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CSPAN
May 31, 2016 4:00am EDT
relevant. nevertheless i don't believe george washington, john adams, james madison and almost every great thinker in history believed in a cartoon. that dismissal ismo very common today. people have a dismissive attitude to those of us who actually believe in the god of the bible and you are free to have that belief. it is not cartoonish. it is indispensable that there is a god who demand that we be good people who we will have to answer. the best idea ever developed for the creation of decent people. i would like everyone walking here to feel their behavior toward other humant beings is just by god. i don't know why that is objectionable. i don't. .. i can't think of a better idea. to think that i want through life having to be a good person and that god expects me to be good, why does that make people like the last caller angry so much so that he calls what we believe in a cartoon? it's a puzzle to me, frankly. i deal with them on the radio show, i deal with it in e-mail. i can only say that this is what -- it has presented a cartoonish caricature of what we believe in. and then s
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2017 12:55am EST
annual savannah book festival presented by george power and the family foundation. what a terrific day we are blessed to host such celebrated authors in trinity united methodist church today which has been made possible by the generosity of curt anderson, we like to stand special thanks to our literary members and individual owners who have made and continue to make the festival free. before we get started saturdays, i said sundays. to make saturday's free festival events possible. before i get started there are always housekeeping issues. immediately following the presentation,
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2017 9:23pm EDT
, pretty much centerstage. the capital is one of the areas. you are going to st. george? where is that in relation to columbia? caller: east of columbia. i'm getting on i-95, it takes me straight there. i'm getting off the exit and finding a place to park. your money, i will avoid i-95 this weekend. caller: i guess it will go as far as i can. anyone is assuring us what weather will be like? host: along the path of totality? caller: yes, where it will be overcast. ont: i would think and app your phone would probably be just as good as anything else. caller: the regular forecast. host: yes. thank you for calling. hello, marjorie. caller: before i tell you what i will be doing, i want to say i went to the nasa website and they offer a variety of ways that you can make your own viewing devices at home. what i plan to be doing is i will really just be praising jesus christ, the creator of heaven and earth, and i pray that all of you guys have a wonderful, wonderful day. host: thank you for that. i wanted to pass along a note. someone had called about a helmet, according to nasa's website, a sh
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2017 9:51am EST
. i am delighted to welcome you to the 10th annual savannah book festival presented by george r
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2014 4:20pm EST
all the dragnet tools to do surveillance and all these things. i found when george w. bush left the white house people asiewmented the patriot act had gone away. people were telling me what does the aclu have to do now? couldn't grow out of business and saying mission accomplished? the patriot act is very much with us. the current events i actually one thing i hope we can talk about. i think there might be some prospect for change. >> where? >> guest: one thing that happened. i started writing this weak in the -- book in the middle of barack obama's first term. at that time, people didn't understand that obama continued bush's policy. the surveillance and everything we were doing domestically. and so linda greenhouse referred my book to the wake-up call. people didn't wake up that much. people were not looking to re-examine the decisions that had been made in the fall of 2001 about what our antiterrorism strategies should be. so what i would say is there was a snooze alarm. and the wake-up call came with snowden. when he started releasing documents about what actually is going on be
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2014 11:00pm EST
early on he empowers them. having his influence is because george bush gives in this influence to me in power some. in cheney to is pushing in a direction that bush is inclined to go anyway. is only later that he begins to start whistling elisabeth the notion that cheney is in charge. by the 2004 re-elect he offers a drop off the ticket. and bush thinks about it. he gives it a few weeks and comes up with the name of someone who might take his place . and on other reasons he says he is thinking of doing it is because it will show who is really in charge. you begin to see, he has begun to resent the notion that somehow he, the president, is now really in charge of his own administration. >> nextel sherry in dayton beach -- daytona beach florida. >> hi. november 2001 bush overturned the 1978 presidential records act. he signed an executive order permanently flaunting from the public of presidential documents and tapes going back to the reagan ministration. many in congress called this measure for secrecy unconstitutional. my question is, after bush left office, are those presidential re
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2015 9:35pm EST
good writer. some presence had wonderful writers for the scripts. also george hw bush when he became president. , they were great speeches. words are much more important than many people realize. i remember when hillary clinton was running last time and she accused her competition, using words is a huge part of leadership. they have all had the power of communication, lincoln, theodore roosevelt, jack kennedy, words matter and carry-on for the following generations. we still quote this. imagine martin luther king without the power of his words. that is why it is important that we all learn to use the english language. one of the startling marvelous aspects of the wright brothers was the quality of the letters of the wrote. it was not just that they were correct grammatically, they were powerful and effective clear and could be funny and touching. they were incapable of writing a short letter or a boring one. that's where it is. i would've wanted to have written my book about the wright brothers even if they had not succeeded in their mission. so much is there learn from their attitud
CSPAN
May 17, 2015 10:30pm EDT
that you need freedom in the worst of times. it was george washington warned us about this. it was the founders of our government they gave us checks and balances and a vest the different parts of the bill of rights. they said even though we are going to be the government and you have to watch as absolute power corrupts absolutely. and you have to have your zone of privacy and individual space and last year they say if you have a smart phone on you they cannot crack the code and use that information. that is a violation of the fourth amendment and that is exactly what the american revolution was fought about. agents of the king cannot come into your house. and so we have forgotten that notion and we have surrendered this power and its increasingly held by private agency that the cia has funded and there are no checks and balances. the head of our whole security apparatus has told them that we are not doing this we are not getting this information, and so we don't have accountability. and my whole point is the worry is not privacy but really sovereignty and that is what the fourth amend
CSPAN
Sep 13, 2015 4:20pm EDT
his writers, who also then wrote for george w. bush when he became president and, of course, kennedy's ghost writers and franklin roosevelt. they are great speeches. words are much more important than many people realize. i remember when hillary clinton was running the last time and she accused her competition of just using words, using words is a huge part of leadership. the great presidents of all had the power of communication, lincoln, roosevelt, franklin roosevelt, kennedy, words matter, they endure and carry on following generations. we still quote them. imagine martinwe luther king without the power of his words. it's so important that we all learn the english language. one of aspects of the wright brothers was the quality of the letters they wrote. it wasn't that they were correct gram -- grammatically, they were clear, funny and touchy. they were incapable at the collection in congress proves, they were incapable of writing a short letter from a boring one. .. man beings, that is we're it is. what they put down on paper in the english-language. i would have wanted to have writ
CSPAN
Mar 11, 2017 7:00pm EST
george soros to fund planned parenthood which is politically contentious than the could take of the care of a good portion of what planned parenthood needs never mess that he put $280 million into years ago blumberg picked up the ahold deficit when susan g. coleman group pulled out of funding planned parenthood. >> guest: i do not have a comment except planned parenthood does get a lot of private foundations -- donations. >> host: you may comment you'll think they should find government responsibilities. >> guest: and was trying to say i don't think private philanthropy can substitute for government action to cover all of the social needs that b.c.. just because it is not a comparable amount of money it is nothing like the government budget government is trillions state local and federal government trillions of dollars so somehow private philanthropy that the math does not work. that is what i was trying to say if you look at health care fall or all -- for all then there is no way that private philanthropy of any kind can begin to address that. that is in many multibillion-dollar commitm
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2017 3:30am EDT
. i think it was founded by margo george, best i can remember. do you have any current information about that alliance? >> guest: i'm afraid -- >> host: we'll get an answer in just a second. gypsy, can you tell us a little bit about yourself and how you got to elk horn city, kentucky? >> caller: well, i grew up -- i was born in west virginia, wyoming county, near the now-famous oceana from which the documentary oceana was filmed. .. >> i've fumbled my way through life; 1960, gosh, i'm just going along about myself. oh, my. >> my point was, you live in a rural area and you're identified as a lesbian. what has that life been like for you? >> well, i'm out to the people who know me, but i don't know very many people in this area. i didn't grow up here. i just grew up a county away in southwest virginia. >> thank you for your time and for your story. lillian faderman. >> i ton know about the feminist groups you talk about but i spoke a couple of times at a woman's book store in atlantay i heard recently the book store is still going. so, i think you should try to contact them, and i be
CSPAN
Sep 2, 2016 9:34pm EDT
christianity is a combination of this religion and jud judaism. >> george is on the line. we are listening. >> caller: i have a couple questions how christianity reconciles jesus as god. at one point jesus says the father knows the time of the final judgment and coming but i don't. then again, and i went to church today new zealand appears to disciples but they don't recognize him. i never heard what he look like or what form he takes. >> guest: yes, post resurrection there are narratives in which jesus appears kind of ghostly. the disciples don't recognize him. he changes the way he looks. they break the bread and they recognize him. just as there was difference on what the resurrection meant there was just the same amount about jesus and his relationship with his father. in the gospel of mark, at no point, does jesus ever identify himself as god. in matthew and luke there are talks maybe he is equating himself with god. he acts by the finger of god and if he has the finger of god maybe he is saying he himself and god in some form. jesus is barely human in that one. he is pure g
CSPAN
Feb 23, 2014 1:45am EST
both at the white house this past week. you were there for a screening? >> we were invited george clooney was nice enough to include me in their youngest officer who is 88 years old and was invited to a private screening at the white house with president obama who made a point to had time for a visit and it was a great opportunity for harry. one of the few people who has been to the white house twice under to sitting presidents and then the can we prepare for bush. >> the next call is from south carolina this is from martha? >> caller: hello peter. because i went out and bought his book years ago and did you have stolen my thunder peter with a price list and the cost and the value of the arch. it is priceless just as life and the movie portrays that. i imagine there were more lives lost. my question robert edsel, a thank you for your works since the age of 39, i had a feeling the movie was like a fraternity party atmosphere even though the location of the artwork was superb i am glad this story is out. i want to know the rest of the story about madonna. >> that is the only sculptu
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2016 7:50am EST
been-- hece replaced rumsfeld by george bush and he was close to the bush family and when obama came himd he reappointed him, but to a half years later there was tension inside with a republican doing things and gates was very much against some of the things that. thought happened in the operation and he that we should just bomb the place and let it go not jeopardize the seals because if something had gone wrong and they had been captured they had no protection and they were basically committing a war crime. he was a prisoner of war and t and they executed a prisoner of war and they went into a country without any notice to the authorities. anyway, here's what the issue was gates, basically and for me as a journalist, what is so important aboutimport pakistan? why do we spend so much time cozying up to the generals who run it? because right now when i wrote about in the new yorker in 2009, more than 100 nuclear weapons and we worry about their weapons and safety characters a huge muslim fundamentalist population pakistan and in fact, the reason the pakistani had never said anything p
CSPAN
Sep 3, 2017 6:40am EDT
you about your books. >> guest: he wrote a book about george washington. are you still a baseball commissioner or softball commissionerror your daughter's league? >> guest: i retired a year ago because thank you daughter outgrew me. i ran the competitive softball program in the bay area. >> host: must have been a heady thing. >> guest: unbelievable. half my life. actually it was a fantastic social experiment. i think we have to wrap it up. but the -- i live in berkeley, which is filled with all of these liberal people who don't believe in competition, and so the softball league is a recreational. it's beautiful. the the girls softball leave and if you coach the league, you have to lose have your games. that's the rule. the perfect coach goes .500. however, someone years ago realized that some people had a competitive streak, and so they allowed an organization on the side of it to be formed as after that the league concluded, all-stars were picked and would good out into the wilds of california and play republicans. and this was always a miserable -- every game was custer's last s
CSPAN
Apr 1, 2016 8:58pm EDT
director george hw bush. >> this is the least of the classical buildings. the other buildings is very neoclassical. and this one is a mirror image but a litter plainer. it is very modest. some people compare it to a large icecube tray. >> don ritchie takes us into the newest of the senate office buildings to learn about its construction and place in hisdy. and smithsonian portrait gallery david ward chronicles lincoln's life. >> lincoln takes time out from writing the inaugural address or fighting the war and you notice the eyes disappear. the sense in which lincoln is probing to the public in his suffering. >> for the complete american history tv schedule go to cspan.org. >> more from tucson festival of the book where we talk to linda hirshman about her books "sisters in law." this is half an hour. >> host: linda hirshman is now with us. linda hirshman, what is the relationship between sandra day o'connor and ruth bader ginsburg ? were they friends? >> i would say they had an affectioniate alliance. they were not bff's. ruth bader ginsburg was really friends with scalia and marty and
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2015 6:39am EST
you come to be part of history, you become a part of all that history. the story of george washington eve of thery of rental house and the story of thomas jefferson or the story of jupiter of monticello are all american stories. eve of the randolph house. you see every single person who lived in the colonial times, no matter what their color was, whether they were native or woman, ithite, man or is your story as americans, as a member of the world. those stories need to be told everywhere. that is where we are heading. we will always have new programs that tell stories that tell about the enslaved. not as slaves, but as people. people that had lives just as rich as anyone else within the world of the 18th century. that is where we are going. that is the destination. host: a lot more to come from colonial williamsburg. i'm sure many of our viewers have been enticed today to visit. we thank you for the conversation and everyone there at the foundation for welcoming , helpinghe c-span bus us bring the sites and sounds of 18th-century virginia today to americanago p.m. and 11 a
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2014 11:00pm EDT
george w. marshall who is a big believer in unified command. the anglo american ability to create this unified command structure is one of the things that made d-day possible. >> here's john from san diego. go ahead. >> yes, good morning, mr. symonds. my father was one of some 2,000 african-american men who landed at omaha and utah beaches on june 6th, 1944. he was one of the people who drove the trucks that supplied ammo and food and yet you never see one african-american depicted in any documentary. you never see them in movies like "private ryan" or "the longest day." i think there's a distortion of history that some 2,000 african-american men were never given an honor for what they contributed to probably the greatest save of the democracy to ever occur. i just want to know your thoughts on that. >> i think you are absolutely right. it's worse than you suggest. it's not just that 2,000 african-american men went ashore. on omaha and utah beaches. it's that 10% of the entire american army consisted of african-american men who did all of the work that made possible the logistic s
CSPAN
Sep 3, 2016 1:45am EDT
thought george bush foreign policy, the first was against everything that america stood for he was worried about the first goal for the first foray as american empire he was really run out of the conservative movement for his views on this he thought bush betrayed the entire reagan legacy. he did not believe in any form of overseas expansion so the idea that we have troops stationed in 150 countries is something very different and would havee been very upset and would not have recognized the neocons and bought about that but and not to necessarily name names but to beat dedicated tos, conservatism not as art but is entertainment but to sell that as a radio show or tv show'' we're doing is a discussion to take those 45 minutes that is what we should be doing that was the proper way to do the news and there were people like mine recent going at it and is very charitable but to let her talk and then just answered very calmly and then did that with malcolm x. that was not his sound bites >> with that exchange of ideas we want to open the floor for questions. . . biographies. in the mea
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2015 10:12am EST
. ronald reagan had peggy noonan for one of his writers. she also then wrote for george hw bush when he became president. of course,
CSPAN
Apr 24, 2016 9:26pm EDT
. my name is eric, i'm from george washington university and i'm the cochair of the seminar along with my colleague chris of the history and public policy program here at the woodrow wilson center. the washington history seminar, as many, many of you know, is a joint product of the woodrow wilson center and to the national history center. we've now been going for a good number of years. as we do every week, we like to thank the people who make it possible behind the scenes.
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2015 11:09pm EST
history, you become a part of all that history, and the story of george washington, and the au story ofse eve of the randolph house and the story of thomas the jefferson or jupiter of monticello are all american stories. and when you come to see those stories, you see that every or single person who lived in the colonial times, no matter what their color was, whether they were native, whether they were black, whether they were white,h whether they weree a man, whethr they were a woman, it is your story as an american, it is your story as a member of the world.. and those stories need to be wah toldav everywhere. that's where we're heading. and yes, we will always have new programs that tell stories aboua the enslaved where their stories are told as them being people, not as slaves but as people, ase people that had lives that were just as rich as anyone else within the world of the 18th century. that's where we're heading towards. that's where we're going.sburg. that's the destination. >> a lot more to come, it sounds like, from colonial hank you williamsburg, and um assurei'm lot of
CSPAN
May 6, 2016 9:01pm EDT
a christian but nevertheless, i thought it might be relevant, and i don't believe that this george washington, john adams,ad james madison and almost every great thinker in history believed in khartoum. that dismissal is very common today. people have a dismissive attitude toward those of us who actually believe in the god of the bible. you are certainly free to have that belief, but it is not cartoonish. it is into stem indispensable and he demands we be good people and we have to answer to him. it's the best idea ever developed for the decency of people. i would like everyone walking along here to feel that their behavior toward other humann bei beings is just by god. i don't know why that is objectionable. i really don't. i can't think of a better idea. to think that i walk through life having to be a good person and that god expects me to be good, why does that make people like the last former caller angry?i deal with th it's a puzzle to me. i deal with it on my radio show. ideal with the in email e-mail. i can only say that this is what politics has succeeded in doing. it has
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2016 2:00pm EST
. if we go back to 2003 with the george w. bush administration invaded iraq, they did not anticipate what the full cost would be and part of the judgment of that administration is their failure to understand what was going to ensue. the need to consider alternatives to simply further expenditures of military power, whether it is solar panels or irrigation or some other program of economic development, ultimately nurturing, functioning, stable societies, he is going to require something other than simply dropping bombs and conducting military campaigns on the grounds. i think your question makes that point very nicely. >> host: colonel, is there a tendency toward groupthink in the pentagon in military circles? or is there a pretty robust debate that goes on before policies are implement it? >> guest: i don't have great insight to what they talk about in the pentagon these days because i've been out of the army for quite some period of time but i think there is groupthink with any institution. the older the institution, probably the tighter the grip of groupthink. certainly the united
CSPAN
Jun 8, 2014 5:33am EDT
result productionements or -- direction provided by george c marshall, who was a big leader in the unified command. the ability to create this unified command structure was one of the things that made it possible. >> here is john from san diego. go ahead. some father was one of 2000 african-american men who landed at omaha and utah beaches on june 6, 1944. thats one of the people drove the truck that supplied ammo and food, and yet you never see any african-americans .epicted in any movie i think it is a distortion of history that some 2000 african-american men were never given honor for what they contribute it to probably the greatest saving that ever occurred. >> i think you are absolutely right. and it is worse than you suggest. it's not just the 2000 african-american that were ashore on omaha and utah beaches. it is that 10% of the entire american army consisted of african-american men who did all the work and made possible -- logistic support work and made all of it possible for the invasion in the first place. but it is not historians and modern-day commentators who overlook
CSPAN
May 18, 2015 2:00am EDT
george stephanopoulos. the worst question ever. i've been on this program. that one was from way left field. remove the convention up put it in cleveland. don't mess the draft. he put in cleveland. he also limited the base to 12 total command he made a compressed schedule for primary selection. i think that last thing is going to result in probably the 1st open convention we have ever had. if i can summarize if you hold your primary or caucus you have to allocate your delegates proportionate to the votes the common. if you hold it on march 15 or thereafter it will be winner take all. everyone is going to get a little bit of something. iowa new hampshire south carolina, nevada. march 1. in florida godzilla jeb bush versus marco rubio the distraction of the sunshine state they will win it all, but it is also the 1st big taxes georgia super tuesday thing. it will all be a great convention. >> host: c-span will be in cleveland gavel to gavel and , and we will also be in philadelphia. pat in palo alto california. you have been patient. >> caller: fortier chairman of committees in the house
CSPAN
Nov 7, 2015 8:29pm EST
. host: thank you for the call. let's move on to george, joining us from hawaii. caller: aloha. when i was in the masters program, i could not complete a research topic on segregation, but a few years after i graduated, it was revealed, the massacre in which there was a rice riot -- race riot with 1000 casualties and the records were distributed to a pacific unit. are any of your researchers looking at that or is that though an open mystery? the researcher who started this past away. -- passed away. mr. czekanski: we do not have anyone that is currently working on that. i have heard of it. i do not have the details. host: did the u.s. take many prisoners in the pacific battles? mr. czekanski: not compared to say the number of germans. for the japanese, surrender was not considered an audible and to -- honorable end to their service. they would kill themselves or make a final assault. many prisoners we did take were taken because they were wounded and incapacitated, they were captured in that manner. towards the very end of the war, more japanese began to surrender. host: do you gather
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2014 2:00pm EDT
angle's manuscript on george h.w. bush and the peaceful end to the cold bar. >>> the world war ii d-day invision took place on june 6th, 1944, when 160,000 allied troops attacked german forces along a 50-mile stretch of french coastline. next, our discussion on d-day with craig symonds on the 70th anniversary of d-day in june, including his responses to your calls, tweets, and facebook posts. >> now joining us live from new york city is craig symonds. he's the author of the new book "neptune: the allied invasion of europe and the d-day landings. mr. symonds, thanks for joining us. >> my pleasure. thank you. >> we just saw yesterday, mr. symonds, an anniversary in normandy, the 70th anniversary of d-day. a lot of dignitaries there to make the day special yesterday. why do you think 70 years later this date still resonates with the american public? >> well, first of all, i'm glad that it does. i think it's important to remember significant moments in american and even world history and particularly this one where the world changed so dramatically as a result of the sacrifice of those
CSPAN
May 31, 2015 3:00pm EDT
totally. it's like george orwell. freedom is slavery war is peace. white is black. they created a mechanism never seen before that pairlee liesed -- paralyzed the mine minds of millions of russians and they say quite a while before country can go back to normal. >> host: your mother is still live nothing moscow? >> guest: yes. she has sisters nephews nieces. so it's a big family, and difficult to move outside of the country we were born. we all were born -- but it was part of the former soviet union when the soviet union collapsed we moved to moscow, which is the capital of the state we were born. we grew up in the russian -- within the russian culture russian education russian history, and seeing the demolition of the greatness of the country the heritage, social and cultural, scientific areas, it's very painful because russia has a lot of bad things that happened throughout history, but also it has huge positive influence over culture and today it has been almost thrown away, and we can just only hope that one day rather sooner than later our country will start building its futu
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2016 1:25am EST
leader george mitchell explores the potential for peace between israel and palestine. harvard business school professor explores the motivation of white collar criminals and this weekend, washington post columnist sebastian maltby talks about the career of former federal >> but what i call it is it is basic is new york that is focused to create that aggregate data which had not existed . so that creation of data is the best quality data but not modeling are taking that for granted with those logical connections >> afterwards, airs on book tv saturday and sunday at 9 p.m. eastern, you can watch all previous afterward programs on our website, book tv.org. am and book tv is live at th >>host: we are live that the miami book fair for the 33rd year the festival has then held at miami dade college north of downtown miami we're now joined on the set whisky author of the book they cannot control assault . -- us all that is a long title. >> it comes from a video after the fatal shooting of martin one of the first fatal shootings after the grand jury decision not to charge the officers in fergus
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2016 10:00am EST
us trillions of dollars. now, if we go back to 2003 when george w. bush administration invaded iraq they did did not anticipate what the full cost would be, and indeed part of the judgment of that administration is their failure to understand what was had actually going to ensue. but the real point would be that -- the need to consider alternatives to simply further accident pendture of military power whether it's solar panels or irrigation or -- some other program of economic development, ultimately the -- nurtureing, functioning, stable society is going to require something other than simply dropping bombs and conducting military campaigns on the ground. and i think your question makes that point very nicely. >>, is there a tendency towards group thinking in the pentagon in a military circle or is there a pretty robust debate that goes on before policy or implement? >> i don't have great insight into what they talk about in the pentagon these days because i've been out of the army for quite some period of time. but i think, i think there's group think within any institution. and a
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2016 12:00pm EST
morning? mr. travers: no -- joe lockhart and george elliott were manning the radar station. they saw the points coming in, relayed the message back to headquarters, and it was dismissed as the b-17's flying in from california. historiansome of the made reference to earlier in the week, on various shows, we knew the japanese fleet was on the move, but we did not know where. it took everybody by surprise they were sailing across the northern pacific, and launched the attack, probably about 250 miles north of oahu. the caller mentioned human intelligence -- technology does not fail in these events. it is human intelligence that fails. the same thing with the condo response -- condor response. the word goes up and sinks the submarine. it is related back, and of course, it is lost in the paperwork. host: and they just recently discovered some of that some burning -- submarine. mr. travers: yes, they did. they actually believe a couple of the submarines got inside the at pearl harbor and inflicted damage on the battleship oklahoma. host: let's hear from bill next in muskegon, michigan, on
CSPAN
Apr 14, 2015 10:00pm EDT
soviet union because we couldn't defeat them, too good, too strong. then back under the george bush administration, saddam hussein, you know, he had to go. he was a strong man, but when he was there, none of these problems existed because he crushed them. granted, yeah, he was brutal, but now that he's gone, there is a power vacuum there. it's created a multitude of problems, which we helped create. >> ambassador hill, do you want to pick up on that? your assessment of how much responsibility the u.s. has in the problems in iraq today. >> well, you know, if you live there, as i've lived there, and you see what saddam hussein did to that country and did to his people, you don't rue the day we got rid of hussein. he was a hideous character. at the same time you do have the impression that the u.s. didn't understand what we were dealing with that. we thought that somehow, if we got rid of saddam hussein, there was this sort of level of middle class and issues-based politics yearning to flourish in a democratic environment. in fact, when you get rid of governance, even bad governance, a
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2015 8:25pm EST
william and mary and studied with george here in town would have been here for much longer. so the situation sort of varied depending on which of these individuals you see. as the colonial capital, most of the -- well, essentially all of the really important business at the colonial level was administered here. so if these individuals had business that needed to be done with the state, they had to come here. so this was a busy place with people coming and going and visiting, sometimes for longer and sometimes for shorter. by all accounts, it was a pretty happening place. >> and when did williamsburg become the capital? >> so williamsburg becomes the capital of virginia in 1699. previous to that, it had been -- so from 1607 to 1698, the capital was in jamestown. and in 1698, the statehouse in jamestown burned down for the third time, and they started to -- or they took the opportunity to see if there was a better location. and williamsburg at that time was known as middle plantation. it was the home to the college of william and mary. it had an established church here at bruton pari
CSPAN
Apr 11, 2017 9:23pm EDT
. some of these images make george waldrop. it's incredible. so yes i completely agree that. >> host: we all knew what apollo was but how many people heard that they would google it or help explain it. >> guest: i think it is a real problem. it is unfortunate if we have to spend tv to send astronauts into space because there's a lot of excitement out there exploring with robotic spacecraft as well. >> host: was very common lament among these women? >> guest: i didn't say there was. they all had different experiences and different takes on their career but for the most part, they felt very fortunate to have the careers they had. but i guess i would say the most common lament is they had been forgotten i documented several parts of that in the book i talk about the 2008 they had a big gala for explorer number one. it's one of thenot one of them t even of barbara paulsen. they've just been left out of so many of the celebrations. >> host: was an oversight? >> guest:. >> host: kerry in michigan, you are on the air with author nathalia holt. >> host: you are on booktv. we will give you on
CSPAN
Nov 19, 2016 11:25am EST
investigation of gun violence in america. former senate majority leader george mitchell explores the potential for peace between israel and palestine. harvard business school professor explores the motivation of white collar criminals and this weekend, washington post columnist sebastian maltby talks about the career of former federal reserve chairman alan greenspan. >> what i call the new york school. there was a school based in new york around the national bureau of economic research which was focused on just counting the economy, creating the aggregate data which we see in the statistics which hadn't existed in the 30's and how you generated the best quality data and having got his start not modeling, not for taking data for granted and in the building of complex mathematical connections between the data points. >> afterwards, airs on book tv saturday and sunday at 9 p.m. eastern, you can watch all previous afterward programs on our website, book tv.org. >> and book tv is live at the miami book fair. this is the 33rd year that the festival has been held. and held on the campus of miami-dade
CSPAN
May 25, 2015 2:00pm EDT
the end to what victory is in the george w. bush administration they decided that we were going to basically take an enormous ounce of data to capture and catch come into that and growing and growing under bush. the threat is so great we need to trust you and it turns out no matter how much you think the federal government ought to be trusted it never ends well trusting the government is very rarely a good proposition and that's why we do need some significant limitations on what the federal government can and cannot do. >> paperback, any updates updates enough enough to click >> i don't believe so. >> your previous book bullies who are they click >> they are the folks on the left that are trying to say that anybody that disagrees is about human being into this is the entire thing. he did is costly to marco rubio it's fascinating hillary clinton is now a week and a half into the campaign she has been asked zero questions because she is away from the cameras and we get to talk about the order that was would you attend a wedding it the case in which no he is mean and nasty guy for no
CSPAN
Mar 2, 2014 8:00pm EST
monuments men foundation is doing is we are trying to raise v visibility and that is why the george clooney film is doing that is opening. this shows the united states' effort they played in saving these. this isn't segregation. they stole anything of value. the monuments officer rescued whatever was stolen. in iraq, the great tragedy was in the national museum and the culture treasure there that we didn't make protection in the of culture treasure in iraq a priority target. we paid a horrible price. it is work to restore that. we need the president to come forward and reinstate protection and respect for the works of other is people. >> host: brian perry tweet ted e movie was fun, but there is a documentory in the works? >> guest: it is big story. it hasn't been told up until this time. it has taken years to get the books written. i hope we have a chance to do this. i hope we see a future film saving italy. it will present the problems and the different cast of monuments men officers. >> host: what is the photograph on the cover? >> guest: it is of the david. you think about the mo
CSPAN
May 30, 2015 2:18pm EDT
? all right. [laughter] the last question the home run question. mrs. george johnson. where are you? okay. all right robert, here we go. ing as highest ranking official at the time, what percentage of accountability do you believe your brother had in his indiscretions without comparison to former congressman jesse jackson jr.? >> i don't think i understand that question, i'm sorry. >> in other words ms. johnson wants to know do you think your brother had any accountability to what happened to you as opposed to jesse jackson jr.? >> i don't blame my brother for what happened to me. i blame patrick fitzgerald. he overreached he knew who i was. the fbi knew who i was. they knew wiz an honorable, honest guy, and they chose to harness me into, to me an overreaching prosecution. so i blame fitzgerald and not my brother. >> how about a round of applause? [applause] >> robert, a one-year membership to the city club. it's a short trip from nashville. and when you put this on your desk, this mug no u.s. prosecutor will dare come near you. [laughter] the city club mug. >> thank you. >> we're n
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