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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  June 23, 2017 2:07am-3:59am EDT

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tossed some trucks right through a chain linked fence. nobody was killed in storm cindy. creeks and buy us flooded in low lying neighborhoods some areas up to ten inches of rain forcing drivers to a bandon their cars. >> i was going to go through it but it was too deep. >> mississippied performed a well-rehearsed routine, neighbors checking on neighbors. larry took us down his driveway by boat to show the area flooded 49 times since he lived her. >> life on the river. >> yes, sir n would the trade it for nothing. >> the river has risen
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this is the cbs overnight news. >> president trump says he's very supportive of the health care plan senate republicans rolled out today. >> within hours the bill went from being a secret to a lightning rod. four showing their opposition. >> we not support the bill we're open to negotiation we want it to be more like a bill. >> the
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eliminates obamacare's insurance mandates and its new taxes on the wealthy. but it retains a good chunk of obamacare's tax credits to help lower income americans buy insurance. >> i'm going to go back and read the bill. >> reporter: many senate republicans said that's an improvement on the house version, which president trump recently described as mean. south carolina's lindsay graham: >> it leaves pre-existing illnesses alone, so you'll never be denied coverage because you're sick. that's a pretty good place to start. i have to run it by south carolina and see how it will fix us on the medicaid side. >> reporter: the senate bill would roll back obamacare's expansion of medicaid. >> no cuts to medicaid! >> reporter: that drew dozens of disabled protesters to senate leader mitch mcconnell's office today, and it's a sticking point for several moderate republicans. >> i have a lot of concerns. >> reporter: so republican leaders must now find ways to appease both wings of their party, in the face of universal opposition from democrats like oregon's ron wyden.
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>> senate republicans are going to keep telling americans they're fixing their health care, right up until the second when it gets taken away. >> reporter: on facebook, former president obama call the g.o.p. plan "a massive transfer of wealth from middle-class and poor families to the richest people in america." "simply put," he wrote, "if there's a chance you might get sick, get old, or start a family, this bill will do you harm." the survival of his signature achievement now depends on the ability of republicans to work out their differences. they can only afford to lose two senate republicans, anthony, and as you can see, there are far more holdouts than that right now. >> mason: nancy cordes on capitol hill. thanks. inspectors are checking pbuildings all over britain
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external panels that burn quickly and produce poisonous fumes. the panels may have played a role in the high-rise fire last week that killed 79 people. jonathan vigliotti is in london. >> reporter: investigators suspect the plastic core of the exterior cladding of grenfell tower was the reason the fire spread so rapidly, engulfing the 24-story building in less than an hour. british authorities are now rushing to test the cladding on at least 600 other high rises. known in the trade as "aluminum composite material," or a.c.m., the cladding encases a polyethylene core that is flammable. it is banned in the united states and parts of europe on any building over 40 feet that firefighters can't reach with ladders. but britain has not followed suit. residents booed prime minister theresa may over the government's handling of the fire. today, she announced that seven other high-rise towers have been found to have this same cladding. >> shortly before i came to the chamber, i was informed that a
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back as combustible. >> reporter: when it burns it produced cyanide fumes and three he people had to be given a antedote. >> reporter: the cladding manufacturer, new york-based arconic, said today it fully supports the british investigation. its own brochure says this type of cladding never should have been used on any building more than 32 feet high. anthony, police are now looking at how it came to be installed in this high-rise building. >> mason: jonathan vigliotti, thanks. the pentagon put out photos today of what it calls an unsafe intercept of a u.s. spy plane over the baltic sea this week. a russian fighter jet came within five feet of the american plane's wing tip, then flew under the spy plane and came up on the other side. the russians insist the u.s. is to blame for making a provocative move.
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an apparent case of road rage triggered a frightening crash yesterday on a southern california freeway. jamie yuccas has the cell phone video, which plays like a scene from an action movie. >> reporter: in this video, you see a motorcyclist kick the driver-side door of a nissan sedan. the sedan then swerved and hit a cement divider, bounced out into traffic, and slammed into a pickup truck, causing it to flip over on this busy southern california freeway. >> i have a gouge up in my head somewhere. >> reporter: the driver of that truck, 75-year-old carlos benavidez, was rushed to the hospital. >> i saw my world coming to an end, to be honest with you. when i felt the impact, and my truck spun out from beside me, and i started to roll. i saw nothing but asphalt and-- and sky. >> reporter: you thought you were going to die. >> i honestly did. >> reporter: we reached chris traber, the man who shot the video from the passenger seat of another car by phone today. he says he began recording when
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lane change suddenly shift into high gear. >> yeah, it was like, what the heck is going on with these people. i don't know if the driver of the car got scared or freaked out, like, "what am i supposed to do now?" or intentionally try to run him off the road. >> reporter: according to the latest figures from the national highway transportation safety administration, fatalities from aggressive drive having increased 60% since 2011. about two-thirds of highway deaths are caused by aggressive driving. joshua greengard is with the california highway patrol. >> whatever they did for this incident to occur doesn't warrant them fighting in the middle of the freeway. >> reporter: officers are trying to track down the motorcyclist who could face a felony if he's charged with a hit-and-run for what happened on this california freeway. as for carlos, he's already survived cancer, heart disease, and now this crash. anthony, after rewatching the video, he really can't believe he walked away. >> mason: maybe he should buy a lottery ticket. jamie yuccas, thanks very much.
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coming up next disconnect between women and their doctors about the risk of heart disease. and later, riding the waves in the moonlight.
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>> mason: heart disease kills more american women than cancer. yet, many don't discuss the dangers with their doctors. in a new study, 74% of women reported having at least one risk factor for heart disease, but just 16% were told by their doctor that they were at risk. mireya villarreal has more. >> reporter: when casey maurer was hit by a sudden pain in her chest and shortness of breath, she waited hours before deciding to go to the hospital. >> it felt like somebody had taken their knuckle and rapped me in the center of my chest. >> reporter: at 40 years old, did you think this is a heart attack? >> no, absolutely not. i didn't have, you know, the classic tv or movie heart attack symptoms. >> reporter: turns out, it was a heart attack. heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the united states, and yet maurer's first cardiologist couldn't figure out how to make things better. >> he said, "i don't know what to do with you. most of my patients are
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you're young and female, and i don't know how to help you." >> reporter: a new report by the women's heart alliance pinpoints a communications gap between women and their doctors. while most women got a routine physical, just 40% received a heart-risk assessment from their physicians, and almost half said they canceled or postponed a doctor's visit until they lost a few pounds. >> and that's a very dangerous thing. >> reporter: dr. holly andersen directs education and outreach at new york's ronald o. perelman heart institute. >> women all too often wait, if they think there's a problem with their heart. and all too often, they could die waiting, because sometimes the first symptom of heart disease is sudden death, and that's why prevention is so important. >> reporter: maurer now takes prevention to heart, focusing on sleep, healthy eating, and exercise. she's lost more than 50 pounds, and has gone on to run three marathons. this new report also identified a knowledge gap when it comes to heart disease in women.
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a majority of the women surveyed said they never discussed the topic with their doctors because they figured if it was that important, their doctors would bring it up. anthony? >> mason: mireya, thanks. still ahead, robocalls that look like they come from your area code. ♪
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u.s. capitol police officer crystal griner last night, as she threw the ceremonial first pitch at the congressional women's softball game in washington. griner was shot in the ankle defending congressional republicans who were attacked during a baseball practice. she's expected to make a full recovery. house majority whip steve scalise remains in fair condition. call on line 1 for adrian abramovich-- it's the f.c.c. the commission said today it wants to fine the miami man a record $120 million for tricking people into buying vacation packages. the f.c.c. said his company's made nearly 97 million robocalls late last year, faked to appear as if they came from local area codes so folks were more likely to pick up. up next, something new under the moon.
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>> this portion is sponsored by --
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>> mason: we end tonight with carter evans working the night shift at our surf city bureau. >> reporter: when the sun sets over malibu, there's a peaceful calm to the breaking surf. but when the moon is full, a different breed of surfers hit the water. >> when you take off, you can see just the reflection of the water and the moon on it. you kind of get a rhythm. it's like dancing on the water. >> reporter: in his 50 years of surfing, helmut igle has seen
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the sport explode in popularity. now with an estimated 35 million surfers worldwide, crowded waves are common. but not at night, as i found out on my first surf session after dark. if it were light out here, there would be 100 guys out there. >> 100 guys, and everybody running into each other, but here it's like-- >> reporter: we had the whole places to ourselves. >> yeah. >> reporter: although we may not have been entirely alone in the water, a concern not lost on j.p. pereat. >> there have been a tremendous number of shark sightings down south this year. do you think about that at all? >> at night, i do. i like to keep my feet up and out of the water. >> reporter: at night, though, you're not going to see it coming. >> maybe that's the whole thing. i don't want to see it coming! >> reporter: night surfing isn't entirely new, but new technology is making waves. sean johnson rides a board with built-in l.e.d.s. >> the lights really help you get into that other world of just having a blast out there and feeling the wave.
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in the water and it becomes a tapestry of light, not just to signal their positions to others, but to make an impression back on shore. >> it's like a painting out there. >> reporter: it's like the ocean is your canvas. >> oh, absolutely. >> reporter: still, helmut igle prefers to keep it old school. >> i feel like i'm at halloween or something. it's a little bit disco, but i think i'll stick with my glow stick, and the moon if it's out. >> reporter: either way, sport or art, when the night falls, the surf is still up. >> ya-hoo! >> reporter: carter evans, cbs news, malibu. that's the "cbs evening news." for this friday. check back a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. i'm anthony mason. thanks for watching.
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this is the cbs overnight news. >> the long awaited senate plan to replace and repeal act landed with a thud. it was crafted in secret and senate majority leader mitch mcconnell said to get it past in a week but at least others won't vote for it as written. >> within hours the bill went from being a secret to a lightning rod. four showing their opposition.
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>> we cannot support the current bill. we're open to negotiation but we want the bill to look more like a repeal. >> the 142-page bill eliminates obamacare's insurance mandates and its new taxes on the wealthy. but it retains a good chunk of obamacare's tax credits to help lower income americans buy insurance. >> i'm going to go back and read the bill. >> reporter: many senate republicans said that's an improvement on the house version, which president trump recently described as mean. south carolina's lindsay graham: >> it leaves pre-existing illnesses alone, so you'll never be denied coverage because you're sick. that's a pretty good place to start. i have to run it by south carolina and see how it will fix us on the medicaid side. >> reporter: the senate bill would roll back obamacare's expansion of medicaid. >> no cuts to medicaid! >> reporter: that drew dozens of disabled protesters to senate leader mitch mcconnell's office today, and it's a sticking point for several moderate republicans.
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>> reporter: so republican leaders must now find ways to appease both wings of their party, in the face of universal opposition from democrats like oregon's ron wyden. >> senate republicans are going to keep telling americans they're fixing their health care, right up until the second when it gets taken away. >> reporter: on facebook, president obama call the g.o.p. plan "a massive transfer of wealth from middle-class and poor families to the richest people in america." "simply put," he said "if there's a chance you might get sick, get old, or start a family, this bill will do you harm." the survival of his signature achievement now depends on the ability of republicans to work out their differences. they can only afford to lose two senate republicans, anthony, and as you can see, there are far more holdouts than that right now.
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>> after keeping the country guessing for more than a month president trump said he did not keep recorded conversations with he and then-f.b.i. director james comey. today, we got the answer-- it was a bluff. and it all began with comey's claim, and the president's denial, that mr. trump had asked comey for a pledge of loyalty. julianna goldman is at the white house. >> reporter: president trump returned to where he started the controversy-- twitter, writing, "i have no idea whether there are tapes or recordings of my conversations with james comey, but i did not make, and do not have, any such recordings." his admission came nearly six weeks after he tweeted fired f.b.i. director james comey "better hope that there are no tapes of our conversations before he starts leaking to the press!" >> lordy, i hope there are tapes. >> reporter: the president's tweet set off a chain reaction. comey told congress it led him to leak memos he wrote about his conversations with the president. >> because i thought that might prompt the appointment of a special counsel, so i asked a close friend of mine to do it. >> reporter: comey's gamble worked.
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mueller is heading the russia investigation, which likely includes whether the president obstructed justice by interfering in the probe. >> well, you're going to be very disappointed when you hear the answer. don't worry. >> reporter: president trump and his team stonewalled reporters and members of congress for weeks over whether any recordings existed. >> so when he's ready to make that announcement, we'll let you know. >> well, i'll tell you about that maybe sometime in the very near future. >> he's not waiting for anything. when he's ready to discuss it further, he will. >> reporter: at today's white house briefing, where cameras were not allowed, spokeswoman sarah huckabee sanders said today's tweet was extremely clear but still did not explain why he mentioned the tapes in the first place. >> did the president intend to threaten james comey with that tweet? >> not that i'm aware of. i don't think so. >> later she explained. >> it was more about raising the question of doubt in general. >> the timing of the
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announcement was in response from house ngd and republicans who want a answer not a tweet. >> region as food prices through the roof in georgia. >> right now pickers should be harvesting this orchard but look how puny this peach is. it is worthless. and it has plenty of company. tree after tree. same story. no peach is worth picking. multi-million dollar disaster. >> nothing better than georgia peach. >> absolutely not it's the best there is. >> he knows what a difference a years makes. this was dickey's farm last year. spectacular plot, thousands of acres of orchards produced eight millionsnd
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peaches this year two million pounds, a 75% drop. take this tree, he said his peaches should be size of a golf ball. >> you would hope to have 4 to 500 peaches that size on this tree, this tree has zero mature peaches. >> here's why. whacky winter weather confused and then killed the crop. deprived the crop of chill hours and followed by freezing temperatures in mid-march that stretched across the southeast. >> when you have a freeze you know within a couple days what's alive and what's dead. >> the loss could top $5 million. the dpgary black the agricultur commissioner told us the state could lose 80% of its crops. >> it's representative hundreds of millions of dollars in georgia's economy.
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you will see supply drop off and we'll prepare for 2018. >> 2018. justin dixon's customer's want to order his peaches this summer. >> we are the peach state. we have to have them. >> you grab as many as you can. >> yeah you stock pile them. you pickle them. you make purees or ice creams. whatever you can before they're gone. >> georgia peach season runs june to august but by july he expects nothing left to ship. for consumer he's could mean a summer that will taste a little less sweet. >> in south carolina they have it worse, 90% of that crop was destroyed. there is some good news,
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this is t cbs overnight new s news. >> one of the largest construction project in u.s. military history. we got a bird's eye look of the dmz. >> right now we're in the center of seoul. >> we hitched
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miles from the border. >> it's unbelievable more packed than new york city. >> it's all within reach of kim jong-un's artillery. >> what kind of long-range damage can it do? >> a lot. it's very destructive. >> >> reporter: over 108,000 could die in initial fire and 64,000 lives could be lost for one day. that's one of the reasons the military is moving its headquarters 40 mimes south in camp humphries. >> get out of the range of the long-range artillery. it removes that immediate threat. >> reporter: at a sprawling 3,400 acres, humphries is the largest peace team construction project in u.s. military history with south korea picking up 90% of the bill.
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we landed a short distance away at the air base. >> i'm commander of the 682. we landed at the air base, home of the 35th air defense artillery. >> we're doing a p.a.c. 3 missile. >> we saw them. shooting down incoming ballistic missiles from north korea >> reporter: how accurate is it? >> it's very accurate. very, very accurate. >> reporter: it had just a 9% success rate but he says it's now a key piece of protection. >> we're truly the first line of defense. we buy decision space for the president and for the coc commander general brooks to make decisions on how to potentially de-escalate or escalate the conflict. >> reporter: in the face of international condemnation north korea has conducted ten missile tests this year. two of them involved solid fuel missiles which the north can launch with less warning.
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>> why do these solid fuel rockets make it hard sner. >> because it doesn't require as much preparation for them to take a missile and prepare it and get it ready for launch. >> colonel rick wright took us inside the control station where they would be on to shoot down any incoming threat. >> this is the button where they would push the button to launch it. >> exactly. they can execute the air battle. >> we routinely exercise that from the phone call to actually moving them on the road to putting a missile up in the air. >> how quickly can you do that? >> i can do that pretty fast. >> you practice that? >> we practice it very routinely. >> more in south korea will interview the president when she visits the states next week, we also got to visit her old neighborhood. turns out she grew up on a
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>> more than 21,000 people are stationed at this army base, about a third are residents, including american service members and their families. >> this is right in the september of seoul. >> almost geographically, right on the edge of the river near the center. >> lived here for years. my father over saw the fifth preventative unit. >> it has not changed at all. it's virtually the same. >> colonel scott peterson helped me find my old house. >> this whole housing area hasn't changed in like 32 years >> >> not much. in terms of laying out the location, yeah, not a lot changed. >> my best friend lived there. thisth
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with my parents and three siblings. it's different. there used to be a helicopter landing pad in the back. >> yeah that's no longer there. >> i can remember the helicopter landing on that pad here i am today in the same spot >> that was my room right there. >> reporter: even though the base is about 25 miles away from the dmz, safety was never a concern for us that it was a great place to grow up. you were safe. even though you were in the middle of a foreign country in seoul, south korea, i could ride my bike. and my parents weren't worried about me at all at ten years old they said go play. >> it's a close community. very, very close community. we're proud of it. >> we also
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seoul american elementary. >> so this would have been my fourth grade classroom. >> this is where you went to school? >> 30 years ago. >> let's take you inside. >> this was in your classroom. >> this would have been my classroom. he oh, my gosh. it's virtually the same. this is the same. right. >> the one thing changed -- >> -- there's a tv. >> it's an interactive smart board. >> can you believe i was ten years old in this classroom. >> reporter: today the elementary school upholds it's education for delivering a top-notch education. >> our students are able to go to school any where in the country. >> you have a graduate who's a journalist on cbs. >> it's a great thing. >> it's a great country. >> it's a great place. a grpl
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we may have the next cbs anchor here. hi, everyone. this is norah. >> this happens to be where i started my career in broadcasting, >> yes there are a lot of students. >> giving on-camera english lessons. >> voice, voice. >> for the korean educational development institute. [ speaking foreign language ]. >> see you next week. bye-bye, everybody. >> good-bye. >> good-bye. >> cbs overnight news will be right back. ♪ oh, hello! lucky for me, there's some great golf here in the carolinas. whether you golf or not, geico could help score you some great savings on car insurance. maybe even hundreds of dollars.
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s >> it's awesome. you can cruise all night long. it's like dancing on the waters. >> you're not going by sight. you're going by feel. >> reporter: it's not for the faint of heart or short sighted. >> for a sport that depends on seeing the right wave at the perfect time it may seem crazy to dive into darkness, but as i found out on my first night's surf section it's all about escaping the crowds. >> if it were light out here, there's bes like 100 guys. >> right now there's only a few out. >> he's one of the 35 surfers around the. he's one of the 35 million surfers around the world as
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those numbers grow so do the dear devils >> you're watching the light. >> while they're avoiding the surf lining gridlock, they're risking encounters with other under water creatures. >> >> there have been a number of shark sightings. do you think about that at all? >> at night. i like to keep my feet up on a he long board. >> you're not going to see it coming. >> that's the thing. i don't want to see it coming. >> reporter: night surfing. isn't new. wet suit warriors have been quietly doing it for decades but in 2011, the sport got a social media boost from this.
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off north shores in maui prosurf prosurfer. >> my heart was pounding i was telling myself just stay on your feet. it was one of the most scary thin things. >> the lights are so people could see you. >> that look is now catching on. >> roy johnson used tonight surf now spends his free time crafng
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lights. he says they are for safety but mostly they think it's a u.f.o. coming down the wave. this is the "cbs evening news." >> mason: good evening. but at the end of the day or night surf something more sport than 5and some prefer to keep i old school. >> >> i feel like i'm at halloween or something. it's a little bit disco, but i think i'll stick with my glow stick, and the moon if it's out. >> once each month it's the one day everyone can agree on. >> it's a mfulloon i can go for it.
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>> reporter: carter evans, malibu.
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for years now the biggest complaint about air travel has been has been the security s. >> jet kbl blue is about to take a test into the future. going to take my photo to match my passport it says i'm
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i can board without presenting my boarding pass or other travel documents. >> this is a trial of facial recognition technology by u.s. customs and jet blue. the airline wants to see if it makes the board process faster. >> it just amazes me the technology. >> it matches government database of passport photos. a seemless process of. >> we're looking at reducing the friction points to create an experience that doesn't have any lines. >> that is revolutionary in the airline industry and delta is right at the front of it. >> delta's senior vice president tested bag drap facial recognition. passengers can check luggage without
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>> you can go from curb to plane without interacting with a human bei being. >> couldn't be faster. >> some fear too fast. >> jeremy scott worries about the use of personal identifiers that can't be changed. >> as we consolidate into big databases and use it more and more those become targets and the risk of data breach increases greatly. >> for those long tsa lines at check points the tsa is experimenting with finger print verification for identities. >> that's the overnight news for this friday. from the
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city. >> mason: the bluff stops here. >> did president trump record his conversations with former f.b.i. director comey? >> mason: the president admits he did not. also tonight-- >> senateub repnslica put out her health care plan plan and for protesterers a waiting. >> we can't allow cuts to medicaid. we can't. >> what the heck is going on with these people? >> mason: road rage sets off a chain-reaction crash. and >> it's like dancing on the water. >> mason: night surfing-- riding a new wave of popularity. >> reporter: what do people say when you're out on the water with this? >> oh, they're tripping. theynk this it'f.a u.o. coming down the wave. >> whooo-who!
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this is the "cbs evening news." does the trump white house have a nixon style recording system? for 41 days, the president kept us guessing after putting out a tweet that suggested he might be recording conversations, or at least those he had with then-f.b.i. director james comey. now we have the answer. it was a bluff. and it all began with comey's claim, and the president's denial, that mr. trump had asked comey for a pledge of loyalty. julianna goldman is at the white house. >> reporter: president trump returned to where he started the controversy-- twitter, writing, "i have no idea whether there are tapes or recordings of my conversations with james comey, but i did not make, and do not have, any such recordings." his admission came nearly six weeks after he tweeted fired f.b.i. director james comey "better hope that there are no tapes of our conversations before he starts lea t
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>> lordy, i hope there are tapes. >> reporter: the president's tweet set off a chain reaction. comey told congress it led him to leak memos he wrote about his conversations with the president. >> because i thought that might prompt the appointment of a special counsel, so i asked a close friend of mine to do it. >> reporter: comey's gamble worked. now special counsel robert mueller is heading the russia investigation, which likely includes whether the president obstructed justice by interfering in the probe. >> well, you're going to be very disappointed when you hear the answer. don't worry. >> reporter: president trump and his team stonewalled reporters and members of congress for weeks over whether any recordings existed. >> so when he's ready to make that announcement, i'll let you know. >> well, i'll tell you about that maybe sometime in the very near future. >> he's not waiting for anything. when he's ready to discuss it further, he will. >> reporter: at today's white house briefing, where cameras were not allowed, spokeswoman sarah huckabee sanders said today's tweet was extremely clear but still did not explain why he mentioned the tapes in the first place. >> did the president intend to threaten james comey. >> not that i'm e
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i don't think so. >> later she explains. >> i think it was more about raising the question of doubt in general. >> reporter: trump confidant newt gingrich said he thought the president had been trying to rattle james comey. anthony, the timing of today's announcement was in response to a request from the house intelligence committee, where republicans and democrats say they still want an official statement, not a tweet. >> mason: julianna goldman at the white house, thanks. the president said that when he fired comey last month, the russia investigation was on his mind. the f.b.i., congress, and now a special counsel, are looking into russian meddling in the u.s. election and whether anyone in the trump campaign was involved. it appears the president is still thinking about it. here's jeff pegues. >> reporter: the president, energized by republican success in special congressional elections, blasted the russia investigations again last night. >> i mean, they have phony witch huntin
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they have everything going. and you know what? all we do is win, win, win. >> reporter: and he continued on twitter this morning. "former homeland security adviser jeh johnson is latest top intelligence official to state there was no grand scheme between trump and russia." johnson, who left d.h.s. in january, told investigators he was only aware of what had been discussed publicly. since then, the investigation has expanded, and today, cbs news confirmed congressional investigators are interested in whether trump campaign associates obtained information from hacked voter databases. michael bahar was a democratic staffer on the house intelligence committee. >> if stolen data was used, then there's going to be a question of how it was used, how it was obtained, and with what level of knowledge did people use it. >> we have evidence of 21 states. >> reporter: just yesterday, a department of homeland security official said russian hackers targeted 21 state voter
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today, sources told cbs news, nearly twice that many showed evidence of a breach. president trump zeroed in on the hacking in another morning tweet. "it all took place during the obama administration. why didn't they stop them?" congress pressed johnson on that yesterday, too. he said the democratic national committee, whose computer network was compromised, declined his agency's help. >> in retrospect, it would be easy for me to say that i should have bought a sleeping bag and camped out in front of d.n.c. in late summer, with the benefit of hindsight. >> reporter: in a statement today, the d.n.c. said that it was working with the f.b.i. long before homeland security reached out. anthony, complicating all of this is a record of denials by trump campaign officials that they were in contact with the russians, followed by evidence that, in fact, some of them were. >> mason: jeff pegues, thanks, jeff. the airport attack in flint,
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michigan, yesterday, could have been much worse. the f.b.i. said today amor ftouhi tried to buy a gun recently, but was turned down because he is not from the u.s. ftouhi who lives in canada is accused of stabbing a police lieutenant in the neck while shouting, "god is great" in arabic. the officer is in stable condition. investigators do not believe ftouhi is part of a wider terror network. cindy lost tropical storm status today but is still plenty dangerous, it rumbled across the deep south bringing heavy rain, strong winds and at least one tornado. david now is tracking cindy. >> in fairfield, alabama, the siren sounded as the twister touched down near downtown birmingham, it left some bottles untouched on a store room shelf.
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the powerful winds tossed some trucks right through a chain linked fence. several were injured but nobody was killed it was spawned from tropical storm syndergaard. creeks and bayous flooded in low lying neighborhoods some areas up to ten inches of rain forcing drivers to abandon their cars. >> i was going to go through it but it was too deep. >> mississippians performed a well-rehearsed routine, neighbors checking on neighbors. larry took us down his driveway by boat to show the area flooded dozens of times since he's lived here. >> life on the river. >> yes, sir wouldn't trade it for nothing. >> the river has risen 13 feet and flooded areas ea
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river good news it is cresting and will only go dowomn fr her ♪ [electric guitar] caring - soft tone i just need a second. is your weight holding you back?
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this is the cbs overnight news. >> president trump says he's very supportive of the health care plan senate republicans rolled out today. it's their alternative to obamacare chand to the plan approved by the house. >> within hours the bill went from being a secret to a lightning rod. >> four senate conservatives quickly announced their opposition including kentucky's rand paul. >> we cannot support the current bill we're open to negotiation we want it to be more like a bill. >> the 142-page bill eliminates obamacare's insurance mandates and its new taxes on the wealthy.
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obamacare's tax redits to help lower income americans buy insurance. >> i'm going to go back and read the bill. >> reporter: many senate republicans said that's an improvement on the house version, which president trump recently described as mean. south carolina's lindsay graham: >> it leaves pre-existing illnesses alone, so you'll never be denied coverage because you're sick. that's a pretty good place to start. i have to run it by south carolina and see how it affects us on the medicaid side. >> reporter: the senate bill would roll back obamacare's expansion of medicaid. >> no cuts to medicaid! >> reporter: that drew dozens of disabled protesters to senate leader mitch mcconnell's office today, and it's a sticking point for several moderate republicans. >> i have a lot of concerns. >> reporter: so republican leaders must now find ways to appease both wings of their party, in the face of universal opposition from democrats like oregon's ron wyden.
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>> senate republicans are going to keep telling americans they're fixing their health care, right up until the second when it gets taken away. >> reporter: on facebook, former president obama call the g.o.p. plan "a massive transfer of wealth from middle-class and poor families to the richest people in america." "simply put," he wrote, "if there's a chance you might get sick, get old, or start a family, this bill will do you harm." the survival of his signature achievement now depends on the ability of republicans to work out their differences. they can only afford to lose two senate republicans, anthony, and as you can see, there are far more holdouts than that right now. >> mason: nancy cordes on capitol hill. thanks. inspectors are checking buildings all over britain for external panels that burn quickly and produce poisonous fumes. the panels may have played a role in the high-rise fire last week that killed 79 peop
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jonathan vigliotti is in london. >> reporter: investigators suspect the plastic core of the exterior cladding of grenfell tower was the reason the fire spread so rapidly, engulfing the 24-story building in less than an hour. british authorities are now rushing to test the cladding on at least 600 other high rises. known in the trade as "aluminum composite material," or a.c.m., the cladding encases a polyethylene core that is flammable. it is banned in the united states and parts of europe on any building over 40 feet that firefighters can't reach with ladders. but britain has not followed suit. residents booed prime minister theresa may over the government's handling of the fire. today, she announced that seven other high-rise towers have been found to have this same cladding. >> shortly before i came to the chamber, i was informed that a
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back as combustible. >> reporter: when it burns it produced cyanide fumes and three survivors at kings college hospital were given a cyanide antedote. >> reporter: the cladding manufacturer, new york-based arconic, said today it fully supports the british investigation. its own brochure says this type of cladding never should have been used on any building more than 32 feet high. anthony, police are now looking at how it came to be installed in this high-rise building. >> mason: jonathan vigliotti, thanks. the pentagon put out photos today of what it calls an unsafe intercept of a u.s. spy plane over the baltic sea this week. a russian fighter jet came within five feet of the american plane's wing tip, then flew under the spy plane and came up on the other side. the russians insist the u.s. is to blame for making a provocative move. an apparent case of road
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rage triggered a frightening crash yesterday on a southern california freeway. jamie yuccas has the cell phone video, which plays like a scene from an action movie. >> reporter: in this video, you see a motorcyclist kick the driver-side door of a nissan sedan. the sedan then swerved and hit a cement divider, bounced out into traffic, and slammed into a pickup truck, causing it to flip over on this busy southern california freeway. >> i have a gouge up in my head somewhere. >> reporter: the driver of that truck, 75-year-old carlos benavidez, was rushed to the hospital. >> i saw my world coming to an end, to be honest with you. when i felt the impact, and my truck spun out from beside me, and i started to roll. i saw nothing but asphalt and-- and sky. >> reporter: you thought you were going to die. >> i honestly did. >> reporter: we reached chris traber, the man who shot the video from the passenger seat of another car by phone today. he says he began recording when he t
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lane change suddenly shift into high gear. >> yeah, it was like, what the heck is going on with these people. i don't know if the driver of the car got scared or freaked out, like, "what am i supposed to do now?" or intentionally try to run him off the road. >> reporter: according to the latest figures from the national highway transportation safety administration, fatalities from aggressive drive having increased 60% since 2011. about two-thirds of highway deaths are caused by aggressive driving. joshua greengard is with the california highway patrol. >> whatever they did for this incident to occur doesn't warrant them fighting in the middle of the freeway. >> reporter: officers are trying to track down the motorcyclist who could face a felony if he's charged with a hit-and-run for what happened on this california freeway. as for carlos, he's already survived cancer, heart disease, and now this crash. anthony, after rewatching the video, he really can't believe he walked away. >> mason: maybe he should buy a lottery ticket. jamie yuccas, thanks very much. diming up next
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their doctors about the risk of heart disease. and later, riding the waves in the moonlight. two kids barfed in class today. it was so gross. lysol disinfectant spray kills 99.9% of bacteria,
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one more way you've got what it takes to protect. first you start with this. these guys. a place like shhh! no. found it! and definitely lipton ice tea. lots of it. a lipton meal is what you bring to it. and the refreshing taste of lipton iced tea. it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together. do you often wake up with chest congestion or suffer excess mucus? left untreated mucus can build up causing further problems.
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>> heart disease kills more american women than cancer. yet, many don't discuss the dangers with their doctors. in a new study, 74% of women reported having at least one risk factor for heart disease, but just 16% were told by their doctor that they were at risk. mireya villarreal has more. >> reporter: when casey maurer was hit by a sudden pain in her chest and shortness of breath, she waited hours before deciding to go to the hospital. >> it felt like somebody had taken their knuckle and rapped me in the center of my chest. >> reporter: at 40 years old, did you think this is a heart attack? >> no, absolutely not. i didn't have, you know, the classic tv or movie heart attack symptoms. >> reporter: turns out, it was a heart attack. heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the united states, and yet maurer's first cardiologist couldn't
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better. >> he said, "i don't know what to do with you. most of my patients are geriatric and male. you're young and female, and i don't know how to help you." >> reporter: a new report by the women's heart alliance pinpoints a communications gap between women and their doctors. while most women got a routine physical, just 40% received a heart-risk assessment from their physicians, and almost half said they canceled or postponed a doctor's visit until they lost a few pounds. >> and that's a very dangerous thing. >> reporter: dr. holly andersen directs education and outreach at new york's ronald o. perelman heart institute. >> women all too often wait, if they think there's a problem with their heart. and all too often, they could die waiting, because sometimes the first symptom of heart disease is sudden death, and that's why prevention is so important. >> reporter: maurer now takes prevention to heart, focusing on sleep, healthy eating, and exercise. she's lost more than 50 pounds, and has gone on to run three marathons. this new report also identified a knowledge gap when it comes to heart disease in women.
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said they never discussed the topic with their doctors because they figured if it was that important, their doctors would bring it up. anthony? >> mireya, thanks. still ahead, robocalls that look like they come from your area code. no matter who was in there last. protection.
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u.s. capitol police officer crystal griner last night, as she threw the ceremonial first pitch at the congressional women's softball game in washington. griner was shot in the ankle defending congressional republicans who were attacked during a baseball practice. she's expected to make a full recovery. house majority whip steve scalise remains in fair condition. call on line 1 for adrian abramovich-- it's the f.c.c. the commission said today it wants to fine the miami man a record $120 million for tricking people into buying vacation packages. the f.c.c. said his company's made nearly 97 million robocalls late last year, faked to appear as if they came from local area codes so folks were more likely to pick up. up next, something new under the moon. ♪ >> this portion is sponsored by --
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>> we end tonight with carter evans working the night shift at our surf city bureau. >> reporter: when the sun sets over malibu, there's a peaceful calm to the breaking surf. but when the moon is full, a different breed of surfers hit the water. >> when you take off, you can see just the reflection of the water and the moon on it. you kind of get a rhythm. it's like dancing on the water. >> reporter: in his 50 years of surfing, helmut igle has seen
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now with an estimated 35 million surfers worldwide, crowded waves are common. but not at night, as i found out on my first surf session after dark. if it were light out here, there would be 100 guys out there. >> 100 guys, and everybody running into each other, but here it's like-- >> reporter: we had the whole places to ourselves. >> yeah. >> reporter: although we may not have been entirely alone in the water, a concern not lost on j.p. pereat. >> there have been a tremendous number of shark sightings down south this year. do you think about that at all? >> at night, i do. i like to keep my feet up and out of the water. >> reporter: at night, though, you're not going to see it coming. >> maybe that's the whole thing. i don't want to see it coming! >> reporter: night surfing isn't entirely new, but new technology is making waves. sean johnson rides a board with built-in l.e.d.s. >> the lights really help you get into that other world of just having a blast out there and feeling the wave. >> repor g
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tapestry of light, not just to signal their positions to others, but to make an impression back on shore. >> it's like a painting out there. >> reporter: it's like the ocean is your canvas. >> oh, absolutely. >> reporter: still, helmut igle prefers to keep it old school. >> i feel like i'm at halloween or something. it's a little bit disco, but i think i'll stick with my glow stick, and the moon if it's out. >> reporter: either way, sport or art, when the night falls, the surf is still up. >> ya-hoo! >> reporter: carter evans, cbs news, malibu. >> and that's the overnight news for this friday for some of you the news continues for others check back a little bit later for the morning news and cbs this morning. forever the broadcast center in new york city i'm anthony mason.
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this is the cbs overnight news. welcome to the overnight news. >> the long awaited senate plan to replace and repeal act landed on capitol hill with a thud. the bill was crafted in secret and senate majority leader mitch mcconnell said to get it past in a week but at least others won't vote for it as written. nancier >> within hours the bill went from being a secret to a lightning rod. >> this current draft doesn't get the job done. >> four senate conservatives quickly announced their
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rand paul. >> we cannot support the current bill. we're open to negotiation but we want the bill to look more like a repeal. >> the 142-page bill eliminates obamacare's insurance mandates and its new taxes on the wealthy. but it retains a good chunk of obamacare's tax credits to help lower income americans buy insurance. >> i'm going to go back and read the bill. >> reporter: many senate republicans said that's an improvement on the house version, which president trump recently described as mean. south carolina's lindsay graham: >> it leaves pre-existing illnesses alone, so you'll never be denied coverage because you're sick. that's a pretty good place to start. i have to run it by south carolina and see how it will fix us on the medicaid side. >> reporter: the senate bill would roll back obamacare's expansion of medicaid. >> no cuts to medicaid! >> reporter: that drew dozens of disabled protesters to senate leader mitch mcconnell's office today, and it's a sticking point for several moderate republicans.
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>> reporter: so republican leaders must now find ways to appease both wings of their party, in the face of universal opposition from democrats like oregon's ron wyden. >> senate republicans are going to keep telling americans they're fixing their health care, right up until the second when it gets taken away. >> reporter: on facebook, president obama call the g.o.p. plan "a massive transfer of wealth from middle-class and poor families to the richest people in america." "simply put," he said "if there's a chance you might get sick, get old, or start a family, this bill will do you harm." the survival of his signature achievement now depends on the ability of republicans to work out their differences. they can only afford to lose two senate republicans, anthony, and as you can see, there are far more holdouts than that right now.
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>> after keeping the country guessing for more than a month president trump said he did not make tapes of conversations with fired fbi director james comey. the president and mr. comey have told very different stories all tied to the russian investigation. >> president trump started where he started the controversy twitter. writing i have no idea if there's conversations with james comey but i do not have any. this coming after his tweet better hope there's no conversations before he started leaking to the press >> lordy, i hope there are tapes. >> reporter: the president's tweet set off a chain reaction. comey told congress it led him to leak memos he wrote about his conversations with the president. >> because i thought that might prompt the appointment of a special counsel, so i asked a close friend of mine to do it. >> repr:
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now special counsel robert mueller is heading the russia investigation, which likely includes whether the president obstructed justice by interfering in the probe. >> well, you're going to be very disappointed when you hear the answer. don't worry. >> reporter: president trump and his team stonewalled reporters and members of congress for weeks over whether any recordings existed. >> so when he's ready to make that announcement, we'll let you know. >> well, i'll tell you about that maybe sometime in the very near future. >> he's not waiting for anything. when he's ready to discuss it further, he will. >> reporter: at today's white house briefing, where cameras were not allowed, spokeswoman sarah huckabee sanders said today's tweet was extremely clear but still did not explain the first place. >> did the president intend to threaten james comey with that tweet? >> not that i'm aware of. i don't think so. >> later she explained. >> it was more about raising the question of doubt in general. >> the timing of the announcement was in response to a request from the
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intelligence committee where republicans and democrats say they still want a official statement not a tweet. >> the remnants of tropical cin cindy with power outages but the agriculture prices are going through the roof crop has increased, tree after tree, acre after acre coming up on "cbs this morning." people shopping for summer fruits may notice peaches are selling for higher prices. a double whammy of unexpected weather destroyed most of the peach crops in the southeast. last month whole sale prices for thousands of acres produced 8 million pounds
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two million pounds. dickey says his peaches should be the size of a golf ball. >> you would hope to have peaches of that size on the tree. >> what do you have? >> really don't have any this tree has zero peaches. >> reporter: here's why. whacky winter weather confused and then killed the crop. first unseasonably warm temperatures deprived the crop of needed chill hours followed by freezing temperatures in mid-march that stretched across the southeast. >> when you have a freeze, you know within a couple of days what's alive and what's dead. >> the dickey family's loss could top $5 million. georgia's agriculture commissioner gary black told us the state could lose 80% of this year's crop. >> it's representative of hundreds of millions of dollars in georgia's economy.
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i >> i really think you're going to see a drop-off after the fourth of july and that will mean we're preparing for 2018. >> 2018. justin dixon customers want to order his peach salad this summer. the execute chef at a restaurant the shed in atlanta has become a hoarder. we're a peach state. we have to have them. >> you grabbed a many as you can? >> yeah. yeah. you stockpile them before they're gone. >> george's prime peach season typically runs june to mid-august but by early this year dickey expects to have nothing left to ship. for consumers, that could mean. a summer that will taste a little less tweet. georgia farmers have it bad, but in south carolina, which actually grows more peaches, have it worse, there is some s 0
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it worse, 90% of that crop was destroyed. there is some good news, california had a great crop this year. if you are looking for a southern peach, may have to settle for water melon. [sound of wrench] [intricate guitar riff] [engine starts] [guitar continues] not all fish oil supplements provide the same omega-3 power. megared advanced triple absorption is absorbed three times better. so one softgel has more omega-3 power than three standard fish oil pills. megared advanced triple absorption.
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south
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we landed near air base >> we're doing a p.a.c. 3 missile. >> we saw them. shooting down incoming ballistic missiles from north korea >> reporter: how accurate is it? >> it's very accurate. very, very accurate. >> in the gulf war the patriot missile had 90% success rate but he says it's now a key piece of protection. >> we're truly the first line of defense. we buy decision space for the president and for the coc commander general brooks to make decisions on how to potentially de-escalate or escalate the conflict. as necessary. >> reporter: in the face of international condemnation north korea has conducted ten missile tests this year. two of them involved solid fuel missiles which the north can launch with less warning. >> why do these solid fuel
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rockets make it harder? >> because it doesn't require as much preparation for them to take a missile and prepare it and get it ready for launch. >> colonel rick wright took us inside an engagement control station where the pressure would be on to shoot down any incoming threat. >> this is where they would push the button to launch it. >> this is where they can execute the air battle. >> we routinely exercise that from the phone call to actually moving them on the road to putting a missile up in the air. >> how quickly can you do that? >> i can do that pretty fast. >> you practice that? >> we practice it very routinely. >> while she was in south korea she interviewed the country's new president who will be visiting the united states last week. we also got to see her old neighborhood. turns out she grew up on an old army base in seoul. >> more than 20
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stationed at this army base, about a third are residents, including american service members and their families. >> this is right in the center of seoul. >> almost geographically, right on the edge of the river near the center. >> more than 30 years ago my family lived here for two years. my father u.s. army commander over saw the fifth preventative medicine unit. >> i can't believe we found it. >> yes, ma'am this is it. >> it has not changed at all. it's virtually the same. >> colonel scott peterson helped us find my old house. >> this whole housing area hasn't changed in like 32 years >> >> not much. not much. the residents are pretty much the same. a lot of maintenance has gone on inside the homes but in terms of laying out the location, yeah, not a lot changed. >> my best friend lived there. this is the duplex i lived in. with my parents and three siblings
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i can remember doing easter egg hunts out the back. >> sure. >> it's different. there used to be a helicopter landing pad in the back >> yeah that's no longer there. >> i can remember president ronald reagan landing on that helicopter pad in our backyard. here i am today in the same spot >> that was my room right there. >> reporter: even though the base is about 25 miles away from the dmz, safety was never a concern for us it was a great place to grow up. you were safe. even though you were in the middle of a foreign country in seoul, south korea, i could ride my bike. and my parents weren't worried about me at all at ten years old they said go play. >> it's a great community here, very, very close community. all of the families are close. as you said it couldn't be safer. we're proud of it.
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seoul american elementary. >> so this would have been my fourth grade classroom. >> this is where you went to school? >> 30 years ago! >> let's take you inside. >> oh, my goodness. >> yeah so this would have been your classroom 30 years ago. >> this would have been my classroom. he oh, my gosh. it's virtually the same. this is the same. right. >> the one thing changed -- >> -- there's a tv. >> it's an interactive smart board. >> can you believe i was ten years old in this classroom. >> reporter: today the elementary school upholds it's reputation for delivering a top-notch education. >> our students are able t go to school any where in the country. >> you have a graduate who's a journalist on cbs. >> it's a great thing. >> it's a great country. >> it's a great place. a great place to live. who knows. we may have the next cbs anchor here.
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hi, everyone. this is norah. >> this happens to be where i started my career in broadcasting, >> yes there are a lot of students. >> giving on-camera english lessons. >> voice, voice. >> she dreamed that she met christopher columbus. >> for the korean educational development institute. [ speaking foreign language ]. >> see you next week. bye-bye, everybody. >> good-bye. >> good-bye. >> cbs overnight news will be right back. ♪ what makes a lipton meal? first you start with this. these guys. a place like shhh! no. found it! and definitely lipton ice tea. lots of it.
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ng taste of lipton iced tea. it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together.
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one more way you've got what it takes to protect. what does life look like during your period? with tampax pearl. you get ultimate protection on your heaviest days and smooth removal for your lightest. tampax pearl and pocket pearl for on the go. the people who keep track of these things say there's now about 2 million surfers in the united states and when surf is up it seems like they're all on the same beach. some surfers who want some elbow room have taken to catching waves at night. cart er has the story from malibu. >> it's twilight on the malibu coast line and this crowd is just getting started.
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>> night surfing is awesome. you can cruise all night long. it's like dancing on the waters. >> you're not going by sight. you're going by feel. >> reporter: it's not for the faint of heart or short sighted. >> for a sport that depends on seeing the right wave at the perfect time it may seem crazy to dive into darkness, but as i found out on my first night's surf section it's all about escaping the crowds. >> if it were light out here, there's bes like 100 guys. >> an everyone running into each other but right now there's like hardly anybody out.
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the numbers grow. >> you watch the light on the wave like a serpent on the water. >> while avoiding gridlock are risking encounters with other under water creatures >> >> there have been a number of shark sightings. do you think about that at all? >> at night. i like to keep my feet up on a he long board. >> you're not going to see it coming. >> that's the thing. i don't want to see it coming. >> reporter: night surfing isn't entirely new, but new technology is making waves. in 2011 got a social media boost from this.
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an australia conquered the wave. >> my heart was pounding so much at the timing myself just stand on your feet. >> it took him four years of preparation. and small army of support staff. >> the lights are so people could see you. >> yeah. >> that look is now catching on. roy johnson used to night surf as a younger man now crafts boards with led lights built into them. >> i like the reactions of the crowd, watching my son srurfing and see people come out go that's so cool. >> you're the official product
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tester. >> absolutely. rain or shine we're out there. >> he says mostly the led lights make an impression on shore. >> what are people saying. they think it's a u.f.o. coming down the wave. >> at the end of the day or night surf something more sport than art and some prefer to keep it old school. >> i feel like i'm at halloween or something. it's a little bit disco, but i think i'll stick with my glow stick, and the moon if it's out. >> once each month it's the one day everyone can agree on. >> it's a full moon i can go for it. >> reporter: carter evans, malibu.
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ople take action against housing discrimination? my friends were told they might be more comfortable in another neighborhood. my co-worker was pressured by her landlord to pay her rent with sexual favors. my neighbor was told she needs to get rid of her dog, even though he's an assistance animal. they all reported these forms of housing discrimination. when you don't report them, landlords and owners are allowed to keep breaking the law. housing discrimination is illegal. if you think you've been a victim, report it. like we did. narrator: if you suspect that you've been discriminated against because of race, color, religion, national origin,
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report it to hud or your local fair housing center. visit hud.gov/fairhousing or call the hud hotline at 1-800-669-9777. fair housing is your right. use it. the military is more than a career, it's a journey. and every step along the w, the uso is there. it's an experience that soldier will never forget... for the rest of his life that's what the uso does. [announcer] from the time they join, to the time they transition out of the military, the uso is there, offering programs and support along the way. [army soldier] the uso has tons of programs. how to do a job interview, what to wear what not to wear. knowing that there was going to be a life after the military. [announcer] for over 70 years, the uso has continued to meet the needs of our troops and their families, standing with them when it counts. we all got to watch pretty much his last goodbye,
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without the uso, it wouldn't be possible for me and my children to watch jared tell us that he loves us. these are memories that we'll have forever. [announcer] be a part of their journey, learn more today at uso.org.
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captioning funded by cbs it's friday, june 23rd, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." senate republicans finally reveal their health care plan, and already it's at risk of flat lining. tropical storm cindy soaks the south and spawns deadly tornados. this morning the system's remnants will um packet millions more from florida to the northeast. hoop dreams come true. the nba's number one draft pick on his future off the basketball court. and skirting the rules. a group of boys protest their school's no shorts policy to beat the heat.

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