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CSPAN
May 13, 2013 12:00am EDT
of afghanistan which happenin' 1979. chine. china. the rise of dung xiaoping and his beginning of a turn towards the markets and an end to mao and his cultural revolution. poland, as we mentioned, the election on the polish pope john paul ii and his return to his homeland and the precursor of the solidarity movement. great britain, the election of margaret thatcher and the real thumb put over the british economy that has been lost as part of the historical narrative of britain after thatcher. so, i'm looking forward to coming back to that. and then number five, the one people thing about first, the iranian revolution. the toppling of the shah and the hostage crisis. that's an awful lot of ground to cover. let's start with thatcher. there's just been huge outpouring of honors for thatcher. and your book takes apart ofsome of the myth office margaret thatcher. >> guest: i tried to do that but it's always a challenge because you want to show why somebody is worth knowing about in the first place, right? there's been a lot of revisionist histories of thatcher, a lot of people correct so
CSPAN
Mar 14, 2010 12:00pm EDT
like china or russia or other nations of the world and to protect ourselves, in response to the humanitarian crisis and have a nuclear deterrent against the nuclear threat, the list goes on and on of various challenges the military has. in my view, it requires an annual budget of roughly 4 percent of gdp right now 3.8% and total federal spending is over time approximately 20% of gdp. so it should be 20% i apologize for taking that course but sometimes we say we are spending so much more than any other nation in the world, why should we spend any more than the military? they spend far less. but actually, if you go behind the numbers, they don't report all military spending and the cost for instance of standing of the army, not a volunteer army the cost as much lower. if you look at a comparable basis china is suspending 10% that have level of the of the united states if we did with the same cost for the various resources. and russia likewise is spending a good deal more than a report which suggest we really cannot continue to pare down the military might we must be confident that
CSPAN
Aug 26, 2012 4:00pm EDT
carry out. our military has a far boder array of responsibility and missions than a nation like china or russia or other nations in the world. and to protect ourselves to protect our seedlings to respond to humid tear crisis and have a missile defense and list goes on and on in various challenges our military has. in my view, requires an annual budget of 4 percent of gdp. right now we're 3.8% of our gdp. total spending is about 20% of the gdp. we're saying the defense budget ought to be 20%. there are a lot of percentage. i apologize for taking that course. i think sometimes we say, gosh, we're spending so much more than any other nation in the world. why should we be sp spending any more on the military? they spend far less than we do. as you go behind the numbers and find they don't report all of their military spending and their cost, for instance, of standing up an army they have con sings, not a paid voluntary arm army. their costs are lower. china is not spending at 10% the level at the united states but something close the level of half the united states. if we were paying with
CSPAN
Mar 7, 2010 9:00pm EST
responsibilities and missions then let's say a nation like china or russia or other nations in the world and to protect ourselves and respond to humanitarian crises to have a nuclear deterrent against a nuclear threat to have missile defense the list goes on and on and on of the challenges the military has. in my view it requires an annual budget of roughly 4% of gdp. right now about 3.8% of gdp and total federal spending but approximately 20% of the gdp. so we are seeing the the defense budget ought to be about 20% of the total gdp. a lot of percentages. i apologize for taking that course. but i think sometimes we say we are spending so much more than any other nation in the world why should we be spending any more on the military? because they spend for less than we do actually as you go behind their numbers and find they don't report all of their military spending and the costs for instance standing up an army where they have conscription, not paid volunteer army, the costs are lower so when you look at a more comparable basis china is spending a lot at 10% the level of the united states
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2011 9:00pm EST
say, i don't want to go overseas. the guy down the road went joe seas, went to mexico, went to china. they undercut me. if i don't move my factory, i'm finished. frankly, i blame the free traders, blame them, and i used to be one of them. we used to be friends until i got a level saying i was doing the devil's work. i was opposed to free trade. i'm with you on that. my sense is that some of the business guys say, look, in the global economy they dump me in. i work for this company, and i've got to save the company, but if someone said the problem, ralph, is this, that the vital interests of the united states, and the vital interests of the fortune 500 are the # 00 or whatever it is, they used to be the same in this country, and they diverged. their intrirses, and, look, if what's good for general motors is moving factories overseas, than what's good for general motors is not good for the united states of america. >> host: it's happening with the solar industry. we were ahead from the world, and now the factories move to china because china gives them the store. >> guest: what do you
CSPAN
May 27, 2013 1:00pm EDT
-- the pope and the head of the pentagon and the president of china or russia or the united states are very powerful people that they can do less. they are more constrained in what they can do and therefore i started looking at that. it also coincided with the period, i have been the editor of foreign-policy magazine as you said for 14 years and so i was trying to distill what did i learn in those 14 years? what are the important trends that came into my mind as i was trying to summarize that experience. >> host: so, why don't we stop for a moment and why didn't you tell me a bit more about how you define power because they think the definition and layout in the book is central to your thesis of how it's declining and how it's different from how we talk about power conversationally today. >> guest: right, and as you know power has been discussed since the memorial and there is many definitions and a cam bit -- yet as complex as you develop the idea and it has become very complex. for the book and for the conversation it is enough to say that power is the ability for one actor to do
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 9:00pm EST
papers. you have written passages of martin luther king. you took the play to china and palestine. those are amazing places to take a play about dr. king who was a protester against government pity the talk about that. >> guest: i've always been trying to find other ways of doing documentaries about the movement of martin luther king. i looked at by is on the prize and other things. so the play -- i was a colleague playwright and she suggested loci i have to create my documents by interviewing those people. you spend your life putting together all these sources. why don't you take this information and transform it into a play. >> host: that was a great idea. >> guest: i thought it was a good idea, too. i didn't know how much work i was going to get involved in and how difficult it would be. but i did it and the play was produced and stanford and i worked very closely with of the drama department and they put it on their program and we didn't. since then i've been tinkering with it and it's been like a hobby. >> host: you have some of it in the book in taking it to china and palestine how
CSPAN
Feb 22, 2013 8:00pm EST
the book. taking it to china taking it to palestine, how did you write a play, go through all you had to go through three different governments to do and what it and what was the reception and most respected areas? >> guest: in china one of my former students was there so that was the accident. i had visited her and she was fluent in chinese. she was there for a long period of time and she had seen danny glover before. i had written a script at that time. he read the script and she said well look, why can't we do this in china? it would really be a great impact to bring king. so the national leader of china. >> host: what year is this? >> guest: this was 2007 and we performed it in the theater less than two miles from tiananmen square. >> host: in chinese? >> guest: in chinese. we were performing the birmingham protests with the chinese martin luther king and all of this is taking place before packed audiences within walking distance of tiananmen square. so translating king's legacy and ringing a gospel choir you know -- and i have actually three of my students were part of that q
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 10:00pm EST
have written a play, passages of martin luther king and you took to china, palestine. those are amazing places to take up play who is a protester against the government. >> host. >> guest: i tried to find other ways to do documentary's about the movement. i worked on eyes on the prize. i was a colleague of another playwright. ms. smith suggested i have to create a minor documents. you have spare life to bring together all these sources burkhardt station so take that and transform it into a plate. >> guest: i did not know how much work and difficult it would be, but i did it and the play was produced at stanford and i worked closely with the person in the drama department. we did it. since then i tinker with it. is the hobby. >> host: some of it is in the books. how did you write a play, go through all you have to do it with governments and what was the reception? >> guest: in china a former student was there. she was fluent in chinese and was there for a long time and she had seen danny glover perform king and she said why can't we do this in china? it would be a great impact. she convi
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 12:00pm EST
, passages of martin luther king. tell about the plea. you took the play to china. you took the play to palestine. both amazing places to take a point about dr. king, was a protester against governor. talk about that very briefly. >> guest: i have always been trying to find other ways, doing documentaries about the movement and martin luther king. i worked on eyes on the prize. so the plate was just, i was a colleague of a playwright, and she suggested that, one of the things she said was look, i have to create my document by integrating these people. you've spent your life bringing together all these sources. why don't you take this material and transform it into a play? >> host: praided ya. she's brilliant. i was a great idea. >> guest: i thought it was a great idea, too. i did know how much work i was getting involved in and how difficult it would be. but i did it and the play was produced at stanford and i worked with very close with a person in the drama department and the drama department put it on the program. and we did it, and since then i've kind of been tinkering with the. it
CSPAN
Mar 3, 2013 9:00pm EST
the pentagon and the president of china, russia, the united states are very powerful people but they can do less. the are more constrained on what they can do. therefore i started looking at that. it also coincided with a period -- i get in the editor of foreign policy magazine as you said for 14 years. so i was trying to distill what did i learn in this 14 years. but are important trends that came into my mind as i was trying to summarize that experience. >> host: why don't we stop for a moment and you tell me a bit about how you define power because i think the definition you rang out in the book is central to your thesis of how it is declining and its different from how we talk about power conversationally today. >> host: as you know the power has been discussed in the memorial and there are many definitions and it can get complex and develop that idea, and it has become very complex. for the book and for the conversation, it is not to say that power is the ability of one actor to make others deutsch or stop doing something. and influencing -- power and influence are interrelated
CSPAN
May 18, 2013 10:00pm EDT
powerful systems to do things with force and energy. and they dominated different portfolios with china. and with the loss of china and this is something we know from the record some were just marxist not necessarily identified as agents. he was doing a lot of the economic policy and basically did one these soviet-style government. >> host: so did white but at the time harry dexter white came across as the new dealer but an economist who was in the keynesian tradition and a counterpart with creation of post-world war two global financial architecture and it is incredible and mind-boggling. >> guest: that hundreds of agents not all of them are famous but they still have not been identified with 500 agents that they can all of the fall of the soviet union and for what facilitated this identification. >> there several archives. to go between russian and soviet embassies in council it back to moscow. this and with 1943 and the idea was to break the code to find out what the soviet allies really wanted so we could be better allies. infiltrating it everywhere but it was hard work and they too
CSPAN
Mar 30, 2013 10:00pm EDT
about right now, the globalization of food, especially from china and that sort of thing. i wondered if you could talk about this. >> the means to coming from china and other things? >> yes, and the massive multinational corporations. a lot of those companies that have grown from just being red white and blue to having a lot of process and influence on ingredients the book on vitamins, in the chapter about this, most people never even think about this issue. they come from very strange things. 50% of all vitamins come from china. artificial sweeteners are made in china. their regulations for workers and their a lot of food corporations now. if you are a binational and a type of person, you look at their income statements, you will see that a lot of the revenues our growth revenues. particularly developing markets. india and china are the big ones. and so they were exporting this through to other countries. changing their diet the way that our diet changes. starting about a hundred years ago. >> he made suggestions about what we can do better in your book. >> yes, it is kind of the st
CSPAN
Jan 9, 2011 9:00pm EST
development, and so i point to the fact that china might be a very dirty place today, but it's because the price that they pay for the added pollution kof the acid rain, all of the environmental consequences of this very fast, cold fuel the growth of that they are engaging in right now is at their stage of development was important, less relevant than providing jobs to millions and millions of farmers that are being displaced. so right now their calculation to the society is the pollution is worth it. now as they move up the environmental and the economic ladder, this choice will change because suddenly adding an extra job will not be as perfect for, you know, adding this extra chunk and they become a little bit more like us. >> host: you also talk about how we in the u.s. we pay people to take our garbage away and bury it somewhere and in other countries to pay even more and putting a high price causes people to maybe recycle more and then in some other places people will spend their days going through garbage in order -- it's a resource for them because they can feel they can
CSPAN
Apr 17, 2011 9:00pm EDT
failure of socialism and a national basis and the soviet union or china before they are or india during its socialist days between the independent and its civilization in the 90's. but also with unlike the american public school system, the mexican public weal companies, state-run industry and venezuela come up places like that. they all have similar sorts of failures with misallocation of capital and incentives for production. it's a lot heavier than the book is by the way. >> host: and the book is -- the book goes through both the theoretical cases of socialism and then the series of object lessons in countries, regimes, ideas that demonstrate the way in which these failures as you see them how they developed and what they have in common, and what is the nature of the truth of how they operate versus how they describe themselves or how they propagandize for themselves what strikes me as interesting as we are talking about this, and i presume that you wrote this book because it was published in large measure because we are living in a time where great controversy about the nature of th
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2011 12:00am EST
function of our stage of development, and so i point to the fact that china, china might be a very, very dirty place today, but it's because the price that they pay for this, you know, added pollution for the acid rain and all the environmental consequences of this very fast, coal-fueled growth they are engaged in right now. at their stage of development, it's less important and less relevant than providing jobs to millions and millions of farmers that are being displaced from the rural economy. right now, their calculations as a society is the pollution is worth it. now, as they move up, the environment -- the economic ladder i mean, this choice changes because adding an extra job will not be as worth it for, you know, adding this extra chunk of pollution, and they will become more like us. >> host: you talk about how in the u.s. we pay people to take our garbage away and bury it somewhere, and another countries they pay even more and putting a high price on it causes people to recycle more, and then in other places, people will spend their dayings going through garbage in order -- so i
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2011 7:00pm EDT
not quite as dapper, but is driven. there are people who broke china when they walk in the china shop and were sorted and told forward by the sense of the danger we face. richard clarke is another one who straddles two administrations and certainly became a major part of the story during the 9/11 commission. talked to me about richard clarke. just go clarke and o'neill were sold brothers. they really thought each other as having the same kind of drive, same obsessiveness, the same intolerance of bureaucratic resistance and people are shufflers. they wanted to get to and consequently the also had in common the fact that they had a lot of enemies. it was clerk who spotted o'neill and began to promote him. actually offered him his own job as a counterterrorism czar at the nsc in the white house. it could well have done that was a prompt in fact are that caused someone in fbi hierarchy to torpedo o'neill. they would never have wanted to report to him in the white house. it would have been intolerable for them. it was hard enough being his boss. romeo was irascible and tumultuous. he
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 10:00pm EST
have civil society there to take care of the elderly. china -- china already has what is called a slow-motion human catastrophe where you are going to have literally hundreds of millions of people who are elderly with no state support whatsoever in terms of pension and health care and very little money to support them because they have this one-child policy and almost no progeny of their own. so what are the chinese going to do with her old people? it's a terrifying question. >> host: well, if you are convinced that this is a disaster of some kind what works and what doesn't? what can be done? what if anything can the government do to encourage women or families to have more children? >> guest: [inaudible] that is how we sell books. [laughter] people have been trying to do this for a long time. seasseas are augusta saw they ha fertility problem and the empire. he tried to get people to get married and have kids and it didn't work or that the soviet union had a fertility problem so stalin commissioned a motherhood medal giving it out to women who had five or more children. you can
CSPAN
Sep 2, 2012 9:00pm EDT
. that's why they see the middle class of china and india in particular as representing that growth. that's the whole heart of things. whereas in the u.s., more stable now, and the folks at the bottom don't have the money to buy like they once did. >> host: you know, when president obama says something of this type publicly, he's castigated said to be attacking people who create wealth in america, and it's said when he said you didn't build it that the larger society contributed the legal structure, the bridges, the roads, he is said to be demeaning small business owners in america, would you agree or disagree? >> guest: no, absolutely not. he's absolutely right. it could have been phrased more elegantly, perhaps, but he's absolutely right. that's like us saying we did this ourselves. we didn't. we had all kinds of help. the idea that one person or two people do everything -- the best example is steve jobs and apple. apple derived enormous ben facilities from the advanced research project agency that really started the interpret. it was not al gore. does he pay tribute to that? abso
CSPAN
May 26, 2013 12:00pm EDT
with force and energy. they, they dominated different portfolios. loughlin curry's portfolio was china. he was very instrumental in the loss of china and, indeed, this was, you know, something we know, we know on the record. so there were many others, there were some who were just, you know, marxists. they weren't necessarily identified as agents early on. rexford tug welshing this very important -- >> host: what was he doing? >> guest: he was doing the economic policy, and he basically did want a soviet-style economy -- >> host: so hid harry -- so did harry dexter white as it turns out from recent research. at the time, harry dexter white came across as a new dealer, but an economist who was in the keynesian tradition. in fact, he was a counterpart to keynes in creation of post-world war ii global financial architecture. it's incredible, it's mind-boggling. >> guest: but i think the important thing to remember is there are hundreds of agents. >> host: yeah. >> guest: not all of them are famous. there are some who still have not been identified, but we know for a fact there was somethi
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2011 10:00am EST
thinking about? and really, the teachers led me to find the students. and one girl from china had written a college essay about coming to america. are very first we choose opposed to move in with her father whom she hadn't seen in years, and when she got there on her first day, her new stepmother basically didn't want her there and kicked her out. when i met her living on her own in a room, she rented in chinatown, so for one english teacher that was a student she couldn't stop thinking about when she went home at night. every other student i basically found that way. except for a burmese girl found because i wanted to observe a new student, and i really just ran into her on the first day of school and then a very interesting that she was the only person in the whole school who spoke our language, no one else did. so i thought she would be an interesting person to paula. >> i know many of these students, like a chinese girl you mention, and had very dramatic passages from their native country to america. and i believe -- >> i'm going to read, so many of the kids have amazing stori
CSPAN
Mar 27, 2010 10:00pm EDT
policy. very experienced. i do sing in the book as again i try to be fair, the china business i think was not good. i know people made a lot out of the toast and there was more going on in brent scowcroft toast to the chinese leadership but trademark and square -- >> host: what more could you have done at trademark and square because that was the downside of his realism which was if you're an idealist and tenements where happens you react and pushback on china. if you are a free list you say that is to affairs >> guest: i've been critical of democratic and democratic presidents with. i don't think the case can be made that when we cooperate with china things get better. i think if he tally of the sheet i don't think the case can be made. i was one of the people of my organization, jack kemp, rumsfeld all signed on to permit normal trade relations. i didn't. they should be tougher, things should be tougher now. we are we too easy now. >> host: why? >> guest: they are doing is bad. policies are bad, they kill girls. i think that is a terrible, terrible thing and they do all sorts of oth
CSPAN
Mar 29, 2010 12:00am EDT
push back on china. if you are a realist to say that is our internal affairs. they still intend to be critical of the presidency in china. i just don't think the case can be made that when we cooperate with china things get better. i think if you tally up the sheet i don't think the case can be made. i was one of the only people in my organization of power america jack kemp, jeane kirkpatrick, rumsfeld also signed on to read i didn't. i think they should be tougher. everything should be tougher now. we are we too easy now. >> host: why? >> guest: because what they're doing are bad. the policies are bad. they kill girls. that is a terrible thing it a dual source of the repressive things. >> host: i think a repressive society that represses the free flow of information and will end up losing to and what city in to get which is a messy economy will but right now at least allows the free expression and that will be one of the strolls in this world. >> guest: i agree with you and the interesting polls recently to have seen a lot of americans are not sure that we will be dominant in the fut
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2009 12:00am EST
it can work anywhere, australia, china, india, and hopefully if aid likes it. they sent 71 of their top project managers to see how it's done, and it's one of the examples i use in this book. >> host: i want to talk a little bit more later about the ways in which -- the ways that you might want to -- about how one goes about getting people to invest in this point of view. reading the book would be a start. i want to know why you invested in it? you write about reading tarzan backs, dr. dolittle. i find it hard to think of you as jane, but you're a different kind of jane. >> guest: i was very jealous of that stupid jane. >> host: how so? >> guest: because i wanted to be with rzan myself. anyway. from the time i was born -- i was interested in animals, animals, animals, animals. i'm going to go to africa and live with animals and write books about them. at a time when girls didn't do those sort of thing. world war ii was raging. we didn't have enough money for a bicycle, let alone a car. that's why i didn't go to university, couldn't afford it. but i had an amazing mother, and she wou
CSPAN
Jan 3, 2010 11:00am EST
replicate this around other wilderness areas. you know, it would work anywhere. australia, china, india, and so hopefully usaid loves it. they sent a 71 of their top project managers to see how it's done. and it's one of the examples i use in this book. >> host: i want to talk a bit more about, later, about the ways in which -- the ways that you might want kashmir or about how one goes about getting people to invest in his. obvious he, reading the book would be a start it but i want to know why it is you invested in a. you write about creating tarzan books, reading doctor doolittle. i find it difficult to think of you as jane, even though you are jane. you would have been a different kind of jane, i think, but where did your passion come from? >> guest: i was very jealous of that stupid jane. [laughter] >> host: how so? >> guest: because i wanted to be tarzan to make myself. [laughter] >> host: will. >> guest: but anyway, from the time i was born apparently i was only interested in animals, animals, animals. books about animals. 11 years old i'm going to go to africa and live wit
CSPAN
May 20, 2013 12:00am EDT
with china. he was very instrumental from china and this is something that we know in the record. there were many others, mark says stephen and part of the economic policy and did want the soviet-style economy as it turns out from recent research at the time harry dexter white came across as the keynesian tradition and the counterpart of the post world war two global financial architecture and it is mind-boggling. >> guest: but there are hundreds of agents. some still have not been identified that the renewal for a fact there is something around 500 agents that have been identified that has come after the fall of the soviet union. >> host: but what was the key intercept that facilitated thisd this identification of 500? >> it was an archive set up going between the embassies and consulates back to russia or moscow. the western union was ordered to start making copies and the idea was to break the code and read them to find out whether south -- soviet allies wanted to make a better allies and when the codebreakers started to work on the cables is started to realize the soviet union was a
CSPAN
Jun 29, 2013 10:00pm EDT
political capital me -- i should have crossed it and gone to china when i saved it. i saved it for you guys. you were the civilian overseers. then the next 24 months you decided not to go something that was against my advice. you took my advice. years later you are criticizing me what i say you should i should have done. so it was -- even the honor of the civilian relationship. he made it clear in a number of essays that while he liked douglas macarthur personally and respected his military acumen, he was in heir because he jeopardized it. >> host: i would love to hear a little bit more about that tension, and that support between the leaders of the state that you discuss, and the commanders that you discuss. is that kind of -- is it the support from the leadership of a country necessary to have the savior general? >> guest: it is. it's very controversial. these are generals who come in at the 11th hour when the policy of the state and usually the commander in chief, president or emperor, whoever the political system has in charge. it's a referendum something is wrong. if david pet
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2010 9:00pm EST
to ancient china to say with a minute. we forgot all about this, how person can be successful list that is the stronger person 31 of the striking things emerge even after line 11 is that the americans -- the american government -- i must make a distinction it's a mistake to say the americans and the japanese, and we, muslims, and so on. one of the striking things is there were many people in the u.s. government all along at lower levels. we were saying this is crazy. first, we should be doing more against al qaeda, and then after 9/11, they were saying invading iraq is crazy and this in the cia and city and this and said, and they are saying this and the defense, which, they are seeing this in the state, but it's not reaching the top most levels of government. one of the ideas that they couldn't get through was the whole concept of insurgency, counterinsurgency, what we refer to as the weapons of the week. what is that will mobilize people to in fact fight and i recall was not necessarily being a religious. one of the major things is being occupied, which is exactly what americans
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2010 12:00pm EST
people who came up belatedly with their counterinsurgency ideas, they go back to ancient china, you know, to say wait a minute, we forgot all about this, how a weaker person can be successful against a stronger person. one of the striking things that emerged even after 9/11 was that the americans, the american government -- i must make a distinction here. it's very, it's a mistake to say the americans and the japanese and the muslims and so on. one of the striking things was there were many people in the u.s. government all along at lower levels who were saying, this is crazy. first, we should be doing more against al-qaeda and then after 9/11 they were saying invading iraq is crazy. and they're saying this in the cia, they're saying this in cent come, they're saying this in the defense college, they're saying this in the state department, but it's not reaching the topmost level of government. one of the ideas that they couldn't get through was the whole concepts of insurgency, counterinsurgency, what we refer to as the weapons of the week, what it is that will mobilize people to, i
CSPAN
Sep 9, 2012 12:00pm EDT
you can understand why they're coming from. the middle class in china endorse the middle class. middle class in india, brazil, you name it. and that's why they say the u.s. is kind of irrelevant. >> host: thermos looking for growth. that's the part of the whole stock receipt. they want growth with companies took the multinational connect in such operations and revenue streams. that's where they want growth and that's why they see the middle class in china and india in particular mr. presenting macro. they don't have the bottom unshared money to buy what they once did. >> host: when someone says something of this type publicly, use cap related india said to be attacking people who create wealth in america. when he said he didn't know, the larger society contributes the legal structure, bridges and roads, he said to be demeaning small-business owners in america. do you agree or disagree? >> guest: he's absolutely right. it could've been phrased more elegantly perhaps. he's absolutely right. loopy late gemini saying we developed this ourselves. we didn't do it ourselves. we had al
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 9:00pm EST
. china already has a slow motion catastrophe where you are going to have literally hundreds of millions of people who are elderly with no state support whatsoever in the pension health care and very little money to support them because as the one child policy they have one of their own and so what are the chinese we do? and it's a terrifying question. >> host: if you are convinced this is a ruling disaster of some kind, what works or what doesn't, what can the government do to encourage women or families to have more children? >> guest: that's how we sell books. people have been trying to do this for all long time. caesar augustus past the bachelor tax to get people married and have kids and that didn't work. they have a fertility problem and they have a motherhood metal to have five or more children. you can get them on ebay. they've spent the better part working hard. the other countries say the fertility rates aren't that hot and they have the rate of 6.1 to 6.7. all the evidence suggests that is because of innovation and they have a great deal for north africa and the difference in
CSPAN
Mar 28, 2010 9:00pm EDT
which is if you are an idealist and trademark men's wear happens you react and push back on china. if you are a real list you see this internal affairs. >> guest: i have tended to be critical of a democrat and republican presidents both. i don't think the case can be made that when we cooperate with china things get better. i think if you tally up the sheet i don't think that -- i was one of the only people at my organization of power america, jack kemp, rumsfeld, they all signed on to the normal trade relations. i didn't. i think they should be tougher and things should be tougher now. i think we are way too easy now. >> host: why? >> guest: because what you're doing is bad. the policies are bad. they kill girls. i just really think that is a terrible, terrible thing and they do all sorts of other repressive things. post, i also think that a repressive society that represses the free flow of information and -- will end up losing to india which is a messy economy right now but at least it allows free expression and that's going to be one of the struggles coming up in the world. >> gue
CSPAN
Mar 16, 2013 10:00pm EDT
calling out to china for recognition. they are still calling out to america in some way or another. yes go they are and when america doesn't respond they get very upset more so than in china doesn't respond. no matter its faults the u.s. should stand up for democracy and human rights etc. so whatever the history of the united states, whatever the interest that it has to pursue, that is the expectation. >> host: he you write that it's almost like a catch-22. one official says if we intervene they say we are meddling and if we stay back they say where to standing up for human rights? no matter what we do we do we ae on with some site of criticism. >> guest: that is the fate of the superpower. it is a catch-22. people want you to deliver for them but they don't necessarily want to give you what it takes to deliver further so it's all about your own interest. i do quote this official who says we are damned if we do and damned if we don't. the pendulum swings constantly and cystic wiggle thing. look at syria now. people are very upset in syria and in the region and here in the u.s.. you
CSPAN
Sep 12, 2009 12:00pm EDT
that come through in your story are not quite as dapper, but driven. they are people who broke china when they walked in the china shop, and were sort of impelled forward by this sense of the danger we faced. richard clarke is another one of them. he straddles two admistration and certain became a maj part of the story during the 9/11 commission. talk to me about richard clarke. >> guest: well, yeah, clarke and o'neill re soul bthers. they really saw each other as being having the sam kind of drive, the same kind of obsesqiveness, the same intolerance of bureaucratic resistance. they wanted to get things done. and consequently they also had in, the fact that they had a lot enemies. it was clark who spotted o'neil and ben to promote him actually offered him his own job as the countertarrorism czar in the white house. it could welhave been that that was the prompting factors that caused someone in fbi hierarchy to torpedo o'neil, that they wod never want to report him in the white house. it would have bn an intolerable to them. it was hard enough being his boss. o'neil was irascible an
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2009 3:00pm EST
. people understand especially of china, un, russia, now saying let's remove the dollar as an international reserve currency. that would mean less finance for the dollar, which would be not good things. peter schweizer, i want to thank you again. my name is michele bachmann, a member of congress. i want to thank peter schweizer for his book "architects of ruin." you can find more information at peter schweizer.com. thank you so much for joining us today. >> did you know you can view booktv programs online? go to booktv.org. type the name of the author, book or subject into the search area in the upper left hand corner of the page. select the watchfully. now you can view the entire program. you might also explore the recently on booktv box or the featured programs box. to find and view recent and featured programs. coming up next booktv presents "after words," an hour-long interview program where we invite a guest host to interview the author of a new book. this week, taylor branch recalls his eight years of private meetings with president bill clinton from 1993 to 2001 in "the
CSPAN
Feb 14, 2010 12:00pm EST
listen to the preaching of the united states. the secretary of treasury would go to china to drag their fingers and say you ought to liberalize the financial markets like we did. they had a robust debate in those countries. they said nothing to. now they say much more loudly, no think you because we were worried. now we see how worried we should happen. >> the interesting disconnect i have noticed within the 20 summit a global call for deregulation we will shift back to the s but after the same time you have the imf the arsonist in charge of putting out the fire with the instrument for a global mechanism and have the wto the united states pushing for more financial deregulation. those rules already have to be reversed instead of pushing for more. there seems to be the perverse notion we need to regulate but there are these global institutions point* mentioned the need to manage a global the economy but professor stiglitz it says no regulation given a shift in the u.s. role and market fundamentalism did not work have you see the new rules that are created? >> one of the good things
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 1:00pm EDT
president. in china, he's a hard-liner in some ways on war issues. vietnam, another issue where he's had a very mixed record. but i think the problem he had in the context of the book and this discussion on presidents on race and african-americans is that he couldn't be relied on to stay with a principle or a conviction if the politics told him to do something else. that was the perception and that's the way a lot of people think of nixon, of course, his nickname was tricky dick. it wasn't that he did everything wrong. it's just that he couldn't be relied on to do what was right in the crunch if politics dictated something else. that's the way i look at it. >> host: much of your book really does deal with the inside of the white house and some still with the outside beginning with johnson. we began to see african-american cabinet members. >> guest: yes. >> host: obama has clinton and 15% respectfully. >> guest: right. >> host: if you put your predictors hat on looking ahead, will that now be the bar for presidents in terms of cabinet members? >> guest: well, not necessarily. but i th
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2012 9:00pm EST
and scrap iron to japan which was at war with china in 1940 and more seriously, roosevelt's imposition of a total economic sanction embargo against japan in july of 1941. he argued this had the effect of driving the vehicle driving the japanese into the corner because they felt they are being deprived of the supplies they need. their economy will collapse unless they get the surprise somewhere that means they will have to see is moly our the dutch east indies and the united states might be in the way. he argues that we drove the japanese into a corner and we didn't understand the japanese psychology which our ambassador was pointing out but the japanese might choose to start a war knowing that they would lose rather than surrender to the american pressure so that's one side of the queen. the other is in the fall of 41 there was a time a japanese prime minister wanted a conference with roosevelt as we would now use the term and she had a certain peace proposals he wanted a kind of modus with the united states and roosevelt was very cool towards this and the secretary of state
CSPAN
Jun 30, 2013 9:00pm EDT
in time i should have crossed the 38th parallel and gone all the way to china when i had just saved it. i saved it for you guys. you were the civilian overseers in the next 24 months he decided not to do something that was against my advice. you took my advice and years later you're criticizing me for not doing what you say that i should have done. so he honored the civilian relationship and he made it clear in the number of essays that, while he liked douglas macarthur personally and he respected his military acumen, that he was in error because he jeopardized that very valuable relationship and tension between civilian and military authority. >> host: i would love to hear a little bit more about that tension and that support the between the leaders of the states that you discussed and the commanders that you discussed. is that kind of, his full support from the leadership of the country necessary to have a savior general? >> guest: it is in its very controversial because these are generals who, at the 11th hour when the policy of the state and usually the commander in chief presid
CSPAN
Mar 18, 2013 12:00am EDT
calling out to china for recognition. they were still calling out for america in some way or another. >> guest: they are, and when america doesn't respond people get very upset. more so than if china does not respond. there's still a feeling within the arab world and other regions, i think as well, that no matter its faults the u.s. should stand up for democracy, human rights, et cetera. so whatever the history of the united states, whatever the interests it has to pursue, that is the expectation. >> host: you write it's almost like a catch-22. one official says, if we intervene, they say we are immediateling. with we stay back they say, why aren't you standing up for human rights? so we're always on some side of criticism. >> guest: that's the fate of a superpower. it is a catch-22. people want you to deliver for them, but they don't necessarily want to give you what it takes to deliver for others, so it's all about your own interests, and i do quote this official who says, we're kind of damned if we do, damned if we don't. the pendulum swings constantly. it's cyclical thing. look a
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2011 6:00pm EST
65%. the chinese took 23%. people don't even know china was in the war. 15 million chinese dead. a million yugaslovs, and it goes on and on. the statistics are not all of it, but it's amazing that you had, for example, if you were a german, a russian soldier, you had a one in four chance of being killed. british, one in twenty, and an american had a one in 32 chance of being killed. something else that's important to quantify this in saying that it's almost insulting to say to people who experienced the war how it was, so it's the privilege of historians, us lucky people in the television studio to say here's the truth, but if you were a gi or a british soldier with your mates being blown to bits around you, to have a bastard say, well, actually, it's worse on the russian front, that's insulting. if you're an american or british housewife struggling to cope with rations to say in lenongrad they are eating each other and in east bangor, fathers are selling their daughters? so we always have to maintain a sense of humility and never forget 6 # 6 years -- 66 years on, we can say these
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2011 12:00pm EST
took 65%. chinese took 23%. a lot of people don't even know china was in the war. 15 million chinese did, a million yugoslavs, they took 3%, so it goes on. so the statistics are enormous but they are still an amazing. you had, for example, if you are a russian soldier, you had a one in four chance of being killed. if you're a british soldier to have a one in 20 chance of being killed if you're an american soldier and one in 3 32. one has to qualify this by saying it's almost insulting to say to people who went through the experience of war with other people how it works. it's a privilege of historians, of us people sitting in our comfortable television studio to say here's some truth. but if you were a g.i. or a british soldier with your mates being blown to bits around you, perhaps some bastard come out of the court as they actually it's much worse on the russian front. this insult you. if you're an american or british housewife struggling to cope with ration. in leningrad they are at each other teaching of in east bengal that the fathers are selling their daughters? so we always ha
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 12:00pm EDT
revolution, no one was calling out to china for recognition. they were still going out for america in some way or another trip to the are. and when america doesn't respond people get upset. more so than if china doesn't respond. there's still a feeling within the arab world and other regions i think as well. that no matter the fall, the u.s. should stand up for democracy, human rights, et cetera. so whatever the history of the united states, what are the interests that has to pursue, that is the expectation. >> host: but you write it's almost like a catch-22. quote one official who says if we intervene, they say we are meddling. if we stay back basic why are just an effort human rights? so no matter what we do we are in some kind of criticism. >> guest: that is the fate of the superpower. it is a catch-22. people want you to deliver for them, but they don't necessary want to give you what it takes to deliver for others. so it's all about your own interest. i do quote this official who says we're damned if we do, damned if we don't. the pendulum swings constantly. it's a cyclical thing
CSPAN
Jul 20, 2009 12:00am EDT
buying chinese product, on the very next day, factories are being closed in china and people are losing their job. so it's a very dependent economy. they are doing very well for 20-40% of the nation because 20 percent are doing very well. 40% because you have a trickle down effect, and 60% are completely out of the loop. so this is the system, and so it's very unpredictable, very dangerous. i very often say if you want to make money fast, go to chinese. if you want to make money for long, you go to india, but you need patience because it's less risky. >> thank you. [applause] >> guy sorman was an economic advisor to the president of france. he taught economics from 1970 to 2000. he is author of over to -- over 20 books. for more information, visit. manchin: hat tan-institute.org. >> coming up next texas book tv presents after word, an hour-long program where we invite guest hosts to interview authors. edward humes discusses his book with matthew kahn. >> host: hello. i'm matthew kahn and we're here today to talk about ecobarons. i'm here to talk to ed humes. welcome. why did you write t
CSPAN
Aug 3, 2013 10:00pm EDT
happening in south korea or sweden or any of the european countries or japan or china. china may be the story that tips this. maybe americans will wake up and say oh oh my god would have begun? china is committed to getting these high-capacity fiber connections to every home as quickly as they can. they are building these homes with cables and they see this as just part of their infrastructure story to create a giant metaclass that consumes lots of stuff, does a lot of that on line. we have no plan to do this and as a result where falling further and further behind. made of that will get americans interested. my goal is to reach as many people -- though i think i can change the world just by educating and they will figure out what to do in their communities to make sure the connectivity and gradually we will do to the point where federal policy of the changes. >> host: that is striking to me that these networks are inherently local. we think of the internet is a global network but in fact it's always local and in fact the neighborhood unit is technically speaking a good way of going
CSPAN
Aug 13, 2012 12:00am EDT
didn't even apple, which we think of making everything in china -- a lot of the high chip manufacturing processors are here, samsung, all these companies, and there's a lot been written, a lot of analysis done about actually the importance of having innovation close to the manufacturing floor simply because there's a feedback loop in all of that. so, it seems like manufacturing -- even if you're focusing on innovation economy, seems like manufacturing still has to be or should be part of the picture. >> guest: i'm more skeptical than most. i think if you go to 'chip fabrication, highly, highly cap cal intensive. it's unique in that way relative to other manufacturing. a lot of pushed off to china is plastic widget manufacturing, high run, you can put it on she shelf, very little profit. >> host: i'm making that distinction. >> guest: the capital we deployed, instead of putting it into that, we put into it google and face -- >> host: i'm not sure germany is making plastic widgets. >> guest: i agree itch don't think they can compete in that area, either. >> host: but they are making machi
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2012 10:00pm EDT
that -- even apple which we think is making everything in china. a lot of the high end ship manufacturing is done here. samsung, intel, there's a lot of analysis being done about the importance of having innovation close to the manufacturing floor simply because, you know, there's a feedback flop all of that. it seems like manufacturing, if even you're focuses on innovation economy, it seems like manufacturing has to be -- should be parking lot of the picture. >> host: i'm more conservative call than most. highly capital intensive. it's a unique in that way. relative to other manufacturing. age lot what's been pushed off to china is plastic manufacturing that is very commodity. you can put it on a ship and -- very little profit in it. making that distinction. and the capital we deploy instead of put into that. >> guest: i'm not sure germany is making plastic >> host: i agree. i don't think they can committee in that area as well. they are may being tools they are shipping to china. i find germany worrisome in the future. >> guest: let me get back to redeployment of labor. wh
CSPAN
Feb 6, 2010 10:00pm EST
go to china and widen their finger and say you ought to liberalize your financial markets like we did. and they had a robust debate in the country's. they said no thank you. now they say it much more loudly, no thank you because we were worried. now we see how worried we should have been. >> host: it's an interesting disconnect because i've noticed for instance with veggie 20 summit you have now a global call for the reregulation. we're going to shift after this back to the u.s. reregulation context. but at the same time you have the international monetary fund, the sort of arsonist being in charge of putting out the fire as far as the instrument perhaps for some kind of a global mechanism in the crisis. you have at the world trade organization the united states pushing for more financial deregulation. those rules already as you've identified have to be reversed, the existing wto rules on the lock in deregulation. instead they're pushing for more. so they're seems to be this perverse notion of we need to reregulation but there are still these global institutions that you call for.
CSPAN
Jul 19, 2009 9:00pm EDT
$4.5 a gallon last year that "lake with no name: a true story of love and conflict in modern china" team was receiving more phone calls and government regulation like in california with 8032 that governor schwarzenegger signed in 2006, are you optimistic there is a positive synergy that eco barons light speed 18 will be better able to achieve their goal as the government steps in and regulates carvin? >> guest: i think it depends on whether we get serious about imposing those regulations and and linking economic incentives and put the environmental responsible thing to do and it has to be part of the same process. look at the history of renewable energy development. carter was the last president to pay attention to those of us use any substantive way. the one and only press conference on the roof off the white house says that jimmy carter showing off his new solar panels that they were symbolic for a green stimulus if you will. they were not calling it that than the that's what it was. it was incentives, tax breaks and other government programs to stimulate the development of solar
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