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20090604
20171214
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KQEH (PBS) 4
KQED (PBS) 3
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2017 114
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Search Results 50 to 99 of about 114 (some duplicates have been removed)
Bloomberg
May 13, 2017 1:00pm EDT
: your business is very profitable in united states, not as much eope but it is profitable in china. why are you so successful in china? do you manufacture cars there? mary: yes, but i think is back to the buick brand. in is a strong brand. it had a rich history in china of driving some of the chinese officials around back in the 1920's and 1930's. great brands. we beenblto grow the chevrolet brand and the cadillac. the cadillac is one of fastest-growing luxury brands. we build many of the products in country. david: you used to have pontiac -- have a lot more brands, pontiac that has gone away and oldsmobile. now you have chevrolet, cadillac, buick and gmc. are those the main ones in the united states? mary: yes. david: cadillac, that's your premium. right? it also makes the presidential limousine, which is like bombproof or something. ever been in that car to see what it's like? or you cannot comment? mary: i can't comment. [laughter] david: i guess the average person cannot afford to buy some thing like that. probably not. [laughter] you joined general motors in it was a dominant comp
Bloomberg
Nov 18, 2017 9:00am EST
globalize the platform. we did not want to spend the money to be big in china or africa. i worked in appliances. i would not have be ceo if i had not spent four years in the appliances business. i loved the brand and have great affection for it, but we were chopping wood. we were not on a path to greatness. we can take that capital and put it in our energy business. david: what about nbc universal? your predecessor bought that business and it was profitable. didn't you like hanging out with tv stars and movie stars? jeffrey: good industry. good team. we generated a good return for the company. here was my value added with nbc. make better shows. david: just tell them to make better shows. jeffrey: we were not adding a lot of value. number two, you could see the industry was going through this change. we always did strategic reviews. one of our theories in 2010 when we sold it is we believe the ability to preserve pricing power can only be captured by those people that own the pipes and content. we had no interest in owning the pipes. three, unless you are in an existential way willin
Bloomberg
Oct 21, 2017 3:00am EDT
it. you see year-over-year wage gains coming up. you see the inflation across europe, japan, china. it is all picking up. jonathan: is it picking up, marilyn? marilyn: it is picking up to a certain extent. still from very, very low levels. it is all relative. certainly still at very low levels. jonathan: michael collins, you will take the other side of that? mike: all day long. given the fund rate is 03% it will assure we go into a recession and the stock market crash. if you have a money market fund at 3% or 4%, everybody would take all their money out and put it into money markets. it is too good to be true. on the inflation side, i'm in the disinflationary camp. i'm looking at anecdotal evidence of companies in the world that have the ability to raise prices on their goods and services to consumers. there are very few that can do that. it is the opposite. they are all fighting with each other for market share. bob: i found the chart i was looking for. what you are looking at is developed market core inflation and china cpi year-over-year. this goes back to 2012. there is the def
Bloomberg
Nov 19, 2017 10:00am EST
money to be big in china. we did not want to spend the money to be big in africa. i worked in appliances. i would not have been ceo if i had not spent four years in the appliance business. i had great affection and i loved the brand, so i had great affection for it, but we were just chopping wood. you know, we worked, -- weren't, we weren't on a path to greatness. we could take that capital and put it in our energy business. our aviation business. david: what about nbc universal? your predecessor bought that business, and it was profitable. didn't you like hanging out with tv stars and movie stars? you didn't like that? jeffrey: so, good industry, good team. dance we generated a good return -- and we generated a good return for the company in the time we had it, here was my value added with nbc. make better shows. i'm just telling make better , shows. as a company, we were not adding a lot of value. number two, you could see the industry was going through this kind of change. we always did, as a board, strategic reviews of nbc. i think one of our theories in 2010 when we sold
Bloomberg
Jan 13, 2017 9:30pm EST
behind countries like australia and china when it comes to production. and in china, it is a one-stop shop with the mining and battery production happening together. this is a leap chilean companies have been unwilling to make. maybe you could make the batteries here in chile? alejandro: well, for me, it would be excellent, but the company, we are experts in mining, experts in producing lithium. if we put that to produce batteries, we are probably not going to do as well. ♪ ashlee: things have been tense between the mines and the chilean government. the feds have put strict quotas on lithium production and have they have also been trying to act tough and save face after some politicos were accused of taking bribes from the mines. environmentalists are not huge fans of the mines either. they are saying that water is being sucked from nearby lagoons that feed these flocks of sunning flamingos. alejandro: what we do here has absolutely no impact on the flamingos, but we are still responsible for what is happening with them. we need to do counting of the flamingos every year. they ident
Bloomberg
Sep 17, 2017 1:30am EDT
is bloomberg. ♪ ♪ stephen: welcome to china, birthplace and home place of juggernaut alibaba. i'm stephen engle, and what a past 18 years it has been, transformative for not only alibaba, but china as well, and the global internet economy as a whole. and we were here for the 18th birthday bash. [applause] stephen: packed in with 40,000 employees into an outdoor stadium. and we spoke exclusively with group executive chairman jack ma.
Bloomberg
Oct 7, 2017 3:00am EDT
will it work in asia, china? we have proven that it popular all over. where and 191 countries. in 191 countries. verse 400 million millennial's in china part of the middle class. >> although there is great , what do you make of the competition? it's a complicated market. >> complicated, and fairs competition is famous for. -- fierce competition it is famous for treat our approach for china is to focus on her unique strengths. -- focus on our unique strengths. not many of our competitors have that much of a global network. that's the only way for chinese millennials to travel abroad and authenticallynd experience the culture. it has allowed us to become popular and experience a lot of growth. ♪ haslinda: how does it feel to be a billionaire? >> it's not something i expected. it's easy to give money away, but to do that anyway that has a maximum benefit requires a great deal of thinking. ♪ ♪ about howqet's talk mom's aw up. homemaker, dad's an engineer, he had a huge influence. picked up an engineering book. >> it started before them. my dad, -- tommy a few things. so is tryin
Bloomberg
Mar 31, 2017 9:30pm EDT
lithium deposits in the world, but it started to fall behind countries like australia and china when it comes to production. in decline, it is a one stop shop with the mining and battery production happening together. this is a leap chilean companies have been unwilling to take. >> maybe you could make the batteries here in chile. >> well, for me it would be great. but the company is an expert in mining and producing lithium. it would put us to produce batteries, we are probably not going to do it well. >> things have been extra tense lately between the mines and the chilean government. the feds have put strict quotas on lithium production, and they have always been trying to act tough and save face after some were accused of taking bribes from the mind. environmentalists aren't huge fans of the mines either. they say that water is being sucked from nearby lagoons that ed these flocks of flamingoes. >> what we do here has no impact on the flamingos, but still we are responsible of what happens to them. we do a counting of the flamingos every year. we identify them by the feathers on the
Bloomberg
Apr 30, 2017 7:00pm EDT
pressure on pyongyang. president trump has threatened to act alone if china does not rein in its ally. the first official economic indicators for china signal growth may be slowing with the factory gate falling to 51.2. tighter property curbs and stricter financial regulations are likely to hit output at well. has takenovery another step forward with $4.5 billion in operating profit, leaning on the playstation, where operating profits will account for about a third of total profit. the company is expecting strong growth at its memory chip division. high order to maintain a profit level, we should challenge new business areas, but we should not be too aggressive. details about the management strategy will be announced in may. haidi: the french presidential macron has won an endorsement from angela merkel, saying he would make a strong president. she said her support should not the as a surprise given candidacy of marine le pen. global news 24 hours a day powered by more than 2600 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries. this is bloomberg. a quick check of the markets, setting up
Bloomberg
Apr 12, 2017 9:00pm EDT
when it comes to trade ministers around the region given comments from trump that china is not a currency manipulator, to take a notch down when it tensionstrade between the two superpowers and the on flow effects for asia. rish, what are you watching today? haidi: rex tillerson warning about the dangers of this relationship between moscow and washington, d.c., saying relations are at dangerously low levels. we are looking at aussie jobs though. we just got breaking news , australian jobs numbers rising 60,900 jobs in march. again, another blowout, unexpected, unpredictable figure . we were looking for 20,000 jobs to be added. 60,000 is quite a beat, 64.8% for participation rate, so again, a beat as well. part-time employment falling 13,600 jobs in
Bloomberg
Mar 15, 2017 9:00pm EDT
of the trading day across china. tom rishaad salamat coming you from bloomberg's asian headquarters. ♪ i am haidi lun in sydney. digesting the morning after after that much-anticipated and largely expected move from the fed, but all the talk is about where we go from here. fitch for one saying we will get andn rate hikes over 2017 2018, but most people we have spoken to this morning has seen that as overly hawkish. rishaad: indeed. janet yellen saying when asked whether three rate hikes would count as being gradual, and she agreed with that, so perhaps three this year and four if fitch is correct. looking at the open in hong kong. free market come all stocks on the hang seng moving to the upside, except one notable exception, cathay pacific. let's see how that is playing at and get to the start of the session. here is sophie. theie: hong kong with biggest advance, up 1.4% despite the drop in cathay pacific. followed by taiwan and malaysia. .upport for the taiex we do have chinese stocks rising for a fourth day here, led by minors and industrial stocks. i also want to look at what
Bloomberg
Jul 16, 2017 10:00am EDT
. your father is trying to talk his brother out of moving back to china but at that time your father said, this would be a better place for my son to learn to play cello. yo-yo: what happened is that by total coincidence my sister, who played very well, violin, piano, and we did a small performance someplace in manhattan on our last stop. this franco-american lady who had founded an elementary school in new york was looking for a music teacher, had heard about a and said i dr. m , am kind of interested. she came to the concert, and then decided on the spot to ask him to teach at her school. had we not met this lady, we would have gone back to france and i would have, you know -- david: you might be in private equity. yo-yo: or i might be kissing you on both cheeks. david: you were already fairly accomplished. because we are in the kennedy center -- yo-yo: it depends on how you define accomplished. david: by almost any normal standards you are already well , known. you already met the man that most people consider the greatest cellist in the first half of the 20th century. did you mee
Bloomberg
May 1, 2017 3:00am EDT
tough. >> lower commodity prices pushed china's official factory gauge lower in april, declining from a five-year high. 51.2acturing pmi fell to from 51.8 in march, missing analyst expectations. the first economic indicator for the second quarter signals growth of the world's's second-largest economy is set to slow after unexpectedly picking up in the first three months of the year. the united states is considering a range of options as it reaches out to allies in confronting north korea's latest provocations. h.r. mcmaster said the elastic missile tests this week were in "defiance" of the international community. >> we have to do something, again, with partners in the region, and globally, and that involves enforcement of the u.n. sanctions in place. it may mean ratcheting up the sanctions even further. then it means being prepared for military operations is necessary. >> meanwhile, north korea says it will speed up steps to bolster nuclear deterrents. time for a check on the key asset classes. most european markets are shut for the mayday holiday. the u.s. spending bill weighing in
of-- well, china, which is still growing at around 6 percent. and economically in europe, with growth around 1.5 percent. the world is in a period of recovery. and i just think that the... those who thought we were facing an imminent recession were not taking into account the fundamentals. just the-- the economic driver in the world is the u.s. economy. you're the ceo of one of the best-known wall street firms in the country, in the world, so why do you think the image of wall street firms is not so great in the country? well, first, i have to say coming into this room, i got a round of applause, which i appreciate. okay. [audience laughs] because i will go anywhere for a round of applause these days. you know, it's-- it-- the facts are that, um... absent the great depression, the great recession that we all went through, wall street had a large part to do with it, if not the major part to do with it. and a lot of the synthetic-type products that were created that gave rise to putting a level of risk in the financial system that turned out to be systemic risk, that led to massive fail
Bloomberg
Dec 2, 2017 9:00am EST
studios. health care in china, and cell towers in southeast asia -- and two of the most prominent tech unicorns, uber and airbnb. as these companies take longer to go public, tpg's investment strategy is undergoing a new evolution in the era of private markets. join
Bloomberg
Sep 30, 2017 3:00am EDT
, in any country, whether the u.k., germany, china or the united states, how do small businesses become more productive? how do large companies in those countries become more competitive? ultimately how we have to measure our success and that is what is going to cause governments to say are these contributing or not? emily: should the tech industry being doing more self policing? of change isce such and more rapid that we are absolutely going to look at the unintended consequences of tech knowledge he and make sure that we do not trade away some of these timeless values, as there are advances in technology. long before even regulation, it is important for tech companies to "self police" or create the tools that create transparency. make sure people's privacy is protected. emily: would you ever make a phone again? emily: there has been a spate of sexual harassment allegations in tex. many revealed publicly, many more happening i'm sure than we know about. what is the responsibility of text here? satya: let's start with recognizing how important it is for our business to have the diverse
Bloomberg
Sep 16, 2017 3:30am EDT
>> welcome to china, birthplace and home place of juggernaut alibaba. i'm stephen ingles, and what a past 18 years it has been for alibaba, but china, as well and the global internet economy as a whole. and we were here for the 18th birthday bash. [applause] packed in with 40,000 employees into an outdoor stadium. and we spoke exclusively with group executive chairman jack ma. cofounder and group ceo daniel zhang. >> everybody has a big chance to go digital, but people need to change. >> three leaders driving alibaba: the global disruptor. stephen: it was a humble as theyg for jack ma cofounded alibaba in 1999. the chinese were even connected to the world wide web and alibaba wanted in. ofbaba employee was expected contracting sars in 2003, senior executives were quarantined and that gave birth to perhaps the best platform today. which growth ebay out of china and led to the single day shopping extravaganza and the world meeting the new ipo in 2014 and the launch of many new businesses, much like bloomberg's set up for the interviews, the rise of alibaba has been no small feat. and
Bloomberg
Jul 2, 2017 1:30am EDT
second-biggest economy, china. how does apple navigate what seem to be uncertain economic and political waters there? tim: china, for us, we make all decisions for the long-term. we are not investing for next quarter or next year, we are thinking many years out. and as i stand back and look at china, i see mega-trends that make china an incredible market, and i don't mean just a market to sell in. i also mean for application developers. we have 1.5 million application developers in china now. probably closer to 2 million. it has been an incredible market place for talent, and in terms of the size of the marketplace. the short-term kinds of economic moves up and down, i do not get too excited about. emily: how realistic is it to expect double-digit growth to continue for apple? to continue in china? tim: it didn't continue last year. >> are the days of double-digit growth over? tim: i think we will do better this quarter than the last several. that doesn't mean that we are growing double-digit or will grow, but i think it will be better year-over-year comp over growth over? than the prev
Bloomberg
Apr 5, 2017 9:00pm EDT
was civil war in china. anyway, he was a little nervous. and i said, we are not going to spend time in the past. all i will say is, you did the wrong thing for the company. i made a lot of mistakes too, and here are some of the mistakes i made. after i gave him the mistakes i made, he said thank you for , sharing that with me. we had a very nice lunch. it's not quite clear that he did the wrong thing for the company. life goes on. david: so, you were in a small office, as i recall it, at the seagram's building. jamie: after i got fired come you mean. david: you had a small office. jamie: this shows you how stupid corporate america gets -- the company had been set up. we had a cochairman and co-ceo. i was going to be the president and run the global corporate investment bank and other jobs. because those turmoil among tough,ent deals are very c-heads of asset management, consumer -- and technology reported to me. instead, all of the staff was reporting to sandy and john. when they did that, i said you , guys are crazy. this will destroy the company. the second you do this, people will b
Bloomberg
Apr 2, 2017 10:00am EDT
it privately. it was on the front page of the ft. and there was civil war in china. anyway, he was a little nervous. and i said, we are not going to spend time in the past. did thell say is, you wrong thing to the company. i made a lot of mistakes too, and here are some of the mistakes i made. he said, thank you for sharing that with me. we had a very nice lunch. life goes on. david: so, you were in a small office i recall at the seagram's building. jamie: after i got fired. david: you had a small office. jamie: let me show you how stupid corporate america gets -- the company had been set up. we had a cochairman and co-ceo. i was going to be the president and run the global corporate investment bank. and other jobs. because of turmoil among management, deals are very tough. , co-heads ofads asset management, consumer -- and technology reported to me. instead, all of the staff was reporting to sandy and john. i said, you guys are crazy. this will destroy the company. the second you do this, people will build trenches and stockpile ammunition. by the time you two guys figure it out, a
Bloomberg
Feb 4, 2017 1:00pm EST
china wants to add manufacturing jobs. the president of -- the chancellor of germany must and manufacturing jobs. how do we find a way to help exporters? right? that is a good thing. john: what about the relationship with china? is the prospect of any kind of trade dispute with china, does that worry you? just in the ge context, but an economic context here it there is no good case -- not just in the ge context, but in the economic context. there is no good case where the two biggest economies on earth are going to trade. i think that relationship, that bilateral relationship is significantly important for the whole world. and so, that is one i would be very strong on. good sign that donald trump respects the issue of deregulation. and the issue particularly of corporate tax. do you think there is a possibility that this is an area where business could have a benign effect on administration? jeff: you will have different camps that have different -- you know, i respect walmart but we , are going to have a different perspective on tax reform. we are going to have a different st
Bloomberg
Aug 5, 2017 3:30am EDT
positive. francine: how do you see china? joe: china -- the chinese way is typically sit down and smile. francine: and behind closed doors? joe: and look what happens. today, with the western world, having not yet fully straightened out what we mean by what we say. china says, if there is no western lead anymore on global trade and things like that, then why don't we do this job for them? because we have 1.6 billion people, so we are more than europe and the united states together anyways. so why bother? just a couple months ago, i was at the one belt, one road summit and president xi was the keynote speaker. it was his summit. he said we're going to build a -- the old silk road. 65 nations signed up, 100 state leaders there. there might be more than the 65, but they are going to bring about $200 billion in financing to build this. he said, you know, the silk road in ancient times has brought peace and trade and all that good stuff, so why not build it again? well if you take this one step , further, think about it. 100 nations in the western world don't know how to deal with global tra
Bloomberg
Aug 27, 2017 1:30am EDT
china that didi is kind of the only player. you can see where, if they keep executing well, this is a huge opportunity for them. this also plays into the needs of the country, where you don't want to have car ownership. you want more green cars. it's much easier to take large players like didi and get them to work with the government and getting the green stuff, electric cars. emily: so uber has pulled out of china. uber has pulled out of russia. do you see them making the same decisions in india, in southeast asia, in brazil? nikesh: i actually believe it is possible for two players to coexist in the market and coexist happily. but i think it requires the markets to rationalize and stabilize. there are many industries who have multiple players that coexist like telecom services. there are four players in the united states. they are competing every day with some of them making large amounts of money like the cable industry. i think it is a large market. i'm sure they can. can they go it alone? i think they probably could. emily: do you see that with uber and lyft in the u.s.? that t
Bloomberg
Apr 14, 2017 6:30am EDT
exceptional. talku do not believe me, about brazil, argentina, venezuela, china, india, not quite there. a magnificent -- we have a magnificent work ethic. beingone what to do with more productive, not just steve jobs, the widest and deepest financial markets the world has ever seen. i just made a list of these things. maybe i missed something. it is extraordinary. and we have it today. yes, we have problems. you travel around the world, get in an airplane and travel to other countries and tell me what you think. go to europe, talk about tough regulations and bad politics, we have it all but we need to fix -- we have been shooting ourselves in the foot. we have done a good job shooting ourselves in the foot. [applause] you would never consider running for office, would you? [laughter] jamie: i would love to be the president of the united states of america. they said, you will never have a rich businessman who has never been in politics be president. i was wrong about that. it is too hard. you have to be senator or governor for most people. it is white michael bloomberg would be qualified b
Bloomberg
May 27, 2017 11:30pm EDT
, venezuela, argentina, china, india -- believe me, it is not quite there. we have a magnificent work ethic. we have innovation from the core of our bones. you can ask anyone in this room what we can do to be more productive. ask your assistance on factory floors. it is not just steve jobs. we have the widest and deepest financial markets the world has ever seen. ok? i just made a list of these things. maybe i missed something. it is extraordinary. it is extraordinary. and we have it today. yes, we have problems, but you know, when i hear people -- you travel around the world, get in an airplane and travel around the world and tell me what you think. go to europe. talk about tough regulations and bad politics. we have it all. we just need to fix -- we, we have done a pretty good job shooting ourselves in the foot. [applause] david: you would never consider running for office, which you? [laughter] jamie: i would love to be president of the united states of america. ok? and until donald got elected, i said you would never have a rich businessman who has never been in politics be presid
Bloomberg
May 20, 2017 1:00pm EDT
the united states. not as profitable in europe and latin america but very profitable in china. why are you so successful in china? they manufacture the cars there? mary: yes, we manufacture several cars there. it is a very strong brand. it had a rich history in china of driving some of the chinese officials around back in the 1920's and 30's. a great brand. we have been able to grow the chevrolet brand and cadillac. cadillac is one of the fastest-growing luxury brands. we build many of the products in-country here. david: general motors used to have more brands, pontiac, oldsmobile. now you have chevrolet, cadillac, buick, and gmc. are those the main ones in the united states? mary: yes. david: cadillac is your premium, right? it also makes the presidential limousine which is bombproof. what is it like? mary: i cannot comment. [laughter] david: i guess the average person could not afford to buy something like that. probably not. it joined general motors but it was a dominant company in the united states. and it went south. what was the atmosphere like working there? mary: clearly, it w
Bloomberg
Apr 19, 2017 9:00pm EDT
days of declines. it's really the small caps we are watching for because the china index is a pretty good indicator of sentiment and is nearing a nine-month low. rishaad: oil price move overnight, something in the recovery taking place. the dow on two-month lows. china, lows wein haven't seen also for three months. it's about the open. sophie: it's a crucial open for stocks in china. this is its worst streak so far this year. as you pointed out earlier in the show, this benchmark has not fallen more than 1% so far this year. when you look at the bigger context, there seems to be some support from regulators to get their pledge to make sure they clamp down on activity. we do have stocks in hong kong managing to snap a three-day drop, up about a 10th of 1%.
Bloomberg
Jul 12, 2017 9:00pm EDT
situation. you got to new york. your father is trying to talk his brother out of going back to china. be aid maybe this would better place for my son to learn to play cello. yo-yo: what happened is by total coincidence my sister, who piano,very well, violin, and we did a small performance someplace in manhattan on our last stop. this franco-american lady who schoolnded an elementary in new york was looking for a music teacher, had heard about i am kindn and said of interested. she came to the concert, and then decided on the spot to ask him to teach at her school. lady, wet met this would have gone back to france and i would have, you know -- david: you might be in private equity. yo-yo: or i might be kissing you on both cheeks. david: you were already fairly accomplished. yo-yo: it depends on how you define it. david: by almost any normal standards. you are already well known. did you meet him and what did he think of your playing? yo-yo: i was taken to him at age , and i have him writing something in my autograph book, and i played for him and he good, that you should also play basebal
Search Results 50 to 99 of about 114 (some duplicates have been removed)