Skip to main content

About your Search

20090604
20171212
STATION
DATE
2014 3
2016 3
2009 2
2012 2
2010 1
2013 1
2015 1
2011 0
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13
CSPAN
Nov 14, 2016 12:00am EST
parallels with the growing immigration to put american workers in competition with others like china or mexico are directly of the united states and that with the dust to believe more competition would have a downward pressure of wages bearishness some research in trained immigration one. >> that we would be less to believe of what is going on. . . and why this would continue to go on for the next few years. it's like the experiment i just described. immigrants do not land randomly in different cities. any rational human being would rather live in a high wage city. they are coming here to work and want to make a -- they want to have a high wage level so they will settle in the city's have high wages. but look at what that means. it creates a coalition between immigration and wages. it makes it very hard to detect the impact on the potential negative impact immigrants could be having on the market because you've already got the date of isaiah sinisaiah sing it in a ws to be in high wage places it's not actually one difficulty that's been very difficult to get around. the second difficult
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2016 10:00pm EST
competition with other workers, whether they're in china or mexico in terms of import's or in terms of immigration and certainly basic economics would lead toddes believe that more competition would have a downward pressure on wages, but there's been an awful lot of research and this is wart of what you calling length here -- both in trait grade immigration that makes a different argument that suggests that flights that, the effect wed would be led logically to believe are not in fact what is going on. why is this such an enormous fight within the immigration economic field? >> it has been over the last ten years or so that economists have begin to document the negative impact of trade on works the u.s.a. market. before the last ten years it was said to be very small and very sort of numerically relevant and now it's nobody -- showing that trade as an impact and some people, some americans have ends up behind by trade. this immigration is part of the trade. there's a couple of reasons wife it has so difficult and why it is -- why the debates still going on and -- for the next few years
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2016 9:00pm EST
are immigration put american workers in competition with other workers, whether they are in china or mexico or whether they are directly in the united states in terms of immigration. and certainly the economics would lead us to believe more competition would have a downward pressure on wages. but there's been an awful lot of research into this is what you challenge them to immigration to try to make a different argument that suggests that isn't true in the affect is that we would be led kind of logically to believe are not in fact what's going on. why is this such an enormous fight in the economic field? >> guest: i have to return to trade because you raised a point of trade. in the last ten years or so, economists have begun to document the negative impact of trade on the workers in the u.s. market. before it was thought to be very small and numerically relevant and now there is a new body of work schilling trade has an impact and some people have been left behind by trade. immigration is actually in part trade to measure the impact. there's a couple of reasons why it's so difficult
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2015 10:47pm EST
the world, explosive economic growth in asia and the rise of china economic rise strategic desire for a larger and more modern military force. my conclusions are overwhelmingly optimistic, and icon to both optimistic conclusions conclusions informed by my experience as prime minister impossible for our nation, nation, australia, to improve its relationship with us and china at the same time. you could only improve the relationship with one at the cost of the relationship with the other. i set out to prove that that was not right. during my time we took a step forward with an alliance with the us and now trained us marines in our northern territory. pres. president obama said he wanted a harsh environment for them to train. i said boy, boy have i got a harsh environment for you. [laughter] they train in 100-degree heat and 90 percent humidity i'm probably not on their list of most liked people, like people, but we took a big step forward in the alliance at the same time we took a big step forward with china one of the few nations on earth to be able to strike such a compact. it is
CSPAN
Mar 15, 2014 10:00pm EDT
can't be sure but she was a pioneer in her own right lou henry hoover. they wanted china for a couple of years and eventually hoover use london as his base during his mining career which took them up to world war i. he became successful and traveled all over the world and went to places like wermuth, china and australia and so forth and had a great success in that first career. >> we want to stop a minute and think about this. imagine you have a son or daughter and he goes to college and studies that thing that the world needs most at that point getting minerals out of the ground and growing the economy needs minerals especially when the world is on the gold standard. your child is the best-educated speaking of hoover in the area studied with masters at stanford and also hoover was it was that the best paid young man of his generation and certainly one of the most successful. he wasn't just any success. >> guest: you are quite right. he became the outstanding mining engineer at this time. he was recognized for that. he was earning in 1908 to 1914 in excess of $100,000 a year which was
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2009 12:00am EST
it can work anywhere, australia, china, india, and hopefully if aid likes it. they sent 71 of their top project managers to see how it's done, and it's one of the examples i use in this book. >> host: i want to talk a little bit more later about the ways in which -- the ways that you might want to -- about how one goes about getting people to invest in this point of view. reading the book would be a start. i want to know why you invested in it? you write about reading tarzan backs, dr. dolittle. i find it hard to think of you as jane, but you're a different kind of jane. >> guest: i was very jealous of that stupid jane. >> host: how so? >> guest: because i wanted to be with rzan myself. anyway. from the time i was born -- i was interested in animals, animals, animals, animals. i'm going to go to africa and live with animals and write books about them. at a time when girls didn't do those sort of thing. world war ii was raging. we didn't have enough money for a bicycle, let alone a car. that's why i didn't go to university, couldn't afford it. but i had an amazing mother, and she wou
CSPAN
Jan 3, 2010 11:00am EST
replicate this around other wilderness areas. you know, it would work anywhere. australia, china, india, and so hopefully usaid loves it. they sent a 71 of their top project managers to see how it's done. and it's one of the examples i use in this book. >> host: i want to talk a bit more about, later, about the ways in which -- the ways that you might want kashmir or about how one goes about getting people to invest in his. obvious he, reading the book would be a start it but i want to know why it is you invested in a. you write about creating tarzan books, reading doctor doolittle. i find it difficult to think of you as jane, even though you are jane. you would have been a different kind of jane, i think, but where did your passion come from? >> guest: i was very jealous of that stupid jane. [laughter] >> host: how so? >> guest: because i wanted to be tarzan to make myself. [laughter] >> host: will. >> guest: but anyway, from the time i was born apparently i was only interested in animals, animals, animals. books about animals. 11 years old i'm going to go to africa and live wit
CSPAN
Aug 4, 2013 9:00pm EDT
in south korea or sweden or the northern european countries or maybe china beat china may be the story that takes this and maybe they will wake up and say what have we done. but china is committed to getting these high-capacity fiber connections to every home as quickly as they can they are building these homes and they see this as part of their infrastructure story to create a giant middle class that consumes a lot of stuff and there is a lot of that online. we have no plan to do this and as a result we are falling further and further behind and maybe that will get americans interested. my goal is to reach as many people i think i can change the world just by educating. and then they will figure out what to do in their communities to make sure this connectivity exists and then gradually get to the point where federal policy also changes. >> host: they are inheriting local. we think of it as a global network in fact the connectivity attacked the neighborhood unit is going about with of these changes. >> guest: because they are so great and once you build the thing it is so cheap
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2012 10:00pm EST
to what is happening in the east and asia, the rise of china and hear you talk about what you think should be the dual roles of the united states in the future. in the west, the u.s. should remain i suppose in its role as a promoter and guarantor of greater order unity. in the east you distinguish america's role saying that we should be the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain that a little bit more, why these need to be separate roles? >> guest: because of the case of europe, we were engaged in two world wars and we had to be engaged in these two world wars. because these two world wars were still fought on the premise that the victor would dominate the world and i think it is correct to say and morally right to say that the world would be better off without hitlerism or stalinism. this is no longer the issue. the danger today in my view is if we do not do the things i say in my book, and i'm thinking of is strategically, the world will succumb to greater and greater turmoil in the future. the world is now not only composed of competitive states that s
CSPAN
Jan 29, 2012 9:00pm EST
asia in the rise of china coming in here to talk about what you think should be the whole of the united states in the future. in the west the u.s. should remain i suppose in its role of a promoter and a guarantor of the creature and a broader unity. in the east be distinguished america's role saying that we should be the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain that a little bit more why these need to be separate roles? >> guest: in the case of europe we were engaged in the world for and had to be engaged in the world war because the two world wars were still fought on a promise that the victor would dominate the world, and i think it is correct to say that the world wouldn't be better off if it was a stalinism. today that is no longer the issue. in the east is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view is that if we do not do the things i say in my book, and i'm thinking of it strategically, the world will succumb to greater and greater turmoil. the world is now not only composed of competitive states that should be as possible coopera
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2009 9:00pm EST
wilderness areas. and, you know, it will work anywhere, australia, china, india, and so hopefully u.s. aid lovesick. they said 71 of their top project managers to see how it is done, and it is one of the examples i use in this book. >> host: i want to talk a little bit more later about the ways in which you might want to -- how one goes about getting people to invest in this point of view. reading the book would be a start but i want to know why it is you invested. you write about reading tarzan books, dr. doolittle. i find it difficult to think of you as jane even though you are jane. you would have been a different kind of gene i think but where did -- >> guest: i was very jealous of that stupid jane. [laughter] >> host: how so? >> guest: because i wanted to be tarzan's me to myself. [laughter] >> host: well i think -- >> guest: from the time i was born apparently i was only interested in animals. books about animals, 11-years-old i'm going to go to africa, live with animals and write books about them at a time when it as you said girls didn't do that sort of thing, world war ii was ragi
CSPAN
Mar 21, 2014 9:53pm EDT
exercise of impulse control. >> but china right now is a good example of the country described with the strong sense of security with we have been humiliated by the west. we will see what happens. >> host: amy chua and jed rubenfeld date you for joining us to talk about "the triple package". . . the 31st president of the united states ranked 37 out of 43 in a recent u.s. news poll that that magazine wrote of hoover, you was known as a port communicator who fueled trade wars and exacerbated the depression. not only those on the left but also ones on the right to assign blame. we're here today to talk about that specifically. president hoover's own analysis, his own work with plans of the people as well including his successor, franklin roosevelt and his predecessor calvin coolidge. we want to welcome you, viewers, to this hoover revision. dr. nash is a frequent guest on this channel. richard norton smith introduced him and interviewed him a few years ago for another boat. this time are going to get right to this crucial controversial depression. are going to break our our into three part
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2014 12:00pm EDT
her own right. they went to china for a couple years and eventually hoover used the base during his mining engineering career, which took him out to world war i. he became very successful at it, traveled all over the world, lived in places like irma, china, australia and so forth and had a great success at the first career. posters to stop a minute and think about this. imagine you have a son or daughter and he goes to college and studies the thing the world needs most at that point, getting minerals out of the ground, a growing economy needs minerals, especially with the world islamic gold standard. your child is the best educated in that area. he studied with masters at stanford and is also the most able. some of us that the best paid young man of his generation. certainly one of the most successful. he wasn't just any success. >> you're quite right. he became the outstanding writing engineer this time who is recognized for that. he was earning in 1908 to 1914 money probably in excess of $100,000 a year, which is a lot of money in the pre-income tax stays. but you know, he didn't
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13