a long-time grateful dead fan with deep pockets. here's anthony mason. >> reporter: it may be one of the most well-traveled guitars in rock 'n roll history. ♪ jerry garcia played his custom-made wolf in the rock halls of europe, the arenas of the u.s. and even under the great pyramids of egypt. ♪ >> reporter: the grateful dead front man first used the guitar at a private, 1973 conset fcert
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the hell's angels, but now, nearly 22 years after garcia's death, wolf found a new home. >> selling once, selling twice, sold! >> reporter: marketing ceo, brian haligan placed the winning bid, the $1.9 million price tag after a buyer's fee makes wolf one of the most expensive guitars ever sold. >> the guitar and jerry and the grateful dead have had a great impact on my life. >> reporter: the guitar's previous owner decided to sell-off the rock relic and donate the proceeds to the southern poverty law center. an anonymous charity matched the purchase price, netting more than $3.5 million for the law cent
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the carolinas. whether you golf or not, geico could help score you some great savings on car insurance. maybe even hundreds of dollars. whoa! (chuckles) hole in one! and that's a par five, mind you. see how much you could save on car insurance. go to geico.com today. engineers in california are still trying to figure out how to clear a massive landslide off the pacific coast highway. >> reporter: the gash on the hillside is more than a third of a mile wide, tumbling into the ocean and there's more waiting to come down. are we walking on a potential id
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land slide. >> reporter: he showed us where the landslide is still slipping. start small? >> start small and still dig. >> reporter: the ongoing movement is being measured by ground sensors like these and radar that continually scans the hillside. an animation shows how more than a million tons of rock and earth came down, pushing some 15 acres of new land 600 feet into the sea. it stretches more than 18 feet across and a thousand feet high. engineers can't figure out how to begin rebuilding this road that clings to the coastline, 150 feet above the ocean. >> it was cut in 80 years ago by hand, but it was cut through large masses of unstable ground. >> reporter: unusually heavy rain this winter triggered other mudslides
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than 50 miles of highway 1. that has left tourist businesses there almost completely cut off. the one way in for visitors is by air. but even that's not certain. when we tried to fly in, fog blocked our landing. okay, let's go. that left one or option, a nearly mile-long hike. president of the big sur chamber of commerce was our guide. >> this is the only trail access in from north to south for local residents. >> reporter: he is general manager of a big sur restaurant with spectacular views but these days almost no customers. >> so the tradeoff for this really amazing location is a certain fragility of access. every once in a while we lose it and we have to work our way around it and that's what we're challenged with today. >> reporter: the bridge that's out could be replaced by late september, but the landslide that's up this year could take more than a year to fix.
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that mart
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the pittsburgh pirates are having a tough year, they are currently in last place. but fans are still coming to the ballpark, and many are greeted by an old friend. steve hartman has this story. >> reporter: a lot of baseball stars can put fans in the seats. but only phil coin cleans them first. >> there we are. >> reporter: wonder if he's a bigger celebrity than anybody on the field. >> he is. i think it makes their day. >> wow. that was great, you know? >> follow me. >> reporter: what makes phil famous around here is how long he's been around here. >> there we are. >> reporter: at 99, he's still working as an usher for the pittsburgh pirates. >> feels good to get out of the sun. >> reporter: seating people in sweltering heat.
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would hospitalize nearly any other soon to be centenarian. >> when i'm not working, i carry a cane. >> reporter: you do? >> yeah. the reason i carry a cane, it gets me a front seat on the bus. [ laughter ] >> reporter: phil grew up near the old forbes field in pittsburgh. in fact, when babe ruth hit the last home run of his career over this wall, phil was one of the kids who ran after the ball. becoming an usher was a rite of passage in his neighborhood. every kid did it for a year or two. but not phil, he's still at it, 81 years later. of course he did have a day job for many years, worked as a machinist. he also took time off to save the world in '41, but other than that, it's been this. >> god bless you. >> thank you. >> reporter: you still look forward to coming to work? had >> oh, yeah. >> reporter: what do you like about it? >> the people. i get more hugs and kisses now than i ever got in my life. >> how are you
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success means climbing a ladder, always doing something different, something bigger, but phil coin has a gift for finding joy in the same place he found it yesterday. i saw that most clearly during the national anthem. he's probably heard that song 10,000 times, and yet, when it ended, he was moved to tears. that national anthem, is that emotional for you every time? >> yes. >> reporter: love of country, love of people and happiness and hard work. if you want the secret to life. now you know. >> 26f. follow me. >> reporter: just follow the usher. pittsburgh. that's overnight news for this monday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, you can check back with us a little later for the morning news and of course cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm dimarco morgan.
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a nation on edge. british police quickly round up suspects following a deadly van and knife attack in the heart of london. the prime minister calls for a crackdown on islamic extremism. >> we cannot allow this ideology the safe space it needs to breed. >> as we learn mabore out the heroes and victims, president trump slams london's mayor for being politically correct. talsohtonig, a night of healing and ariana grande's all-star benefit for the manchester victims. and more than 1500 soccer fans are injured when a loud noise triggers a stampede. this is the "cbs overnight news." hi, everyone, and welcome to the overnight news. i'm dimarco morgan.
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than 30 are in hospitals following a night of terror in london. the three attackers were also killed by police. a dozen suspects arrested. it comes two weeks after a concert bombing in manchester. today prime minister theresa may declared enough is enough as she called for a crackdown on evil extremism. and singapore, prince harry joined muslims breaking their ramadan fast. with prayers for the victims. we have a team of correspondents covering a city and nation on edge. we begin with elizabeth palmer. >> reporter: just after 10:00 on london bridge, people were running for their lives, urge the on by the police. >> move back! >> reporter: the van that the terrorists had used moments before to mow down pedestrians stood abandoned as security forces rushed to the rescue from the air and the ground.
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bridge when he realized the van was headed right for him. it missed him by inches he told us, but he can't forget what he saw next. >> my girlfriend saw someone jump off the bridge. >> reporter: and the people lying in the road, were they in need of help? >> nah, they were, i haven't seen anything like that. they were just -- >> reporter: you think they were dead? >> yeah, for sure. >> reporter: after they crashed their van, the three attackers jumped out, armed with knives and raced to a nearby area, packed with bars and restaurants where they went on a stabbing rampage. as armed units moved into position, these filmed by a traumatized resident on her phone, police in the area shouted at bar patrons to hit the floor. there was a burst of gunfire, and then as suddenly as it had
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the three suspects shot dead by the police. all were wearing what looked like suicide belts which turned out later to be fakes. prime minister theresa may. >> the terrorists were confronted and shot by armed officers within eight minutes of the police receiving the first emergency call. >> reporter: britain's admired for its lightning response. which undoubtedly saved lives. but what they really want is something police can't give, a guarantee that something like this isn't about to happen again. >> oh, my god! >> reporter: i'm charlie d'agata. the rampage that left scores of wounded in its wake may have happened in the heart of london, but the victims hail from around the globe. a canadian and a frenchman were among the first confirmed deaths. an australian is recovering after her neck s
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eating dinner with her boyfriend. from new zealand, oliver left in a coma after being stabbed in the face, neck and stomach. american, british and spanish are among the wounded. survivor accounts paint a gruesome picture of eight minutes of horror that unfolded. jerrard had just left the pub when he heard the screaming. >> that's when i saw the three guys, the tree terrorists, they run up and stabbed the woman. they repeatedly. stabbing her non-stop. >> reporter: he did what many others did, threw everything he could at them. >> i think i picked up a chair. i was trying to chuck it. i might have hit one of them. glasses, trying to get him to chase me. >> reporter: photographer gabriel shotto captured the moments they were brought down in a hail of bullets. >> at a certain point, the cops came over, so the attackers were surrounded by the police, and they shut them down.
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>> reporter: britain's emergency medical teams responded quickly, but the sheer number of victims, suffering such horrific injuries and spreading patients out to five area hospitals. london mayor sadiq khan condemned the attack as cowardly. >> there aren't words to describe the grief and anger i'm feeling today. i'm appalled and furious. >> reporter: a city he called united against terror, which today feels more united in pain. >> reporter: this is anna werner on london's east side. early sunday, police swarmed an apartment building in this working class neighborhood. residents heard the controlled bang of explosions, and saw officers take four men and several women into custody. medics put another woman into an ambulance. some told us they thought they recognized one of the three men killed in the attack as their neighbor. in part because he appeared to be wearing the same clothes they saw him in on saturday.
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>> a young wife and two children. so a toddler and a recently-born baby. >> reporter: he said saturday he'd been loading a van to move out when a neighbor approached to ask him about the van. >> he came speaking to me very friendly, and he's asking me where i got my van from, started asking questions how much, this, that and the other, and yeah. it wasn't until now that it starts sinking in, really. >> reporter: several of the neighbors described man who they knew as very friendly. someone they'd see outside in the patio, playing with kids, even hosting barbecues. >> i was like, it can't be that man. i've seen him walk around with his kids, with his mrs. quite often they go for a walk in the evening. >> reporter: police have not said anything about the results of their early morning raids or what they may have found. >> thanks to our team in london. a loud noise triggered a
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the crowd had gathered to watch a broadcast of the champion's league soccer final. many thought the noise was a terror attack. it wasn't, but over 1500 people were injured in the stampede, some seriously. this happened shortly before last night's attack in london. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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now we head north to manchester, the scene of a suicide bombing two weeks ago that left 22 people dead and more than 100 wounded. it happened at an ariana grande concert. and tonight, grande and others are helping manchester heal. jonathan vigliotti is there. >> reporter: the a-list roster anchored by ariana grande began with an emotional reminder of what brought everybody here. >> we are a city united, and we will remain a city united. >> reporter: the one love manchester concert was meant to honor the victims of the deadly bombing nearly two weeks ago. >> so tonight, manchester, let's send our love to our friends in london who are going through the same that we were going through.
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message took deeper meaning and along with it, renewed fear. is there any part of you that's afraid to be here in light of the attack that took place yesterday? >> yes, definitely. >> reporter: 16-year-olds tia and holly were at the manchester arena when the suicide bomber struck. >> and i thought oh, she's coming back on. >> reporter: you thought it was part of the celebration. >> yes. >> reporter: they were are part of the group from the original concert who returned in defiance of terror. the concert featured pop's biggest and brightest. ♪ >> reporter: it was upbeat, but careful never to rise above the tragedy. >> what a better way to fight evil with evil than to fight evil with good. would you guys agree with that? >> reporter: 50,000 people
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packed this stadium just outside the city. thousands lined up hours earlier to go through tedious but necessary security checkpoints. everyone was searched. the hundreds of police on guard, a reminder of the two active terrorist investigations still >> when i see all the police, it reassures me that everything's going to be okay. >> we're still all together. we're not afraid. >> reporter: inside, all eyes were on the stars. a celebration of music, defiance and uniting together. [cheers and applause] ultimately, it was the victims who were front and center. all the profits from ticket sales will go to the victims' fund, which has already raised more than $7 million. dimarco? >> thank you. tonight, president trump was briefed by his national security team on the unfolding tragedy in london. paula reed is at the white house.
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>> reporter: as details emerged about the london attack, president trump took to twitter. we must stop being politically correct and get down to the business of security for our people. he took aim at london's mayor. at least seven dead and 48 wounded and terror attacks and mayor of london says there's no reason to be alarmed. mr. trump also pointed to the attack as a reason the courts need to approve his controversial travel ban. we need a travel ban as an extra level of safety. fran townsend says shared intelligence is essential is to u.s. security. >> british authorities have continued to share intelligence with us. it will help us in understanding how this attack was executed to help protect americans at home. >> reporer: despite the president's insistence that a travel ban could help protect against further attacks, senators from both
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aisle disagree. republican susan collins. >> i do believe that the very broad ban that he has proposed is not the right way to go. >> reporter: democrat mark warner. >> don't continue to call for this travel ban, which is frankly all of the leaders and the intelligence community have said would be a slap in the face to muslim americans and others in many ways might actually incite more incidents. >> reporter: later this week, fired fbi director james comey is expected to testify. before the senate. >> translator: intelligence committee. members of the committee say they want to hear from comey specific details about his conversations with the president and whether he was pressured in any way to back off of the russia investigation. >> paula reed in washington, thank you. coming up next, muslims and latinos, breaking bread with tacos.
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no matter who was in there last. protection. new lysol power & fresh 6 goes to work flush after flush for a just-cleaned feeling that lasts up to 4 weeks. lysol. what it takes to protect. when muslims break their daily fast they call it iftar.
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some muslims in southern california are having tacos for iftar, having salsa with latinos in their community. here's mireya villarreal. >> reporter: just before sundown, the tacos on muay truck is rolling into a different parking lot. where the spots are often reserved for muslim worshippers. tacos at every mosque is the passion project. it plays off a 2016 comment by president trump supporter marco gutierrez. >> if you don't do something about it, you're going to have taco trucks on every corner. >> we're trying to show love and that we're human. >> reporter: the goal here goes way beyond what's on the menu. >> donald j. trump is calling for a total and complete shutdown of muslims entering the united states. we're going to build a wall, don't woab
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>> reporter: these two groups are trying to step outside their comfort zone. >> we have to not just get to know one another, we have to defend one another. and us sharing our culture, sharing our food, is part of that movement. after sunset prayer, muslims and latinos, break fast together. between bites, comments touch on religion and circle back to politics. >> this is probably trump's worst nightmare, to have a taco truck at every mosque. >> reporter: he is a immigrant fasting out of respect for ramadan. the council on islamic relations says 2015 saw a 50% increase in anti-muslim incidents over the previous years. lucy silva worries about the rise of hate crimes ai
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religion. >> being here and sharing or stories of being immigrants and having to deal with every day issues about the stereotypes that everybody encounters on a daily basis. and we all have that in common. >> reporter: their resolve fueled even further by another attack overseas. >> when you think about what happened in london, it could have happened here. it could have been us. it could have been all these beautiful children walking around. and it's sad. that's why we need this to work. >> reporter: mireya villarreal, cbs news, santa ana, california. a haven for refugees in georgia. you knou
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we take you now to clarkston, georgia. the town east of atlanta is known as a safe haven for refugees. many of its residents are from the muslim-majority countries that would be impacted by president trump's travel ban. we paid a visit. mark strassmann paid a visit. >> we were target. we didn't want to take that risk. >> reporter: for seven years, the brothers were threatened with death in iraq.
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militias targeted them for working with american companies. was coming to this country the difference between potentially life and death? >> it was a life and death, yes. >> reporter: in 2011, they applied to u.s. as refugees. after years of vetting by homeland security and the state department, they emigrated here to clarkston, georgia. known as the ellis island of the south. >> this clarkston is a refugee welcoming place. everyone is here from different countries. >> 40 different nationalities. 60 different languages spoken. in our 1.4 square mile city. >> reporter: ted terry is clarkston's mayor. half its8,000 residents are foreign-born. >> these people who have fled from those conflicts are the ones escaping terror. we're getting people war-torn areas, religious, sexual persecution. >> reporter:rk
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religious services, local shops, community gatherings and schools. >> since 9/11, there hasn't been a refugee that has committed an act of domestic terrorism and here in clarkston we continue to be one of the safest cities in georgia. >> reporter: to him, the latest travel ban presents the greatest threat of all. >> that would change the idea of america. which is a free country. and a right country. >> reporter: they arrived believing in the idea of america. clarkston gave them a chance to live it. mark strassmann, cbs news, clarkston, georgia. up next, the valuable life lesson boys can learn in in gentlemen's club.
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we end tonight at the gentleman's club in greenville, south carolina. no, it's not a nightclub for men. far from it. it's where life lessons are taught. >> you look sharp, sir. good morning, how are you? >> reporter: at thomas c kerns elementary some are getting more than just a textbook education, >> going to straighten this up just a little bit for you. >> reporter: and ha starts with what you wear and how you wear it and how you eat. >> got it? switch hands to your right. >> welcome to this fine occasion. >> reporter: welcome to the gentleman's club, the school's most sought-after group of 48 fourth and fifth graders. >> the gentleman's club is not just teaching you how to be a gentleman. >> it teaches you to respect others and treat them how you would want to be t
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yourself for who you are and don't let anybody get in the way of that. >> gentleman's club impacts these young boys with a sense of belonging. >> reporter: principal mark adams started the club last year. >> we look at it as preparation for academics, for behavior, for citizenship. it's our responsibility to prepare them for the next level. >> reporter: the group met every other friday to learn real-life lessons from cleaning your neighborhood to watering plants. >> the food is super good. >> reporter: and twice a year they get to enjoy a gourmet three-course meal. >> i start to get in love with it. >> this is so good. i think i see jesus. >> reporter: perched on a low-income neighborhood in south carolina, almost every student here qualifies for free or reduced-price meals. for gavin curtis, a luncheon like today is something he'll never forget. >> only a couple times in your lifetime you'll have that good of a meal. >> repr:
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lawyer when he grows up. his classmate, elijah wants to write songs, and the gentleman's club has something to do with it. >> it gives me a confidence to actually do it. because if i didn't have the confidence, i would not be holding a pencil, and the pencil would not go on the paper. >> i used to be a bad kid. i used to get in a lot of trouble. when i heard about the gentleman's club, i joined. after like the first meeting that we had i felt changed. i started acting better. getting better grades. >> academic achievement in my opinion is mostly about hard work and commitment. and i am proud of you for your accomplishments today and this year. >> reporter: hard work paid off indeed and what better way to celebrate. >> to the gentlemen of thomas e. kerns elementary school, cheers. >> cheers. >> and the best of luck to all the gentlemen there. that's "cbs overnight news" for this monday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, you can check black with us a little later fort morning news andf
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this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm dimarco morgan. this is the "cbs overnight news." hi, everyone, and welcome to the overnight news. i'm dimarco morgan. at least seven are dead and more than 30 are in hospitals following a night of terror in london. isis is now claiming responsibility. three attackers are also dead, killed by police. a dozen other suspects, several of them women, arrested sunday. saturday's knife and van attack comes less than two weeks after a concert bombing in manchester. sunday, prime minister theresa may declared enough is enough, as she called for a crackdown on evil extremism. and singapore, prince harry joined muslims breaking their ramadan fast. with prayers for the victims. we have a team of correspondents coveng
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edge. we begin with elizabeth palmer. >> reporter: just after 10:00 last night around london bridge, people were running for their lives, urged on by the police. >> move back! >> reporter: the van that the terrorists had used moments before to mow down pedestrians stood abandoned, as security forces rushed to the rescue from the air and the ground. dan from california had been on the bridge when he realized the van was headed right for him. it missed him by inches, he told us, but he can't forget what he saw next. >> my girlfriend saw someone jump off the bridge. >> reporter: and the people who were lying in the road, were they in need of help? >> nah, they were -- i hadn't seen anything like that. they were just -- >> reporter: you think they were dead? >> yeah, for sure. >> reporter: after they crash their van, the three attackju
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knives and raced to a nearby area, packed with bars and restaurants where they went on a stabbing rampage. as armed units moved into position, these filmed by a traumatized resident on her phone, police in the area shouted at bar patrons to hit the floor. there was a burst of gunfire and then as suddenly as it had begun, it was over. the three suspects shot dead by the police, all were wearing what looked like suicide belts but which turned out later to be fakes. prime minister theresa may. >> the terrorists were confronted and shot by armed officers within eight minutes of the police receiving the first emergency call. >> reporter: britons admired this lightning response which undoubtedly saved lives, but what they really want is something the police can't give, a guarantee an attack like this isn't about to happen again.
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>> oh, my god! >> reporter: i'm charlie d'agata. the rampage that left scores of wounded in its wake may have happened in the heart of london, but the victims hail from around the globe. a canadian and a frenchman were among the first confirmed deaths. australian candace hedges recovering after her neck was stabbed while eating dinner with her boyfriend. from new zealand, oliver downing reportedly left in a coma after being stabbed in the face, neck and stomach. american, british, german and spanish are among the wounded. survivor accounts paint a gruesome picture. of eight minutes of horror that unfolded. jerrard said he had just left the pub when he heard screaming. >> that's when i saw the three guys, the three terrorists and they ran up and stabbed the woman. they repeatedly stabbed her, three of them. >> reporter: all three of them. >> stabbing her nonstop.
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>> reporter: he did what many others did, threw everything he could at them. >> i chucked a chair. i threw bowls and glasses, trying to get them to chase me. >> reporter: photographer gabriel shotto captured the moment the attackers were brought down in a hail of bullets. >> at a certain point, the cops came over, so these attackers were surrounded by the police, and they shot them down. >> reporter: britain's emergency medical teams responded quickly, but the sheer number of victims suffering such horrific injuries and spreading patients out to five area hospitals. london mayor sadiq khan condemned the attack as cowardly. >> there aren't words to describe the grief and anger that our city will be feeling today. i'm appalled and furious. >> reporter: a city he called united against terror, which today feels more united in pain. >> reporter: this is anna werner in barking on london's east side.
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apartment building in this working class neighborhood. residents heard the controlled bangs of controlled explosions and saw officers take four men and several women into custody. medics put another woman into an ambulance. some told us they thought they recognized one of the three men killed in the attacks as their neighbor. in part, because he appeared to be wearing the same clothes they saw him in on saturday. ken lives in the same building. >> he had a young wife, from what i could see and two children. so a toddler and a recently born baby. >> reporter: he said saturday he'd been loading a van to move out when the neighbor he knew only by the nickname abs approached him to ask him about the van. >> he started speaking to me very friendly, asking me where i got my van from, how much, this, that and the other, and yeah. it wasn't until now that it starts sinking in, really. >> reporter: several of the neighbors described the man they knew who lived in this ground
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friendly. someone they'd see outside on the patio, playing with kids, even hosting barbecues. >> the first thing i heard the news this morning, and i said it can't be that man. i saw him walking around with his mrs. they used to go for walks in the evening. >> reporter: police have not said anything about the results of their early morning raids or what they may have found. >> thanks to our team in london. in other news, much of washington is focussed on thursday when former fbi director james comey goes before the senate intelligence committee. two of those members spoke to john dickerson. on "face the nation." >> so you expect james comey to talk about why he felt a sense of pressure. he won't be bringing those memos, though, that he wrote. why can't you -- >> we want to get a look at those memos as well. i believe former fbi director mueller will have to agree whether comey can look at those
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a chance to look at them. i think it's very important. >> is there a key question you want comey to answer? >> i want him to reenforce, one, that the russians directly intervened in our elections which everybody accepts except for the president and maybe vladimir putin, and two, i want to know what kind of pressure, appropriate, inappropriate, how many conversations he had with the president about this topic. did some of these conversations take place even before the president was sworn in, and i think james comey deserves to have his day in court since the president has disparaged him so much. >> if the president said, look, i just fired the guy, i feel bad for him, what do you think's going to happen. that's one thing. if on the other hand the president said i want you to end this investigation of general flynn, i want it ended now, and if you don't do so, you're going to be in trouble, that is a whole different nature of a conversation. and that's why the tone, the exact words that were spoken and the context are so important. and that's what we lack right
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roger waters is part of rock 'n roll royalty, selling millions of albums with his former group pink floyd. he walked away decades ago but has never stopped making music, and now he has a new album and has kicked off a world tour that he says will likely be his final act. here's anthony mason. >> reporter: for much of may, roger waters' stage crew was setting up his new show. >> as you can see there's a lot of -- >> reporter: this is all your gear. >> yeah. >> reporter: working out the staging in a vacant arena in the new jersey meadowlands. you've basically booked a 20,000-seat arena, just to rehearse. >> yeah. >> reporter: waters' last tour, an epic prodon
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wall". ♪ all in all ♪ you're just another brick in the wall ♪ >> reporter: the rock opera he wrote for his former band, pink floyd. ♪ we don't need no education >> reporter: ended in 2013, after taking in nearly $500,000, the highest-grossing tour by a solo artist in history. his new show? another spectacular. in terms of scale, how does this show compare to the wall? >> this is even more complex and bigger. >> reporter: really? the us and them tour kicked off last week in kansas city. and it may be the 73-year-old musician's last lap. ♪ i'll see you on the dark side of the moon ♪ >> i can't imagine i'll do another one after this.
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i'm going all over the world with this thing. >> reporter: you think this is the last one? >> oh, i would think so, yeah. ♪ how i wish >> reporter: it's simply a matter of time, says waters. it's been 50 years since pink floyd released their debut album. waters formed the band in college with his cambridge friend sid barron and nick mason and rick wright. but barret, the band's creative force soon had a mental break down. >> it happened so fast, we just turned pro. we just had a song in the top ten in the uk. and suddenly, the guy who wrote all the songs disappeared. >> reporter: were you guys a bit lost for a while. >> yeah, we were. and of course what you do, everybody who can starts trying to write, because if you don't write, you're dead. ♪
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>> reporter: waters emerged as the band's main songwriter. ♪ >> reporter: the force behind two of rock's most influential albums. 1973's "the dark side of the moon." which spent a record 14 years on the chart. ♪ >> reporter: and 1979's "the wall." the fifth best-selling album. of all time. ♪ hey, teacher, leave them kids alone ♪ its theme, the walls that divide us. ♪ all in all, it's just another brick in the wall ♪ >> reporter: but a wall was rising within pink floyd, as waters and guitarist, david gilmore, battled for control. in 1985, in one of the ugliest breakups in rock history, waters
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>> there's a large kind of body of people, fans, i guess, of the band who sort of blame me for having destroyed something that is precious to them. and i guess i can understand it to some extent. but i regret it. >> reporter: while the other members continued on as pink floyd, waters went out on his own. >> i was doing gigs in, you know, 4,000-seat arenas to 1500 people when they were playing to 70,000 people in local football stadiums. all the same songs, still playing all my songs, but. and that was very character for me. very character for me. >> reporter: the bass player suddenly had to come out of the shadows. >> i was so scared. i was just terrified. >> reporter: what were you
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>> failure, being found out. >> reporter: what were you afraid of being found out? >> if people find out you're a wanker, you know. >> do you think everybody has that feel on some level? >> i'm sure that's right. mine is very much connected to the whole father/son thing. >> reporter: waters was just five months old when his father eric waters was killed during world war ii. after a recent concert, a veteran came up to him. >> and he said to me, your father would be proud of you. and i just -- >> reporter: you lost it. >> i lost it completely. i was just, and i realized it was a uniquely kind of important moment to recognize, i could still be that needy of my father's approval, if you like. but also emotionally entangled in that loss. >> reporter: at the end of his last tour, for the documentary about the wall, he went to the beach in italy where his father
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you'd never been. >> no. i'd never followed to his death, if you like. i'd never stood on that beach staring out to sea. thinking about that. >> reporter: and in the other war that altered waters' life, with his former band mates, especially david gilmore, he's declared a fragile truce. there's kind of a peace with you guys these days? >> sort of. yeah. david and i, we don't see each other, kind of ever. >> reporter: which is not slamming each other. >> yeah, which is a very good thing. >> reporter: why did that happen? >> well, it's kind of a waste of time. you know, it's a real waste of time and energy to butt-heads about things that are essentially superficial. >> reporter: this past fri
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album in 25 years. is this the life we really want? a question he asks again in his new tour. >> the whole show is really a kind of musical protest against the acceptance of the state of perpetual warfare. >> reporter: when you take an overtly political show like this into the polarized environment. >> mm-hm. >> reporter: of this country, what sort of reaction are you expecting? >> i'll let you know in a few weeks' time. >> reporter: at a time when the american president wants to build a wall, roger waters is still trying to tear them down. is there still a role for the protest song? >> absolutely. of course, you know. if one isn't protesting this
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what's going on now? i think i'd rather be dead. one of the most famous guitars in music history was recently sold at an auction for $2 million. it was jerry garcia's custom wolf. the new owner is a long-time grateful dead fan with deep pockets. here's anthony mason. >> reporter: it may be one of the most well-traveled guitars in rock 'n roll history. ♪ jerry garcia played his custom-made wolf in the rock halls of europe, the arenas of the u.s. and even under the great pyramids of egypt. ♪ >> reporter: the grateful dead front man first used the guitar at a private, 1973 concert for the hell's angels, but now, nearly 22 years after garcia's
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death, wolf found a new home. >> selling once, selling twice, sold! >> reporter: marketing ceo, brian haligan placed the winning bid, the $1.9 million price tag after a buyer's fee makes wolf one of the most expensive guitars ever sold. >> the guitar and jerry and the grateful dead have had a great impact on my life. and i'm thrilled to own an a little piece of it. >> reporter: the guitar's previous owner decided to sell-off the rock relic and donate the proceeds to the southern poverty law center. an organization dedicated to fighting h fighting hate groups. and keeping in the spirit of sharing, an anonymous charity matched the purchase price, netting more than $3.5 million for the law center. ♪
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engineers in california are still trying to figure out how to clear a massive landslide off the pacific coast highway. john blackstone is on ragged point, a little south of the slide. >> reporter: the gash on the hillside is more than a third of a mile wide, tumbling into the ocean and there's more waiting to come down. are we walking on a potential slide? >> we are walking on an active land slide.
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>> reporter: cal tran's engineer cook showed us where the landslide is still slipping. start small? >> start small and still dig. >> reporter: the ongoing movement is being measured by ground sensors like these and radar that continually scans the hillside. an animation shows how more than a million tons of rock and earth came down, pushing some 15 acres of new land 600 feet into the sea. from here, this massive land slide stretches more than 1800 feet across, more than 1,000 feet high, and it's still moving. so unstable, engineers haven't even begun to figure out how to clear this road that clings to the coastline 150 feet above the ocean. >> it was cut in 80 years ago by hand, but it was cut through large masses of unstable ground. >> reporter: unusually heavy rain this winter triggered other mudslides as well, closing more than 50 miles of highway 1.
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that has left tourist businesses there almost completely cut off. the one way in for visitors is by air. but even that's not certain. when we tried to fly in, fog blocked our landing. okay, let's go. that left one or option, a nearly mile-long hike. president of the big sur chamber of commerce was our guide. >> this is the only trail access in from north to south for local residents. >> reporter: he is general manager of a big sur restaurant with spectacular views but these days almost no customers. >> so the tradeoff for this really amazing location is a certain fragility of access. every once in a while we lose it and we have to work our way around it and that's what we're challenged with today. >> reporter: the bridge that's out could be replaced by late september, but the landslide that's up this year could take more than a year to fix. but tourists should be aware that parts of highway 1 to the
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there are spectacular views to
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i just need a second. is your weight holding you back? [male narrator] are everyday tasks getting harder and harder to do? did you see this? hm? your cousin's in the hospital from a heart attack. really? [narrator] health risks associated with excess weight or obesity can be serious. but you can do something about it. i know you're worried. i found this. [narrator] take the your weight matters challenge. visit your weight matters dot org where you'll find free resources to help you take control. you can start improving your life right away. download the free toolkit to prepa you to speak with a healthcare provider about your weight and health. your weight does matter. accept the challenge
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visit your weight matters dot org. captioning funded by cbs it's monday, june 5th. this is the "cbs morning news." the hunt is on for those who helped three people carry out a terror attack in londoni that left at least seven people dead and 47 injured. singers from around the world came together in manchester to stand tall in the face of terror. and bill cosby's sexual assault trial gets under way today with opening statement.

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