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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  June 12, 2017 2:35am-4:00am EDT

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i'm so proud to be a non-smoker. ask your doctor if chantix is right for you. many insurance plans cover chantix for a low or $0 copay. ♪ don't go chasing waterfalls >> i'm surprised it's not more elaborate. >> remember tlc, hard to believe it's been 25 years since they released their debut album. >> it sure has. i remember all of those. baby, baby, baby, what about your friends? i was loving that. >> you dance to everything. >> that's right. >> the surviving ladies are still making music. and we talked to them behind the scenes of their new music video shoot. >> don't go chasing waterfalls, please stick to the rivers and
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the lakes that you're used to. >> kwloin turn it on you see tlc, how do you feel? >> i start grilled cheesen. >> colgates all day. >> believe in yourself. the rest is up to me and you. >> the voice coach's version has been viewed $62 million -- 62 million times. we were on set of the music video back in 1995. one is now a mom of two. and chili has a 20-year-old son of her own. lisa "left eye" lopez died in a car crash in 2002 but she is kept alive in their music, name and fashion. >> she is always with us. >> she is on you
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>> fans tell us how they can feel her energy. >> i ain't too proud to beg, no. ♪ >> so i creep. >> t-boz and chili have plenty of swag. tlc's got a new generation of fans. >> we look out in the audience and we see 10-years-old and stuff and it's time to sing red light special and the kids are right there. don't clap. >> back in the day -- >> we were like red, light -- all that g. >> i don't want
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>> watch how i sneak in this question to chili about nick cannon. >> i really do love nick cannon. i thought that maybe -- i had hope. i had -- nick is my guy. and i was like oh -- >> we just friends. >> okay, all right. >> tlc has a lot of celebrity friends including katy perry who donated $5,000 to their kick starter campaign. katy won a sleepover. >> what was that like? >> we have not done that yet. >> katy, where are you girl? we have our oncies and are waiting. >> i could not be more jealous of kevin frazier. but katy you have a little bit of time. they are headlining the i love the '90s tour this summer.
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"dancing with the stars" next season. lionel richie's daughter can't wait to see her dad in concert. >> i requested 500 tickets. i'm not exaggerating. >> i just need one, nicole. >> lionel's tour was rescheduled after he needed more time to heal from a knee surgery but he is back in fighting shape and i got a sneak peek at rehearsal. >> the first thing i thought was oh, really? >> that was designed. get that in there. >> she is. >> she is very -- we have known each other forever. >> she calls you mr. richie? >> the hit maker teaming up for mariah for a 22-city
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>> such incredible songs we grew up hearing and loving and listening to and i'm excited about it. >> lionel is excited to be back after a knee injury forced him to postpone his original concert date. >> i'm well now. it's not the end of the career but i feel great now. it's back to normal. >> the other diva we are clamoring to see you with is adele. >> she will make time for you. >> it's tough. >> can we talk about nicole? >> i requested 500 tickets and i'm not exaggerating. >> did she ask you for 500 tickets? >> that is a true statement. and nicole has never, never done this before. >> lionel is the cool dad to a point. sophia called him out for tracking her phone. >> did you track her phone? >>ou
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>> you know, lionel was once a guest judge on "american idol" and paula abdul is back on tour for the first time in 25 years and she's still got at 54. she proved it when she lit up the lip sync battle stage. >> i had no idea the impact that i had on jenna until channing came up to me on an event and said straight up i'm not kidding when i tell you this. my wife is like you're the reason -- i've always wanted to seeou y and do cold hearted snake. and then, smash cut to a couple months later and i got to work with her. ♪ >> yeah, that lip sync battle surprise was jenna's idea but jenna
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they look and dance like they could be sisters. >> she said it on the show how freaked out she was dancing with you. >> she is incredible. >> she's not the only one fan girling all over paula. since the former laker girl got her start in the mid-80s, three generations love the song. the moves and little girls love her fashion. >> forever your girl. >> now let's break down the total package tour. she has four costume changes, performs six hits, paula, along with the newid ks on the block and boyz 2 men are hitting up 45 cities. >> there's a pa. >> reporter: where i can go with the mosch pit area. and they are having
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they're asking me questions. we're googling we can't believe your age. i'm going, i'm forever your girl. i got to go. >> when i tell you paula is good back on the stage, i was so excited and happy for her. by the way, this is a milestone for paula, the first "american idol" premiered on june 11th 15 years
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travel considerations provided by -- look at all those stars with birthdays this weekend. shia labeouf is turning 31. elizabeth hurley, 52. look at your choices which model scores back to back sports illustrated covers? that is kate upton who turns 25 this week. monday, "e.t." is with prince harry's girlfriend making her first public appearance since pippa's wedding. only we are behind the scenes of the bad moms
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>> we are almost out of time this weekend. but for all the late breaking hollywood news go to our website, etonline.com. >> check out the new video from tim mcgraw and faith hill. >> enjoy it and the rest of your weekend. bye-bye. ♪ ♪ that's how you talk to a woman ♪ ♪ that's how you speak to a girl ♪
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turning in homework when she wrote "royals." it spent nine weeks at number one and earned her two grammys 6grammys. dav david bowie said listening to her music felt like listening to tomorrow. but she found it an odd fit. >> reporter: you said you're not very good at being famous. >> i'm not. it's hard. it's all body language, and, you know, the angles. i don't know, the angles. >> reporter: she aspired to be an artist, not a star. ella, who grew up in a suburb of auckland, was fronting the high school band at age 12 and
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you read constandly. >> yeah. i had no friends, and i read a ton of books. >> reporter: her father's a civil engineer. her mother, a poet laureate. >> i remember being 2 and lying awake in my mom's bed, talking about our favorite fruits and why we loved them. and there's a lyric on the album where i say i'm my mother's child. and i don't think i was ever going to be but an artist. because of my mom. >> reporter: sonya yelich still accompanies her 20-year-old daughter on her travels. your mom has said your head is always on fire. >> oh, great. >> reporter: is it true? >> i don't know about on fire. it's definitely, there's such current around me all the time. ♪
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like the way i go through the world, and the way i see things is so, like, it's like in tech any color. it's like magic to me, and i feel like i have to get people to see what it is that i'm seeing. >> reporter: right. her sensitivity is heightened by a neurological condition, called sin esthesia, where sounds conjure textures and colors in her mind. you see it as what? >> it's like a colored gas that like fills the room. >> reporter: that's pretty cool. >> it's pretty cool. it's pretty crazy. >> reporter: does it help your writing? >> i think it definitely sends it in the right direction. i think i make the choices that i make with songs in part because of the association. >> this is a song called "my ability." >> repte
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pretty big breakup. >> yeah. ♪ i was able to make a record about being alone and celebrating that and, you know, absolutely hating that. ♪ they say you are a little much for me ♪ ♪ you're a liability ♪ you're a little much for me >> but being sultry was the thing that really unlocked the process. ♪ i'm a liability ♪ ♪ i'm a little much >> reporter: you, yourself have said this record in spots is a little weird. >> it's kind of weird, yeah. i think about david bowie, and every record was such a
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and you almost felt afraid on a new record. am i even going to understand this? and i think that, throwing people into that sort of fear is like the most important thing you can do as an artist long term. >> reporter: have you had a lot of rehearsal time so far? the day we followed lorde, she was headed to a rehearsal studio where she began by jumping online to release her latest single. >> it's happening. okay. now twitter. ooh, so weird. ♪ ♪ oh, they bite you ♪ they said you would always be in love ♪ ♪ but you're not in love >> reporter: she was rehearsing for her appearance at last weekend's governor's ball festival. >> here, performing for you, and it feels so
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♪ >> reporter: are you as happy on stage as you are in the studio? >> i think i'm happiest in the studio. stage is different, because i get so nervous that it's sort of like a weird trans, like i really have to, it's quite, i definitely, when i'm on stage i feel myself go right to the edge of the cliff so to speak. if i broke my arm on stage i wouldn't know it, i don't think, pause i because i'm so dialed into this crazy environment of. >> reporter: after nearly four years away from that crazy environment with her al babum release, lorde returns this week. do you think you're ready to be back? >> i don't know. being back is quite, we talked about it not being good with fame, but no,
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ready to be in conversation
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a newly-discovered work by the legendary painter jackson pollock goes on the auction block later this month. it's expected to fetch nearly $15 million. a few years back one of his works sold for $58 million. what is unusual is where it was found. >> reporter: jackson pollock was known for his abstract splatter paintings. he became a sensation on the art scene in the 1940s. more than 60 years after his death, a formerly unknown piece of work might have popped up in arizona. >> reporter: when josh levine's auction firm was called to this retirement community in 2015, they thought they were
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examine memorabilia signed by laker star kobe bryant. instead, they stumbled on what appeared to be hidden treasure. >> it was all packed up. all in piles. you could see library boxes of personal effects, the way tax returns, letters, correspondence and then these stacks of art. >> reporter: inside this garage levine says he found famous works of art and what he believes is the work of abstract impressionist jackson pollock. >> this will be the biggest thing i've represented in my life. >> reporter: it had been sitting in the arizona garage since 1992, when the owner, who wishes to remain unnamed, inherited it from his sister. >> jen everybody gordon was a socialite in the new york scene at the right time at the right time. all the artists were hanging out at her apartment, including jackson pollack. >> reporter: finding the painting was the easy part. levine reportedly spent
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to date it and a private investigator to confirm he hung out with the guggenheims. >> i really looked at it all over and under magnification. >> reporter: appraiser shawn morton was asked to assess the painting. >> when i first saw the painting i was a little skeptical until i learned of the owner and her relationship with jackson pollack. >> reporter: numerous lawsuits have erupted over the years over the authenticity of his paintings. this one, a real deal, was found in a new york garbage dump. levine is convinced his discovery is the real thing. >> i'm putting my entire reputation and business on the line saying this. there are people who will go, you are nuts, but i'm sorry, we have everything. we know, the only thing i don't have is a photograph of jennifer standing next to jackson going hey, look here's our pangts.
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this monday. from the cbs broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano. america's longest war. three u.s. soldiers murdered this weekend in afghanistan. the debate intensifies in washington over how to end the 16-year war. >> mr. chairman, i believe we're at a stalemate. also ton, ightidpresent trump's wedding surprise and sunday morning tweet storm. gay pride events turn into resist trump marches. >> we are not invisible! and as puerto rico votes whether to become the 51st state, we check in with puerto ricans on the island of manhattan. >> we deserve all the rights of citizens. this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to thern
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i'm elaine quijano. the pentagon is investigating the apparent murders of three u.s. soldiers this weekend in eastern afghanistan. the afghan army says one of its troops turned his gun on the americans before he was shot dead. the taliban claims this was the gunman and that he was one of their own, an army infiltrator. the attack comes as america's longest war is at another crossroads. the pentagon wants to add thousands of troops to the 8,000-plus already in afghanistan. they're helping in the fight against the taliban, al qaeda and isis. but some in congress want to cut off funding for the 16-year war, saying the u.s. has sacrificed enough blood and treasure. here's tony dokoupil. >> reporter: when an afghan soldier opened fire saturday, killing three americans who were supposed to be his allies. vice president mike pence offered solace at a speech in milwaukee. >> suffice it to say, when heros fall, americans grieve.
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with the families of these american heroes. >> reporter: after nearly 16 years, more than 2200 casualties and an estimated cost topping $800 billion, the u.s. is deadlocked in its fight with the taliban. the islamic militia that rules much of the countryside and took credit for saturday's murders. lieutenant nicholson is asking for as many as 5,000 additional soldiers to break what he calls a stalemate. but congress is showing signs of war fatigue. >> we have allowed the executive branch to take over our foreign policy and to determine how to use our troops. it's wrong. >> reporter: north carolina congressman walter jones opposes the war and is the author of new legislation that would defund combat operation. the bill now has ten co-sponsors, three republicans
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>> congress has the only power to declare war. it's in the constitution, and yet all the seven and a half years i've been in congress, we've never taken up the issue of war. >> reporter: most of the current house of representatives, more than 300 in all, were not in office the last time congress voted on the use of force in afghanistan. >> there is no easy solution. it's a catch-22 for us. >> reporter: a senior fellow for the foundation of the defense of democracy says the issue is not only a lack of debate in congress but a lack of clear strategy on the battlefield. >> you have to turn around and look at the big picture and see that the alternative to not staying is defeat. >> reporter: president trump didn't discuss afghanistan much on the campaign trail, but an increase in troops would contradict his america-first promise to avoid prolonged military operations overseas. this weekend, it was confirmed, u.s. forces are providing technical support and
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battling isis-linked militants. dozens of civilians and troops, including 13 philippine marines have been killed trying to drive islamist militants from the city. an airstrike was conducted in somalia. it destroyed a command center used by the islamic-based group. officials say as many as 10 militants were killed. u.s.-backed forces in syria and iraq continue to gain ground on isis militants in the cities of raqqah and mosul. jonathan vigliotti has the latest from our london bureau. >> reporter: elaine, raqqah has long been considered the islamic state's capital in syria, and now at least part of it's been ripped from the terror group's hands. although the area is small, this is a symbolic defeat. a milestone that comes after two days of intense fighting by u.s.-backed forces. the fighters recaptured the northwestern neighborhood this morning.
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including a commander. the british-based observatory for human rights who has been monitoring the war says u.s.-backed forces now control two neighborhoods in the city and have just entered a third. the battle, however, is likely to be long and difficult, as the extremist group fiercely defends its self-declared capital. fighting also ramped up this weekend in the city of mosul, isis's last remaining stronghold in iraq. u.s.-backed forces began their counter assault eight months ago, and since then, all of the city has been recaptured except for an ongaenclave near the wes bank. that hasn't stopped them from firing back, and it's often the civilians caught in the crossfire. nearly 500,000 people have been displaced in the operation to retake the city. a curfew has been declared between mosul and baghdad, and they continue to say victory in mosul is imminent, however, the militants control areas south and west of the city as well as
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swaths of the area. near the border with syria. >> jonathan vigliotti, thanks. president trump returns to washington after a mostly quiet weekend at his new jersey golf club. here's errol barnett. >> reporter: president trump is wrapping up another weekend at his new jersey golf club. he stayed out of the public eye for the most part, aside from a brief cameo at a wedding. but sunday morning, mr. trump was back to criticizing james comey. calling the former fbi director cowardly. >> you're your own worst enemy, mr. president, knock it off. >> reporter: appearing on "face the nation," republican senator, lindsey graham said the prenesidtwt's eets are doing more harm than good. >> there's a lynch mob mentality about the trump administration in the press, but these tweets that he does feeds that lynch mob. >> reporter: it was a tweet by the president which first alluded to possible recordings of his conversations with comey.
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collins. >> this is an issue that the president should have cleared up in his press conference. >> reporter: but senate minority leader chuck schumer wants the president to appear before the senate. >> i'd like to invite the president to testify before the senate. i think we could work out a way that it could be dignified, public, with questions. with leader mcconnell. >> reporter: saturday it was announced attorney general jeff sessions will appear before the senate intelligence committee on tuesday. republican committee member james lankford. >> we have to get his side of the story related to jim comey. some of the conversations jim comey had with the president, where was jeff sessions a participant there. >> reporter: now the president participated in a fund raiser at his golf club before returning to washington where another week of congressional testimony awaits. >> thank you. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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in los angeles, sunday, the annual gay pride parade turned into a resist trump march. mireya villarreal was there. >> reporter: in the heart of hollywood, thousands of protesters hit the streets to shine a light on what they believe is an attack on civil rights. >> while it's really important for us to stand up every year and celebrate us being gay, it's not about just us right now. there is a larger community of minorities that feel like they're under threat. >> reporter: stephanie ambrose is here supporting her gay son. >> i've been marching a lot against our current is administration, because i think they threaten everything that i want for my family. >> reporter: that sentiment and other politically-charged marches around the country are what motivated protest organizer brian peddleton to push for a change.
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>> instead of parading, we should march for our human rights. >> reporter: for years, this was los angeles's pride parade, filled with fun costumes and floats moving down the streets, but this year, it has taken a very serious turn. the crowd is diverse with more than 100 different organizations participating. many of them not associated with the lgbt groups. mayor eric garcetti believes los angeles should be at the forefront of this new civil rights movement. >> some people want to pull us apart in d.c. we are pulling to the. >> reporter: locking arms with protesters, maxine waters blames the current administration for creating a divide. >> it is so important for us to send a message across this country that we will not tolerate this president and his cabinet and his allies in the way that they are disrespecting the people of the country. >> reporter: organizers want today's unifying protest to further the resistance movement. pushing les
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take action. mireya villarreal, los angeles. a controversial figure led off the puerto rico day parade in new york today. oscar lopez river ear yea was i first float. he is a former member of a puerto rican nationalist group linked to deadly bombings in the 1970s and '80s. he was released from prison last month after president obama commuted his sentence for seditious conspiracy. many boycotted the parade over rivera. the parade kicked off as voters went to the polls in puerto rico to decide whether it should be the 51st state. >> reporter: four the fifth time in 50 years, puerto ricans went to the polls on sunday to decide whether to become the 51st state of the united states, seek independence or keep the
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puerto ricans have had u.s. citizenship for the past century, but they don't pay federal taxes, vote for american presidents or receive as much federal funding as u.s. states. the referendum comes as puerto rico's economy is crumbling. billions of dollars in debt, the bankrupt island is struggling with failing schools and poverty. nearly 500,000 puerto ricans have moved to the u.s. mainland in the peast decade, many seekig better jobs. at the puerto rican day parade, many people said they hoped for statehood. >> it's the best thing that puerto rico can go through right now. with all the debt that they have. >> reporter: why would it help puerto rico. >> overall, we are treated as citizens of the united states. i think it would be a great thing. >> reporter: those who oppose statehood warn puerto rico could struggle even more financially, because they could be forced to pay millions in federal taxes or lose its cultural identity. a concerned puerto rican native says he doesn't have. >> all you have to do is look at this. you think these people have a culture identity problem? >> rep
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rican residents here and in their homeland vote for their island to become a state, congress would have to approve. and with the main opposition party boycotting the referendum, lawmakers are expected to question its legitimacy. >> thank you. jimmy carter is showing no signs of slowing down, the 92-year-old cancer survivor and former president was spotted aboard a flight from washington to atlanta a few days ago. the 39th president took the time to shake hands with everyone on board. earlier in the week, carter received a medal for distinguished public service, and last weekend he attended the funeral for rock legend, gregg allman. coming up next, the pulse nightclub massacre. one year later, a shattered community continues to heal.
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year since the deadliest mass shooting in american history. 49 people were killed in the attack at the pulse nightclub in orlando, florida. prayer vigils and other events honoring the victims are being held in orlando and across the country. kenneth craig returned to orlando where survivors and families of the dead are still struggling. >> reporter: milan dimarco describes every day as a battle. another day of sad and confused memories of the massacre at orlando's pulse nightclub. >> with every shot it was almost like glass breaking and it was glass braking and glass breaking, because the place is full of bottles. >> reporter: he was a dancer at the nightclub. he survived by hiding in a dressing room but heard the carnage on the other side of the wall where omar mateen opened fire on the crowd, killing 49 people. milan struggles with survivor's guilt but has poured his anguish into his passion of costume design. >> it happened to me for a reason.
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you believe that? >> yeah, i absolutely do. >> reporter: do you know what the reason is? >> absolutely not. i'm not supposed to yet. >> reporter: the doors here at pulse never opened to the public again. for now, the site serves as a tribute to victims and survivors. eventually, it will be replaced with a permanent memorial. >> this keeps me going. >> reporter: tarah connell has a permanent memorial in her home to honor her son who had big dreams of becoming a firefighter. >> it's hard to sleep. i'm thinking of what did he go through? what was he thinking? what was the last thing he said? >> reporter: she said it's been heartwarming to learn how many people cared about cory, but recently, she feels herself buckling. >> i put on this face, you know, and i've heard how strong i am. you're such a strong person, you know, everything you're going through, and, you know, and i
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don't know why all these feelings are all coming the past few months. i question, am i really a strong person? because i hurt. >> reporter: for tara, as for milan, what will get them through the day's events is being together with the only people who really understand. kenneth craig, cbs news, orlando. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. stains happen...
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not all fish oil supplements provide the same omega-3 power. megared advanced triple absorption is absorbed three times better. so one softgel has more omega-3 power than three standard fish oil pills. megared advanced triple absorption. according to a recent report in credit suites, as many as one out of every four shopping malls in the country is expected to close in the next five years. hundreds have shut down in the last 15 years. meg oliver shows us how these empty spaces are being transformed. >> reporter: photographer seth lawless got a look at what happens to malls after they fail, left abandoned and neglected, the giant buildings slowly fall apart. >> everybody saw it as a dead
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>> reporter: this used to be the site of the old granite run mall outside philadelphia. this was the food court? the developer is giving the area a 21st century makeover. what makes it different? >> you know, what's different about this, there's a lot of malls being redeveloped across the country, because malls are dying everywhere. what we did was really, really aggressive. we took down the whole interior portion of the mall. first building b. >> reporter: he is going to replace the old mall with a complex of buildings for shopping, entertainment and a health care facility. >> we have twice as much retail per capita than any other country in the world. >> reporter: ellen dunham jones says re-imagining old malls is becoming a necessity. it's estimated there are about 1,000 malls across the country, around one third are at risk of failing. in rhode island, the historic westminster arcade found new life after adding apartments to
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an old strip mall in tennessee was converted to a church. in the hundred oaks mall in nashville survived after a health facility was constructed next to the store. >> a lot of malls are turned into medical clinics or community colleges. or all range of educational facilities. >> reporter: the first phase of the new property is set to open in may 2018. meg oliver, cbs news, media, pennsylvania. up next, a young patriot on a mission.
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wednesday is flag day, when americans celebrate the stars and stripes being adopted as the u.s. flag on june 14, 1777. now we are introduced to a young patriot who celebrates the flag every day. >> reporter: young boys aren't easily appalled. but 11-year-old preston sharp sure knows the feeling. >> yeah, i was really surprised. >> reporter: and disappointed. >> yeah, really disappointed, yeah. >> reporter: had you seen him like that before? >> not this angry and passionate. >> reporter: preston's mom april said what upset him so was visiting his grandfather's grave and realizing not every veteran in the cemetery had a flag. april says even hours later, he was still
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>> i was like, son, if you are going to complain about something, you have to do something about it or let it go. and he's like, i'm going to do something about it, mom. >> reporter: next thing she knew, preston was taking odd jobs and soliciting donations to buy flags and flowers for every veteran in his grandpa's cemetery. and when that cemetery was covered he moved on to another and then another. and here we are, two years and 23,000 graves later. and he does this every week, rain or shine. especially rain. why? >> like they were out there in the rain doing their job, protecting us. >> reporter: preston says coming out here in the rain or in this case, 100-degree heat, is the least he can do. >> thank you for your service, michael. >> reporter: his devotion really is enormous. >> thank you for your service, samuel. >> reporter: and contagious. >> thank you so much for coming out today. >> reporter: now when word gets out that preston will be at a cemetery, a lot of folks feel compelled to join in. >> it's just amazing. >> reporter: people like vietnam
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veteran, fred loveland. >> what he's doing brings them out, because they can't believe that a young man in this country is doing what he does. >> we've got to put the flower in. >> reporter: it is a movement of young and old. >> thank you for your service, louis. >> reporter: of those who served their country and those who are so grateful they did. >> thank you for your service, alan. >> reporter: all led by this little pied piper of patriotism, who saw an injustice and decided to do something about it. wednesday is flag day, but for preston sharp, it's just another one of 365 chances to do what's right. >> thank you for your service, norman. >> reporter: steve hartman, on the road in redding, california. >> a true patriot. that's overnight news for this monday. for some of you, the news continues, for others, check back a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm elaine quijano. the pentagon is investigating the apparent murders of three u.s. soldiers this weekend in eastern afghanistan. the afghan army says one of its troops turned his gun on the americans before he was shot dead. the taliban claims this was the gunman and that he was one of their own, an army infiltrator. the attack comes as america's longest war is at another crossroads. the pentagon wants to add thousands of troops to the 8,000-plus already in afghanistan. they're helping in the fight against the taliban, al qaeda and isis, but some in congress want to cut off funding for the 16-year war, saying the u.s. has sacrificed enough blood and treasure. here's tony doko.
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>> reporter: when an afghan soldier opened fire saturday, killing three americans, who were supposed to be his allies, vice president mike pence offered solace at a speech in milwaukee. >> suffice it to say, when heroes fall, americans grieve. and our thoughts and prayers are with the families of these american heroes. >> reporter: after nearly 16 years, more than 2200 casualties and an estimated cost topping $800 billion, the u.s. is deadlocked in its fight with the taliban. the islamic militia that rules much of the countryside and took credit for saturday's murders. lieutenant general john nicholson is asking for as many as 5,000 additional soldiers to break what he calls a stalemate. but congress is showing signs of war fatigue. >> we have allowed the executive branch to take over our foreign policy and to determine how to use our troops, it's wrong. >> r
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congressman walter jones opposes the war and is the author of new legislation that would defund combat operations. the bill has ten o-sponsors, three republicans and seven democrats. >> congress has the only power to declare war. it's in the constitution. and yet all the seven, almost seven and a half years i've been in congress, we have never taken up the issue of war. >> reporter: most of the current house of representatives, more than 300 people in all, were not in office the last time congress voted on the u.s. of force in afghanistan. >> there is no easy solution. it's a catch-22 for us. >> reporter: bill, a senior fellow at the foundation for the defense of democracy says the issue is not only a lack of debate in congress but a lack of clear strategy on the battlefield. >> you have to turn around and look at the big picture and see that the alternative to not staying is defeat. >> reporter: president trump didn't discuss afghanistan much
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increase in troops in afghanistan would contradict his america first promise to avoid prolonged, overseas military operations. elaine? tony, thanks. this weekend, the u.s. embassy in the philippines confirmed u.s. special forces are providing technical support and surveillance for local troops battling isis-linked militants. dozens of civilians and troops, including 13 philippine marines have been killed in the three-week battle to drive islamic militants from the city. today the u.s. military unleashed a drone strike on al shabab militants in somalia. it destroyed a command center used by the al qaeda-led group. as many as ten militants were killed. u.s.-backed forces in syria and iraq continue to gain ground against isis in raqqah and mosul. jonathan vigliotti has the
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>> reporter: raqqah has long been considered the islamic state capital in syria. and now at least part of it's been ripped from the terror group's hands. although the area in question is small, this is a symbolic defeat, a milestone that comes after two days of intense fighting by u.s.-backed forces. the team of kurdish-led fighters recaptured the northwestern neighborhood this morning. 12 isis were killed including a commander. the observatory for human rights who has been monitoring the war says u.s. backed forces now control two neighborhoods in the city and have just entered a third. the battle is however likely to be long and difficult, as the extremist group fiercely defends its self-declared capital. fighting also ramped up this weekend in mosul, isis's last remaining stronghold in iraq. u.s.-backed forces began their counter offense eight months ago and nearly all has been captured except for an enclave near the western bank, but it hasn't stopped the isis forces from anring back.
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caught in the crossfire. nearly 500,000 are displaced. they have begun an operation between mosul and baghdad and they continue to say victory is imminent, however militants control swaths of territory near the border with syria. president trump is back at the white house after spending another weekend at his golf course in new jersey. this week is expected to be another political rollercoaster in washington with the congress at testimony of attorney general jeff sessions. the topic of course, russia's efforts to influence the presidential election. john dickerson of "face the nation" spoke to two members of the senate judiciary community, lindsey graham and chuck schumer. >> he doesn't believe he did anything wrong with the russians, and i tend to believe him. he can't collude with his own government, why do you think he's colluding with the russians.
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so there's a part of this that genuinely frustrates the president. mr. president, don't make a circus out of your presidency. if you want to come to the judiciary committee and testify under oath, we'll put comey right by you. it will be the highest-rated tv show in the world but it's not good for the democracy. >> isn't the challenge not the collusion question. but the interference question? and wouldn't that be the tough questions for him? >> sheerhere's what i think. i think the president believes if we pursue how russia interfered with the election we're suggesting he did not win fairly. i see no evidence of the president's campaign colluding with the russian. i see all kinds of evidence of the russians trying to destroy our democracy. there will be a bill coming this week to punish russia for interfering into our elections. they hacked into the dnc, podesta's e-mails, it was russians. they colluded with assad so he could keep his chemical weapons, and i think they were complicit in the attack by assad on children in syria.
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we're going to punish the russians. any member of the congress who doesn't want to punish russia for what they've done are betraying democracy. and if the president doesn't sign it he will be betraying democracy. >> what do you think he'll do? >> i think he'll sign it. and if he doesn't we'll override the veto. >> what do you want to hear from jeff sessions? >> first, i think he should be sworn under oath. second, i think it should be public. there's very little that's classified. anything that's classified they can do in a separate classified briefing. there are some questions about sessions that have to be asked. first, did he interfere with the russian investigation before he recused himself? second, what safeguards are there now so that he doesn't interfere? third, he says he was involved in the firing of comey, and the president said comey was fired because of russia. how does that fit in with his recusal? it doesn't seem to stand up well to me, and fourth, he's been involved in the selection of the new fbi director. did he talk about the russian investigation with them?
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epa administrator scott pruitt is praising president trump for creating 50,000 new jobs in the coal industry since he took office. the trouble is, pruitt's got his numbers wrong. there are only 50,000 coal industry jobs in the entire country. and since the president took office, the increase is about 1,000. some of those jobs are at a brand-new mine outside pittsburgh. don dahler is there. >> reporter: we are 120 feet below ground. and this is the entrance to one of the mines. they've just started digging these, and this is a brand-new mine. this is one of the big mining machines that's digging in to those coal seams with these big teeth. the material pulled out of these mines is called metallurgical coal as opposed to the coal used in electricity, this is coal used in the production of steel.
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but for the people in this area, this rock represents hope. did it feel for a while that this was a dying industry? >> yes. yes, it did. >> reporter: a bleak thought for a place where coal runs in the blood. >> my grandfathers were coal miner, my father was a coal miner for a while. >> reporter: rob listened carefully to candidate trump's promises on the campaign trail. what did it mean to you to hear the commitment he made to the coal industry? >> i think it's great, because, you know, gave people a little more optimism, and people have a little more hope in the industry. >> reporter: that's the coal seam right there? >> reporter: the mine was in the works before the election. but last week, the president highlighted it as a rare bright spot. >> a big opening of a brand new mine. it's unheard of. for many, many years that hasn't happened. >> reporter: the coal industry has lost more than a third of its workforce over the last decade, with 6
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number of active mines in the past 20 years. >> it's hard for me to see that coal's going to recover its huge market share. >> reporter: jay aft is head of the electricity industry center. he says steel-producing coal represents a teeny fraction of the overall industry and won't move the needle on the bigger problem. >> natural gas has eaten coal's market share. gone down from 50% to 30%. those coal mines are unlikely to come back anytime soon. >> reporter: when did things get rough around here? >> i'd say in the '90s. it started in the '90s, maybe, where the mines were shutting down, and that's where the people worked here. >> reporter: since then, betty rhodes hasn't had as many hungry mouths to feed at the coal miner's cafe. the new mine is only hiring 70 to 100 new miners but she's bracing for business to pick up. >> reporter: what does it mean to this community? >> everybody hoping it's income
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>> reporter: down in the mine, they're just happy to finally be moving forward. >> do you think this is the beginning of something? >> i hope so, yeah. i think it will be. >> reporter: it may be only 70 jobs, but those 70 jobs mean the world to those 70 families. there are only about 50,000 coal miners left in the country, which is why it was a surprise when scott pruitt announced that 50,000 jobs had been added to the economy. there have been jobs add, but only about 1,000. the "the cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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lysol. what it takes to protect. ♪ i don't think that's how they're made. klondike hooks up with tasty flavors... the best ice cream bars ever conceived. four years ago, a singer and song writer who goes by the name lorde shot to the top of the charts with her grammy award-winnin
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royals." we took the subway with the young songstress. ♪ >> reporter: one of the most anticipated albums of the year had its inspiration under ground, in the new york city subway. >> i love this train. it's my favorite. >> reporter: for nearly a year, lorde used the f-train as her mobile office. did you actually do writing down here in the subway? >> every day, twice a way. i like thanked the subway in my album. i wouldn't have been able to make the album without it. it's amazing space to be around people. >> reporter: on her daily ride to the recording studio -- do you stand or sit? >> i mean, i do sit. >> reporter: all right, well sit. usually unrecognized, the new zealand-born singer worked on the words and music for melodrama, the album she'll finally release this week.
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>> singing my songs, quietly as i could so no one would hear me. >> reporter: i want to hear that album. ♪ come get my things i but can't let go ♪ >> reporter: did you freak out at all during the making of this record? >> i definitely had real moments of true fear, like just terrible, i shouldn't be allowed to do this. ♪ >> reporter: the pressure was so great it took her four years to follow up the record that literally changed pop music. ♪ ♪ bloodstains ♪ ball gowns ♪ we don't care ♪ who's driving cadillacs
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>> reporter: ella yelich o'connor was 15 and still turning in homework when she wrote "royals." it spent nine weeks at number one and earned her two grammys. david bowie said listening to her music felt like listening to tomorrow. but lorde found the sudden fame an odd fit. >> reporter: you said you're not very good at being famous. >> i'm not. it's har. it's all body language, and, you know, the angles. i don't know, the angles. >> reporter: she aspired to be an artist, not a star. ella, who grew up in a suburb of auckland, was fronting the high school band at age 12 and devouring books.
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>> yeah. i had no friends, and i read a ton of books. >> reporter: her father's a civil engineer. her mother, a poet laureate. >> i remember being 2 and lying awake in my mom's bed, talking about our favorite fruits and why we loved them. and there's a lyric on the album where i say i'm my mother's child. and i don't think i was ever going to be but an artist. because of my mom. >> reporter: sonya yelich still accompanies her 20-year-old daughter on her travels. your mom has said your head is always on fire. >> oh, great. >> reporter: is it true? >> i don't know about on fire. it's definitely, there's such current around me all the time. ♪ like the way i go through the
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world, and the way i see things is so, like, it's like in tech any color. it's like magic to me, and i feel like i have to get people to see what it is that i'm seeing. >> reporter: right. her sensitivity is heightened by a neurological condition, called synesthesia, where sounds conjure textures and colors in her mind. you see it as what? >> it's like a colored gas that like fills the room. >> reporter: that's pretty cool. >> it's pretty cool. it's pretty crazy. >> reporter: does it help your writing? >> i think it definitely sends it in the right direction. i think i make the choices that i make with songs in part because of the association. >> this is a song called "my ability." >> reporter: while you were making this record, you had a pretty big breakup.
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>> yeah. ♪ i was able to make a record about being alone and celebrating that and, you know, absolutely hating that. ♪ they say you are a little much for me ♪ ♪ you're a liability ♪ you're a little much for me >> but being sultry was the thing that really unlocked the process. ♪ i'm a liability ♪ ♪ i'm a little much >> reporter: you, yourself have said this record in spots is a little weird. >> it's kind of weird, yeah. i think about david bowie, and every record was such a poem. and you almost felt afraid on a new record.
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am i even going to understand this? and i think that, throwing people into that sort of fear is like the most important thing you can do as an artist long term. >> reporter: have you had a lot of rehearsal time so far? the day we followed lorde, she was headed to a rehearsal studio where she began by jumping online to release her latest single. >> it's happening. okay. now twitter. ooh, so weird. ♪ ♪ oh, they bite you ♪ they said you would always be in love ♪ ♪ but you're not in love >> reporter: she was rehearsing for her appearance at last weekend's governor's ball festival. >> here, performing for you, and it feels so incredible. ♪
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>> reporter: are you as happy on stage as you are in the studio? >> i think i'm happiest in the studio. stage is different, because i get so nervous that it's sort of like a weird trance, like i really have to, it's quite, i definitely, when i'm on stage i feel myself go right to the edge of the cliff so to speak. if i broke my arm on stage i wouldn't know it, i don't think, because i'm so dialed into this crazy environment of. >> reporter: after nearly four years away from that crazy environment with her album release, lorde returns this week. do you think you're ready to be back? >> i don't know. being back is quite, we talked about it not being good with fame, but no, i'm really, i'm ready to be in conversation with
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captioning funded by cbs it's monday, june 12th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." one year ago this morning a terrorist opened fire in a gay nightclub in orlando. today survivors remember the attacks of 49 victims. president trump spent the weekend criticizing james comey for his testimony on the russia investigation while members of his own party pressed the president to come clean about his taped tweet. ♪

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