Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  September 1, 2017 2:07am-3:59am EDT

2:07 am
i have to call you back." three-year-old jordyn grace was found alive, floating in floodwaters shivering from hypothermia. she clutched the body of her mother, 41-year-old clolet sulcer. she told rescuers, "mama was saying her prayers." but most flooding fatalities here happened in cars. donald and rochelle rogers died together, their truck washed off the road and overturned into a ditch. reuben jordan, a retired legendary high school track coach, was last seen in his toyota tundra. ed emmett is the chief executive in harris county. he says 500,000 vehicles were lost in the storm. >> the deaths occurred in vehicles where people were out driving, and they got into high water. there could still be some people in some vehicles that we haven't recovered yet. we recognize that. >> reporter: receding floodwaters will reveal many more cars and potentially more victims. and, dermarco, that house-by- house search rescue teams launched today will involve tens of thousands of resis.
2:08 am
>> morgan: mark strassmann reporting.
2:09 am
2:10 am
>> announcer: this is the cbs overnight news. gasoline prices all over the nation up 10 $2.45 a gallon, the highest they have been all year. more on that now from transportation correspondent kris van cleave. >> reporter: this is the nation's largest oil refinery, waterlogged and shut down after harvey ravaged port arthur, texas. more than a dozen refineries across the gulf are closed, including this conoco-phillips plant outside houston and the exxonmobil facility in bay town, the nation's second largest. it normally pumps out 560,000 barrels of oil a day. about a third of the nation's refining capacity is offline on the gulf coast.
2:11 am
>> without it, we'd be in gas lines all the time. we need that gulf coast. >> reporter: john hofmeister is the former president of shell oil. >> best case, the refineries should be up and operating again, for the most part, by the middle of september. worst case, some of those refineries, if they're really seriously damaged, they could be down through thanksgiving or longer. >> reporter: the houston area is a major hub for the energy industry. this map shows the number of oil and gas installations that were in harvey's path, and it's not just about the refineries. the colonial pipeline, which runs to new york and provides nearly 40% of the south's gasoline, is shut down until at least sunday. the port of houston remains closed to large vessels. today, the coast guard began replacing damaged shipping lane markers and buoys. but the huge backlog of ships is building off the coast.
2:12 am
experts warn fuel be in short fly in the midwest and northeast. all ready lines are showing up in dallas where some stations have run out. >> i heard there was going to be a shortage so i figured i might as well get gas while i can. >> reporter: a million barrels of oil will be released from a government stockpile and the secretary of transportation is working to expedite the delivery of gas here to texas from 25 other states. some refineries are coming back online, but others like this one, clearly have, a long way to go. demarco. >> morgan: kris van cleave reporting. kris, thank you. i'm demarco morgan. i'll have much more from houston later in the broadcast. but the news continues now with margaret brennan in new york. margaret. >> brennan: well, the white house says harvey's floodwaters damaged or destroyed nearly 100,000 texas homes. at least 51,000 claims have been filed with fema's national flood insurance program, but many victims have no flood insurance. here's jim axelrod. >> reporter: in crosby, texas, the floodwaters in consuelo ibarra's kitchen, the one she finished remodeling just last week, rose to her knees. >> whitewater got all the way in to the top.
2:13 am
>> reporter: but like so many others, since her home is it outside fema's map of high-risk flood areas, she did not buy any flood insurance. >> we were always theeld we were not in a flood zone so we didn't need to get it. >> it's going to be somewhere around 15% of the homeowners in the affected area that have flood insurance. >> reporter: do the math, says mark hanna, of the insurance council of texas, and that means five out of every six flood victims have no flood insurance, even though the cost was as little as a few hundred dollars a year for those outside the flood plain. >> we're talking about thousands of people who are just now getting back to their home, seeing that they've got considerable flood damage, and they're going to do what they can. but they're on their own. >> reporter: the small business administration will offer low- interest loans to rebuild, but that's on top of existing mortgage payments.
2:14 am
grants, but they're capped at $30,000, and the average payout historically is $5,000, says carolyn kousky with the university of pennsylvania's risk center. >> the bottom line is while there may be some federal help, it generally will be capped and limited, and if you don't have flood insurance, you may face a financial calamity. >> yes, and i think it's important for us to think more going forward about how we can make sure that a much greater number of people have flood insurance so that they have the financial resources they need to rebuild after an event like this. >> reporter: almost no private insurance companies offer flood insurance. virtually all flood policies are government backed. but there have already been 100,000 claims for damaged vehicles, and another 100,000 expected for wind damage. those are made on private insurers. margaret. >> brennan: pricey disaster. jim, thank you. president trump today pledged $1 million of his own money to disaster relief. the white house has asked for suggestions as to where that money should go. the president will be visiting houston on saturday. today, vice president mike pence
2:15 am
comforted victims in rockport, texas. then he got to work, rolled up his sleeves in the 90-degree heat and helped clear debris in the city, where harvey made landfall last friday. we have much more reporting from our correspondents on harvey's aftermath and ways that you can help the victims if you go to our website. cbsnews.com/hurricaneharvey. as bad as the flooding is in texas, it may be worse in south asia. in mumbai, india, today, 19 people were killed when a five- story building collapsed. torrential rain had weakened its in recent weeks, floods have killed more than 1,000 people in india, nepal, and bangledesh. millions have been forced from their homes. the western u.s. is being hit by another type of natural disaster, wildfires. 70 large fires are burning from california to montana. hot, dry weather in washington state is helping to fuel the
2:16 am
more than 9,000 acres have burned. coming up next, a police officer is caught on video telling a dr, iver"we only kill black people." and later, diana's legacy two decades after her death. clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours. but can ot fix this teens skateboarding mishap? nope. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things. reminds me of how geico hasd been saving people money for over 75 years. hey, big guy! come on in! let me guess your weight! win a prize! sure, why not. 12 ounces! sorry, mate. four ounces. i've been taking the stairs lately. you win, big guy.
2:17 am
sorry, 'scuse me! oh, he looks so much more real on tv. yeah... over 75 years of savings and service. get your rate quote today. your toilet is germ-ridden with mineral buildup. clorox toilet bowl cleaner with bleach is no match against limescale. but lysol power toilet bowl cleaner has 10x more cleaning power against limescale. so switch to lysol. what it takes to protect.
2:18 am
it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together.
2:19 am
>> brennan: the wells fargo scandal is worse than first reported. today, the bank said 3.5 million phony checking and credit card accounts were opened in customers' names without their permission, two-thirds more than we were first told. bank employees did this in order to meet sales goals. wells fargo has paid hundreds of millions of dollars in fines and settlements. an undocumented immigrant whose arrest in february drew national attention was released from custody last night. agents had picked up romulo avelica-gonzalez in los angeles as he was taking his daughters to school. he was reunited with his family after a judge set bond while he appeals his deportation. the mexican immigrant has lived in the united states for 20 years and has had two misdemeanor convictions.
2:20 am
the police chief in cobb county, georgia, said today he's firing a lieutenant for making racially charged comments to a driver during a traffic stop. it happened in july of last year, but the dash-cam video has just been released. the female driver, who is white, told lieutenant greg abbott she was afraid to reach for her cell phone. >> brennan: abbott's lawyer says he was just trying to de- escalate the situation. when we come back, how the death of a princess 20 years ago changed a nation forever. i just want tod
2:21 am
show me used trucks with one owner. pretty cool. [laughs] ah... ahem... show me the carfax. start your used car search at the all-new carfax.com. because your carpet there's resolve carpet care. it lifts more dirt and pet hair versus vacuuming alone. resolve carpet care with five times benefits do i use ...one that'sthat wgood for my teeth? .. now i don't have to choose! from crest 3d white comes new whitening therapy. it's our best whitening technology. plus, it has a fortifying formula to protect your enamel. crest. healthy, beautiful smiles for life. not all fish oil supplements provide the same omega-3 power. megared advanced triple absorption is absorbed three times better. so one softgel has more omega-3 power than three standard fish oil pills. megared advanced triple absorption.
2:22 am
>> brennan: 20 years ago tonight, princess diana was killed in a car crash in paris as she and her new boyfriend raced to escape paparazzi. mark phillips, who covered that story, reports tonight on diana's legacy. >> reporter: 20 years later, and the diana devotees are back. and her sons, who have managed this commemoration, say it will be the last one. they won't again publicly relive the devastation they felt when at just 15 and 12 years old they had to pare
2:23 am
the world. but even back then, diana's death became more than their tragedy. it became a national psycho- drama with very un-british public displays. >> she touched our hearts in life and death. >> reporter: and it seemed to rattle the monarchy itself, which many felt took too long to respond to the public sorrow. and it cast the future king and diana's ex, prince charles, as the villain. charles, who has become "charles the silent" for this anniversary, for good reason says royal correspondent roya nikkah. >> this could never have been a time charles would be liked and loved by the public. they are reminded once again of how badly wrong that marriage went. >> reporter: diana, the modern, accessible, caring, and yet exasperating royal had become their new brand, and her death seemed to break the bond between the monarchy and the people. it became the story at the time.
2:24 am
in some ways, though, her death is proving more difficult for them to handle than her life was. 20 years later, the flowers are gone, and that great flood of shock and grief that had swept britain has long since receded, leaving a kind of sad nostalgia behind. diana's legacy is that she changed the way a nation behaves. >> there is no doubt that diana marks an epoch. >> reporter: royal historian david starkey. >> from the people with the stiff upper lip, we become a nation where there's nary a dry eye and the lip always trembles. this, i think, is very, very different. >> reporter: a difference she never got to see. mark phillips, cbs news, london. >> brennan: in a moment, we'll go back to demarco morgan in houston where flood victims are being blessed by the amazing grace of victoria white.
2:25 am
2:26 am
2:27 am
relief agencies are doing all they can to fill the stomachs of flood victims, but an angel of mercy has made it her personal mission to fill their spirit. here's jericka duncan. >> reporter: it was an impromptu moment captured on camera. victoria white, a 30-year-old university admissions counselor, singing a song of hope at the lone star convention center shelter. ♪ she was doing it for the people here in conroy, texas, who were forced to flee their flooded homes. ♪ less than two days later, more than 16 million people have seen it.
2:28 am
again. this time at another shelter in her home town of livingston. >> all right! ♪ i once was lost ♪ reporter: delivering a robust version of "amazing grace" as 67-year-old patsy morgan sang along. >> amen! awesome! thank you, miss patsy. >> reporter: after watching the coverage of hurricane harvey, white says she knew she had to do something. >> we began to just kind of think about what can we do to inspire people and to let them know it looks hopeless, but i promise it's not. with that we said, man, we can use our voices. ♪ i lift my voice ♪ reporter: you are such a light. i mean, these people are warming up to you instantly, smiling. where do you get that from? >> i was raised to be a good person. you help your neighbors. you help the stranger who needs help, because one day you're going to be at the other end of
2:29 am
need somebody's help. >> reporter: gayle fisher, who like so many in houston, is distraught, has found one more reason to be grateful. >> it was a blessing, because it kind of gave you an uplift, you know. she's got such a beautiful voice, to boot. moourz ♪ let it be a sweet, sweet sound ♪ ♪ news, livingston, texas. ♪ ♪ in your ear ♪ >> that's the overnight news for this friday. for some of you the news continues for others check back a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. in houston i'm margaret brennan in new york, thanks for watching.
2:30 am
♪ >> announcer: this is the c brks srs overnight news. >> i'm margaret brennan in new york. >> and i'm demarco morgan inned houston as the flood disaster here enters a seventh night rescuers are going house to house to check on the welfare of anyone who might be inside the death toll up to at least 29, more than 19,000 people and more than 1,000 pets have been rescued. >> in one sign of improvement, power outages in texas have fallen from 300,000 to 200,000. more than 33,000 people spent last night in shelters, and the red cross has now served a quarter of a million meals and snacks. >> morgan: the latest estimate is that harvey's reign of
2:31 am
gallons of water, enough to supply new york city for nearly 69 years. we begin our coverage tonight with anna werner in port arthur, texas. >> reporter: helicopters from the coast guard to the national guard pulled residents up and out to safety. a baby in beaumont. in west houston, a father and son. boats manned by police and volunteers went door to door in port arthur, seeking anyone left behind. deputy bryan haymon came from louisiana's ascension parish. and when you look around here, does this neighborhood look to you like anybody was ready for this? >> a lot of people just hesitant to leave their homes. you can see all the cars. that tells you they came up so fast that they couldn't even get their cars out of the-- out of the driveway. >> reporter: today, the sun came out, but water made many routes throug
2:32 am
to the north in beaumont, residents have no drinking water. floodwaters overwhelmed estate's the city's water system. without it, beaumont's baptist hospital had to evacuate all its patients. shelters are packed, and the red cross' chester jourdan says they need more food. >> the biggest issue is cooked food, food somebody can bring in or that we have here or we can cook. >> reporter: kaevon roach just reunited here with his wife and three children. he was saved by a helicopter. they were rescued in a boat. what was that like? i mean, you've got little kids. >> it was scary. i mean, i had to get more food because we were running out. >> reporter: what you're seeing here is the effect of 26 inches of rain in just 24 hours. and, demarco, rescue operations are continuing tonight. >> morgan: anna werner reporting. anna, thank you. adding to the fear and danger here, explosions at a chemical plant sent a cloud of smoke into
2:33 am
the air and more than a dozen sheriff's deputies to the hospital. david begnaud is covering that. >> reporter: it happened at 2:00 a.m. local time, the first of two explosions lit up the night& sky. by morning, a fire was still burning. a mile and a half radius around the chemical plant was evacuated tuesday after company representatives warned local officials their emergency plans had failed. ed gonzalez is the harris county sheriff. >> we believe the smoke is a nontoxic irritant. >> reporter: the company had backup generators. all of them failed. then refrigeration units in three of nine trailers failed. officials warn the highly combustible compounds, known as organic peroxides, were sure to burn as the temperatures rose, although they downplayed the harm. >> no one is in danger based on the fire we expect. >> reporter: arkema executive richard rennard defended the company's response. >> we believe at this point the safest thing to do is toow
2:34 am
product in those to degrade and burn. >> reporter: we asked the company to provide us with a list of chemicals at the plant. they said they would. we called 11 times today and never got that list. we tried to get in touch with your company yesterday repeatedly and could not get a-- i just have a simple question. regarding the chemical, can you tell us what it is and exactly what it contains. >> yes, it's a liquid organic peroxide. >> reporter: so what is it that makes it worse? >> the concern is when these things degrade, they generate heat. when they generate heat, they can burn. when they burn, you can have an explosion. >> reporter: the occupational safety and hazard administration inspected arkema's crosby facility last year and found 10 serious violations. but experts say it is premature to speculate if they were related to today's explosions. this afternoon, the federal chemical safety board launched an investigation. we still want to know why, didn't the company have a plan to neutralize these chemicals when everything else seemed to fail?
2:35 am
demarco, even if the water recedes, the plant which is about five miles behind me, and it is clear, or appears clear to go in, officials say it's not because the situation is too volatile for them to try to stop anything now. >> morgan: david begnaud reporting. david, thank you. as rescue efforts goes on, houston remembering those who were lost. here's mark strassmann. >> reporter: they prayed for each other's safety in downtown houston, a room full of cops, their grief still raw from the loss of sergeant steve perez early sunday morning. the father of two drove through pounding rain into 16 feet of water and drowned. today would have been his 61st birthday. ray hunt is president of the police union. >> he perished trying to do what he's been doing for 34 years, which is keeping the city safe. that-- i think that says everything about what kind of man sergeant perez was. >> reporter: alexander sung spent his final minutes at his clock store, trying to savs
2:36 am
the phone rang. the 64-year-old told his daughter, frantically, "sweetie, i have to call you back." three-year-old jordyn grace was found alive, floating in floodwaters shivering from hypothermia. she clutched the body of her mother, 41-year-old clolet sulcer. she told rescuers, "mama was saying her prayers." but most flooding fatalities here happened in cars. donald and rochelle rogers died together, their truck washed off the road and overturned into a ditch. reuben jordan, a retired legendary high school track coach, was last seen in his toyota tundra. ed emmett is the chief executive in harris county. he says 500,000 vehicles were lost in the storm. >> the deaths occurred in vehicles where people were out driving, and they got into high water. there could still be some people in some vehicles that we haven't recovered yet. we recognize that. >> reporter: receding floodwaters will reveal many
2:37 am
and, dermark oh, that house-by- house search rescue teams launched today will involve tens of thousands of residents. >> morgan: mark strassmann reporting. mark, thank you. as the floodwaters here in texas rose, so did gasoline prices all over the nation. since friday they are up 10 cents to a nationwide average $2.45 a gallon, the highest they have been all year. more on that now from transportation correspondent kris van cleave. >> reporter: this is the nation's largest oil refinery, waterlogged and shut down after harvey ravaged port arthur, texas. more than a dozen refineries across the gulf are closed, including this conoco-phillips plant outside houston and the exxonmobil facility in bay town, the nation's second largest. it normally pumps out 560,000 barrels of oil a day. about a third of the nation's refining capacity is offline on the gulf coast. a million barrels will be released from the
2:38 am
stock pile secretary of transportation is working to expedite the delivery of gas here to texas from 25 other states. some refineries are coming back online, but others like this one, clearly have, a long way to go. fast relief in every bite. crunchy outside. chewy inside. tum tum tum tum tums chewy bites. ♪ lysol max cover kills 99.9% of bacteria,
2:39 am
one more way you've got what it takes to protect. two kids barfed in class today. it was so gross. lysol disinfectant spray kills 99.9% of bacteria, even those that cause stomach bugs. one more way you've got what it takes to protect. ito become dangerous.d for an everyday item new tide pods child guard pack. helps keep your laundry pacs safe and your child safer. align, press and unzip.
2:40 am
♪ >> announcer: this is the c brks srs overnight news. the skies have cleared over houston and tens of thousands of people forced to inflee by the wrath of harvey are headed home. for many it's a heart breaking home coming. kris van cleave reporting. outside houston. >> this time they are visiting their home in a boat. first time back since hurricane harvey hit. they couldn't get in because they lost the key to the house. they didn't have
2:41 am
so we waded through chest-deep water to help get through their back window. inside its worse than they feared. >> what's going through your mind when you walked in here. >> i don't have the words. >> the couple lives here with four adult children and one grand kid. a baby's bottle and food sit unfinished on the counter. reminders how quickly they had to get out. >> people parked cars on the streets thinking it was high enough but the water kept coming. >> it was a heart breaking home coming for many families in crosby. >> everything just gone. >> he lives down the street, and had to canoe to his house during the stormer his family woke up to three feet of water inside their home and just had to go. what's in his truck bed is all he could salvage zblx what about the baby pictures. >> we got some saved. with you not much. everything is almost gone.
2:42 am
enough dry clothes for couple days. >> my kids want to come back home. >> it's hard to imagine that will be possible any time soon. so for now they'll stay with family. >> i just feel overwhelmed. you know. helpless. >> i don't know know what to do right now. >> a feeling shared by so many around here as they come home to find there's not much to come home to. >> estimates show more than 80% of people in this area with water damage do not have flood insurance. no one we talked to has any flood insurance which means they may be on their own when it comes to paying for repairs the. >> in other news it is a mournful day in great britain where they marked 20 years since the tragic death princess diana.
2:43 am
>> 20 years ago this was a scene of mass mourning for the princess and frankly has taken just about that long to try to understand what her life and her death meant. >> the only official recognition of the anniversary was the brief public appearance of her two sons and william's wife kate in the memorial garden dedicated to diana and with a small crowd of well-wishers at the gate. sfrlz a faint echo of the mass expression of public grief that followed diana's shocking death. >> such a waste, i feel i'm speaking for everybody. it's just incredibly sad. >> back then it became more than a tragedy for two young boys, william was 15 and harry 12 at the time. it was a national psycho drama that seemedo
2:44 am
foundation of the monarchy. of the heir to the thrown prince schar charles still being blamed for the break down of the marriage and for the princess who seemed to drag the stuffy royal family into the modern world and who had more or less become its brand. >> she touched our hearts in life and death. >> the fractures and the bond between the royals and the people that diana's death rev l revealed became the story. >> in some ways her death is proving to be more difficult to handle then her life was. >> 20 years later the flowers are gone and that great shock and grief leave a sad nostalgia behind. the changes to the monarchy turned into mostry a question of style. >> goes to show what a
2:45 am
figure she was and still is. >> royal correspondent. >> in terms of press and dress and the way the royals do their job so she still is that focal point. >> somebody who has not been a focal point is prince charles, the next king, who has decided, many keep wisely, to keep silent during this comemmoration. as for diana's son's they too have decided to commemorate this event in private.
2:46 am
it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this.
2:47 am
no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together. clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours. but will it stop this teen from being embarassed by her parents? nope. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things. your toilet is germ-ridden with mineral buildup. clorox toilet bowl cleaner with bleach is no match against limescale. but lysol power toilet bowl cleaner has 10x more cleaning power against limescale. so switch to lysol. what it takes to protect.
2:48 am
millions of americans are watching the tragic events in texas and louisiana unfold from the comfort of their living rooms, but even where it is warm and dry the scenes of devastation can be unnefbing. unnerving. in norway viewers watch a show called "slow tv". we report on this phenomenon for sunday morning. >> it's television's version of taking a deep breath. a very long, very slow deep breath. ♪ >> it's called slow tv. and it's a surprising smash hit in norway.
2:49 am
it began with this broadcast of a train journey from the coastal city to the capital. the formula, simple, put few cameras on a train and watch the scenery go by. for seven hours. >> did you know where that journey would lead. how successful it would be. >> no, not at all. >> the brains behind the whole thing we met at the train station. >> it's normally one of those late night ideas after couple beers at the bar and when you wake up the next day eh, it's not that good idea after all. [ speaking foreign language ]. . but much to their surprise there was a green light from their bosses at norway's public broadcaster
2:50 am
>> yes. of course it's boring. >> you admit your own show is bore sng. >> yes. much of life itself is boring. but in between there there are some exciting moments and you just have to wait for them. >> yeah, yeah. >> since the train in 2009 they've experimented with other slow ideas. there was a national knitting night. which started of course with sheering the sheep.
2:51 am
knitting the sweater came much later in the 13 hour broadcast. >> the shows get slower and slower. >> it has to be unique. not a copy of the last one. so we have to push the boundaries for each show, i think. ♪ >> the show titled "salmon swimming up stream" ran 18 hours and afterwards the head of the station said it felt too short. >> is there a recipe for the perfect slow tv? >> it's important that it's an unbroken timeline that you don't take away anything. that everything is in there all of the boring stuff, all of the exciting stuff, so you as a viewer you have to find out what's boring, what's interesting. >> it kind of requires you to precise precisely, to slow down, to kind bi twist your head in a little
2:52 am
>> are you a fan of slow tv. >> i am. >> he is a professor of media studies at the university eff oslow. >> when you first heard about slow tv did you think you would like it? >> i thought the whole notion was weird, to tell you the truth. but turned out at least some of it i found surprisingly appealing. >> he likened slow tv to opening a sort of window, an escape valve for what he called fast paced eye candy tv. >> when did we come to accept that television should be this accelerated, busy, intense in-your-face thing, at some point that became the norm. >> the producers say one scene sums up their approach. >> once we passed a cow on
2:53 am
camera on it and kept rolling. didn't cutaway and then you keep it and then you keep it and then suddenly a story evolves. because what is the cow doing? why is it walking there? where is it heading? so suddenly comes a story out of it. you have to see what happens. ♪ >> there was plenty of time to follow that cow because they came across it while shooting an episode which followed a crew along norway's coast that cruise was five and half days' long, slow tv broadcast all 134 hours of it live. at one point almost half of norway was watching. norwegians lined the ship's route often waving
2:54 am
welcoming it into port. ♪ slow tv episodes are special events, they're not on all the time. the creators want them to stand apart from regular programming. all of this got us to thinking. >> i wanted to show you something, get your thoughts on this. we have something on sunday morning called the moment of nature to the end of every broadcast and thought you guys might like to see it. >> we leave you this sunday morning among the big horn sheep of jackson hole, wyoming. >> watch. >> i get the feeling. >> slow tv in the makmaking? >> compared to other things, yes, definitely. i guess you get a lot of good reactions on be this one. >> the audience loves it and they always want it to be longer.
2:55 am
>> that you each drive a ford pickup right? yes. i'm going to show you a next generation pickup. awesome. let's do this. the bed is made of high-strength steel, which is less susceptible to punctures than aluminum. stronger the better. and best of all, this new truck is actually- oh my... the current chevy silverado. it's the chevy summer drive. get a total value of $9,600 or, get 0% financing for 60 months on this silverado all star. find new roads at your local chevy dealer.
2:56 am
2:57 am
its said that a picture is worth a thousand words but for some nursing home residents trapped by rising flood waters this picture was more than that, it was a lifesaver, because it led it to this picture. we have the story outside houston. >> the name is "the beautiful life" in italian. but life became unbearable for residents when
2:58 am
rushed into the home during hurricane harvey we spoke to ruth miller and she told me what happend. >> can you tell me about being in the water. >> i didn't like it. >> you didn't like it? >> no it scares me i didn't feel safe. >> as the water rose around ruth miller and her friends, staffers there relied on a simple mantra. >> keep calm and collective. >> kept saying that over and over again. >> oh, smells good doesn't it. >> nursing home owners say they were initially told to shelter in place. >> that is where the water rose in this room. >> but evacuation was soon their only option. >> within 45 minutes to an hour went from ankle to stomach. >> to get help she snapped
2:59 am
photo and sent it it to her daughter in florida. >> few hours after it was posted on social media came the rescues and then the reunions. >> what was it like when you first saw me today? >> oh, god, i was so happy. >> ruth is now living with her older sister suzanne bobrick. >> what you look at that picture again what goes through your mind? >> how tragic this could have ended up. the water rose and luckily it held. it held. >> ruth will stay with her sister until the family can find a new facility to fit her needs. as for the owners of the nursing home they plan to rebuild. there's plenty of damage so no telling when residents can return. >> that's the new for this friday for some of you the news continues. for others check back later for the morning news and of course cbs this morning. from the broadcast center
3:00 am
york city. >> announcer: cbs news, original reporting. >> morgan: and on the seventh day, no rest. >> i woke this morning with the intention to come out and rescue. >> morgan: civilians and soldiers save thousands more from harvey's floodwaters and search door to door for anyone stranded. also tonight, chemical plant explosions pose a new danger. >> reporter: okay, but you make it sound simple. if it was so simple, there wouldn't be so much worry. >> look at these houses and vehicles. people are going to lose. >> morgan: the uninsured-- why mapl peoe won't get the help they need to rebuild. britain remembers diana 20 years later. >> reporter: it became a ery onal psycho-drama with v unbritish public displays. amazing grace >> morgan: and after a flood of biblical proportions, gospel lifts their spirits. ♪ now i see
3:01 am
good evening i'm in houston with margaret brennan in new york. as the flood disaster enters a seventh night, rescuers are now going house to house to check on the welfare of anyone who might be inside. the death toll is up to at least 29. more than 19,000 people and more than 1,000 pets have been rescued. >> in one sign of improvement, power outages in texas have fallen from 300,000 to 200,000. more than 33,000 people spent last night in shelters, and the red cross has now served a quarter of a million meals and snacks. >> morgan: the latest estimate is that harvey's reign of terror totaled 27 trillion gallons of water, enough to supply new york city for nearly 69 years.
3:02 am
with anna werner in port arthur, texas. >> reporter: helicopters from the coast guard to the national guard pulled residents up and out to safety. a baby in beaumont. in west houston, a father and son. boats manned by police and volunteers went door to door in port arthur, seeking anyone left behind. deputy bryan haymon came from louisiana's ascension parish. and when you look around here, does this neighborhood look to you like anybody was ready for this? >> a lot of people just hesitant to leave their homes. you can see all the cars. that tells you they came up so fast that they couldn't even get their cars out of the-- out of the driveway. >> reporter: today, the sun came out, but water made many routes through town impassable. the motiva oil plant shut down. to the north in beaumont, residents have no drinking water. floodwaters overwhelmed
3:03 am
the city's water system. without it, beaumont's baptist hospital had to evacuate all its patients. shelters are packed, and the red cross' chester jourdan says they need more food. >> the biggest issue is cooked food, food somebody can bring in or that we have here or we can cook. >> reporter: kaevon roach just reunited here with his wife and three children. he was saved by a helicopter. they were rescued in a boat. what was that like? i mean, you've got little kids. >> it was scary. i mean, i had to get more food because we were running out. >> reporter: what you're seeing here is the effect of 26 inches of rain in just 24 hours. and, demarco, rescue operations are continuing tonight. >> morgan: anna werner reporting. anna, thank you. adding to the fear and danger here, explosions at a chemical plant sent a cloud of smoke into the air and more than a dozen sheriff's deputies to the
3:04 am
david begnaud is covering that. >> reporter: it happened at 2:00 a.m. local time, the first of two explosions lit up the night sky. by morning, a fire was still burning. a mile and a half radius around the chemical plant was evacuated tuesday after company representatives warned local officials their emergency plans had failed. ed gonzalez is the harris county sheriff. >> we believe the smoke is a nontoxic irritant. >> reporter: the company had backup generators. all of them failed. then refrigeration units in three of nine trailers failed. officials warn the highly combustible compounds, known as organic peroxides, were sure to burn as the temperatures rose, although they downplayed the harm. >> no one is in danger based on the fire we expect. >> reporter: arkema executive richard rennard defended the company's response. >> we believe at this point the safest thing to do is to allow the other eight containers, product in those to degrade and burn.
3:05 am
>> reporter: we asked the company to provide us with a list of chemicals at the plant. they said they would. we called 11 times today and never got that list. we tried to get in touch with your company yesterday repeatedly and could not get a-- i just have a simple question. regarding the chemical, can you tell us what it is and exactly what it contains. >> yes, it's a liquid organic peroxide. >> reporter: so what is it that makes it worse? >> the concern is when these things degrade, they generate heat. when they generate heat, they can burn. when they burn, you can have an explosion. >> reporter: the occupational safety and hazard administration inspected arkema's crosby facility last year and found 10 serious violations. but experts say it is premature to speculate if they were related to today's explosions. this afternoon, the federal chemical safety board launched an investigation. we still want to know why, didn't the company have a plan to neutralize these chemicals when everything else seemed to fail?
3:06 am
demarco, even if the water recedes, the plant which is about five miles behind me, and it is clear, or appears clear to go in, officials say it's not because the situation is too volatile for them to try to stop anything now. >> morgan: david begnaud reporting. david, thank you. as rescue efforts goes on, houston remembering those who were lost. here's mark strassmann. >> reporter: they prayed for each other's safety in downtown houston, a room full of cops, their grief still raw from the loss of sergeant steve perez early sunday morning. the father of two drove through pounding rain into 16 feet of water and drowned. today would have been his 61st birthday. ray hunt is president of the police union. >> he perished trying to do what he's been doing for 34 years, which is keeping the city safe. that-- i think that says everything about what kind of man sergeant perez was. >> reporter: alexander sung spent his final minutes at his clock store, trying to save his most valuable time pieces. the phone rang. the 64-year-old told his daughter, frantically, "sweetie,
3:07 am
i have to call you back." three-year-old jordyn grace was found alive, floating in floodwaters shivering from hypothermia. she clutched the body of her mother, 41-year-old clolet sulcer. she told rescuers, "mama was saying her prayers." but most flooding fatalities here happened in cars. donald and rochelle rogers died together, their truck washed off the road and overturned into a ditch. reuben jordan, a retired legendary high school track coach, was last seen in his toyota tundra. ed emmett is the chief executive in harris county. he says 500,000 vehicles were lost in the storm. >> the deaths occurred in vehicles where people were out driving, and they got into high water. there could still be some people in some vehicles that we haven't recovered yet. we recognize that. >> reporter: receding floodwaters will reveal many more cars and potentially more victims. and, dermarco, that house-by- house search rescue
3:08 am
of thousands of residents.
3:09 am
3:10 am
>> announcer: this is the cbs overnight news. he. as the floodwaters rose so did gasoline prices all over the nation up 10 cents to a nationwide average $2.45 a gallon, the highest they have been all year. more on that now from transportation correspondent kris van cleave. >> reporter: this is the nation's largest oil refinery, waterlogged and shut down after harvey ravaged port arthur, texas. more than a dozen refineries across the gulf are closed, including this conoco-phillips plant outside houston and the exxonmobil facility in bay town, the nation's second largest. it normally pumps out 560,000 barrels of oil a day. about a third of the nation's refining capacity is offline on >>e gulf coast.
3:11 am
lines all the time. we need that gulf coast. >> reporter: john hofmeister is the former president of shell oil. >> best case, the refineries should be up and operating again, for the most part, by the middle of september. worst case, some of those refineries, if they're really seriously damaged, they could be down through thanksgiving or longer. >> reporter: the houston area is a major hub for the energy industry. this map shows the number of oil and gas installations that were in harvey's path, and it's not just about the refineries. the colonial pipeline, which runs to new york and provides nearly 40% of the south's gasoline, is shut down until at least sunday. the port of houston remains closed to large vessels. today, the coast guard began replacing damaged shipping lane markers and buoys. but the huge backlog of ships is building off the coast. experts warn fuel be in short fly in the midwest and northeast. all ready lines are showing up in dallas where some stations have run out. >> i heard there was going to be a shortage so i figured i might
3:12 am
as well get gas while i can. >> reporter: a million barrels of oil will be released from a government stockpile and the secretary of transportation is working to expedite the delivery of gas here to texas from 25 other states. some refineries are coming back online, but others like this one, clearly have, a long way to go. demarco. >> morgan: kris van cleave reporting. kris, thank you. i'm demarco morgan. i'll have much more from houston later in the broadcast. but the news continues now with margaret brennan in new york. margaret. >> brennan: well, the white house says harvey's floodwaters damaged or destroyed nearly 100,000 texas homes. at least 51,000 claims have been filed with fema's national flood insurance program, but many victims have no flood insurance. here's jim axelrod. >> reporter: in crosby, texas, the floodwaters in consuelo ibarra's kitchen, the one she finished remodeling just last week, rose to her knees. >> whitewater got all the way in to the top. >> reporter: but like so m
3:13 am
others, since her home is it outside fema's map of high-risk flood areas, she did not buy any flood insurance. >> we were always theeld we were not in a flood zone so we didn't need to get it. >> it's going to be somewhere around 15% of the homeowners in the affected area that have flood insurance. >> reporter: do the math, says mark hanna, of the insurance council of texas, and that means five out of every six flood victims have no flood insurance, even though the cost was as little as a few hundred dollars a year for those outside the flood plain. >> we're talking about thousands of people who are just now getting back to their home, seeing that they've got considerable flood damage, and they're going to do what they can. but they're on their own. >> reporter: the small business administration will offer low- interest loans to rebuild, but that's on top of existing mortgage payments. fema will make grants, but they're capped at $30,000, and the ave
3:14 am
historically is $5,000, says carolyn kousky with the university of pennsylvania's risk center. >> the bottom line is while there may be some federal help, it generally will be capped and limited, and if you don't have flood insurance, you may face a financial calamity. >> yes, and i think it's important for us to think more going forward about how we can make sure that a much greater number of people have flood insurance so that they have the financial resources they need to rebuild after an event like this. >> reporter: almost no private insurance companies offer flood insurance. virtually all flood policies are government backed. but there have already been 100,000 claims for damaged vehicles, and another 100,000 expected for wind damage. those are made on private insurers. margaret. >> brennan: pricey disaster. jim, thank you. president trump today pledged $1 million of his own money to disaster relief. the white house has asked for suggestions as to where that money should go. the president will be visiting houston on saturday. president trump today pledged $1 million of his own money to disaster relief. the white house has asked for suggestions as to where that money should go. the president will be visiting houston on saturday. today, vice president mike pence
3:15 am
texas. then he got to work, rolled up his sleeves in the 90-degree heat and helped clear debris in the city, where harvey made landfall last friday. we have much more reporting from our correspondents on harvey's aftermath and ways that you can help the victims if you go to our website. cbsnews.com/hurricaneharvey. as bad as the flooding is in texas, it may be worse in south asia. in mumbai, india, today, 19 people were killed when a five- story building collapsed. torrential rain had weakened its foundation. in recent weeks, floods have killed more than 1,000 people in india, nepal, and bangledesh. millions have been forced from their homes. the western u.s. is being hit by another type of natural disaster, wildfires. 70 large fires are burning from
3:16 am
state is helping to fuel the jolly mountain fire. more than 9,000 acres have burned. coming up next, a police officer is caught on video telling a driver, "we only kill black people." and later, diana's legacy two decades after her death. ♪ lysol max cover kills 99.9% of bacteria, even on soft surfaces. one more way you've got what it takes to protect.
3:17 am
it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together. new deep hydrating eye gel with hyaluronic acid
3:18 am
ge eye cream for better hydration. and your best look yet. olay eyes collection. ageless. because your carpet there's resolve carpet care. it lifts more dirt and pet hair versus vacuuming alone. resolve carpet care with five times benefits clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours. but can ot fix this teens skateboarding mishap? nope. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things.
3:19 am
>> brennan: the wells fargo scandal is worse than first reported. today, the bank said 3.5 million phony checking and credit card accounts were opened in customers' names without their permission, two-thirds more than we were first told. bank employees did this in order to meet sales goals. wells fargo has paid hundreds of millions of dollars in fines and settlements. an undocumented immigrant whose arrest in february drew national attention was released from custody last night. agents had picked up romulo avelica-gonzalez in los angeles as he was taking his daughters to school. he was reunited with his family after a judge set bond while he appeals his deportation. the mexican immigrant has lived in the united states for 20 years and has had two misdemeanor convictions. the police chief in cobb county,
3:20 am
a lieutenant for making racially charged comments to a driver during a traffic stop. it happened in july of last year, but the dash-cam video has just been released. the female driver, who is white, told lieutenant greg abbott she was afraid to reach for her cell phone. >> brennan: abbott's lawyer says he was just trying to de- escalate the situation. when we come back, how the death of a princess 20 years ago changed a nation forever. once there was a little pig that had built his house out of straw. one day a big bad wolf huffed and he puffed and blew the house down. luckily the geico insurance agency had helped the pig with homeowners insurance. he had replacement cost coverage,
3:21 am
ouse was rebuilt, good as new. the big bad wolf now has a job on a wind farm. call geico and see how easy it is to switch and save on homeowners insurance. not all fish oil supplements provide the same omega-3 power. introducing megared advanced triple absorption... it supports your heart, joints, brain, and eyes. and is absorbed by your body three times better. so one megared has more omega-3 power than three standard fish oil pills. new megared advanced triple absorption.
3:22 am
gainst limescale. but lysol power toilet bowl cleaner has 10x more cleaning power against limescale. so switch to lysol. what it takes to protect. >> brennan: 20 years ago tonight, princess diana was killed in a car crash in paris as she and her new boyfriend raced to escape paparazzi. mark phillips, who covered that story, reports tonight on diana's legacy. >> reporter: 20 years later, and the diana devotees are back. and her sons, who have managed this commemoration, say it will be the last one. they won't again publicly relive the devastation they felt when
3:23 am
at just 15 and 12 years old they had to parade their grief before the world. but even back then, diana's death became more than their tragedy. it became a national psycho- drama with very un-british public displays. >> she touched our hearts in life and death. >> reporter: and it seemed to rattle the monarchy itself, which many felt took too long to respond to the public sorrow. and it cast the future king and diana's ex, prince charles, as the villain. the silent" for this me "charles anniversary, for good reason says royal correspondent roya nikkah. >> this could never have been a time charles would be liked and loved by the public. they are reminded once again of how badly wrong that marriage went. >> reporter: diana, the modern, accessible, caring, and yet exasperating royal had become their new brand, and her death seemed to break the bond between the monarchy and the people. it became the story at the time.
3:24 am
in some ways, though, her death is proving more difficult for them to handle than her life was. 20 years later, the flowers are gone, and that great flood of shock and grief that had swept britain has long since receded, leaving a kind of sad nostalgia behind. diana's legacy is that she changed the way a nation behaves. >> there is no doubt that diana marks an epoch. >> reporter: royal historian david starkey. >> from the people with the stiff upper lip, we become a nation where there's nary a dry eye and the lip always trembles. this, i think, is very, very different. >> reporter: a difference she never got to see. mark phillips, cbs news, london. >> brennan: in a moment, we'll go back to demarco morgan in houston where flood victims are being blessed by the amazing grace of victoria white.
3:25 am
3:26 am
3:27 am
relief agencies are doing all they can to fill the stomachs of flood victims, but an angel of mercy has made it her personal mission to fill their spirit. here's jericka duncan. >> reporter: it was an impromptu moment captured on camera. victoria white, a 30-year-old university admissions counselor, singing a song of hope at the lone star convention center shelter. ♪ she was doing it for the people here in conroy, texas, who were forced to flee their flooded homes. ♪ less than two days later, more than 16 million people have seen it. and y,
3:28 am
again. this time at another shelter in her home town of livingston. >> all right! ♪ i once was lost ♪ reporter: delivering a robust version of "amazing grace" as 67-year-old patsy morgan sang along. >> amen! awesome! thank you, miss patsy. >> reporter: after watching the coverage of hurricane harvey, white says she knew she had to do something. >> we began to just kind of think about what can we do to inspire people and to let them know it looks hopeless, but i promise it's not. with that we said, man, we can use our voices. ♪ i lift my voice ♪ reporter: you are such a light. i mean, these people are warming up to you instantly, smiling. where do you get that from? >> i was raised to be a good person. you help your neighbors. you help the stranger who needs help, because one dayo
3:29 am
going to be at the other end of that stick, and you're going to need somebody's help. >> reporter: gayle fisher, who like so many in houston, is distraught, has found one more reason to be grateful. >> it was a blessing, because it kind of gave you an uplift, you know. she's got such a beautiful voice, to boot. moourz ♪ let it be a sweet, sweet sound ♪ ♪ >> reporter: jericka duncan, cbs news, livingston, texas. ♪ ♪ in your ear ♪ >> that's the overnight news for this friday. for some of you the news continues for others check back a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. in houston i'm margaret brennan in new york, thanks for watching. ♪ is
3:30 am
>> announcer: this is the cbs overnight news. >> i'm margaret brennan in new york. >> and i'm demarco morgan inned houston as the flood disaster here enters a seventh night rescuers are going house to house to check on the welfare of anyone who might be inside the death toll up to at least 29, more than 19,000 people and more than 1,000 pets have been rescued. >> in one sign of improvement, power outages in texas have fallen from 300,000 to 200,000. more than 33,000 people spent last night in shelters, and the red cross has now served a quarter of a million meals and snacks. >> morgan: the latest estimate is that harvey's reign of teor
3:31 am
supply new york city for nearly 69 years. we begin our coverage tonight with anna werner in port arthur, texas. >> reporter: helicopters from the coast guard to the national guard pulled residents up and out to safety. a baby in beaumont. in west houston, a father and son. boats manned by police and volunteers went door to door in port arthur, seeking anyone left behind. deputy bryan haymon came from louisiana's ascension parish. and when you look around here, does this neighborhood look to you like anybody was ready for this? >> a lot of people just hesitant to leave their homes. you can see all the cars. that tells you they came up so fast that they couldn't even get their cars out of the-- out of the driveway. >> reporter: today, the sun came out, but water made many routes through town impassable. the motiva oil plant shut down. to the north in beaumont,
3:32 am
water. floodwaters overwhelmed estate's the city's water system. without it, beaumont's baptist hospital had to evacuate all its patients. shelters are packed, and the red cross' chester jourdan says they need more food. >> the biggest issue is cooked food, food somebody can bring in or that we have here or we can cook. >> reporter: kaevon roach just reunited here with his wife and three children. he was saved by a helicopter. they were rescued in a boat. what was that like? i mean, you've got little kids. >> it was scary. i mean, i had to get more food because we were running out. >> reporter: what you're seeing here is the effect of 26 inches of rain in just 24 hours. and, demarco, rescue operations are continuing tonight. >> morgan: anna werner reporting. anna, thank you. adding to the fear and danger here, explosions at a chemical plant sent a clo o
3:33 am
the air and more than a dozen sheriff's deputies to the hospital. david begnaud is covering that. >> reporter: it happened at 2:00 a.m. local time, the first of two explosions lit up the night sky. by morning, a fire was still burning. a mile and a half radius around the chemical plant was evacuated tuesday after company representatives warned local officials their emergency plans had failed. ed gonzalez is the harris county sheriff. >> we believe the smoke is a nontoxic irritant. >> reporter: the company had backup generators. all of them failed. then refrigeration units in three of nine trailers failed. officials warn the highly combustible compounds, known as organic peroxides, were sure to burn as the temperatures rose, although they downplayed the harm. >> no one is in danger based on the fire we expect. >> reporter: arkema executive richard rennard defended the company's response. >> we believe at this point the safest thing to do is to allow the other eight containers, product in those to degrade and burn.
3:34 am
>> reporter: we asked the company to provide us with a list of chemicals at the plant. they said they would. we called 11 times today and never got that list. we tried to get in touch with your company yesterday repeatedly and could not get a-- i just have a simple question. regarding the chemical, can you tell us what it is and exactly what it contains. >> yes, it's a liquid organic peroxide. >> reporter: so what is it that makes it worse? >> the concern is when these things degrade, they generate heat. when they generate heat, they can burn. when they burn, you can have an explosion. >> reporter: the occupational safety and hazard administration inspected arkema's crosby facility last year and found 10 serious violations. but experts say it is premature to speculate if they were related to today's explosions. this afternoon, the federal chemical safety board launched an investigation. we still want to know why, didn't the company have a plan to neutralize these chemicals when everything else seemed to fail?
3:35 am
recedes, the plant which is about five miles behind me, and it is clear, or appears clear to go in, officials say it's not because the situation is too volatile for them to try to stop anything now. >> morgan: david begnaud reporting. david, thank you. as rescue efforts goes on, houston remembering those who were lost. here's mark strassmann. >> reporter: they prayed for each other's safety in downtown houston, a room full of cops, their grief still raw from the loss of sergeant steve perez early sunday morning. the father of two drove through pounding rain into 16 feet of water and drowned. today would have been his 61st birthday. ray hunt is president of the police union. >> he perished trying to do what he's been doing for 34 years, which is keeping the city safe. that-- i think that says everything about what kind of man sergeant perez was. >> reporter: alexander sung spent his final minutes at his clock store, trying to save his
3:36 am
the phone rang. the 64-year-old told his daughter, frantically, "sweetie, i have to call you back." three-year-old jordyn grace was found alive, floating in floodwaters shivering from hypothermia. she clutched the body of her mother, 41-year-old clolet sulcer. she told rescuers, "mama was saying her prayers." but most flooding fatalities here happened in cars. donald and rochelle rogers died together, their truck washed off the road and overturned into a ditch. reuben jordan, a retired legendary high school track coach, was last seen in his toyota tundra. ed emmett is the chief executive in harris county. he says 500,000 vehicles were lost in the storm. >> the deaths occurred in vehicles where people were out driving, and they got into high water. there could still be some people in some vehicles that we haven't recovered yet. we recognize that. >> reporter: receding floodwaters will reveal many more cars and potentially more victims. and, dermark
3:37 am
launched today will involve tens of thousands of residents. >> morgan: mark strassmann reporting. mark, thank you. as the floodwaters here in texas rose, so did gasoline prices all over the nation. since friday they are up 10 cents to a nationwide average $2.45 a gallon, the highest they have been all year. more on that now from transportation correspondent kris van cleave. o >> reporter: this is the nation's largest oil refinery, waterlogged and shut down after harvey ravaged port arthur, texas. more than a dozen refineries across the gulf are closed, including this conoco-phillips plant outside houston and the exxonmobil facility in bay town, the nation's second largest. it normally pumps out 560,000 barrels of oil a day. about a third of the nation's refining capacity is offline on the gulf coast. a million barrels will be released from the government's stock pile secretary of transportation is working to expedite the delivery of gas here to texas from 25 other states.
3:38 am
some refineries are coming back online, but others like this one, clearly have, a long way to go. oz rethink what's possible. rethink your allergy pills. flonase sensimist allergy relief helps block 6 key inflammatory substances with a gentle mist. most allergy pills only block one. and 6 is greater than one. flonase sensimist. ♪ because your carpet there's resolve carpet care. it lifts more dirt and pet hair versus vacuuming alone. resolve carpet care with five times benefits ...with pantene 3 minute miracle daily conditioner.s... a super concentrated pro-v formula makes hair stronger* in just 3 minutes. so it's smoother every day.
3:39 am
not all fish oil supplements provide the same omega-3 power. megared advanced triple absorption is absorbed three times better. so one softgel has more omega-3 power than three standard fish oil pills. megared advanced triple absorption.
3:40 am
♪ >> announcer: this is the cbs overnight news. the skies have cleared over houston and tens of thousands of people forced to flee by the wrath of harvey are headed home. for many it's a heart breaking home coming. kris van cleave reporting. outside houston. >> this time they are visiting their home in a boat. first time back since hurricane harvey hit. they couldn't get in because they lost the key to the house. they didn't have high-water gear so we waded through chest-deep water to help get through their back window.
3:41 am
inside its worse than they feared. >> what's going through your mind when you walked in here. >> i don't have the words. >> the couple lives here with four adult children and one grand kid. a baby's bottle and food sit unfinished on the counter. reminders how quickly they had to get out. >> people parked cars on the streets thinking it was high enough but the water kept coming. >> it was a heart breaking home coming for many families in crosby. >> everything just gone. >> he lives down the street, and had to canoe to his house during the stormer his family woke up to three feet of water inside their home and just had to go. what's in his truck bed is all he could salvage >> what about the baby pictures. >> we got some saved. with you not much. everything is almost gone. >> she was only able to find enough dry clothes c
3:42 am
days. >> my kids want to come back home. >> it's hard to imagine that will be possible any time soon. so for now they'll stay with family. >> i just feel overwhelmed. you know. helpless. >> i don't know know what to do right now. >> a feeling shared by so many around here as they come home to find there's not much to come home to. >> estimates show more than 80% of people in this area with water damage do not have flood insurance. no one we talked to has any flood insurance which means they may be on their own when it comes to paying for repairs the. >> in other news it is a mournful day in great britain where they marked 20 years since the tragic death princess diana. >> 20 years ago this was a scene of mass mourning for the
3:43 am
princess and frankly has taken just about that long to try to understand what her life and her death meant. >> the only official recognition of the anniversary was the brief public appearance of her two sons and william's wife kate in the memorial garden dedicated to diana and with a small crowd of well-wishers at the gate. a faint echo of the mass expression of public grief that followed diana's shocking death. >> such a waste, i feel i'm speaking for everybody. it's just incredibly sad. >> back then it became more than a tragedy for two young boys, william was 15 and harry 12 at the time. it was a national psycho drama that seemed to shake the foundation of the monarchy. of the heir to the thrown prince
3:44 am
charles still being blamed for the break down of the marriage and for the princess who seemed to drag the stuffy royal family into the modern world and who had more or less become its brand. >> she touched our hearts in life and death. >> the fractures and the bond between the royals and the people that diana's death revealed became the story. >> in some ways her death is proving to be more difficult to handle then her life was. >> 20 years later the flowers are gone and that great shock and grief leave a sad nostalgia behind. the changes to the monarchy turned into mostly a question of style. >> goes to show what a massive figure she was and still is. >> royor
3:45 am
>> in terms of press and dress and the way the royals do their job so she still is that focal point. >> somebody who has not been a focal point is prince charles, the next king, who has decided, many keep wisely, to keep silent during this commemoration. as for diana's son's they too have decided to commemorate this event in private. downy and it's done. it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this.
3:46 am
no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together. clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours. but will it stop this teen from chugging hot sauce? ...oh jeremy. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things.
3:47 am
two kids barfed in class today. it was so gross. lysol disinfectant spray kills 99.9% of bacteria, even those that cause stomach bugs. one more way you've got what it takes to protect. have you any wool?eep, no sir, no sir, some nincompoop stole all my wool sweaters, smart tv and gaming system. luckily, the geico insurance agency recently helped baa baa with renters insurance. everything stolen was replaced. and the hooligan who lives down the lane was caught selling the stolen goods online. visit geico.com and see how easy it is to switch and save on renters insurance.
3:48 am
millions of americans are watching the tragic events in texas and louisiana unfold from the comfort of their living rooms, but even where it is warm and dry the scenes of devastation can be unnefbing. unnerving. in norway viewers watch a show called "slow tv". we report on this phenomenon for sunday morning. >> it's television's version of taking a deep breath. a very long, very slow deep breath. ♪ >> it's called slow tv. and it's a surprising smash hit in norway.
3:49 am
a train journey from the coastal city to the capital. the formula, simple, put few cameras on a train and watch the scenery go by. for seven hours. >> did you know where that journey would lead. how successful it would be. >> no, not at all. >> the brains behind the whole thing we met at the train station. >> it's normally one of those late night ideas after couple beers at the bar and when you wake up the next day eh, it's not that good idea after all. [ speaking foreign language ]. . but much to their surprise there was a green light from their bosses at norway's public broadcaster nrk 2. >> actually we like it being a bit strange.
3:50 am
>> yes. of course it's boring. >> you admit your own show is no commercials. >> yes of course it is boring. >> you admit your ian show is boring. >> yes much of life itself is boring but in between there are some exciting moments and you just have to wait for them. >> yeah, yeah. >> since the train in 2009 they've experimented with other slow ideas. there was a national knitting night. which started of course with sheering the sheep.
3:51 am
knitting the sweater came much later in the 13 hour broadcast. >> the shows get slower and slower. >> it has to be unique. not a copy of the last one. so we have to push the boundaries for each show, i think. ♪ >> the show titled "salmon swimming up stream" ran 18 hours and afterwards the head of the station said it felt too short. >> is there a recipe for the perfect slow tv? >> it's important that it's an unbroken timeline that you don't take away anything. that everything is in there all of the boring stuff, all of the exciting stuff, so you as a viewer you have to find out what's boring, what's interesting. >> it kind of requires you to precisely, to slow down, to kind bi twist your head in a little
3:52 am
>> i am. >> he is a professor of media studies at the university eff oslow. >> when you first heard about slow tv did you think you would like it? >> i thought the whole notion was weird, to tell you the truth. but turned out at least some of it i found surprisingly appealing. >> he likened slow tv to opening a sort of window, an escape valve for what he called fast paced eye candy tv. >> when did we come to accept that television should be this accelerated, busy, intense in-your-face thing, at some point that became the norm. >> the producers say one scene sums up their approach. >> once we passed a cow on one of our journeys and we put a
3:53 am
camera on it and kept rolling. didn't cutaway and then you keep it and then you keep it and then suddenly a story evolves. because what is the cow doing? why is it walking there? where is it heading? so suddenly comes a story out of it. you have to see what happens. ♪ >> there was plenty of time to follow that cow because they came across it while shooting an episode which followed a crew along norway's coast that cruise was five and half days' long, slow tv broadcast all 134 hours of it live. at one point almost half of norway was watching. norwegians lined the ship's
3:54 am
welcoming it into port. ♪ slow tv episodes are special events, they're not on all the time. the creators want them to stand apart from regular programming. all of this got us to thinking. >> i wanted to show you something, get your thoughts on this. we have something on sunday morning called the moment of nature to the end of every broadcast and thought you guys might like to see it. >> we leave you this sunday morning among the big horn sheep of jackson hole, wyoming. >> watch. >> i get the feeling. >> slow tv in the making? >> compared to other things, yes, definitely. i guess you get a lot of good reactions on be this one. >> the audience loves it and they always want it to be longer. >> exactly. >> so make it longer.
3:55 am
>> that means they'll watch it. >> stop this piece now.
3:56 am
3:57 am
3:58 am
3:59 am
4:00 am
it's friday, september 1st, 2017. this is the "early morning news." rescues are still underway in texas to save harvey survivors surrounded by water, but flood waters are not the only concern. and as houston beguns to dry out the mayor has a message for the nation. >> the point is, the city of houston and let me just speak into all of the cameras, the city of houston is open for business and quite frankly we're open for business right now. >> good morning from the studio 57 news room at cbs news

46 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on