Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  June 28, 2017 3:07am-3:59am EDT

3:07 am
are this is a criminal motive. why? because they're asking for money. $300 to be exact. it tells the user to pay up in bit coin to get your files back. cyberattacks say the experts are here to stay. especially ransom ware. and they could get much more sinister. >> you can imagine a future where, maybe, conceptually, they're able to -- infect defibrilato, pacemaker, or automobile or something like this, which is the ultimate ransom. >> terrifying prospect? >> i think it is, it is a, not unforecastable future. >> reporter: experts also say there was a software fix available to protect gainst petia, but not everybody has been keeping their cybersecurity up to date. today's attack, anthony should be a wake-up call. elizabeth palmer.
3:08 am
thanks, liz. and we're back in just a moment.
3:09 am
3:10 am
this is the cbs "overnight news." >> president trump appears to have drawn his own red line over chemical weapons in syria. last night the u.s. warned the assad regime it will pay a heavy price if it launches another chemical attack. david martin is following this. the white house warning was based on surveillance of the airfield, the same base from which the syrian regime launched a deadly poison gas attack in april. the nerve agent sarin killed 87 people including children. the u.s. military retaliated. ever since the base has been under intense surveillance as a known location of chemical
3:11 am
president trump's u.n. ambassador, nikki haley told congress what u.s. intelligence has observed. >> they have seen activities similar to preparations of a chemical weapons attack, much like what we saw on april 4th. >> according to pentagon officials an aircraft center which once housed the syrian jet that carried out april chemical attack is once again in use. u.s. intelligence has also picked up increase in communications, by the syrian military unit responsible for chemical weapons. pentagon officials cautioned the intelligence does not add up to a smoking gun. still, the white house rushed out a statement. warning that if the regime of ba sheer al assad conducts another chemical attack he and his military will pay a heavy price. ambassador haley expanded that to include syria's two main allies. >> the goal is at this point, not just to send assad a message, but to send russia and iran a message. >> about the same time haley was
3:12 am
assad was given a tour of russian aircraft at their main base in syria. just offshore, four u.s. navy ships armed with cruise missiles were operating in the eastern mediterranean. twice as many as carried out the strike on sherrat airfield in april. david martin, cbs news, the pentagon. holly williams has been given a rare look inside syria where fighters backed by the u.s. have surrounded raqqa which isis considers its capital. today, holly met with u.s. forces, just outside of the city. >> 12 miles north of the front line in raqqa, american marines and army engineers are replacing a shattered bridge. they have spent three days in the desert coaxing prefabricated steel into place. captain bobby murray at lamp lejune, north carolina told us the war against isis in syria has left behind a deadly path of destruction.
3:13 am
>> there used to be a lot of mines out here from isis. and we, engineers that we brought, along with our, our eod technicians swept out the field. minutes later a truck hit a mine less than a mile away. marines raced off to investigate. the driver miraculously was alive. the medic treated him for lacerations and concussion. a fighter with america's syrian allies. and said he was heading to the front line when he hit the mine. the marines found more mines and then detonated them. in the nearby village. they're grateful for american help. but there is very little optimism. nobody here would speak to us on camera because they still have family members living under isis
3:14 am
of retribution. offcamera they have told us they have no running water. very little food and their children are illiterate. because the the schools have been closed for five years. america's attempt to win hearts and minds in the middle east have often been troubled. after half a decade of civil war, syria's fractures may be beyond repair. holly williams, cbs news, al-abara, north of raqqa. because your carpet never stops working there's resolve carpet care. it lifts more dirt and pet hair versus vacuuming alone. resolve carpet care with five times benefits
3:15 am
3:16 am
it says you apply the blue one ok, s lto me. this.
3:17 am
no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together. here at home as the school year end, camp season begins. but parents are sending their kids off on buses unaware of the serious risks they could face. here's kris van cleave. >> reporter: every day, 60 school bus drivers get into accidents. that its about 22,000 bus crashes a year injuring thousand of students. but the problems are much worse than just traffic accidents. our cbs news investigation found a stunning lack of oversight of school bus drivers. on average at least once a week, a driver is arrested for driving under the influence. >> i caught a big whiff of alcohol. >> or child pornography. >> what was on the computer?
3:18 am
>> underaged pictures. child. >> when i look into her eyes i can see it. >> reporter: this new york couple who didn't want to be identified tell us their special need daughter was assaulted behind a church by her driver when she was 15. >> he would pick her up. make her get out of the bus. and then do whatever he wanted to do. >> reporter: the family says the driver, ronaldo vega should never have been behind the wheel arrest aid year earlier on suspicion of child abuse but was allowed to keep his job. the charges were eventually dropped, but vega pleaded guilty to assaulting their daughter. >> they shouldn't have been an issue. he just shouldn't have been driving those kids. >> reporter: school bus drivers have to get commercial driver's license. but because the few drive across state lines many federal safety rules dude not apply. so while drivers with disqualifying medical conditions dn
3:19 am
could drive a school bus. transportation attorney, steve gerston. >> truck drivers driving heads of lettuce or television sets actually have to meet higher safety standard than the people that drive our children on school buses. >> this driver was busted for dui in connecticut. one of two states keeping track of all drivers arrested on the job. 21 states told us no school bus drivers had been charged with dui in the past three years. but we found at least one such arrest in each of those states. >> there are no universal standards. so, there is nothing that automatically will disqualify a school bus driver who has an extensive criminal background or duis or caused too many crashes. >> alexander rodriguez was hired to drive a school bus in tennessee though his background check flagged criminal charges in new jersey for having a weapon and drugs in a school zone. a few years later he pleaded guilty to statutory rain of a
3:20 am
bus. >> parents assume when they put the student on a school bus the driver is safe. parents really need to be asking who is driving their children. last year, 90% of school districts report aid shortage of bus drivers. one of the largest school bus companies in the country, durham school services turned to craigslist to find drivers even calling former employees like kelly shane hooper hired despite being under investigation for multiple charges of child pornography. >> i got a phone call from my old job. they were offering me my job back they were short. $12.80 an hour. you can get up here quickly. >> reporter: the school bus industry refused all our for interviews. this child survived. the driver, stayed on the job. leaving parents wondering, who is watching out for their children. kris van cleave, cbs news, new york. coming up next, growing complaints about the negative side effects of cosmetics. and later, a piece of hollywood history hits the auction floor.
3:21 am
no matter who was in there last. protection. new lysol power & fresh 6 goes to work flush after flush for a just-cleaned feeling that lasts up to 4 weeks. lysol. what it takes to protect. i just saved a bunch of money on my car insurhuh. with geico. i should take a closer look at geico... geico can help with way more than car insurance. boats, homes, motorcycles... even umbrella coverage. this guy's gonna wish he brought his umbrella. fire at will! how'd you know the guy's name is will? yeah? it's an expression, ya know? fire at will? you never heard of that? oh, there goes will! bye, will! that's not his name! take a closer look at geico. great savings. and a whole lot more. it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot.
3:22 am
two sensations that work together, so you can play together. ialmost everything. you know, ke 1 i n 10 houses could get hit by an expensive septic disaster. but for only $7 a month, rid-x helps break down waste. avoid a septic disaster with rid-x. >> call plants of side effect from cosmetics nearly doubled last year, but most of these products are still on shore shelves. doctor has been following this. what types of product are we talking about and what kind of reactions? >> products that we use every day. makeup. moisturizers, deodorant, perfumes, hair care, coloring
3:23 am
in this analysis, 2015-2016, adverse events doubled from 700 that year, in 2015 to around 1500 in 2016. >> which still doesn't seem like very many? >> it doesn't. authors of the paper suggest we are seeing tip of the iceberg. research shows that we get reports of under 10% of the total amount of adverse events. reactions we are talking about, skin itching, irritation, rashes, hair loss, allergic reaction, concerns about cancer, reproduction effects, endocrine disruptions. >> what oversight is there for the product? >> minimal oversight. that's the problem. a lot of people would be surprised by that. when you look at how the industry is regulated it is self-regulated, self-policing. the biggester to is that manufacturers are not required to give consumer complaints over to the fda. don't have to report
3:24 am
and so, what we have is a passive surveillance system. where essentially the fda is waiting for consumer complaints or complaints from public health officials or doctors. and then, illiciting investigations. >> so, tara, what can consumers do to protect themselves? >> really hard for consume tires navigate the label. one thing they can do is look for products that have the least number of ingredients to limit concern for reactions to ingredients. they can look for products that don't have dyes, fragrances or preservatives. best things consumers can do. go to the fda website and file a report if they have an adverse event. what may be a rash for me may be more serious problem for you. only way the fda will get a clear picture what is going on with more data. >> great advice. doctor, thank you very much. up next, chicago police officers are charged with a cover-up.
3:25 am
3:26 am
as vetsometimes, we forget that the biggestuntry. challenge can be asking for support. call the veterans crisis line at 1-800-273-8255 and press 1 it matters.
3:27 am
three chicago police officers were charged to day with conspiring to cover-up the actions of a white cop who fatally shot a black teenager in 2014. the officers told investigators they saw laquan mcdonald swing a knife at officer jason vandyke. dash cam video showed vandyke shooting mcdonald 16 times as he walked away. vandyke is charged with murder. a report out today says usa gymnastics needs a complete cultural change. following a sex abuse scandal. a former federal prosecutor made 70 recommendations to protect young gymnasts include making sure adults are never alone with minors. former team doctor dr. larry nasser will stand trial for sexual salt of six athletes. >> firefighters battling 20 major wildfires in the west. in arizona a fire tearing through ponderosa pine in prescott national forest is only
3:28 am
5% contained. >> up next, a tuesday night auction, for saturday night fever. ♪ >> announcer: this portion is sponsored by cialis. it has been 40 years since america caught saturday night fever to. night john travolta's dance floor is up for auction. ♪ dancing yeah ♪ dancing yeah >> the movie which ignited the disco craze, had its roots in a magazine article. called tribal rites of the new
3:29 am
about weekends at dance clubs like brooklyn's 2001 odyssey. that's where fever was filmed. on the especially built 24 x 16 foot floor with more than 250 light compartments. actor joseph callie danced on it as travolta's friend joey. >> you see the floor. takes you right back. like it was yesterday. ♪ known you very well >> ah, but it wasn't. trust me. how deep is your love for disco, the estimated value, more than $1 million. ♪ ♪ that's the "overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back a little later for the morning news and of course, cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm anthony mason.
3:30 am
this is the cbs "overnight news." hi, welcome to the "overnight news." i'm demarco morgan. a massive hack attack, locking up computers the world over. banks in ukraine, oil companies in russia. utilities across europe and continues to spread. what do the cybercriminals want? to be paid. elizabeth palmer has the story. >> the malware crippled computers across ukraine, russia, the uk, most of europe and the u.s. disabling, banks, airport, construction company, major law firm and grocery stores where customers were left with no way to pay. corporate titans were hit too.
3:31 am
including, new jersey based merck pharmaceutic t danish shipping company, molar-mersk. and the russian oil giant. whodunni, carl harbaregr. what do you suspect? >> suspicions are, the suspicions are this is a criminal motive. why? because they're asking for -- money. >> $300 to be exact here's what an infected computer tells the user to do. pay up in the crypto currency bit coin. >> they could get much more sinister. >> you can imagine a future where maybe conceptually they're able to -- infect an insulin pacemaker or automobile or something like this. the ultimate ransom. >> a terrifying prospect. >> i think it's -- not
3:32 am
unforecastable future. >> overseas the trump administration drawing a line in the sand. the administration warned the government of assad, if it launches a poison gas attack there will be a heavy price. why the warning? why now? here is david martin. >> reporter: the white house warning was based on surveillance of sherrat airfield. the same base from which the syrian regime launched a deadly poison gas attack in april. the nerve agent sarin killed 87 people including children. the u.s. military retaliated by firing 59 cruise missiles at the airfield. ever since, the base has been under intense surveillance as a known location of chemical weapons. they have seen activities similar to preparations of chemical weapons take much like
3:33 am
>> reporter: according to pentagon officials an air craft shelter that housed the jet that carried out the april chemical attack is once again in use. u.s. intelligence picked up increasen communications, by the syrian military unit, responsible for chemical weapons. pentagon officials cautioned the intelligence does not add up to a smoking gun. still, the white house rushed out a statement warning that if the regime of bashir al assad conducts a chemical attack he and his military will pay a heavy price. ambassador haley expanded that to include syria's two main allies. >> the goal its at this point, not just to send assad a message but to send russia a i
3:34 am
>> about the same time haley was making the statement. syria's assad was given a tour of russian aircraft at their main base in syria. just offshore, four u.s. navy ships armed with cruise missiles were operating in the eastern mediterranean. twice as many as carried out the strike on sherrat airfield in april. david martin, cbs news, the pentagon. meanwhile, u.s. backed forces in syria are fighting their way into the self proclaimed capital of the islamic state raqqa. holly williams caught up with u.s. troops outside the city. >> reporter: american marines are replacing a shattered bridge. they spent three days in the desert coaxing the steel into place. captain bobby murray based at camp lejune, north carolina told us the war against isis here in syria has left behind a deadly path of destruction. used to be a lot of mines from isis. and we engineers and technicians swept out the field. made schuss it was safe.
3:35 am
made sure it was safe. minutes later a truck hit a mine less than a mile away. marines raced off to investigate. the driver miraculously was alive. the medic treated him for lacerations and concussion. a fighter with america's syrian allies. and said he was heading to the front line when he hit the mine. the marines found more mines and definited them. in the nearby village. they're grateful for american help. but there is very little optimism. nobody here would speak to us on camera because they still have family members living under isis control and they're frightened of retribution. offcamera they have told us they have no running water.
3:36 am
because the the schools have been closed for five years. america's attempt to win hearts and minds in the middle east have often been troubled. after half a decade of civil war, syria's fractures may be beyond repair. holly williams, cbs news, al-abara, north of raqqa. for seven years now, leaders of the republican party have win vowing to bury affordable care act. the next step in that promise was supposed to come yesterday, but the senate voting to repeal and replace obama care. well that vote was canceled. nancy cordes has the the story. >> we are delaying the process so we can close remaining issues. >> the senate republican leader postponed the vote in the face of mounting opposition from his own party's lawmakers. like maine's susan collins. >> it is evident to me that there are a lot of concerns and i'm not the only one by any means. about the senate bill. >> they discussed those concerns in a late afternoon meeting with
3:37 am
who downplayed the party divide. >> we are going to talk, we are going to see what we can do. we are getting very close. >> but he find himself short on outside allies. the conservative club for growth panned the gop plan today saying it would make our failing health care system worse. and, even as white house officials lobbied reluctant republicans, gop governors hit capitol hill with the opposite message. >> i want to make sure we are treated fairly. >> florida's rick scott, and ohio's john kasich said the deep medicaid cuts could tie their hand. republican leaders say their bill gives governors like you more flexibility when dealing with the medicaid population. >> little more flexibility. but no money. the whole key was we need not only flexibility but resources. >> biggest blow to the gop plan came yesterday when the nonpartisan congressional budget office projected that the bill would add tens of millions to the ranks of the uninsured.
3:38 am
the cbo also warned that because of the bill's cuts to tax credits, few low income people would purchase any plan at all. >> the ultimate reason this bill failed is because the american people just didn't like it. it supports your heart, joints, brain, and eyes. and is absorbed by your body three times better. so one megared has more omega-3 power than three standard fish oil pills. new megared advanced triple absorption.
3:39 am
it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together.
3:40 am
>> announcer: this is the cbs "overnight news." tomorrow marks the tenth anniversary of one of the biggest technological advances of our age. the release of the first iphone. anthony mason looks back on the gadget that changed the way we work and play. >> reporter: this thursday will mark ten years since apple released the first iphone. >> it's got everything you need wrapped up in one. >> reporter: the device changed the way we use the internet, shop, learn, take pictures, and communicate with each other. in short with more than a
3:41 am
billion iphones sold it's become part of our culture. what are you doing? >> just found out about things called apps. all i do now. apple co-founder steve jobs first showed off the iphone, nearly six months before its release. >> what we are going to do its get rid of all of the buttons and just make a giant screen. a giant screen. >> at the time it entered a crowded smartphone market. apple's competitors were skeptical. >> $500. fully subsidized with a plan. i said that its the most expensive phone in the world and doesn't appeal to business customers because it doesn't have a keyboard. >> not everybody was sure a touch screen on iphone could be a business tool. and it took some time. but that was overcome tremendously, obviously to the point where every device has a touch screen. >> the iphone popularity led to the ipad.
3:42 am
and later, the apple watch. ♪ freedom ♪ >> reporter: all of which fueled apple's explosive growth to become the most valuable company in the world. investors reap the benefits. as apple shares trading at $17.43, the day the first iphone was sold, are now worth nearly ten times that. the iphone has generated some controversy. apple has been criticized for working conditions in chinese plants where the phones are assembled. and following the 2015 terror attack in san bernardino, california, apple ceo tim cook and then fbi director james comey had a public showdown over apple's refusal to unlock the gunman's iphone. this is iphone 7. ten years on the iphone is in its 7th generation. with an 8th soon to come. your fingerprints and even your heartbeat. but despite being on the cutting edge of technology, a decade from now, the iphone may be a
3:43 am
thing of the past. >> ten years is a very long time in tech. so i think in some ways you always have something on you. i do feel like the idea of always looking at a screen in your pocket might change. >> for decades now, people who live in california have been warned that the big one could strike at any moment. scientists still don't know how to predict a major earthquake. an early warning shake alert system could help. carter evans has a look. >> reporter: state of the art earthquake simulator, we know when the shaking is going to start. what if you got a warning before the real thing. but that does actually exist. called shake alert. set to roll out next year. but now, budget cults could put all of that
3:44 am
second counts. early warning systems are already operational in mexico and japan. prior to the massive 9.0 quake in 2011. people in tokyo got a quake warning of more than 60 seconds. now, the los angeles rail system is literally on track with its own early warning program. all train operators are to stop your train at the next station and hold. >> reporter: when an alert sounds during the simulation at rail operation center, supervisors immediately bring all # 3 trains in the system to a stop and then take cover themselves. in a real world scenario, this all would have happened before the shaking began. founder of earl warning labs, one of just a few companies approved by the u.s. government to send out advanced earthquake alerts. today they got a 30-second warning. that doesn't seem look much
3:45 am
>> doesn't. doesn't right. but when it takes, 12 second to stop a commuter train, or, about 10 second to take elevator to the closest floor or three second underneath the desk. save a lot of lives. >> during an earthquake, seismic waves, radiate from epicenter like waves on the pond. currently more than 700 sensors most of them in southern california, detect those waves. passing along data that can be used to predict when shaking will start in nearby cities. >> we now have 40 second before the shaking is expected to come in here to pasadena. >> this seismologist helped develop the early warning system for the u.s. geological survey. it still needs nearly 1,000 more seismic sensors across the west. but that plan its now in jeopardy. >> the if the president's budget is passed by congress, the program will be stopped because this is one of the things being eliminated. >> jones and others hope it doesn't take a disaster to convince lawmakers to keep the program alive. >> japan started their program after 5,000 people died in kobe. mexico started their program after 10,000 people died in mexico city.
3:46 am
we are tryto country to do it without killing the people first. >> in a state of the art earthquake simulator, if the budget is cut. large parts of california, oregon, washington where sensors need to be installed will not get an early warning. the ultimate goal its to get that alert, out to everyone's cell phone before the quake starts. carter evans, cbs news, los angeles. the cbs "overnight news" will be right back. ♪ no! i don't want there to be white marks. ♪ nothing! there's nothing there! no dust, there's no marks... what is this? oh my god, it's dove! no white marks... ...on a 100 colors. ♪ it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here?
3:47 am
ittle fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together. sorry about the holdup, folks. we have some congestion on the runway and i'm being told it'll be another 15, maybe 20 minutes, and we will have you on your way. ♪ runway models on the runway? surprising. what's not surprising? how much money evan saved by switching to geico. i would not wear that lace. hmm, i don't know? fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. ialmost everything. you know, ke 1 i n 10 houses could get hit by an expensive septic disaster. but for only $7 a month, rid-x helps break down waste. avoid a septic disaster with rid-x.
3:48 am
because your carpet there's resolve carpet care. with five times more benefits than vacuuming alone... it lifts more dirt, pet hair and removes odours. while softening every fibre because your carpet never stops working, resolve carpet care with five times benefits you don't even want to know protection detergent alone doesn't kill bacteria
3:49 am
aundry sanitizer kills 99.9% of bacteria with 0% bleach. lysol. what it takes to protect. famous for its canals and gondolas and fine restaurants. and for the past 1,000 years, a little island offshore home to a group of world famous artist whose work in glass. seth doane paid a visit to morano. >> reporter: the furnaces glow orange and belch heat. and at around 3,000 degrees, something almost magical takes place. a sand mixture melts and becomes glass. the molten concoction can then like candy be squeezed, pulled or shaped. it is a craft they have been perfecting on this italian
3:50 am
how unique is morano, this island of glass makers? >> morano its the mecca of glass. >> in the glass mecca no mistaking the dominant industry. adriano borango owns a studio. >> somebody, about the secret of morano. there are no secrets anymore. >> glass, a chemical compound. from the point of the view of the material. there its nothing special in morano. what is special is still the ability of the craftman? >> that ability is also on display at nearby furnace of the great glassmaker. here, few words are said. the glass speaks and how it moves and hardens. it is a silent symphony. in fact, the lead glassblower its called maestro.
3:51 am
high price. this piece retails for more than $1,000. your father was a master. >> oh, yes. it was -- the master of the masters. >> upstairs from the workshop, gino seguso showed us late father's work. >> this was in a museum in vienna? >> yes. >> so many of the pieces have been in museums. >> morano has the set the trend for centuries. and the saguso family had practice. your family has been at it for how long? >> 650. >> yes, 650 years. that's 25 generations. how did morano become this island of glass? >> morano was an industrial settlement, he explaned. the city of venice was mostly made from wood and venetian glass factories regularly caught fire. so, by order of the doge, ruler
3:52 am
of the the time, glass makers were moved off to island of morano in 1291. venice's lagoon functions as a mote keeping morano a fire safe distance from the ancient city. putting so many glass makers on such a small, less than a mile wide island, sparked competition. and created in david landow's eyes, something exquisite. >> can be different. stupendous, marvelous, boring, nothing. vulgar. exciting. extraordinary. >> reporter: fair to say, landeau, successful entrepreneur, fell in love with glass. >> you know i have about 2,500. >> 2,500 pieces of glass? >> yes. >> in your collection? >> madness. >> objects of his infatuation are on display in venice. which landeau co-created. part museum.
3:53 am
and show cases the richness of morano. the creations of italians and american ken scott. >> you can see a touch of something that makes it special. >> landeau notes this art form is struggling to day due to cheap knock-offs from china. and fewer young people learning the craft. >> glass has been made in venice for 1,000 years? does it have another 1,000 still to go? >> only. i hope more. only a question of creativity. that its what we will always have in morano, creativity, challenge to do new things. challenge to continue to have jobs. >> this place has a different feeling from some of the others here in morano. >> he shuns the world of old school chandeliers and glass ware, preferring to work with contemporary artists. he wanted to show us this. >> i am very proud of this. this is my little dream in the drawer. you see?
3:54 am
>> it is not yet open. but he has transformed an old workshop into what will be a museum of contemporary art in glass. showcasing the avant-garde. this chandelier is made from broken champagne bottles. the traditionalist could stay what you are doing here, contemporary art, threatens the great tradition of morano glass. >> well, somebody might think so. but in reality, i am not, i am trying to bring glass to another step. >> glass making techniques were once a state secret in venice. and while today, the process be common knowledge, the craftsmanship and know how of the place sets morano an island apart.
3:55 am
3:56 am
3:57 am
3:58 am
3:59 am
4:00 am
captioning funded by cbs it's wednesday, june 28th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." it's time to regroup on the gop health care bill. >> so we're going to talk and see what we can do. we're getting very close. plus, global hack. a cyber attack paralyzes bank, government offices, and even hospitals around the world. and the death of a chicago teen leads to the indictment of three police officers. good morning from the studio 57 newsroom at cbs news headquarters here in new york. good to be with u.

100 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on