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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 31,486 (some duplicates have been removed)
BBC News
Jan 6, 2017 9:30pm GMT
quickly go for the latest headlines from bbc nears —— now for the latest headlines on bbc news... police in florida say five people were killed during a shoot out at fort lauderdale airport. the gunman was wounded, he is in police custody and is said to have acted alone. it eight people were injured. pollution in china has reached such high levels that residents have been warned against going out in the snow because of fears it is dangerously contaminated. michelle obama has made her last speech as people might first lady richey said the role was an honour. at ten o'clock there will bea an honour. at ten o'clock there will be a full round—up of the news but now it is time for the turn of newswatch with samira ahmed looking at the role of language in news headlines. hello and welcome to the first newswatch of 2017 with me, samira ahmed, where we'll be rounding up some of the comments you've made about bbc news since we went off air before christmas. coming up: jill saward died this week, but should the bbc news website have described her in its headline as a campaigner rather than as a
PBS
Aug 4, 2010 12:30am PDT
>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by -- the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, and union bank. >> union bank has put its global financial strength to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> b.p. starts its static kill procedure in the gulf of mexico, hoping to seal the leaking oil will permanently. and someone says that the war is being lost, and he arrives in britain to talk to prime minister david kendra. -- david cameron. a former head is sentenced to prison for corruption. hello, and welcome to bbc news, broadcast to our viewers in the u.k. and around the world. the oil giant e.p.s. started the long awaited operation, known as "static kill;" -- the oil giant b.p.. this is 1 mile beneath the surface. they will pump cement into it. almost 5 million barrels of oil were spewed into the sea. we were told more about how this procedure should work. >> huge am
BBC News
Jan 27, 2017 9:30pm GMT
the latest headlines from bbc news. the latest headlines from bbc news. the british prime minister, theresa may, has become the first foreign leader to meet president tra nsference leader to meet president transference is in operation. at a news conference, president trump paid tribute to the special relationship between the two countries. mrs may said they had reaffirmed their confidence in nato, despite the recent comments from mr trump: the transatlantic alliance obsolete. mr trump said he has had a friendly conversation with this mexican counterpart. the men had riled about the wall. the vice president has told a rally that they will reckon —— that they will push for a supreme courtjudge was opposed to abortion. at 10pm, fiona bruce will be here with a full round—up of judo‘s news. fiona bruce will be here with a full round—up ofjudo‘s news. first of all, it is news watch. hello and welcome to news watch. it has been a long week in us politics but did bbc news go overboard and how it covered donald trump's inauguration and his first few days as president? and was it
BBC News
Mar 3, 2017 9:30pm GMT
hello. this is bbc news. the headlines: 14,000 1a,000 civilians 1a, 000 civilians have 1a,000 civilians have left mosul in the last one to four hours, as iraqi coalition forces try to defeat so—called islamic state —— the last 24 so—called islamic state —— the last 2a hours. results are coming in as diverse members of the new northern ireland assembly are elected it seems the dup and sinn fein will remain the largest parties —— results are coming in as new members. prosecutors said thatjuan thompson was also charged with cyber his girlfriend. the main centre—right candidate in the french presidential race has suffered a further blow with the resignation of his spokesperson and another party withdrawing its support. at ten o'clock we have a round—up of the day's news, but now it is time for newswatch. welcome to newswatch. on this week's programme, they got their envelopes mixed up, but did bbc news get its news priorities the wrong way round? we discuss complaints that the embarrassment of the oscars was reported on as if it was an event of major global sig
PBS
Dec 31, 2011 12:30am PST
>> this is "bbc world news." >> funding for this presentation foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. focus features. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> security forces in syria clashed with anti-government protesters. at least 35 people are dead. an explosion at a market in nigeria kills four. has been blamed on the infamous group boko haram. protests in turkey after protesters are mistakenly killed. welcome to bbc news, broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. coming up later, a cyclone hit india's southeast coast and batters villages with heavy rain and strong winds. hello again. activists in syria after security forces opened fire friday as they try to stop hundreds of thousands of protesters from demonstrating in front of visiti
PBS
Dec 28, 2010 6:00pm EST
>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> meeting face-to-face. west african leaders until the president of ivory coast, laurent gbagbo, to step down or face possible removal by force. a series of bombings since christmas eve. towns are evacuating in northeastern australia due to what has been called the worst flooding in 50 years. welcome to "bbc world news," with me, peter dobbie. and britain is within sight of retaining the ashes. the incumbent president of ivory coast has been met so that he could be persuaded to step down so that they will recognize the opposition leader, alassane ouattara, as the rightful winner of the recent elections. our international development corre
PBS
Sep 25, 2010 12:30am PDT
offoff >> bbc world news is presented by kcet los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. new man's own foundation. the john d. and katherine t. foundation. union bank and seemon's. >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for companies from major corporations. what can we do for you? >> somewhere in america there's a doctor who can peer into the future. there's a nurse who can access in an instant every patient's past. and because the whole hospital is working together, there's a family who can breathe easy right now. somewhere in america we've already answered some of the nation's toughest health care questions. and the over 60,000 people of seaman's are ready to do it again. >> and now, bbc world news. >> hateful and offensive. barack obama criticizes iran's president to suggesting that the u.s. government was behind the september 11 attacks. britain raises the threat level from dissident irish republicans, warning an attack is a strong possibility. no global food crisis. the u.n.
BBC News
Mar 4, 2017 3:45am GMT
news broadcaster there. the disgruntlement continued through the week. bbc news reported on thursday that the two accountants from pricewaterhousecoopers held responsible for the fiasco would not be working on the oscars again and on friday they would be given bodyguards following threats on social media. stuart reynolds was another viewer who thought bbc news was living in la la land, tweeting. .. well, another viewer who contacted us well, another viewer who contacted us this week was mary kavanagh. she is in our oxford studio. also we have the bbc control of daily news programming. mary, what was your objection? i felt exactly the same as those to viewers that have just given their views. there was so much time spent on this one silly item andi time spent on this one silly item and i think my views from but that —— breakfast programme where dan walker and the weeds were trying desperately to keep the momentum going and they were so excited, oh, we are going to the red carpet! we went to the red carpet and there was this poor man standing in a kilt, desperately trying to speak
PBS
Feb 23, 2011 6:00pm EST
>> this is "bbc world news." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its global expertise to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> gaddafi a's grip on power in libya slowly slipped away. >> be suffering and bloodshed is outrageous and unacceptable. >> gunships and planes fire on their own civilians. witnesses say the police and the country are fighting back. 71 dead in new zealand earthquake and police say hopes have faded of finding anyone else alive. welcome to "bbc world news." coming up later for you -- clashes in greece as a protest against austerity measures continue puree head and white are scientists drilling to kilometers in -- and why are scientists drilling at two kilometers into a british city? welcome to the program. the crisis in libya is increasingly volatile with reports of 600 dead and the army being used against its
PBS
Nov 23, 2010 6:00pm EST
>> >> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." cold war.s north and south exchanged artillery fire. could there be more to come? >> -- under the threat of north korea and guns. it is that the process of hours. what is speeding into view is the sense that north korea is becoming more reckless and provocative. on north korean television they were showing their leader today. kim jong-il out and about on a fish farm. he is trying to engineer a succession of power to his son. north korea blamed the south for firing first. he blamed them for their forces intruding on their territory. >> a rash of tensions and fears here. no one knows what is driving north korea down this dangerous road. bbc
PBS
Aug 24, 2010 6:00pm PDT
>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by -- the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, and union bank. >> union bank has put its global financial strength to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> 6 members of the somali parliament are among 30 dead in an attack on a hotel in mogadishu. 42 died in northeast china when a plane burst into flames. with nearly 1 million cut off by flood waters, the prime minister of pakistan says epidemic is a serious concern. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- we talked to the elite u.s. troops training for afghanistan. all parts of the surge against the taliban. and jubilation in gillette as rescuers make contact with -- in chile rescuers make contact with 33 trapped miners underground. hello to you. in part of the horn of
WHUT
Dec 28, 2010 6:30pm EST
corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> meeting face-to-face. west african leaders until the president of ivory coast, laurent gbagbo, to step down or face possible removal by force. a series of bombings since christmas eve. towns are evacuating in northeastern australia due to what has been called the worst flooding in 50 years. welcome to "bbc world news," with me, peter dobbie. and britain is within sight of retaining the ashes. the incumbent president of ivory coast has been met so that he could be persuaded to step down so that they will recognize the opposition leader, alassane ouattara, as the rightful winner of the recent elections. our international development correspondent, mark doyle. >> it has been described by african leaders as a last chance for a peaceful, negotiated solution. three presidents have come to ivory coast to tell mr. gbagbo his time is up. unless he goes, this key country in west africa, one of the economic powerhouses, could descend back into war. all of the main observers of last month's elections say that laurent gbagb
WHUT
Jun 22, 2010 6:30pm EDT
>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its global expertise to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> can the top general in afghanistan be allowed to disrespect the president, or is president obama about to sack general mcchrystal? an emergency budget that slashes spending and raises taxes in britain. >> this emergency budget deals decisively with our country's record debt. it pays for the past and plans for the future. >> heavy flooding in brazil has made 120,000 homeless. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america and elsewhere around the globe. my name is mike embly. to the world cup, we look at how a country fell out of love with its football team, and 40,000 deaths per year in the u.k. are blamed on trans fat. there are calls now to ban them. hello
PBS
Dec 8, 2010 6:00pm EST
>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> its founder is behind bars, but wikileaks tells the bbc the diplomatic cables will keep on coming. >> we will eventually release all of them. that will take some time. weeks if not months. >> meanwhile, hackers are attacking financial institutions refusing to hand over donations to wikileaks. and 85 die in an overcrowded prison in chile. and peace talks in the middle east are now over. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- fresh riots in haiti as anger builds over presidential election results. and diamonds as abundant on plants
BBC News
Jun 20, 2017 6:00pm BST
for 20 years. and coming up in sportsday on bbc news: the british and irish lions go into the first test against the all blacks in great form, after an emphatic warm—up win against the chiefs in new zealand. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. the chancellor philip hammond has put britain's future economic prosperity centre stage in any brexit deal. in particular mr hammond called for a "jobs first" settlement. he also wants immigration to be managed but not shut down altogether. labour says the chancellor is distancing himself from the prime minister's tough line on brexit, accusing the cabinet of being in disarray over the issue. the chancellor's comments come on a day when the governor of the bank of england has warned of the risks of the brexit negotiations. here's our economics editor kamal ahmed. a year ayearon a year on from the referendum and ca i’s a year on from the referendum and cars waiting in sunny southampton for a journey to the continent of europe, exports to the european union like these are a key driver of oui’ union like these are a key driver
BBC News
Oct 27, 2017 7:45pm BST
report on her news conference from brussels. why? and, should bbc news be interested in what president macron‘s dog did in the fireplace of the elysee palace? what exactly is going on in the negotiations over the uk's departure from the european union? that can be hard to discern that damian grammaticas last friday was trying to get some answers... enter the man who sits in the negotiation room... your recommendation today is significant progress. . . recommendation today is significant progress... sorry, we are going to work... it's michel barnier who the uk has two satisfy first. today, he was here to brief eu leaders on how negotiations had progressed. i'm sorry, but i don't want to answer your question now. i'm sorry, let me work, please. david roberts was troubled by that encounter and got in touch with us to explain why. and another aspect of that summit reporter at the end of last week caught the attention of a number of viewers. a short use during a clip of theresa may's news conference. nobody need be concerned for the current budget plan, that they would have to either pay
PBS
Oct 6, 2010 6:00pm PDT
>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its global expertise to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> up in smoke, again. an attack on in need of supplies and in afghanistan. and miles of toxic sludge that could take at least a year in tens of millions of dollars to clean up. and accusations the cia used a secret prison in europe to torture its most important terror suspects. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. coming up later for you -- win in on the front lines in afghanistan. in a dramatic change. and the province in western cambodia where surviving members of the khmer rouge say they are the victims. the united states has apologized for the nato helicopter attack inside afghanistan that killed two pakastani soldiers and
BBC News
Jul 8, 2017 9:30pm BST
, with me, samira ahmed. bbc news through a virtual reality headset? audiences take to experiencing news events this way. and what questions do the new technologies pose for journalists? first, though, safi roussos, one of 22 people killed at a pop concert in manchester on may 22, her ninth birthday would have been on tuesday. to mark the occasion, we spoke to safi rousos‘s parents. we did not want to let her birthday pass. we did not want to let her birthday pass. she loved the limelight. ijust wanted to celebrate safi's birthday through doing this. what has your family lost? 0h... we have lost everything. we have lost everything, we have. life will never be the same. stephanie and trevor firth were among a number of viewers to pick up on one aspect of the interview, writing: versions of the report ran on bbc news all day, leading the news at six. it provided powerful and moving television, but some people had concerns about the prominence given to the item. here's mark eaton: linda dell also contacted us about the coverage, leaving us this telephone message. i find this mawkish
BBC News
Oct 28, 2017 3:45am BST
york e—mailed us on the same subject, asking: we put that point to bbc news and they told us this: fans of high quality natural history programmes had been looking keenly forward to the start of blue planet ii, and there's a good chance you will have heard it starts on sunday on bbc one. sneak previews of what the david attenborough—fronted series will be bringing us appeared in several of monday's newspapers and widely across bbc news as well. it is 16 years since the groundbreaking blue planet programme appeared on our screens. for the first time, millions of viewers here and around the world can see the wonders of the deep ocean. now, it's back for a second series presented by, of course, sir david attenborough. for the last four years, the bbc natural history unit crews have been scouring the planet to see these aquatic animals. david shukman has been speaking to david attenborough about this series. that many questioned whether it deserved its place in the news. it certainly isn't the first time we've heard the charge of self—promotion, and the same day, breakfast featured item
BBC News
Feb 24, 2017 9:30pm GMT
the latest headlines from bbc news. kimjong—nam, the the latest headlines from bbc news. kim jong—nam, the half the latest headlines from bbc news. kimjong—nam, the half brother of the north korean leader was killed bya the north korean leader was killed by a highly toxic nerve agent according to police in malaysia. the exes classified by the united nations as a weapon of mass destruction. iraqi forces have moved into western mosul as they intensify their battle in driving so—called islamic state from the last major stronghold in iraq, they are responding with mortars and sniper fire. donald trump said that america will be bigger, stronger and better than ever before, speaking to the conservative wing of the republican party, she also said that the mexican wall is ahead of schedule. the french financial prosecutors have opened people enquiring, into the french presidential candidate, fillon, and he's family receiving payments. he denies it. tempi, rita chakra barty is here with a full round—up of the day ‘s news, first it is on his watch. and there and welcome to news wa
PBS
Oct 28, 2010 5:30pm EDT
>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its global expertise to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> help finally reaches the parts of indonesia out worst hit by the tsunami periods trying to avoid another greek that crisis. iwelcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- three months after the floods in pakistan, millions are waiting for help. >> we have been waiting for hours under a blazing sun, wondering if their turn will come before the food runs out. >> and the ever-changing the pronunciation of english. hello to year. emergency aid has reached some of the most remote islands ravaged by monday's tsunami. it is confirmed 340 died, but hundreds more are missing. indonesian autho
BBC News
Jul 23, 2017 2:00am BST
welcome to bbc news, broadcasting to viewers in north america and around the globe. my name is reged ahmad. our top stories: president trump claims "complete power" to issue pardons as senators prepare to question his family's contacts with russians during the us election. venezuela's crisis intensifies as the military clash with protesters trying to march towards the supreme court in caracas. london's great ormond street hospital says staff have received death threats and online abuse in relation to the charlie gard case. hello and welcome to bbc news. president trump has insisted he has complete power to pardon people. it comes amid reports that he's been looking at ways of pardoning himself and his family should investigators decide there was collusion with russia during the us election campaign. next week, his eldest son and his son—in—law are due to testify before congress. but there was no mention of the controversy when the president spoke at a naval ceremony in virginia. from washington, laura bicker reports. donald trump hoped this week would be a celebration of al
PBS
Mar 15, 2011 6:00pm EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> hundreds are tested for radiation exposure in japan after four explosions at nuclear plant. the prime minister asks people not to panic. >> i request you act very calmly. >> amid the carnage, a survivor trapped for 96 hours, but pulled out alive. others call in vain for missing relatives. >> [unintelligible] >> powerful aftershocks are still rocking the country. one measures 6.4 and hit southwest japan on tuesday. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- tensions are running high. two protesters are killed and bahrain declares a state of emergency. and de
BBC News
Sep 2, 2017 3:45am BST
edited. more conventional sports have also featured strongly on bbc news over the last month. from the world athletics championships to last weekend's boxing extravaganza in las vegas in which floyd mayweather beat conor mcgregor. that contest led some news bulletins on sunday morning, prompting viewer jackie downs to complain: there is no doubting the news value of hurricane harvey which landed in texas a week ago and has continued to cause huge damage as a storm and tropical depression with floods now spreading across louisiana. james cook was on the spot for bbc news on saturday. hurricane harvey smashed ashore just a short time ago. not very far from here, about 30 miles east north east of where we are standing here in corpus christi. rockport is where it came ashore. the winds were said to be at 130 miles an hour according to the national hurricane centre. that makes it a category 4 hurricane and an extremely dangerous storm. christian hudson was concerned about the danger, asking: many more viewers had a different concern about the coverage of storm harvey. the floods had displac
PBS
Aug 24, 2010 2:30pm PDT
>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by -- the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, and union bank. >> union bank has put its global financial strength to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> members of the somali parliament are among the 30 dead in an attack on a hotel in mogadishu. up plane in china burst into flames all trying to land. pakistan's prime minister says the threat of epidemics is as serious concern. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- how the british government and the catholic church covered up the priest's role in one of northern ireland's most notorious bombings. and celebrating the waiting game. 33 miners will be tracked until christmas. -- trapped until christmas. hello to you. it is viewed with increasing alarm by the united sta
PBS
Oct 23, 2010 12:30am PDT
>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its global expertise to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> health united states turned a blind -- how the united states turned a blind eye to torture in iraq. and the biggest leaking of secret military records. one says lives would be put at risk. >> the most clear terms with the disclosure of any classified information by any individual or organization that puts the lives of the united states and partner service members and civilians at risk. >> and people are struggling to contain the first caller -- cholera outbreak in haiti in several years. in a battle of wills as the french senate approves a plan to raise the retirement age to 62. america's a desperate democrats. we take look down a lane in each of the women who may have a threat at t
PBS
Feb 5, 2011 12:30am PST
>> this is "bbc world news." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> thousands protest in egypt, but mubarak remains in power. there are talks with the opposition unit and each vice- president. there is a call for a change in egypt to begin now. >> in light of what is happened over the past few weeks, going back to the old ways is not going to work. >> welcome to bbc world news. also in this program, tensions escalate in cambodia. the has been a of the shot u.s. congresswoman is going to begin trading for the final flight of space shuttle "endeavor." ♪ thousands of people are in the square in central cairo after a another huge rally protesting the egyptian president mubarak . tensions continue to build on friday, but he is s
PBS
Aug 24, 2010 6:00pm EDT
? >> and now "bbc world news." >> 6 members of the somali parliament are among 30 dead in an attack on a hotel in mogadishu. 42 died in northeast china when a plane burst into flames. with nearly 1 million cut off by flood waters, the prime minister of pakistan says epidemic is a serious concern. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- we talked to the elite u.s. troops training for afghanistan. all parts of the surge against the taliban. and jubilation in gillette as rescuers make contact with -- in chile rescuers make contact with 33 trapped miners underground. hello to you. in part of the horn of africa viewed with increasing alarm by the united states, the african union, and ethiopia, islamist insurgents in somalia stormed a hotel used by the government, killing more than 30. those killed includes six members of parliament and five government officials. at least 70 have died in two days in some of the heaviest fighting for years. our east africa correspondent reports from neighb
WHUT
Dec 29, 2010 6:30pm EST
>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> a terror plot aimed at taking revenge for cartoons of mohammed. police and denmark arrest five. tens of thousands of homes without water in northern ireland. doctors warn of a public health emergency. a failed mediation, but west african leaders say they will return to the ivory coast as the international community steps up pressure on laurent gbagbo. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. coming up later for you -- crackdown on corruption, but can china reverse something that critics say is deeply ingrained in its bureaucracy? and 70 years on, how firefighters and winston churchi
BBC News
Jan 25, 2017 6:00pm GMT
record nine gold medals through no fault of his own. and coming up in the sport on bbc news, serena williams says britain'sjohanna konta can be a future grand slam champion, after knocking her out in this good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. there's been a sharp increase in the number of homeless people — with more than half the councils in england recording a rise. on a single night last year more than 4,000 people were sleeping rough — that's according to the government figures. it amounts to a 16%jump on the year before — campaigners say it's an appalling rate. 0ur midlands correspondent sima kotecha reports now from birmingham — one of the areas with the largest number of homeless people. as the darkness creeps in, the wind chill begins to bite. those who have nowhere to go look for shelter. volunteers roam the streets, making sure nobody has died because of the cold. one of those workers is paul aitken. the young man there, i'm just checking that he is breathing and he is ok. he's fine, he is fast asleep, so i'm not going to wake him up. paul is just checkin
PBS
Mar 1, 2011 6:00pm EST
>> this is "bbc world news." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its global expertise to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> two tales, one city. gaddafi says tripoli is peaceful, and our reporter finds the unrest has reached the libyan capital. stepping up military might in the region, as world powers consider a no-fly zone. thousands are trying to flee across the libyan border with tunisia. the u.n. is calling this a humanitarian crisis. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast on pbs in america and elsewhere around the world. my name is mike embley. another day of rage in yemen, but the president tells the u.s. to stop interfering. and he is known for shaquita andino -- shocking o on the catwalk, but dior has fired john galliano. hello again. in libya, colonel gaddafi is making efforts to shore up areas around capital of tripo
PBS
Oct 20, 2010 6:00pm EDT
>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its global expertise to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> had a million public sector jobs are going. the biggest cuts in peacetime britain. the chancellor says it is a hard road to the future. >> today is the day when britain stepped back from the brink. [jeering] >> in france, pension reform sparks more riots are in the streets, prompting the police to reopen blockaded fuel depots. afghans parliamentary elections is declared invalid. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- the woman found guilty of murdering her rival by the -- by a sabotaging her parachute. and the problems of pregnancy are growing and growing. hello to you. the wo
PBS
Sep 7, 2010 2:30pm PDT
>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by -- the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, and union bank. >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> taking into the streets. more than 2 million protest against sarkozy's plan to raise the retirement age in france. deadlock over. julia gillard wins but the narrowest margin. hollywood star angelina jolie in visits pakistan flood victims to give the appeal for aid of boost. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- man of iron. prime minister again for another -- is russians -- is russia's prime minister hoping for another stint as president? hello to you. hundreds of thousands of protesters have been on the streets of france, de
PBS
Oct 4, 2010 2:30pm PDT
>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by -- the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, union bank, >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to majorwhat can we do for you? >> and now >>> ." >> at least three german citizens killed in a u.s. drone attacks against militants in the northwest of mutt -- pakistan. staying silent. the dutch anti islamist politicians the fisa accord aziz accused of inciting hatred. it is back to the campaign trail, as brazil poet -- as the leading up hopefuls prepare for round two of elections and a welcome to "bbc world news" broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america and also run the probe. a movie lovers remind baghdad. how in the cinema is open to reignite the rock's passion for the big screen. in europe regains the ryder cup from the united states on a dramatic monday finish. ♪ >> hello, and welcome. it may be an appar
PBS
Jan 11, 2011 5:30pm PST
first time. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- the anniversary in haiti once to remember. one year on from the earthquake, a report on the struggle to rebuild lives. >> more than 800,000 people still live in tented slums like this. believe it or not this represents progress. at the height of the crisis, it was twice that number. >> and the fading future of our coral reefs. conservationists launched a last-ditch rescue plot in london. hello to you. thousands of families that been fleeing australia's third biggest city, brisbane, as they faced the worst flood in 50 years. at least one levee has been breached and the river that runs through the middle of the city is not due to people for 24 hours. ed there are still more dark days ahead, according to the prime minister. 14 dead, but 90 missing. from brisbane, we have this. >> after weeks of flooding, this was the most fatal hour. the town was the scene of the most violent and deadly flash floods since the crisis began. local s
PBS
Oct 29, 2009 5:30pm EDT
>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. the newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> a real hope for wall street. new figures confirm the u.s. economy is out of recession. >> this is welcome news and an affirmation that this rest -- recession is fading in the steps we have taken have made a difference. and we have a long way to go. >> it looks as though iran is seeking major changes to the united nations draft proposal on its nuclear program. u.s. secretary of state tells pakistan and it's hard to believe it now when it knows where al-qaeda @'s leaders are. very warm welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast for our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- the h
PBS
Jun 28, 2010 6:00pm EDT
>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its global >> union bank has put its global expertise to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> 10 people are arrested by the united states, accused of spying for russia. turkey shut its airspace to is really military flights. more fallout from last month's commando raid of the gaza flotilla. and an inquiry into the events that claims the lives of nine turkish activists. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- two more quarter finalists are decided at the world cup in south africa. and drought and crop failure. eight agencies are warning 7 million need food -- eight agencies are warning 7 million need food. -- aid agencies are warning 7 mi
PBS
Nov 15, 2010 6:00pm PST
cassidy, bbc news. >> as a team of international inspectors arrived, european auditors went through the notoriously unreliable accounts. at last the truth of the damage was revealed. 2009, the debt and increase with of a late 200%, the highest and in the european union. its debt rose to 140% of gdp, nearly 2.5 times the limit fort euro zone members the greek prime minister missed the inspectors. he was in paris, talking up his government's efforts in blaming the germans, suggesting -- blaming the germans for suggesting that the taxpayers should not prop up failing nations. its recovery is essential for the european union. the prime minister says that the election results are and mandates to continue with the austerity program he reread -- . the question for the european central bank is whether to give it greece and the bailout money due in december. most economists say this will not happen because the institutions have been invested so much in making sure greece does not fail. but there will be more cuts. bbc news, athens. >> in the runoff election, a new president. his supporters h
WHUT
Mar 10, 2010 6:30pm EST
>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank offers unique insight and expertise in a range of industries. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> bracing for karzai, but cutting of remarks for washington. nato forces must get out. added 49 charge, 200 are arrested. people caught up in the violence have to defend themselves in nigeria. more on israel's plans to expand settlements in occupied east jerusalem. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- a russian billionaire is cleared of allegations he was implicated in the murder of alexander litvinenko. falling in love online. how the internet is changing the business of marriage in india. hello to you. iran is president declared the only chance for peace in afghanistan is for amer
PBS
Aug 25, 2010 5:30pm EDT
>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by -- the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, and union bank. >> union bank has put its global financial strength to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> a wave of death and destruction across iraq. a series of bombs kill 50. flood waters threaten new areas of pakistan. the u.n. release is helicopters to help the stranded you can only be reached by air. carter in korea. the former u.s. president bids before the release of american prisoner. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- the outer limits. astronomers' discover a new planetary system. >> ♪ >> and 40 years after the untimely death of jimi hendrix, a celebration of his life. hello to you. for more than two hours today, insurgent armies the wave of bloodshed a
BBC News
Jan 9, 2018 6:00pm GMT
sportsday later in the hour on bbc news, another competition for manchester city — bristol city are the visitors for the first leg of their league cup semifinal. good evening. a court has heard that the former football coach barry bennell was a "predatory and determined paedophile," who is alleged to have subjected a number of boys to abuse on more than 100 occasions. bennell, who is now known as richard jones, denies multiple historical sex offence charges. the prosecution said that some of the abuse took place in the grounds of crewe alexandra, where bennell was coach, but also at his home. let'sjoin our sports editor dan roan, who's at liverpool crown court. yesterday, we learned that barry bennell had pleaded guilty to seven charges of sexual abuse, but he were still contesting 48 further counts relating to 11 compliments, all boys aged as young as nine between 1979 and 1991. today, this trial, expected to last eight weeks, got under way as the prosecution opened its case. exercise full former coach in the 19805, exercise full former coach in the 1980s, barry bennell worked with
BBC News
Dec 15, 2017 6:00pm GMT
failed to disclose evidence which could have cleared him. how an appearance on bbc news meant this man with learning difficulties, who'd been sent home to die, is now responding well to treatment. and the date is set for prince harry and meghan markle‘s wedding. coming up on sportsday on bbc news, captain steve smith nears a ton as he leads the australian fightback on the second day of the vital third ashes test in perth. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. relatives of the four children who died in a house fire in salford have said they don't know how they will be able to tell the children's mother, who is in a medically—induced coma and likely to remain that way for several weeks. 15—year—old demi pearson, brandon, aged eight, lacey, aged seven, and three—year—old lia died following the fire on monday, which police are calling a targeted attack. the child ren‘s grandfather says the family had been harrassed before and the police had been called on sunday night but left. the house was set alight a few hours later. three people have been charged with murd
WHUT
Nov 2, 2009 6:30pm EST
>> bbc world news is presented by kcet-los angeles. [funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu; the newman's own foundation; the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation; and union bank] >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now bbc world news. >> hamid karzai hangs onto the afghan presidency but a call from the white house talks about a messy election and insists against corruption. >> more terrorists attacks on the streets of tehran. >>> war crimes sus pent -- promises he will actually be present at his trial on tuesday. welcome to bbc world news. forecasting to viewers in america and around the globe. my name is mike hembley. >> blood diamonds -- human rights abuses in zimbabwe mean it should be kicked out of international gem markets. >> a booming oil business in texas and melting glasses in the him lay yeas. we'll be looking at two sides of the climate change debate. >> hello -- ending weeks of uncertainty, hamid karzai has been declared the winner of afghanistan's presidential election. with his only rival out of the race -- has been abandoned but it leaves mr. karzai even weaker than before and a mass of questions unanswered. president obama has phoned him and warned him that corruption must be tackled. the latest from washington in just a moment. first the bbc's ian panel from kabul. >> it's cost millions of pounds and dozens of lives to get to this moment. and it came in a small, packed room on the outskirts of call bull. >> we declare that mr. hamid karzai has gotten the majority of votes i the first round and he is the only candidate for the second round of elections of afghanistan in 2009, be declared as elected president of afghanistan. >> the head of the election board was -- with questions about fraud, corruptions and how a man who won less than half the votes could be president again. >> are you not embarrassed by the way this process has been conducted? >> embarrassed? yes? >> because you've been forced to withdraw a second round. >> that was a duty. the constituency -- >> world leaders have rushed to congratulate hamid karzai, but he emerges weaker than ever, in charge of a coury more divided and dangerous than at any point in the last eight years. >> the country was not really, and i want to say that please check in your countries when you are in the very early stages of first or second round of elections. don't compare us with your experience of hundred years of scandal of elections and our experience in a few years. >> this is how the election went wrong. just days after the votes we were shown hundreds of ballots for one candidate, discarded and torn up. widespread corruption meant millions of votes were discounted, and the credibility of the votes lost. but it is afghans who stand to lose the most. e mid shar's son died right outside his shop in a taliban bomb target, troops. he warns what most afghans have never known, peace and security. it's the most important challenge facing his new president and the international community. >> the afghan presidential election is finally over. tonight there's relief in london, washington, and here in call bull. but with the security situation continuing to deteriorate and a newly-re-elected president even weaker than he was before, the challenges facing afghans and their international sponsors remain daunting. ian panel, bbc news, kabul. >> i spoke to our special correspondent phillippa thomas who says all signs from the white house to kabul was a frosty one. >> i believe it was. president obama's comments to president karzai were frankly warmed. he said he was pleased that final outcome was demmed in accordance with afghan law. now the best bet for the white house is to encourage hamid karzai to take action quickly that can boost his credibility in the eyes of afghans and the international community. >> i did emphasize to president karzai that the american people and the international community as a whole want to continue to partner with him and his government in achieving prosperity and security in afghanistan. but i emphasize that this has to be a point in time in which we begin to write a new chapter, based on improved governance, a much more serious effort to eradicate corruption, joint efforts to accelerate the training of afghan security forces so that the afghan people can provide for their own security. that kind of coordination and a sense on the part of president karzai that after some difficult years in which there has been some drift, that in fact he's going to move boldly and forecefully forward. >> president obama there. phillippa, he is putting a brave face on a mess, isn't he? do you get any idea on what this means on his decision of whether to send thousands of more u.s. trps? >> i think you're right. it's a brave face. the it's what the white house has to deal with. my feeling is that we're not expecting anything imminent. one of obama's advisors valerie jarrett hinted the announcement could drop to late november, that announcement about deploying as many as 44,000 extra troops. an i think the feeling we're getting is that what obama wants from president karzai is some, as he put it, action, not words. he wants to see how the new cabinet is shaped, he wants to see how preparations are made to beef up afghan security forces and whether karzai is frankly serious about rachetting down corruption. this could all take a little while. >> phillippa there in washington. another day of bloodshed in pakistan, the country hit by two separate suicide attacks. the first killed 35 people, hours later two bombers blew themselves up at a police checkpoint at the entrance to lahor city. they left at least seven dead. our bbc correspondent has been at the scene of the explosion in rawalpindi. >> another day, another attack. as the army hs the taliban in south waziristan, the militants are hitting back. and they're still managing to strike supposedly secure districts. this time a street close to army head yours with two hotels and a bank. "i saw so many dead bodies," says this man, "my car was parked in the bank's car park and my child was sitting inside. they won't let me in to look, and i don't know where my child is." the area has now been sealed off but it was busy at the time of the blast. a lot of army personnel and their families come to this ba. they were here picking up salaries and pensions on the first working day of the month. once again, another week has begun with bloodshed. at the scene we met -- tan wier searching for his wounded father. "it's really worrying," he says, "the attacks are increasing, not decreasing. but hopefully after the army operation things will start to get better." lying in his hospital bed, this wounded soldier told us he's be staying in uniform. he says the attacks won't get the army's morale. >> for the sake of the country, our resolve is strong and will remain so. death has to come one day or another. >> his loved ones are showing the strain. everyone's in the firing line here. and there are fears that things could get a lot worse. -- bbc news, rawalpindi. >> authorities in islamabad are offering a $5 million reward for information leading to the capture of the country's taliban leader and 18 of his senior lieutenants. bbc's correspondent has been visiting some of the victims of the deadliest bombing in the city of pashaur. >> today this man was supposed to be getting married. instead he takes us to the home of his cousin to pay condolences. the whole family had gathered from all over pakistan for the wedding. nine went shopping for bangles and clothes to wear to the festivities. none came back. 14-year-old adnan lost his mother, father, two aunts and all five of his younger brothers and sisters. they still haven't found most of the bodies. >> i was supposed to go with them, he says, but i stayed at home. i heard the explosion but i really didn't imagine my family had been hurt. what did they do wrong? he says. i can't understand why anyone would want to do this. his family was caught up in the biggest bombing in a recent wave of militant attacks to hit pakistan. suicide car bomber blew himself up in the heart of the busiest market where over 100 were killed, many more injured. well, days after the explosion here in the center of the city buildings are still collapsing because of the damage they sustained. this building here has been here for over 120 years is about to be demolished because part of it collapsed earlier in the day injurying more people. but it's not just scening like these that remind people of the horrors of that blast. they're given those reminders through the lives that have been turned upside down right across the city. schools remain in the city's main hospital, many having been left with permanent disabilities. they join the victims of previous attacks. >> this is not a new thing for us, but now that we have been here and the intensity has increased, so we are prepared anytime -- >> and that's what it's like here. people still trying to recover from the last attack, wondering when the next one will be and how this violence is ev to end. bbc news, pashaur. >> let's bring you some more top story this is hour. >>> iran is coming under more international pressure to give a quick response to the plan to send its your ran yum abroad for enrichment. the head of the u.n.'s nuclear watchdog has said last month's draft deal represents an unique and fleeting opportunities for all sides to avoid confrontation. >>> north korea has called for direct talks with the united states on nuclear disarmament. it appears the country wants to return to the negotiations it's boycotted for at least a year. -- has warned it will go its own way unless washington agrees. >>> the bosnia an-serbian leader will appear at his trial on genocide and war crimes charges. he boycotted the start last week. he denies all charges and says the tribunal must give him nine more months to prepare his case. one of his legal teams told us he will attend the tribunal on tuesday to discuss how to end the stalemate. >> the grievances are the the same. nothing has changed since last week. he will appear tomorrow, though, because tomorrow is another day, and it's a more procedural hearing than the trial itself. so he wants to participate and try to help find a solution for his problem. >> still to come on bbc world news, the blood diamonds of zimbabwe. campaigners are calling for a ban on sales. >>> first it could tell us a lot about the impact climate change is having on our planet. the european space agency has launched a satellite from russia that will gauge the movement of water around the earth. it could also provide more accurate weather forecasts. bbc science correspondent jonathan amoss has this report. >> a flash in the night and an old soviet miss soil heads sky ward. onboard, the latest european satellite to study the earth. europe wants to be seen as a leader in space. it will launch more than 20 satellites in the coming decade at a cost of more than 7 billion pounds. some will state the climate, others -- will investigate the climate, others will improve our weather forecast. this one will measure the amount of water held in the earth's soils and map the saltiness of the world's socials. these are measurements that have never been made from space before. and developing the technology to do this has been an immense challenge. smoss carries a folding instrument thatives it the look of a space helicopter. its data will tell scientists about the constant exchange of water between the planet's surface and the atmosphere. it's information crucial to understanding where it might rain and how heavily. >> the main benefits from smoss world be to have better weather forecasts and the possibility to forecast extreme events such as floods linked to heavy rains over wet soil. >> it will take a week for engineers to switch on all the spacecraft's systems, and six months to set it up properly to begin its science. jonathan amoss, bbc news. >>> just briefly, the u.n. secretary of state has said that washington has not changed its stance against israeli settlements in the west bank. hillary clinton has been meeting arab leaders in morocco. >>> the latest headlines for you on bbc world news. >>> the u.s. has endorsed hamid karzai as the legitimate leader of afghanistan. but president obama says he's urged him to eradicate corruption. >>> soldiers in afghanistan under constant threat from improvised explosive deves,, --'s. the latest victim, a british bomb disposal expert it. saved many lives in the south of the country. staff sergeant olaf schmidt was killed a week before he was due on leave. british news defense correspondent has the story. >> staff sergeant olaf schmidt, today his comrades called him a legend. he died doing one of the most dangerous jobs in one of the the most lethal places on earth, detecting and defusing ied's in the town of province. he was leading a team like this one when he died, dealing with a homemade device near a british base. it's an area targeted most often by the taliban's bombmakers. on a single day in august sergeant schmidt found 81 ied's while clearing the most perilous road in town. his work saved the lives of many soldiers in the group. >> he was deeply proud of what he was doing, not only proud because of having for example passed the high risk bomb disposal course, the high-threat bomb disposal course in order to come out here, but proud also because of the way that he was every day going out and saving british lives and the lives of afghan civilians. >> sergeant schmidt's death brings to 87 the number of british servicemen killed in helmut so far this year, the vast majority by ied's. >> that's an unseen enemy. that' it. not because they're so sophisticated because they have a huge psychological effect. >> sergeant schmidt was the third bomb disposal in helmut this year. his colleagues remember he diffused 64 of the estimated 200 ied's found by britishroops since january. bbc news. >>> courts for international -- calls for international ban on zimbabwe's dymond sales look like it will -- campaigners want zimbabwe banned from the human world market because of its human rights abuses. southfrican correspondent has the story. >> zimbabwe holds the richest dymond fields in the world. but miners have paid a bitter price. a power struggle to control these mines mines saw the military being sent in last year. these some of the only pictures that capture the zimbabwe defense force at work, now stand accused of appalling human rights abuses. >> the helicopters were throwing tear gas. the policemen were shooting people. so we were running, and that's when they caught us. >> i thought they wanted to beat me, but they said, "today you will be our wife. i real liesed i was going to be rained." >> these grainy pictures capture the murky world of dymond smuggling from these fields, a trade which human rights groups claim is costing lives and is now controlled by the military. the reason, they say, zimbabwe should be suspended from the kimberly process, the scheme that regulates the trade in so-called blood diamonds. zimbabwe has been given time to take corrective action, and according to our research and we were just in the area, tere have been absolutely no improvements there. in fact, the situation continues. there's very serious human rights abuses going on in the fields. new army units have been rotated in. in spite of the zimbabwe government saying that it would take the army out of the area, it has not. >> the president is accused of using the dymond fields to keep his army loyal and to -- part of the coalition which grows more shaky by the day. remote and hard to access, zimbabwe's dymond fields might be out of view to the outside world, but this week will be a major test of whether the very process that is meant to protect against alleged abuses turns a blind eye. karen allen, bbc news. >>> now to climate change conference in spain. african countries have declared they won't take part in discussions until developed countries accept stricter limits on emissions. and that issue is likely to prove crucial in next month's climate summit in copenhagen. a report from houston where it's not hard to find people opposed to cuts. first to a more remote part of the world, our south asia correspondent travelled into the him lay yeas to the source of the river ganges where the -- >> hidden in the clouds high in the hidden him lay yeas a disturbing trend. glacier here are melting faster than anywhere else the for two days we trekked through the foothills on our way to the main source of the river ganges. it's a place with huge religious significance, but now it's all about the climate. -- has brought his gps to the very spot where the river first emerges from the gray, discolored ice. it tells him the glacier has receded by about 15-meters in less than six months. the him lay as hold the largent body of ice outside the polar caps but it's shrinking fast. >> this was the line of the glacier in may? >> yes. >> we're standing on the line? >> yes. >> all this over here would have been thick ice then? >> yes. this was thick ice and this has gone back. >> and this is happening to every glacier in the him lay yeas? >> yes. but with different degrees. all the glaciers in the him lay yeas are melting. >> so this is arguably one of the most important places in ina, becaus it's here that river ganges begins its long journey from the himalaya to the bay of ben gall. downstream millions of people depend on the river. as the glaciers melt faster the river is beginning to change. a few miles downstream, evidence of a changing climate. next to the sandy river bed there's been no crop this year and no heavy snowfall in this village for a decade. less snow means the glaciers melt even faster. >> glacier melting clearly spells a very difficult situation. they are melting at a very rapid rate. the possibility that if we don't do something about stabilizing the earth's climate, then these glaciers could easily vanish in the next few decades. >> an alarming thought, the future of the the ganges and for the people who rely on the river. the indian government disputes some of the climate's science, but it knows it needs to know more and fast about what's really happening to the glaciers in the himalaya. chris morris, bbc news, gangatry. >>> oil is about to flow from a new well on the edge of houston in texas. america's oil boom started here a century ago. people see no reason to stop i now. they know they're going to get plenty of oil out of this new well, because here is the promise. here it is, surprisingly runny, slightly sweet. but this is the stuff that powers the american economy and why there's such resistance to curbs on greenhouse gasses. each stroke lifts more oil to the surface. easy money and demand is huge. talk of limiting carbon dioxide is seen as pointless. >> the question is, how much difference does co2 really make in our atmosphere? and that question should be debated. there are a lot of climate drivers. you can see the sun shining on my face right now. the sun obviouslily is one of the biggest climate drivers. it goes through many cycles. >> and oil is what keeps america moving. it's the lifeblood for millions of truckers. robert garcia sells trucks. we head out onto a bumpy freeway. he fears that limiting emissions will hit jobs at just the wrong time. >> anything that will raise fuel costs in my industry is a killer, meaning the owner operators will have to pay more for fuel, the costs of goods will go up, and so everybody would have to pay more for all the goods they use, consume on a daily basis. >> so is there a greener way to fuel america? well, here in california one option is a thick soup of tiny organisms, a potential source of oil, flourishing in vast pools that stretch across the sand, algae. this bright green algae grows really easily here. it's cultivated in these huge ponds, thriving under the desert sun, drawing in carbon dioxide and producing an oil which can made into fuel. a glimpse of a green future. it's early days for algae fuel but serious money is now behind it. and researchers believe it's a route that america must pursue. >> there is a way to both stimulate our economy, be mindful about our environment, and develop new energy products that we can use sustainably through the next 50 to 100 years. and i believe algae is one of the ways to do it. >> twilight at the giant refineries. america stands at a crossroads, black oil or green. its politicians are divided over climate change, and the rest of the world is waiting for the outcome. david troppman, bbc news in texas. >> what would you say is the perfect gift for the world's fastest man? of course a baby cheetah. -- who has run faster than any human in history is now the proud sponsor of this 3-month-old cub called lightning bolt. the jamaican was in the kenyan capital nairobi promoting conservation efforts for the nation's wildlife. the triple threat of trophy hunting, climb change and human encroachment endangers many animals in kenya. by paying $14,000 to adopt lightning bolt, the sprinter is sure doing something to help. thanks for being with us on bbc world news [funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu; the newman's own foundation; the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation; and union bank] >> union bank hasut its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> i'm julia stiles. >> i'm kevin bacon. >> i'm kim cattrall. >> i'm ken burns. >> i'm lili taylor. >> i'm henry louis gates jr., and public broadcasting is my source for news about the world. >> for intelligent conversation. >> for election coverage you can count on. >> for conversations beyond the sound bites. >> a commitment to journalism. >> for deciding who to vote for. >> i'm kerri washington, and public broadcasting is my source for intelligent connections to my community. >> bbc world news was presented by kcet, los angeles.
PBS
Nov 11, 2011 6:00pm PST
>> this is "bbc world news." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. shell. and union bank. >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> stock markets rise as greece takes step to tackle the debt crisis in the euro zone. the death toll from the crackdown on protesters escalates. standoffs in turkey suspected kurdish militants hijack a ferry with 24 people on board. welcome to bbc news, broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. coming up a little later in this program, mexico's interior minister has been killed in a helicopter crash three years after his predecessor died in similar circumstances. and remembering the war dead, armistice day is marked by silence in ceremonies around the world. >> hello, and welcome once again. stom reacted positively after italy moved to tackle its debt crisis. with the italian senate approving a long delayed economic reform package, shares in most european markets rose between 2% and 3%. interest rate paid on italy's ten-year bonds dropped. meanwhile lucas pop demmeous has been sworn in as the head of an interim coalition government t will fight to push through the bailout package agreed with the e.u. last month. here's our european correspondent matt price. >> from rome today, a glimmer of hope. italy's senate passed a series of emergency economic measures. when the lower house does the same, prime minister silvio berlusconi said he will resign, making way, it's assumed for this man -- the former european commissioner who will head a technocrat government. mario will be tasked with balancing italy's budget by 2014 to help contain euro's debt crisis. italian v.a.t. will go up to 21%. public sector salaries will be frozen for three years. there will be a crackdown on tax evasion. europe's leaders today welcomed the news. >> i'm very hopeful italy will sort out this situation quite soon. there recent news we have been receiving from italy go in that direction but i cannot respond for italy. >> in europe's other problem capital athens, there were more anti-austerity protests on the streets today. "i'm expecting further barbaric measures against the people" this woman said. here too a new government is being imposed on the country. another technocrat, lucas papademos, was sworn in today. his job, to force through more painful austerity measures demanded by brussels. here at the european commission there's a real sense greece and italy are doing part of what is needed to contain the debt crisis. one problematic prime minister has gone, another is on the way out. but is it democratic? brussels gets what it wants. do the voters? for now though it's money to bail out europe that matters most. many say the european central bank should do more to support countries under threat. in berlin, they don't agree. germany's worried about the consequences of the e.c.b. printing more money. today its economics minister said a bailout would remove the pressure on debt-ridden countries to reform. he also had some advice for britain. translator: i find it a bit odd the british don't have the euro and yet they constantly don't know what we should do and don't want to help in any way. >> a sign of tension, perhaps, george osborne, who is today concentrating on what all of this means back home. >> it's a very, very difficult and dangerous situation in the euro zone. britain is impacted by what's happening. no doubt growth in britain, jobs in britain have been hit by what's going on in the euro zone. >> back in italy, silvio berlusconi this evening headed off for what might be his last official engagement as prime minister. the market stabilized when he announced his -- he would resign. today's news also calmed him. but they know the euro is still in a critical condition. matthew price, bbc news, brussels. >> reports in syria say 26 people were killed friday, adding to an escalating death toll from eight months of anti-government protests. november is likely to be the bloodiest month since the uprising against president assad began in march. arab league meeting saturday is going to discuss the lack of progress on any dialogue. the organization is under intense pressure from human rights campaigners to suspend syria's membership. this report from the bbc's king has some pictures you may find disturbing. >> promises, promises. a week after pledging it would respect human rights, these were the forces of the syrian state in action. here a man who appeared mortally wounded is dragged away by soldiers. across syria, the bloody cost of protests escalates. here a wounded man clutches the foot of his comrades. off camera a voice says contemptuously, these are your reforms, bash ard -- ba shard. the u.n. says 3.5 thousand people have died already, yesterday the demonstrators act as if they marched beyond the point of fear. the state is strengthening its defenses. here troops mind the northern border with lebanon. all of this, say human rights groups, say arab states now must isolate the regime. >> we are looking at masses of civilians who are being either killed, detained, tortured and disappeared and we would like to see it stop as soon as possible and we think the only possible way to do that is to put real concerted pressure on the part of the international community with the assistance of regional organizations, such as arab league. >> the arab league used to be seen as a talking shop for middle eastern regimes. it bristled with the rhetoric of arab but achieved little. events of the arab spring changed that, a new dynamic as emerged, driven by the demands of the street. the league led the way in isolating libya. it was instrumental in bringing about the no-fly zone there. and it's pressed regime to stop bloodshed, without it, any sign of success. a regime in damascus fighting for its life knows concessions will be seen as fatal weaknesses, the beginning of the end of its power. syria lies at the heart of the world's most volatile region. the regime knows this makes military intervention hugely risky and, therefore, highly unlikely. but this doesn't address the heart of president assad's crisis, the determination of many of his people to be rid of them. and from within his own security forces, defections like these have emboldened the opposition. whatever the world decides, it's the powerful forces within syria itself that will define the end game. >> there's been an upserge of violence in yemen with reports suggesting 11 people killed and dozens wounded and fighting between government forces and militias. it comes as a united nations envoy returns to the country with the aim of getting months of conflict between the president and opposition groups. the head of the u.n. peacekeeping operations, i should say, explained the sudanese military for an air raid on a refugee camp across the border in south sudan. they rejected the claim saying char tune does not bomb refugee camps. but they called for an independent inquiry. 38 have been injured in peru after police clashed with anti-mining protesters. in the country's northwest, protesters used tree trunks to block a stretch of the busy per-american highway to draw attention to those caused by mining. quee elizabeth's grandson will begin a six-week tour next year shortly before the 30th anniversary of britain's defeat of argentina in the falklands war. britain said the appointment -- deployment to the arch pell ago is routine. turkish vessels are shadowing a passenger ferry hijacked off the northwestern port of is mitt. the captain was allowed to give a brief interview to turkish television in which he said there were four hijackers. officials say there were 25 passenger and crew on board. this is the latest from will grant. for hours the passenger ferry cart tepi has been in the hijacker's hands. as police reinforcements arrived on the key side of the town, the ferry was being tracked by coast guard vessels in the sea of marna. it embarked from the northwestern port of ismut and there are believed to be as many as 25 on board. the captain gave a brief interview to turkish television saying the vessel was taken over by four hijackers thought to belong to the banned p.k.j. tushish movement. one of the hijackers is reportedly carrying a bomb and expected to reach an island where the p.p.k. leader has been jailed since 1999. but for now the authorities say they've not received any specific political demands. translator: we are running out of fuel and they need food. >> the standoff has left friends and families on board very worried. this man's neighbor is on the ferry. when they didn't return home, he said, i came down to the port. but for the time being, there's been very little information available. they requested fresh supplies. the families are in for an anxious night. will grant, bbc news. >> mexico's interior minister has been killed in a helicopter crash. 45-year-old francisco blake mota is one of eight people who died in what's thought to be an accident outside mexico city. he played a leading role in the fight against drug gangs. peter bose reports. >> the minister's helicopter came down in the hills to the south of mexico city. he was traveling to a meeting with a number of officials from the mexican government. the cause of the crash isn't known. a spokesman for president felipe calderon said authorities launched a full investigation. translator: at this moment we're investigating all possible causes of this very unfortunate incident. with respect to relatives and public opinion, there will be a fall investigation by authorities to clarify the circumstances of this unfortunate incident. >> as tirneyor minister responsible for national security, francisco blake traveled widely often to violent areas in cities ravaged by the city's drug wars. he had a leading role in the ongoing battle with the drug cartels. he was known as a hard liner, determined to end the trafficking and drugs which has claimed 45,000 lives over the past five years. mr. blake morrow is the second mexican interior minister in president calderon's government to be killed in an aviation accident. a predecessor died when his small plane crashed in mexico city three years ago. peter bose, bbc news, los angeles. >> you're watching bbc news. still to come, here's hoping for a presidential comeback. the strong man following vladimir putin is exactly russia wants? >> he was once the richest man in ireland but sean quinn has been depee claired bankrupt. the businessman once said to be worth nearly 5 billion euros got into trouble when he invested heavily in the anglo irish bank. it later collapsed and his shares became worthless. from belfast, kevin mcgee reports. >> 63-year-old sean quinn is one of ireland's best known self-made millionaires whose fortunes have marred irish economy going from boom to bust. his problems can be placed back to the crash of the dublin-based anglo bank whose headquarters lie unfinished, he bet on the bank's share price and lost hundreds of millions of euro as a result. this led to the demise of the quinn empire. he lost control of quinn insurance and various manufacturing companies in april. today at the high court in belfast, he voluntarily applied for and was near bankrupt over an alleged debt of 2.8 billion euro at the anglo irish. while he denies know owing the full amount, he does accept he owns the bank for property loans. >> there are debts he's unable to repay which are due to the anglo irish bank in the summit of about $200 million and he has no ability to repay those debts. >> after the brief hearing, he released a statement saying, have i been portrayed as a reckless gambler who bet on a bank. the irish government are intending making scapegoats on my family and i. he defended the decision to apply for bankruptcy here saying, i was born, reared and worked all of my life here. the company who now controls anglo questioned if he even qualifies for bankruptcy in northern ireland. it's said the bank is examining the validity of this application for bankruptcy in light of mr. quinn's residency and extensive interest and liabilities within the republic of ireland. by declaring himself bankrupt in northern ireland, sean quinn only has to wait a year before going back into business. if he had done the same in the republic, it would take 12 years. >> this is bbc news. these are the headlines. stock markets rally as the italian senate adopts a key package of cuts designed to aavoid a bailout of the euro's third largest economy. the death toll from syria's crackdown on protesters continues to escalate with the arab league under pressure to freeze syria's membership. president obama is to host the annual apec leader's summit beginning in hawaii. with most european economies stagnating, mr. obama is expected to use the occasion to hitch the u.s. economy to opportune in the asia pacific region and that's turning into a debate over a new trade agreement, transpacific partnership. >> hawaii is where barack obama was born, indonesia where he grew up. on the face of it, he's a pacific president. but until recently, pressures at home and crises abroad have kept him focused on 2k34ess demestish issues and america's traditional ties to europe and middle east. now with the start of the nine-day trip taking in two summits and handshakes with at least 20 regional leaders, he's the center ps spees of a new american engagement with asia. >> we obviously believe that the world's strategic and economic center of gravity will be the asia pacific for the 21st century and it will be up to american state craft over the next decade to lock in a substantially increased investment, diplomatic, economic, strategic and otherwise. >> but at the apec summit near the beaches of honolulu, asian countries are looking for evidence that the u.s. is serious. in particular, whether they will be progress on the transpacific partnership, now in discussion with nine other countries. one of them is singapore, looking to make the most of the shift in financial power from indebted europe to surging asia. >> we have a long-term change in asia is the emergence of the new economies china, india, southeast asian countries. and the shift in the balance and center of gravity from the west to the east. and how we're going to manage that change in a peaceful, constructive, mutually beneficial way. >> but there could be storms ahead. china is pushing its own version of a free trade deal worth 12 asian countries. while they're happy to trade with china, they're also worried about becoming too dependent and want the u.s. to give them an alternative. the summit will be part a beauty contest and partly test of strength, as china and the u.s. try to win friends for the pacific century ahead. >> in britain the daily newspaper said it's obtained a confidential army document that suggests twice as many soldier as previously thought could be facing redundancy over the next few years. the daily telegraph suggests 15 .5 thousand posts will close and that will be a dramatic cut to britain's armed forces. those wounded in iraq and afghanistan will not be exempt from any future redundancies. britain's future of defense said it had absolutely no plan to change the way it treated wounded, injured and said no decisions have been taken on the scale of the next trench of redundancies. vladimir putin defended his decision to stand in next year's presidential elections in russia. he says he's campaigning to keep the country strong and not for personal gain. mr. putin is the overwhelming favorite to return to a position he first held 12 years ago and some see his political indemrunes as increasingly destructive force. our diplomatic correspondent brinlt kendall has been to meet mr. putin in moscow. >> vladimir putin, for 12 years the face of russia. now he's made it clear he wants to come back as president next year and could be around until 2024. if he can stay in power for so long unchallenged, what has happened to russian democracy. tonight there was a chance to quiz him face to face, meeting with foreign analysts of russia over dinner, he denied he was driven by personal ambition or desire to stop russia changing. it doesn't mean that the political system should stagnate, he told us. but, of course, we're thinking of ways for the foam have more influence on those in power. vladimir putin may not have it all his own way. yes, here in russia he's still the most popular politician. but this place has changed a lot since he came to power. people live better thought butt they're also more dissatisfied and some of those who once praised him for restoring order now say he could be leading the country in a dangerous direction. for all of the appearance of growing rich and poor. stability has become stagnation and could lead to social explosion. even putin's form prime minister says it could be on the cards. you really think it could be the equivalent of the arab spring here in russia? >> absolutely, absolutely. and everything putin is doing that encouraged this mood. it would not -- it would not mature soon, but indefinitely. >> the question is what would it take to get russians traditionally apathetic out onto the streets outside moscow peace headquarters, we found this small picket, hardly the stirrings of revolution but russia's top political blogger said the internet has given the opposition a powerful new tool. >> i think all of the talks about social customer maization and he pathies is true -- empathy is true but everything can change in a very short time. >> some fear more dissent won't be tolerated. owe lag carbon was savagely beaten by thugs a year ago, apparently for critical articles he wrote. translator: it will get more dangerous. many were afraid after what happened to me but can you not stay afraid. something has to change. >> vladimir putin's return to the presidency isn't in doubt. what's much more uncertain is whether his strong man's style is still what most russians want. bridget kendall, bbc news, moscow. >> millions of people across the globe stopped what they were doing on friday as a mark of respect on armistice day. a two-minute slines was observed at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month commemorating the very moment the first world war came to an end 93 years ago. robert hall has this report. >> the sound of a bugle echoing across pat raid ground of camp bastion in afghanistan. the defense secretary paying his tribute to the campaign, a reminder today's act of remembrance spans conflicts stretching back over nine decades. painstakingly restored by the imperial war museum for this anniversary, the stark images from the first world war battles on the son which claimed more than 57,000 lives on the first day alone. a four-year conflict which ended at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918. the hour went on a cloudy morning in 2011, a silence spread outwards in the busy heart of london. the record number of copies sold this year, around 46 million, suggested growing level of public engagement with this act of remembrance. two short minutes in cities, towns and villages where many had time to consider their linked with the past. >> two minutes when families and friends could reflect on their own, more recent losses. >> the worse bit for me was stood in front of so many closets with photographs of people and lives have been killed and i know their families very well. so they weren't just photograph s. they were loved ones of the families i have come to know and love myself. as traffic flowed again in whitehall, police announced support by those who gathered near the senator. there were more than 170 arrests. above all this was a day when communities stepped away from the concerns of the hectic modern life to stand in silence, to lay their poppies and crosses at a time when passed and present are intertwined. robert hall, bbc news. >> you're watching bbc news, just before we take our leave, reminder of the main headline and stock markets in europe as well as united states have risen after italy and greece took steps to solve their huge debt problems. they, of course, threatened the future of the entire euro zone. the upper house, the senate, approved long delayed economic reform package and lower house is expected to endorse that over the weekend. once that happens, silvio berlusconi is expected to step down as prime minister whofment will his successor be? the man you saw with the gray hair shaking hands was the former e.c. european commissioner mario become the new prime minister in italy. this is bbc news. thanks very much indeed. don't forget our website and there's plenty more there on all of the stories we featured, including detailed look at the crisis in the euro zone, italy and greece particularly in the spot light. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. union bank. and shell. >> this is kim - about to feel one of his favorite sensations. at shell, we're developing more efficient fuels in countries like malaysia that can help us get the most from our energy resources. let's use energy more efficiently. let's go. >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet los angeles.
BBC News
Aug 14, 2017 5:00am BST
this is bbc news. i'm kasia madera. our top stories: a gun battle on the streets of burkina faso after suspected jihadists target a restaurant. at least 17 people have died. a vigil in virginia for the anti—racist protestor killed during a white supremacist rally on saturday. pakistan salutes its founding father as the nation celebrates its 70th birthday. hello. i am hello. lam ben hello. i am ben bland with the business news. confounding the critics — japan beats expectations as it records its fastest rate of growth in more than two years. and following the anniversary marking the birth of modern india and pakistan, we'll take a look at how the economies have diverged since the end of british rule. hello and welcome to bbc news. at least 17 people have been killed in a gun attack on a restaurant in ouagadougou, the capital of burkina faso. the government described it as a terrorist attack but it's not yet clear who carried it out. the incident took place around 200 metres from a similar attack in january last year. bill hayton reports. violence return to the main streets of
PBS
Dec 27, 2010 2:30pm PST
>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> an alleged plot to attack high-profile targets across the u.k., nine men appear in court, charged with terrorist offenses. the u.s. and germany voice concern after a court in moscow convicts a russian businessman of embezzlement and money- laundering, mikhail khodorkovsky. and there is snow across the eastern seaboard in the u.s. welcome to "bbc world news." feeling the ashes. england looking to capitalize on their advance ahead of the third day's play. and we visit a village in kenya to find out why it has a proud record of producing champion long-distance runners. nine men arrested in police raids in britain a week ago have appeared i
BBC News
Aug 27, 2017 2:00pm BST
hello. this is bbc news with rachel schofield. the headlines at 2.00: two lorry drivers are charged with dangerous driving offences, after the m1 crash in which eight people were killed. a shift in brexit policy — labour says britain should stay in the single market and customs union for a period after the leaving the eu. the notting hill carnival gets under way in west london — a minute's silence will be held in a hours‘ time for the victims of the nearby grenfell tower. american boxer floyd mayweather confirms his victory over irish martial arts star conor mcgregor will be his final fight. and in half an hour, newsbeat asks if it's time for change over attitudes to the legalisation of cannabis. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the drivers of two lorries involved in a collision on the m1 motorway that killed eight people have been charged with causing death by dangerous driving. four other passengers in the minibus that was crushed remain in hospital. andy moore reports. the minibus involved in yesterday's crash was carrying 12 people from the nottingham area down towards london. police said some of its passengers were visiting from india. one of those who died has been identified as cyriacjoseph, who was also known as benny. he was the owner of the minibus company, abc travels. he is understood to be a father of two from nottingham. on facebook, one friend paid tribute, saying "words cannot describe how helpful you are. "you are there when we need you. "you are my big brother. "we will miss your care." today, police gave an update on the four people hurt in the crash. they're still in hospital with serious injuries. yesterday, police said three of them were in a life—threatening condition. one of them is a five—year—old girl. both lorry drivers were arrested at the scene yesterday, and this morning they were charged, each of them with eight counts of causing death by dangerous driving, and four counts of causing serious injury by dangerous driving. one of them, ryszard masierak, who's 31 and from evesham, has also been charged with drink driving. he's been remanded in custody to appear in court tomorrow. the other driver, david wagstaff, who's 53 and from stoke—on—trent, has been bailed to appear before magistrates next month. andy moore, bbc news. for the first time labour has committed to keeping the uk in the single market and customs union during a transition period after leaving the eu. writing in the observer, the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, said leaving both at once would be too risky. the shift in policy would mean continuing to accept the free movement of people after brexit. our political correspondent jonathan blake reports. labour campaigned to remain. but since the result of the eu referendum in favour of leaving, the party has faced criticism that its policy on brexit was unclear. nowjeremy corbyn and his shadow brexit secretary, keir starmer, have agreed on their version of the way forward. a transitional period is, they say, essential. writing in the observer, keir starmer criticises the government's approach of constructive ambiguity and says there should be no mixed messages. a credible solution is needed to one of the most important issues facing britain's exit from the eu. that means, he says, we would seek to remain in a customs union with the eu and within the single market. it would mean we would abide by the common rules of both. labour hasn't said how long the proposed transitional period should last after the uk leaves the eu, only that it should be as short as possible but as long as necessary. when many labour mps return here to westminster in the next week or so, they may find themselves torn between supporting what many will see as a soft brexit policy and representing their constituents, a lot of whom voted overwhelmingly to leave the eu. long—term, keir starmer has suggested keeping the benefits of the single market with what he called more effective management of migration. some pro—europe labour mps want the party to go further. what people would now like to see, building on this important step forward, is for the labour party to commit to single market membership and the customs union after the transition period, after the uk has left the european union. the government has dismissed labour's policy, saying the party has no vision for britain post—brexit. their plan for a transitional period is now set, but the endgame for britain outside the eu under labour is still far from clear. jonathan blake, bbc news. joining me in the studio is our political correspondent jonathan blake. water this clearly presents now is to political parties with very different policies when it comes to brexit. there is a choice now. there is as far as the transitional period is concerned, a clue distance between the government's policy of taking the uk out of the customs union and the single market on day one, the end of march 2019 when we formally leave the eu, but labour today are putting forward staying in the customs union and in the single market with, as they would see it, all the benefits and also perhaps, as some would see it, the negative aspects associated with that, so we keep having to pay our bill for membership of the eu and abide by the european court ofjustice and accept freedom of movement, immigration into the uk and vice ve rsa . immigration into the uk and vice versa. this is now a clarity from labour which perhaps some say there was not before, a bit of a confused picture is how some saw their brexit policy after the referendum result until now. but the government criticises labour's plan today, saying it is yet another change in policy, and what it demonstrates is that they have no vision for brexit and an attempt to kick the can down the road. also criticism from ukip saying they have betrayed its voters and jeremy corbyn has abandoned principles. here on the news channel there was argument that is not the case, they're not letting people who voted for brexit, which comes down to freedom of movement. has he got a point? they said the freedom of movement can be interpreted in different ways in different context. it can bet the eu has been clear at all stages you cannot cherry pick the benefits of membership. if you are part of single market, then you're signed up to freedom of movement. now, who knows? brussels may well decide to agree a special case for the uk, with perhaps extra controls on immigration, whilst maintaining the other benefits of staying within the single market. certainly they have given no indication they will be prepared to do that early on in this negotiation process. so there may well be many labour voters who voted leave, smashing their heads are looking at this and thinking, well, it sounds a lot like staying in the eu indefinitely, perhaps staying in by the back door, and it is not really what we voted for. obviously, the labour leadership and sir keir starmer, setting out in the observer, that eventually britain with a member of the customs union and perhaps retain some of the benefits of the single market. whilst there is clarity from labour on the transition the endgame of life outside the eu is far less clear. thank you. more on the bbc news website. a second man has been arrested by police investigating friday's attack outside buckingham palace. detectives say they have detained a 30—year—old man in west london on suspicion of being involved in the alleged terror incident. three police officers were injured on friday as they arrested a 26—year—old man brandishing a four—foot sword who repeatedly shouted "allahu akbar". a 31—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering a young a 51—year—old german woman has died from injuries she suffered in the van attack in barcelona. that brings the number dead to 16 and 2a others are still being treated for injuries. severe flooding is now the main concern of officials in texas after tropical storm harvey battered the coast. in the houston area the floods have been described as ‘catastrophic‘ by the national weather service. buildings have been badly damaged and people have been forced from their homes. sarah corker reports. first came the 130mph winds. now torrential rains are expected to inundate south texas for days. the national hurricane centre has warned people to prepare for life—threatening flooding. parts of the city of galveston are already underwater and the flooding could get much worse, with 30 inches of rain forecast. all the streets going down that side are completely flooded. we saw somebody‘s car floating earlier. it's bad out here, guys. we moved our water and food and vehicles inside and the generator. hurricane harvey made landfall on friday as a category four hurricane. it's now been downgraded, but left behind a trail of destruction. this is rockport, homes have been flattened and some people are feared to be trapped. tens of thousands have now fled the area. now that the hurricane has come onshore our primary concern remains dramatic flooding. one of the top focal points we are concerned about is ongoing rescue and recovery. we wa nt to is ongoing rescue and recovery. we want to do everything we possibly can to keep people out of rising water. but those rescue efforts are being hampered by strong winds and severed power lines. more than a quarter of a million people are without electricity. at this time we don't have electricity or water or a sewer and oui’ electricity or water or a sewer and our resources are tied up to find out what's going on. the main people that come through here are flooded. meanwhile, the coast guard has rescued 18 people from stricken vessels and this video shows for people being pulled to safety from a sinking boat. while harvey may have gained strength as it moved inland —— harvey lost strength going inland but more damage is expected from heavy rain still to come. sarah corker, bbc news. we heard earlierfrom cbs correspondent don champion in corpus christi. to the north, we are seeing harvey continued to lash parts of texas. at this hour, there are reports of hundreds of water rescues taking place in and around the houston area, after as much as 1a inches of rain fell there overnight in the span of three hours. now, that area, that region is still going to be pounded by torrential rains, not only today, but over the course of the next two days. at this hour, the flooding that is taking place there is being called a 500—year flood, historic. and what support is being given to people who have already been affected or who have had to leave their homes? yeah, a number of shelters have been opened across this part of texas. also, the national guard has been deployed here. before the storm, the governor and federal officials did pre—position aircraft and supplies up and down the gulf coast here in texas, so that crews were ready to move into hard—hit areas the moment conditions improved. don champion from cbs, one of many journalists in the area covering the flooding and devastation caused by this hurricane. it looks like it will be staying there for a while because we have seen a tweet from president trump saying, i will be going to texas as soon as that trip can be made without causing disruption. the focus must be life and safety. ahead of the hurricane, the president put aside emergency funding and offered the governor of texas a ny funding and offered the governor of texas any support is needed from the white house, and also ordered the national guard to be made available. and a number of aircraft as well, as you heard, to get emergency workers to people in need of help, as quickly as possible. that tweed just sent by donald trump saying he will be heading to texas as soon as you can without causing disruption to rescue efforts. a 31—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering a young boy in wythenshawe in greater manchester. police were called to a report of a incidentjust after midnight, and discovered the body of the youngster when they entered the property. officers also learned that a man and a woman had left the address in beaford road to go to hospital. the woman is being treated for serious injuries in hospital while the man is being questioned in custody. police were called to a previous domestic incident at the home two days ago. police have arrested a man on suspicion of aggravated burglary after an elderly woman was badly beaten in lancashire. the 88—year—old was asleep at her home in chorley in the early hours of saturday morning, when she was woken by a man who attacked her and demanded money. swiss officials have called off a search for eight people missing since a huge landslide struck near the border with italy on wednesday, acknowledging they were likely to be buried under millions of tonnes of rock. police have warned they are expecting more landslides in the remote valley. tim neilson reports. high in the swiss alps, this is what remains of the small village of bondo. two landslides in the space of three days have buried homes, vehicles and people. this dramatic footage shows an entire mountainside collapsing on wednesday, sending a torrent of mud and rocks for five kilometres down the valley. 100 residents were taken to safety, but eight hikers from germany, austria and switzerland are still missing. the search for them has been abandoned. translation: it became clear that the eight missing people were caught in the back path of the val bondasca, hit by a landslide. to be clear, a landslide like this travels at a speed of around 250 kilometres an hour. bondo is close to the italian border in the graubunden region of switzerland. it is known to be at risk of landslides when water overflows from the high alpine lakes. and on friday, as had been feared, a second smaller landslide, a river of boulders. diggers brought in for the initial clean—up were swept away. and this was once one of the area's main roads. swiss police say in places the mud and rock is tens of metres deep and geologists warn the mountain still possesses a threat to the communities living below. tim neilson, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: the drivers of two lorries involved in a collision on the m1 motorway that killed eight people, have been charged with causing death by dangerous driving. shadow brexit secretary keir starmer says britain should remain in the single market for "as long as necessary" after leaving the eu, to avoid the economy falling off a "cliff edge". doves have been released at the opening of the notting hill carnival as a tribute to the victims of grenfell — a minut‘s silence will be held at three o'clock. of grenfell — a minute's silence will be held at three o'clock. the victims of the grenfell tower tragedy have been remembered with prayers and the release of dozens of white doves at the notting hill carnival. security for the event, due to be attended by tens of thousands of people, has also been reviewed in the wake of the barcelona terror attack. our correspondent chi chi izundu is in west london. a different card of all this year, not just because of a different card of all this year, notjust because of the a different card of all this year, not just because of the fears a different card of all this year, notjust because of the fears of terrorism but remembering those who lost their lives and their livelihoods in the grenfell tower, not far from the carnival where you are. indeed. organisers like you said, in about 45 minutes' time they are hoping there will be a minute's worth of silence to remember those affected by grenfell tower is the body as well as that travellers are being asked to wear green as a mark of respect for grenfell tower being asked to wear green as a mark of respect for g re nfell tower start plus they are being asked to lay tributes, candles and flowers, just asa tributes, candles and flowers, just as a mark of respect for those who perished in the tower, which looms ominously over this. tell us a bit more of what to expect from the notting hill carnival in the coming hours, the coming days. it is safe to say that every year it grows in popularity. it does indeed, and the fact it is a lovely sunny day is helping things. we are expecting more than 1 million people for the 51st carnival, the largest street festival... i don't know what you can hear or see over my shoulder, loads of people enjoying the procession. normally there are a lot of bloats going past with sound systems playing reggae, calypso, african beats... but today it isa calypso, african beats... but today it is a children's day and the children are expected to get dressed up children are expected to get dressed up in costumes and have fun and dance. there is a juggling station with green hearts, to remember those victims of grenfell tower. many thanks for now. joining me just before 3pm here on bbc news we will before 3pm here on bbc news we will be heading back to notting hill to the carnival ahead of the minute of silence at 3pm. if you can't make it a west london today, there is a chance you can join us to remember the victims of the grenfell tower is asked. —— grenfell tower disaster. iraq's military says it has retaken almost all of the last of so—called islamic state stronghold inside the country. the city, which is close to the syrian border, was captured by the militants three years ago. it became the final major objective for iraqi—led forces after is fighters were driven out of mosul earlier this year. our correspondent hanan razek has been to the liberated centre of tal afar, and sent this report. it isa it is a ghost town. one week after the battle to retake tal afar, all you can see is destruction, empty houses, and the remains left behind of the so—called islamic state. here at the heart of tal afar city you can see the iraqi flag is now on top of the castle, which was bumped back in 2015. seeing the flag here means that this part of town has been reca ptu red that this part of town has been recaptured by security forces. a victory to many has come earlier than expected. fighting is here has been easier than expected, and many fighters fled before the military operation started. as for civilians, there is no trace of them. translation: most of the civilians have fled. the local terrorists have fled as well. foreign fighters managed to send theirfamilies well. foreign fighters managed to send their families out towards the mountains but they stayed inside to fight. most of the fighters here we re fight. most of the fighters here were foreigners from former soviet union countries and from south—east asia. after the smooth advancing for the iraqi forces so far, the military operation may be over soon, but there is another controversial battle ahead of this town that was once home for minority ethnic groups. it is not clear yet what future holds here for sectarian disputes being very possible. the american boxer floyd mayweather says he's now retiring for good after stopping ireland's conor mcgregor in the tenth round of their fight in las vegas. the former welterweight champion emerged from a two—year retirement to take on the irish mixed martial arts star. richard conway reports. 50 wins, no defeats. floyd mayweatherjunior confirmed his position as one of the all—time greats in a fight that surpassed expectations. with just over a minute remaining in the tenth round, the dominance of the man who refers to himself as "tbe", the best ever, proved too much for conor mcgregor, with the referee stopping the contest. i want to go out with a bang. i told you guys there'd be blood, sweat and tears, and i told you... he was a hell of a fighter, standing up. kind of shocked me. there's only one conor mcgregor! a sense of hope, anticipation and excitement had built throughout the day, with irish fans turning the desert city green. and floyd mayweather wasn't without support either. 49 try and 49 fill. he's going to be fit tonight. believe that. when the bell rang for the first round, mcgregor emerged all guns blazing, catching mayweather with a number of powerful shots. the irishman had claimed for weeks that he was ready to shock the world, and with three rounds gone, some began to wonder if he would deliver on his promise. but in his first professional boxing contest, the pace and skills of mayweather ground the irishman down, and he visibly tired. he came in hands up towards your forehead, dipped in the forehead on the chest, and started to fight that kind of fight. i didn't anticipate that. three game changes in the fight. that's what a true champion does. by the ninth round, mcgregor‘s legs began to wobble, clinging to his opponent and the ropes for survival. and the next round saw the end of a fight that has intrigued and repulsed in equal measure, with all its controversies and the amount of money involved. richard conway, bbc news, las vegas. the queensferry crossing which links the lothians and fife in scotland will be officially opened by the queen next week. the bridge cost £1.3 billion and is the longest crossing of its kind in the world. our scotland correspondent lorna gordon has been to see it, as the finishing touches are made. rising out of the waters of the forth, the queensferry crossing linking edinburgh and fife. the construction of this bridge took six years to complete and its design means it should stay open to traffic no matter how strong the winds get during the often bad winter weather. it's a very technical bridge and a lot of the technical aspects are invisible, you can't see them. the foundations, for example, are probably the most dramatic and the most difficult to achieve on the whole project and i think people don't see that. they do see the magnificence of quite a beautiful bridge. the narrow crossing has a striking cantilever design, which catches the light while the bridge soars above the landscape below. it is the tallest bridge in the uk, as well as the longest of its type in the world. 15,000 people have been involved in this huge construction project. last—minute work is continuing to get the motorway crossing ready for traffic which in just a few days' time will start using this, the third bridge on this part of the forth. lorna gordon, bbc news, at the queensferry crossing. the american horror film director, tobe hooper, who was best known for the texas chainsaw massacre, has died. he was 7a. tobe hooper became interested in film as a child, using his father's cine—camera, and worked as a cameraman before making his own films. the texas chainsaw massacre was banned in the uk when it was released in 1974, for being too violent. his other films included the funhouse and poltergeist. that was a really scary film and one of my favourites. now let's look at the weather. a lot of us are returning the —— enjoying the return of the sunshine. plenty of sunshine around this afternoon from any of us, around 2425 celsius widely. they seem not long ago in bedfordshire, barely a cloud in the sky. but a different story further north and west, a lot more cloud across scotland and all that thinking damage in northern ireland are north—west england and to wales. eventually the cloud will be thick enough to bring them outbreaks of rain into western parts of scotla nd outbreaks of rain into western parts of scotland through the afternoon. what away from the north and west, a good deal of sunshine continues to the afternoon, temperatures between 23 and 26 celsius, perhaps even 1 degrees higher. with centring today in the size overnight, it will keep on bringing across scotland, rendering heavy. wind strengthening into northern ireland through the early hours. tributes —— temperatures around 1316 celsius. bank holiday monday tomorrow and settled across northern ireland and scotland, the wind is strengthening further outbreaks of rain here, and some of that cloud associated with the front will take its way into north—west england, rain later in the day, and more cloud across wales, but otherwise, jim england, eastern parts of wales, another fine and dry and sunny day. quite a different feel across parts of scotla nd different feel across parts of scotland and northern ireland, with the strength of the wind and the outbreaks of rain continuing on and off through the day, a cool deal here, as i mentioned, some of that road and outbreaks of rain north—west england... western part of wales as you had across much of england, we will see plenty of sunshine. temperature is widely up to 2425 celsius. if you get to 28.4 celsius tomorrow it will be the warmest late august back holiday on record. some very warm if not hot weather across england tomorrow. the rain, which will have been affecting scotla nd rain, which will have been affecting scotland and northern ireland, an associated with this cauldron here, thinking across the country in tuesday, but weakening homages demanding a lot of power and outbreaks of rain a bewitched and is allowed. much of the country dry but there will be much more cloud around. that affects the temperature, still a fresh feel across the western part of scotland number —— northern ireland 15 or 17 celsius. hanging on to warrant a humidity in the far east and south—east of england. into wednesday it looks like we'll be approached by two systems, low pressure and another across the new continent. a misty picture midweek with a lot of cloud around and some outbreaks of rain, but the detail at this stage is a bit tricky to pin down. rain probably far away midweek, and by this stage the temperatures across the whole country will start to come back down between 16 and 20 celsius. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines at 2.30pm: two lorry drivers have been charged with causing death by dangerous driving in connection with a collision on the m1 near milton keynes in which eight were killed. labour says britain should remain in the single market and customs union for a transitional period after brexit. the shift in policy would mean continuing to accept the free movement of people after 2019. the notting hill carnival is under way in west london — it begun with a special ceremony as "a small act of remembrance" for the victims grenfell. a minute's silence will also be held this afternoon. president trump announces he is to travel to texas, as the remnants of hurricane harvey continue to cause catastrophic flooding across the state. now on bbc news: newsbeat take a look at the arguments for and against the legalisation of cannabis. cannabis, weed, skunk: call it what you will, for many people, it's a common sight at music festivals, house parties, and, frankly, your local town centre. it's the most commonly used illegal drug in britain, and last year in england and wales alone, over 2 million people admitted taking it, even though being caught could land you in prison. but all over the world, attitudes to cannabis are changing. these countries have decriminalised the drug, meaning if you're caught with a small amount of weed, you're not going to jail. some have gone further, and legalised it. and if you want to see things changing at pace, look at north america. in the us, 21 states have decriminalised small amounts of cannabis for personal consumption, and eight have gone further, legalising recreational use. but a place that many are watching is canada, with the country set to legalise the drug next year. so with all this happening around the world, some in the uk are asking, "cannabis — time for a change?" i'm in brighton to meet rob. hi, how are you doing? he is the chair of the brighton cannabis club, and thinks the answer to that question is "yes". so basically, we're visiting a venue where they offer a fully medicated meal, food, to brighton cannabis club members. when you say fully medicated, that mean there is loads of weed in the meal. yes, it's cannabis infused.
BBC News
Mar 24, 2017 7:45pm GMT
hamer, thanks for joining us. thank you very much. this is bbc news the headlines: there are reports that not enough republican members of the house support the new bill that would replace obamacare. the westminster attacker — police make two more arrests as they try to find out if khalid masood was working alone. a £50 billion bill for the uk to leave the eu — the head of the european commission puts a price tag on brexit. now it's time for newswatch, with samira ahmed. under the spotlight this week, coverage of the attack in westminster. hello and welcome. two big issues on the programme this week. bbc news programmes decamp to westminster near the site of wednesday's attack, was this the scale and response that the attacker might have hoped for? did coverage of martin mcguinness‘s death focus too much on his role as a peacemaker and not enough on his ira past? from early wednesday afternoon millions have watched what unfolded in westminster with a sense of shock and revulsion, and for some there was also concern about whether there was also concern about whether the
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