Skip to main content

About your Search

20090604
20171211
STATION
DATE
2014 95
2013 60
2011 59
2016 59
2017 58
2015 55
2012 51
2010 34
2009 19
SPONSOR
LANGUAGE
Search Results 100 to 149 of about 490 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2015 10:29pm EDT
guest about the affect china's economy has on the u.s. stock market and global economy. after that, senior science writer john markoff discusses the use of robotics in the u.s. manufacturing industry. his new book is machines of loving grace, the quest for common ground between humans and robots. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span and you can join the conversation on facebook and twitter. >> a signature feature of the tv is our all-day coverage of the fearsome book festivals and coverage. beginning this weekend we have the 15th annual national book festival from the nation's capital. near the end of september we are in new york or the brooklyn but festival celebrating its 10th year. in october we have the southern festival of books in nashville and the weekend after that we are live from austin for the texas book festival and near the end of the month we will be covering tube book festivals on the same weekend from our nation's heartland as the wisconsin book festival in madison. and then the boston book festival. at the start of november we will be in port
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2014 10:00pm EST
single civilization, whether it's in china, india, europe, middle east, developed a system whereby a small aristocracy comprising at most five percent of the population, took away the surplus of produce grown by the peasants and kept them at subsistence level in poverty and degradation and used this wealth they'd taken to fund their civilization or project. this could only have been done by force. they had this peasant somehow had to be subdued. so 90% of the population throughout -- for five thousand years were kept in distress and anger. now, as historians tell us, without this terrible system we would probably not have developed beyond a primitive level as a species, because this system supported a privilegedcast with the people who had the less sure to explore the arts and sciences on which civilization depended. plus, whether your economy is biased oning a actual tour, the only way you can, if you like, crease your gross national product is by acquiring more land and more peasants to farm it. consequencely, warfare was the only way for the economy to grow, and plunder was essent
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2014 12:00am EST
more information on both tvs visit from china to tennessee and the many other cities visited by her content vehicles, go to c-span.org/local content. up next on booktv, "after words" with the former senior researcher of columbia university. nicholas johnson in his book "negroes and the gun: the black tradition of arms." in it, the law school professor discusses the tradition of african americans using firearms to defend their families and communities. a tradition that dates back to reconstruction. he argues that the nonviolence of the civil rights help to bury this fact of black history. this program is about one hour. >> so this strikes me as an important intervention in three ways. one of the black freedom movement and over the years has been increasingly revising the way that we understand the role of violence related to nonviolence. the other intervention is cultural in terms of who we see or who we think of when we think of gun owners, and also how we think about black individuals. finally there is a public policy implication for the presentation of the black tradition of arms.
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2014 12:00am EST
on agriculture. and that meant that a small -- in every single civilization, whether it's in china, india, europe, the middle east, developed an inequity system where a small aristocracy comprising five percent of the population took away the surplus of produce and kept the peasants in at subsis stance and used the wealth they'd taken to fund their civilization project. this could only have been done by force. they had this peasant somehow how to be subdued. so 90% of the population throughout -- for 5,000 years, were kept in distress and anger. now, -- so, as historians tell us, without terrible system we november heat developed beyond as a species because this supported a privilegedcast with the people who had the leisure to explore the arts and sciences on which civilization depended. plus, where we all economy is based on agriculture, the only way you can, if you like, increase your gross national product is by acquiring more land and more peasants to farm it. consequently, warfare became essential to the economy. the only way for the economy to grow, and plunder, too, was also
CSPAN
Apr 3, 2016 11:00am EDT
today. there's some great research this is one of our economic power in china or india combined. i think people who look at the evidence-based case you want to get from here today. they are very pragmatic. you are not an ideological about things. they know it matters to our future. i think that's kind of an important point, given that's why your book is laid this out in such an important way. >> guest: i also think, right, the stakes could not be-or in this election. every remaining republican candidate for president has taken a very extreme position on women's health and women's rights. so it's not only that we're going backward, going forward and beat to death someone who really prioritizes and speeds this up. there's also a big danger of falling backward of what's at risk. voting rights for millions of african-american women. african-american women have the highest turnout of any group in the country now. latinas, the question with the supreme court allow obama's immigration orders to go through, or millions of women going to be deported? will women continue to have reproductive
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2014 9:00pm EDT
been since the 1870s. we are going to lose it soon because -- >> host: china is a mess though. >> guest: but they are growing at 6%. how much are we growing? postcode two to three. >> guest: i don't believe they are going to become the same kind. look at the banking system. however, here's the issue. they are already talking about it, about creating the affair so instead of the u.s. dollar being the basis it would be a hodgepodge of things. it would deplete us from the ability to print money. what happens when you can't print money and you have the kind of debt that we have. stop and think about that for a moment. >> host: you talk about political correctness and a look at the last 30 years and think when we grew up we have more honest discussions than we do today. something happens and we say we are going to have a conversation and we don't. there is some fear they are so let me start first with this. do you think there's some -- do you believe some people are against the president simply because of his skin? >> guest: i'm sure there are some people who are against. >> host: . >> guest
CSPAN
Sep 5, 2016 3:00am EDT
threats now don't connie lee packaged it is rush-hour or china or germany. that increasingly facing the threats that have nothing to do with those formal decisions to have a loosely organized network. they don't look like what we think of as crime to cause death or destruction on non scale with the use of military force by states. but if you decide, one way is to say we have a world of the whole continuum for the state conflict on one end it does look more like individual crime. how do we categorize that? we have a big area in between traditional war but we have legal system that does not allow for in between either picked one with this set or it is not in to get this set that are diametrically the opposite so if we decide and i don't know how, but what is an armed conflict? what is a war? is that track a weapon? the airplane? the box cover? they killed a lot of people. what is a combat and? somebody who doesn't belong to any military with planning and supporting with any plot that will eventually hurt people? do have any special level? we have no idea so we have an arbitrary decisi
CSPAN
Aug 14, 2015 8:57pm EDT
economy in the world which we have been since the 1870s, we, we are going to lose it soon. china is a mess too but they're growing at 67% how much are we going? >> two to three. >> so they are going to pass us up, however i don't believe they're going to become the same kind of force, look at the banking system. >> there's a lot of problems they will have. >> however, here's the issue, they're already talking about it and with other nations to create a basket so instead of the u.s. dollar it will be a hodgepodge of things. what what will that do to us? it will rob us, deplete us from the ability to print money. what happens when you can't print money and you have the kind of debt that we have? seventh? seventh think about that for a moment. >> i would ask about race. you talk about political correctness in here. i look at the last 30 years and i think when i grew up we had more honest discussions in the 70s about race that we do today. where were actually afraid to have conversations, something happen someone attacked here pres. and we say were to have a real conversation about race yet we
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2015 10:00pm EDT
current state of japan. it would also be true of china if it wasn't already whereby you have government of the special interests by the special interests for the special interests. i spent five chapters in the first part of the book justifying civil this obedience on grounds that a lot of these dynamics do not lend themselves to solutions. >> host: a couple of things. i still haven't given you a chance to say what you mean by civil disobedience. >> guest: let me give you the story that prompted this book without many details because i don't want to be identified but is a true story. my wife and i have a friend who is a small-business that employs latinos as certain kinds of businesses do. the difference between him and everybody else in this part of the country is he's documented. he spends 20 or 30 grand a year to do this but what happens is doing the right thing and documenting them he has made himself a visible target so he has been for lack of a harassed by a far different with her agency is not doesn't pay good wages are provided living conditions, he does but there are things that
CSPAN
May 26, 2014 6:00pm EDT
age of terror for some and the rise of china and the nuclear progr program. much with the wherewithal clinton cut the defense budget and when you cut spending and maintain a certain level of revenue are going to get a balanced budget surplus and that's what's happening in the states. i have a whole chapter on what's happening in the states. we have indiana, louisiana doing fantastic jobs in balancing budgets. i wish we could have that in the federal level. the federal government of course the word goes out at the end of the fiscal year if we haven't spent it all spend it all the budget might be cut at last to be covered in indiana they send a check with the remarkable thing. you wrote in the federalist papers and all the rest, but then you have to somehow explain to me well then how is it that you can say that the social security and medicare into these things that are around that that is a good thing and clearly you are a big fan of the defense spending and now guess what if the founding fathers were not about the international use of the military overseas. >> thomas jeff
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2016 12:00pm EDT
and, oh, it's russia or, oh, it's china, or, oh, its germany and you can tell they're coming because there are whole bunch of people wearing uniforms driving tanks are rolling towards us that increasingly we're facing threat that cross borders, that may not have anything to do with the formal decisions made by states or their militariesful we thieves loosely organized networks. we have cyber threats and so forth. and and they don't look like what we normally think of as crime because sometimes these are threats that can cause death or destruction on a scale that historically is associated with the u.s. of military force by states. but they don't look like war, either. and if you decide that you're going to -- the problem is --ec one way to put it would be to say we have a world in which there are threats along this whole continuum, from traditional masker state-on-state armed conflict at one end of the continuum, on the eend we have individual crime. a guy drives a truck through a crowded nice how much do we categorize that? so we have threats alonging this continuum, with a big area
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2015 12:00pm EDT
will be soon the true of china if it isn't already whereby sclerosis sets in and you have government of the special interests by the special-interest. i spent five chapters in the first part of the book justifying civil disobedience on grounds that a lot of these dynamics do not lend themselves to solutions. host: a couple of things, i still haven't given you a chance to say what you mean by civil disobedience, and you should because our audience needs what i do that right now. spee2 let me get to a story that prompted this book. without many details because i don't want my friend to be identified, it's a true story. >> my wife and i have a friend who has a small business that employs latinos as are kinds of businesses do, the difference between him and everybody else in his part of the country as he documents it. he spends 2030 grand 30 grand a year to do this. what happened is by doing the right thing and documenting them he sorta made himself an easy target and he has been relentlessly harassed by regulatory agencies not because because he doesn't pay good wages or living conditions,
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2013 12:00pm EST
slow boat to china. they really have no interest this lighting candles or reading names. >> right. >> host: and then there's a group, well intention anded, i'm not critical, who want to light the candles, who want to participate. >> guest: uh-huh. >> host: it's an interesting take on how human beings grieve or react to tragedy. >> guest: yeah. very differently. and i think there has to be space for that. there can't just be, like, one path. this group in philadelphia that i spent time with them, most of them -- not all of them, but most of them were like the first group you mentioned. they have their own memorials in philly. they go up to ground zero once a year maybe. but that's all. they do things with their community and friends in philadelphia, and it stays very private and very personal. whereas, and they kind of, you know, they're aware of the other things going on, but that's not what they want. >> host: yeah. now, we only have a few minutes left and, of course, we've got to focus in the last few minutes, lessons learned. >> guest: yeah. >> host: lessons learned from these
CSPAN
Sep 3, 2014 11:53pm EDT
important his decisions on anything from it the epa to china than nixon was. they drove the decisions. you can see the man suffers making decisions. >> host: what he is doing is trying to tease out from people what they know. >> guest: well there is some of that but he's also trying to clarify. >> host: this is an going to be -- history is not going to judge him as a management consulting team would judge him. history is going to judge him about whether he was good, whether he accomplished some things, whether he cared about the people he represented. >> guest: they will judge him in the context of other presidents is what they will do. as you know i am a hearty biographer. the president has gotten a really bad rap in no one has ever understood it because they have never dug into the facts. i think as long as the facts about nixon's presidency on things like watergate, he's not going to be well respected as a president. he's not going to be an admired figure. he can't be. >> host: will not only that but i mean what these new tapes in the old tape show is he almost had this view of the pres
CSPAN
Sep 25, 2016 3:00pm EDT
being made in china is such a point. he wants to change it so your ties will be made here. >> host: you follow this up as closely as anybody and clearly you have a lot of emotional skin in this game. when you watch trump on television and you think he goes off message, do you call him? you call people on his campaign? >> guest: no? >> guest: now, a tweet. >> host: do you think he listens? >> guest: i'm not saying necessarily to me. i think he totally listens to criticism. we have seen it over and over again where he will make a mistake and sometimes the full-fledged clarification. he absolutely listens to people and he is a quick study. he's obviously very smart. he's going in the direction we want to go when. one of the things they make fun of the media for because i think it is a time filler. they kept attacking them for no policy specifics. one thing i've learned from my fondest editor was the way he used to edit me was to unexampled me. i'm a lawyer so i like to make a statement and had 20 examples. he would say ann, give one example and move on. i got to this chapter and i tho
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2014 12:00am EST
thousand dollars a year, and not just uva or berkeley mitchell slogan now -- i believe china had a slogan of 100 harvards, we need to build 100 berkeleys. we need to have two or three of those in every state. so we don't have every high school kid in america comp peteing to get into one of 12 schools. >> host: some of them to, for instance, you can go for free. >> guest: if you get. >> host: en. do you is -- endowment is so rich bit you also want standards for in the schools. >> guest: that's why i don't want to have to rely own those schools. let's be clear. for the low income kid who can get into print ton or harvard it's amazing it's like three or four percent of their student body are kids from the bottom quarter. >> host: it's small. >> guest: not talking about a lot of kids. >> host: we're trying continue crease our first generation students. we have a program for an additional scholarship and not only a scholarship, penter toship program so when they come they're mentored by students and alumni, in socialed etiquette in negotiating an environment that is very different from the one
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2014 9:00pm EDT
countries. so we are headed for the median age of 41 by the midcentury. i then china will be 46. they had a one child policy for decades now, and it's completely changed. germany would be 51. japan would be 53. so there are a lot of the advanced economies in the world that are looking at the relationship of older people to younger people. the challenge of a society is that people don't have the energy committee ingenuity to the imagination. we respect them and want them to live out their last years and dignity and all the rest that you don't want an economy if you are looking at it from that point of view because you are much better off in the vitality that comes with you. >> host: so the book isn't all mad max and one of the other sides with what has been going on particularly in the great recession is that as you pointed out from the numbers it has fostered this renewed dependen dependency. can you tell us a little bit about that? test code one of the things that tries to do is to play off the challenges and the public policy. for reengineering of the compact between young and old a
CSPAN
May 3, 2014 10:00pm EDT
we hear about china. they are poor and their collectivist and they don't have our standard of living. of course now tokyo have stronger -- and yet we still want to say the wave of the future is windmills and solar energy and green energy. the market is just not moving that way so what we need is the white house and the congress and the commerce department and the department of energy and these geniuses to push s. right direction. what we get a cylinder as a talk to me a little bit about windmills and unicorn flatulance i say this as someone who is a great admirer. their simple arrow oil refinery that runs on wind power because it's like kitty hawk, no people, lots of win. if you go to western pennsylvania the gas wells that are pumping natural gas out of the fracks wells out there run on solar power. there are good applications for these things but maybe not this way of thinking. maybe talk about that in the case of elon musk who is the genius when it comes to rent seeking. >> guest: the last segment of our book is modern subsidies, what we call political entrepreneurs seeking
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2014 10:00pm EDT
: you believe that? china's a mess though too. >> guest: they're a mess, but they're growing at 6-7%. >> host: unsustainable though. >> guest: how much are we growing? >> host: right. 2-3. >> guest: they are going to pass us up. however, i don't believe they're going to become the same kind of force. look at their banking system -- there's a lot of problems they're going to face before -- >> guest: right. however, here's the issue. they're already talking about it, russia, some other nations, about creating a basket currency. >> host: sure. >> guest: so instead of the u.s. dollar being the basis, it'll be a hodgepodge of things. what will that do to us? it will rob us or deplete us from the ability to print money. what happens when you can't print money and you have the kind of debt that we have? stop and think about that for a moment. >> host: yeah. let me ask you about race. because you talk about political correctness in here. and i look at the last 30 years, and i think when i grew up, we had more honest discussions in the '70s about race than we do today. >> guest: sure. >> hos
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2014 12:00am EDT
, china's will be 46. it had a one-child policy for decades. now it is completely changed its age pyramid. germany's will be 51. japan's will be 53. so there are lot of the advanced economies in the world that are looking at uncharted waters in terms of relationship of older people to younger people. the challenge of society is older people developments have the energy, the ingenuity, imagine. they're wonderful, we respect them. we want them to live out their last years in dignity and above -- and all the rest but you don't want an economy, if you're looking at it from that point of view, driven by older people because you're much better off with the vitality that comes with youth. in. >> host: always sounds very dire but you book is not all doom and gloom. not mad max with geese-geezers. one of the upsites post great depression, it is fostered this renewed enter generational dependence simple. can you tell us about that? >> guest: one of the things the book tries to do, again, using data, is to play off the challenges in our public policy, for reengineering the social compact bet
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2013 11:00am EST
he, like other democrats, haunted by the who lost china argument? >> guest: yes. >> host: his presidency, who lost to dallas. and so he being an anti-communist and a cold warrior, him being a strong, national defense, he ran on the missile gap in 1960. there was no missile gap. eisenhower was not very happy. committed the first ground troops in southeast asia. you know, the what ifs, kennedy would not have gone into vietnam in the way that lbj did and the nixon did, although nixon, you know, mr. forces, but kennedy, what you know about him as an anti-communist and not one to lose, would he have also gone and jumped into southeast asia with both feet? >> guest: i examine that question at length because i have great interest in it. here is my conclusion. kennedy deserves part of the blame for vietnam. you cannot exonerate him. put a lot of advisers and some troops in there. exactly. he started the trend, but here is why i believe he never would have done what johnson did. johnson put 535,000 troops in vietnam. first of all, if there is one word that describes president kennedy i
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2016 8:00pm EDT
teefor . . . i think it would be helpful to define what we are walking about. what is china's one-child policy? >> guest: the one-child policy is a bit of a misnomer. it is a name we use to describe a set of rules, restrictions, that china has placed to regulate family population and the size of the family. theoretically you could call it 1.5 child and ten it moved to a two-child policy. >> host: it is not one law but a basket of policies. >> guest: that is right. >> host: when did it happen? when did it go into effect? >> guest: i say 1980 when the communist party sent out an open letter to the members saying we are adviceing everyone to move to a one-child family. -- advise. >> host: you are saying this went under effect under ping. what was going on in china that was so important that people imagined they needed an idea of the policy like this? >> mao had just passed away and the population was growing. there was a worry that china's population was going to overwhelm the showers and there wouldn't be enough to go around and they really need today do something. >> host: you writ
CSPAN
Aug 20, 2016 12:00am EDT
it immensely. it is the subject of a lot of discussion these days among china analyst. the book is called one child, the story of china's most radical experiment. an amendment we will talk about why you chose the subject and how you went about answering the question that were on your mind. first i think would be helpful to define for people what it is we're actually talking about. what is china's one child policy question. >> guest: the one child policy is a bit of an it misnomer. it was used to describe a set of rules and restrictions that china has placed to regulate the population and the size of the family. theoretically you could call it 1.5 child for a long time. now they they have moved it to a two child policy. it just means regulations. >> host: it is not one law and particularly but a basket of policies? when did did it happen and going to a effect? >> guest: 1980 when the communist party sent out an letter saying we are advising everybody to move to a one child family. it was advised but it was really telling. >> host: people think this is the same kind of policy that wa
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2016 10:00pm EST
first book it is the subject of long debate your book is called "one child" the story of china's most radical expeeriment" we will talk like you chose the subject tonight answer the questions but first it is helpful to define for people what we are talking about. what is the one child policy? >> it is a misnomer of we use to set up a set of rules are restrictions -- restrictions china placed. you could call it 1.five so with a lot of regulations stick like a basket of policies? when did that go into effect >> with a 1979 but i seek the 1980 with a communist party we are inviting everybody to move to though one child family. civics of people imagine this is the palaces -- policy now but it actually went under effect before. why did they think they needed this? that was a cultural revolution and. and the population was growing with a significant worry that the population wed overwhelm and therefore to do something spinach you compare though one child policy to a crash diet that was the gun for the reasons that have merit. was the rationale? what was the goal? >> for economic reasons chi
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2016 9:00pm EST
the country. she talks about the book one child of the story of china's most medical experiment. >> welcome to "after words." you published your first book, remarkable and terrific achievement. i enjoyed it immensely and it is the subject of a lot of discussion among the analysts as you know. the book is called "one child the story of china's most radical experiment and in a minute we will talk about why you chose the subject and went about answering some of the questions on your mind but first i think it would be helpful to define what it is we are talking about. so what is the one child policy? >> the one child policy is a bit of a misnomer it is just a name that we use to describe a set of rules and restrictions to regulate. you could call it 1.5 for a long time and now of course they moved it to a two child policy but in reality, it needs more regulation. >> host: so it is a basket of policies. when did it happen and go into affect? >> 1979 and some people collect 1980 when the communist party sent out an open letter because they think we are advising everybody to move to a
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2016 10:50pm EST
personal level, many families in china are making decisions. >> i can't let you to go without talking a little bit about what's on everybody's mind which is the chinese economy. you were a wall street journal for a long time. when you look at what's happening in china, do you see a country that is on the prefaces of an economic transformation, a hard landing or do you see a place that is doing something else? >> i see china in a much more challenge economically. in the past it was all low hanging fruit. there were all the things they did that was all easy to do. the gains for very quick and rapid. now this is the hard part, the things they have to do to keep growth. they're going to have to do a lot more with a lot less people. you have to increase productivity. chinese university are pretty bad. that's why we see such a huge flood of graduate students in the american institution. the reason we have smart graduates is not because of the universities, it's because of natural talent. >> i don't see a very hopeful people picture going ahead. i don't know that green societies mixed with vib
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2013 8:00pm EST
1979, china, the rise of deng xiaoping and the beginning of a turn towards the markets and to mao and his cultural revolution. poland as you mentioned the election of the polish pope pope john paul ii in his return to his homeland and the precursor of the solidarity movement. great britain and and the election of margaret thatcher and the tom alt over the british economy that has been really lost as part of the historical narrative of written after thatcher. i'm looking forward to coming back to that a number five of course the one probably the most people think of first when they think of 1979, the iranian revolution the toppling of the shah and the hostage crisis. wow that's an awful lot of ground to cover. let's start with thatcher. there has just been huge outpourings of tributes to thatcher on the occasion of her death. magazine covers revisited. your book takes apart some of the myths of margaret thatcher. >> guest: well i tried to do that. it's always a challenge because you want to show why somebody is worth knowing about in the first place. there have been a lot of revisionis
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2014 10:45am EDT
the liberals and the conservatives. >> host: tell us about china. where is china in all of this? described as america's banker. you talk about some of the rhetoric from republicans politician, mitt romney talking about naming, sort of shaming china on day one of his presidency, which never happened. he talked about economic nationalism. >> guest: economic nationalism has always been a theme in america. people like pat began to talk of this on the fringes of the debate in many ways, but if you look at the 19th century america was the great protectionist country. that's a who struggle fact. we can argue about whether it was the right thing or the wrong thing. the fact is that someone described to me the american industrial base was built behind a high tariff wall. that's just what happened. the argument on the right is very much, has been about, or shared and as you said economic nationalism. and actually it's not just about economic nationalism. it's also about having a level playing field. if i'm exporting cars to china i would probably have a 15% tariff to get my goods into chi
CSPAN
Jun 15, 2014 12:00pm EDT
information internet is just now beginning to converge with the energy internet in europe and now in china and also beginning to converge their fledgling automated transport and logistics. the information internet company energy in her neck, the automated transport and logistics internet creating the internet of things and they are placing centers across the economic system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting resource flows. we have sensors feeding data from production line, warehouses, distribution centers. we have sensors on martin, sensors connect to the electricity grid so we know what the appliances are doing them in a moment. sensors connecting vehicles and offices and stores it that big data coming in across the economy to these three internet, communication, energy, internet which is its internet is providing a wealth of data about what goes on any given moment across the economy. we now have 14 billion sensors out there now in ibm says in 202,050,000,000,000 sensors connecting everything with everyone. it's exhilarating and challenges. what's interesting fr
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2014 12:00am EDT
agreed by both side, both the liberals and the conservatives. >> host: we talk about china. where is china in all this? described as sort of america's banker, and i interested in -- you talked about the rhetoric from republican politics, mitt romney talking about naming -- shaming china as the currency manipulator on day one -- >> guest: never happened. >> host: talked about the economic nationalism -- >> guest: that's right. economic nationalism has always been a theme in america. people like pat buchanan who talk about this, been on the fringes of the debate it if you look at the 19th century, america was the great protectionist country. that's historical. the fact is, as someone described to me, the american industrial base was built behind a high tariff wall. that is just what happened. the argument on the right is very much -- has been about -- or shaded into the, as you say, x actually it's not just about economic nationalism. it's also about having a level playing field. so if i'm exporting cars into china, i have 15% tariff to get my goods into china, whereas if i'm a chinese
CSPAN
Jun 30, 2014 12:02am EDT
a level playing field. so if i am exporting into china i probably have a 15% tariff to get my goods into china whereas if i can expor am asked porter a 15% subsidy so the trade is about equalizing the trading. again these things are always more complicated. ronald reagan is per trade as a great betrayer but he was a [inaudible] people remember all of these flooding america and harley-davidson was going bust and he just slapped a tie here on these japanese motorbikes and so the domestic industry. >> host: if china had been named and shamed in that way would that have just been basic domestic populism? >> guest: the problem is that there is still a massive demand for these chinese goods and you cannot legislate against them. the naming and shaming, you could. this is a greenspan argument. if we imposed here is, we own china and malaysia and the southeast asian industrial base if you like what provide those goods anyway and it wouldn't help the u.s. many factors. that was his argument. but if you look at where china started its run and we mentioned this earlier. in the 1980s it was one
CSPAN
Jun 7, 2014 10:00pm EDT
just now beginning to converge with the nascent energy internet in europe and now in china and also beginning to converge with a fledgling automated logistics internet so the internet is expanding to three internets read the information internet the automated transport and logistics internet and creating one super and in the net called the internet of things. these three internets are then placing sensors across the entire economic system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting resource flows. we have sensors feeding data in from production lines, warehouses and distribution centers. we have centers on smart groves connecting electricity grid so we know what the appliances are doing at any moment. we have sensors connectinconnectin connecting vehicles in offices and stores. that big data coming in across the economy to these free internet communication energy internet and the distance internet is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. we now have 14 billion sensors out there now and ibm says in 2020, 50 billion senso
CSPAN
Aug 21, 2014 2:39am EDT
converge but the nation's energy internet in europe and now china. and also beginning to converge with a fledgling an automated logistics' the internet. it is expanding into three, information, energy, automated transport or logistics' and creating one super internet of the internet of things. and these three internet seven placing sensors across the system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting three source close, sensors feeding data in from production lines, warehouses, distribution centers, sensors on smart roads, sensors that are connecting the electricity grid so that we know what the appliances are doing at any moment, since disconnecting vehicles and offices and stores. that big a data coming in across the economy to these three internets, communications, energy, and logistics' is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. and what this is -- we now have 13 billion censors out there. ibm says in 2020 there will be 50 billion. and by 2013 perhaps 100 trillion sensors connecting everything or anyone. later on we will t
CSPAN
Jun 29, 2014 9:06pm EDT
they balance the budget and that is what is in the case on china government and it is agreed by both sides the liberals as it was and the conservatives. >> host: you talk about china earlier. where is china and i was interested in the section you talk about some of the rhetoric from the republican politicians come and if romney in 2012, talking about naming and shaming china as a currency manipulator on the number one. and you talk about the economic nationalism. >> guest: the economic nationalism has always been a theme in america. people like pat buchanan who talk about this have been on the fringes of the debate but if you look at the country that is a fact we can argue about whether it was the right thing or the wrong thing the fact is as someone described it to me the american industrial basis was built on the high tariff war. that is just what happens. and so they put the argument on the right that very much has been about the economic nationalism. and it's not just about economic nationalism but it is about having a level playing field. so if i'm exporting the cars into china
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2016 12:00pm EST
think the workers look and they say, entrepreneurs have moved to california and outsourced to china and engineers that remain behind are designing products more mexican and off-shore workers and i'm waiting for entrepreneurs to put me back to work and so 40 million born adults, that's a lot of people looking for innovation and super vision and entrepreneurialism to put them back to work and without that, if you dilute resources, slow growth relative to the west of the economy. >> we are facing high inequality, slow wage growth, it seems like it's a natural thick to do is use the tax code to redistribute. that's not what you want to do. >> well, i certainly recognize that as a possibility and maybe useful in some places. if you're a 50-year-old worker who spent your whole life working in one endeavor and trained in that endeavor and you lose your job it'll be awfully hard to get a job so there's cost and we need to be thoughtful about that. and that talent is working inside of institutions like google, like silicon valley which greatly amplify their productivity. those institutions were
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2016 10:00pm EDT
and hong kong and old china vs. new china. so it probably isn't of a tax rate so overtime with those capabilities that is why it is a mistake to see what would happen to bill gates? that is and really relevant what about silicon valley to slow the gradual accumulation with those capabilities show me where the tax rate is high. >> kovach to the '50s television has created enormous mass markets turning back with two decades of the great depression me have fallen behind. there were numerous reasons a lot of agriculture into manufacturing. >> but nobody pays 90 percent. but corporate taxes were lower than. that was very circumstantial. going back because of the capital-intensive the large corporations general motors and kodak are very capital intensive. they plan to transfer through you have more restaurants we happen to be in the information intensive area. with more of investment phillip said the large corporation has a difficult time innovating in succeeding for such a large pool. >> but we could come to another era where retry to use stop global warming and it all could change with a
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2014 8:00pm EDT
was actually agreed by both sides. >> host: we talked about china earlier. where is this and it's interesting you talk about some of the rhetoric from the republican politicians come in mitt romney talked about naming and shaming and trying on day number one. he talked about some economic nationalism. >> guest: are people like pat buchanan that talk about this that have been on the fringes of the debate but if you look at the 19th century america was the great country and that is a historical fact. we could argue about whether it was the right thing or the wrong thing to the fact is as someone described to me the american industrial base was built at the height ^-caret war. that is just what happened and so the argument on the right is very much as you said the economic nationalism and actually it's not just about economic nationalism but it's about having a level playing field. so i probably have a 15%. where you get a 15% subsidy and so a lot of the trade argument is about equalizing that playing field. he's portrayed as a betrayer but i think it was a 30% tariff people remember
CSPAN
Jun 22, 2015 12:00am EDT
different as china, turkey, afghanistan, the united states, the middle east and north africa going through various instances of saying enough and when i mentioned china i think they were detained and five remain in detention because of the feminist protest. in afghanistan she is lynched for her views even though according to the traditions they say to the men most importantly no weatherman will touch her in reference to a woman that is raped and murdered and here in the united states in response to the police brutality we saw three women who after the murder of trayvon martin started the hash tag #blacklivesmatter. be they women of the middle east or the u.s. commanded the example women in india and hundreds and thousands protested. and there's the issue of women of color speaking out because i think that is historically in silence to the combination of things don't talk about these because it's going to make us look bad or because they give ammunition to the races to use against men so we have a double burden to bear and that is for the middle east and everywhere but these are the reasons
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2016 8:32pm EDT
public, but i am not sure by itself it is enough to sell the public. people know that china is investing. but it is remote to say we want to be number one. my thought is, and what i am saying in this book is want to see to the people who are elected leaders. i feel many of us could be leaders if we are holding office or not. i am trying to be a thought leader. what i am trying to say is we need a vision about mobility. mobility is so essential. you talk about transportation as a circulartory system of the nation. we have to be able to move goods, ourselves, good where we want to go. other countries are moving faster. we can use it metaphorically to talk about catching up or getting into the lead as we compete with other countries. but we have to continue to be the land of opportunity. i say we have gone from the land of opportunity to being the state of malaise. we have to get that back. this is all about building the middle class, restoring the middle class and reducing inequality. one of the things that keep people poor is they cannot get to jobs. we have to make things affordable and
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2016 11:32pm EDT
public. people know that china is investing a great deal and that japan had already invested and it's part of their rebuilding after world war ii. but it is a little remote just to say that we want to be number one on rankings and indicators of it does not translate to things and improve people's lives. some i thought is that what i'm saying in this book and want to say to the people who are elected leaders, i feel many of us can be leaders whether we are holding office at the moment or not. i'm trying to be a thought leader here. what i'm trying to say to them in "move" is that we need mobility. mobility is so essential a new talk about transportation as a circulatory system, we have to be able to move goods, we have to be able to move ourselves so we have to get where we want to go. other countries are moving faster. we can use it metaphorically to talk about catching up for getting into the lead as we compete with other countries. but we also have to continue to be the land of opportunity. i say we have gone from the land of opportunity to the state of delays. but we have to get th
CSPAN
May 24, 2015 9:00pm EDT
future to recite imagination entreprenuers are dreaming up but you mentioned both china and in japan now china is one belts of one road initiative where they try to bring up to date the old silk road that is all about trade in to participate in the global economy. but i was recently in japan i was on the bullet train with the 50th anniversary. now they'll look at a advanced technology. that is the future. >> guest: in that sense that we can learn from them. but i have been in japan to ride those trains i landed and i had of a colleague of was unsure how we would get there but as i would exit from security we were on the train faster than you could get any city in the united states to downtown. and seamlessly it is impressive when i found out the bullet train only an average deviated from schedule 32 seconds. tell anybody who takes amtrak gone the northeast corridor. >> host: i know. and the president knows this to get it going again and your good friend is very interested. >> guest: i know they are trying but i tell a great story about amtrak getting the government regulators to be littl
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2014 12:00am EDT
economy in the world that we have been since the 1870s. we are going to lose it soon because china -- >> host: china is a mess though, too. >> guest: but they are growing at six to 7%. how much are we growing? >> host: two to three, right. >> guest: they aren't going to pass us up however i don't think they are going to become the same kind -- look at the bang in the system. >> host: there's a lot of problems they are going to face. >> guest: however, here's the issue. they are already talking about it. russia is talking and some other nations about creating the basket or in the instance of the u.s. dollar being the basis it would be a hodgepodge of things. what would you do to s.? is what rob us or deplete us from the ability to print money. what happens when you can't print money and you have the kind of debt that we have? stop and think about that for a moment. >> host: with the ask about risk. you took my political correctness in here. and i look a got the last 30 yed i think when i grow up we have more honeshadmore honest discuse 70s out race and we do today. we are actually a
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2014 10:43pm EDT
context of missing control. over china all of a sudden the spacecraft starts spinning. the first day he thinks, well, that's his gyro. one choice. so then they started fighting this. they immediately suspected it was the regina and fall. and so anyway, getting greater and greater. got to the point where there were almost 400 revolutions a minute and all ready to pass out . plant to make the decision to get off of that when there were going to pass out. and they did. he made it. order to get enough rocket power to get off of that he had to fire the a section of his return rocket. to return sections. then the body. so he fired the eight banks, got it under control and un document. as soon as the hon gotten everything they thought well , that's it. they start spending again. then he realized it was joined by eight. they kept turning off. they got down, found the culprit. some mistakes in my mind. so anyway kidded under control. bleated so that next opporunity. the next engine and the is way out in the middle of the pacific. for under miles off of okinawa. had to come and over china. so you
CSPAN
Jul 3, 2014 9:11pm EDT
how we can do just that. >> host: the trade gap with china has resulted in cheaper consumer products for everybody and i guess that's a good thing but it certainly hasn't helped the american manufacturing. you almost never hear anybody complain about that. why? >> guest: well because most people have lost their jobs or are getting lower paying jobs. a small percentage, relatively small percentage of americans are participating in manufacturing. certainly substantially less than it was before so if you are a professional or someone who works in the service industry and you are looking at getting something for a substantially lower price because it's been manufactured overseas you are happy to go to walmart but as you know tucker walmart is now very focused on the ad campaign for the last year almost talking about how they are trained to moving back to america to try to encourage manufacturing here in this country. i think even those who have benefited like walmart from this globalization and having these products made overseas, see the benefits of having these products made h
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2016 10:18pm EST
influences. if this is a new case where china and china slow down precipitates a greater slowdown in the east asian industry and that translates to the united states that would be effective. >> host: has the legislation of 2008 important for stabilization of the economy? >> guest: so i think there are many aspects of the legislative response. the first one, the first big wan was the araa, the american recovery and reinvestment act implemented in 2009. that was a big counter cycle move. i would say that is one thing that pushed the economy in the right direction. that was early on and most affects of that have petered out. but i think that mitigated a lot of the pain and suffering that could have occurred. the other legislation that was passed, i think, have more long-lasting implications and that includes the dodd-frank legislation regarding the bank of legislation. so that is important over the longer term in so far as it really -- it reduces the incentives for banks to over over-leverage. that is borrow up lots amounts and only putting in shareholders money and borrowing up with the sh
CSPAN
Mar 9, 2014 9:00pm EDT
control and finish. have a last sentence. >> guest: i was just going to say that china right now is a very good example of a country described by china scholars as, you know, strong sense of superiority with massive dose of -- we have been humiliated by the west, so that's a nice boil for us, and we'll see what happens. >> host: amy chua, jed rubenfeld, thank you for joining us to talk about "the triple package. >> guest: thank you so much. >> that was "after words," booktv's signature program in which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, legislators and others familiar with their material. after words with air as every weekend on booktv at 10 p.m. on saturday, 12 and 9 p.m. on sunday and 12 a.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" online. go to booktv.org and click on "after words" in the booktv series and top you cans list on the upper -- topics list on the upper right side of the page. >> here is a look at some books that are being published this week: got to talk about the update of the addition of their book the new digital age in which
CSPAN
Jul 27, 2014 12:00pm EDT
out of contact with mission control at the mayor over china on the other side of earth and all the sadness spacecraft starts spinning and he brings it to neil's attention. first he thinks that is his side, so he checked his and his were showing them in a day. so they started fighting this. so immediately suspect they would not follow. so anyway, the speech kept getting greater and greater and it got to the point they were almost like 400 revolutions a minute and they were all about ready to pass out. so neil had to make that vision to get off of that at jena where they are going to pass out and they are dead. so he made it and in order to get enough rocket power to get off of that spinning at jena, he had to fire the a section of his return rockets. he had two sections of return rockets for reentry. they had ebay. so he fired a big, got it under control and i'm not private. as soon as day on talk, they thought that did. they started spinning again. so then he realized he was gemini eight i'm a cat turning off and they got down upon the culprit. and i think it sticks in my mind. it
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2014 11:00am EST
19 century. it's what your pet in 19 century. it's what china, korea and india are leaving right now, and why. the breakup of the extende extem taking their selection is occurring because that works only by enslaving the young. young women to provide the care, and then on top of it isn't something imagine reaching your 80s still waiting to inherit your land. having the economic future still dependent on your data. the economic progress of the world occurs because you give young people from they can work with you, live what they want and marry whom they want to be moved to the city for often they take different lines of work. the often leave the elderly, the elders behind. we didn't have a plan in the 19 century for what happens to people left behind india, china, korea don't either. and what we have decided medicine will take care of it. host lecture turned over to the health care and they will fix and take care of and treat. >> guest: my grandfather, my dad is having trouble with memory or he's having falls in the home. let's take them to the doctor and the doctor will fix that. we
Search Results 100 to 149 of about 490 (some duplicates have been removed)