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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2016 10:00pm EST
competition with other workers, whether they're in china or mexico in terms of import's or in terms of immigration and certainly basic economics would lead toddes believe that more competition would have a downward pressure on wages, but there's been an awful lot of research and this is wart of what you calling length here -- both in trait grade immigration that makes a different argument that suggests that flights that, the effect wed would be led logically to believe are not in fact what is going on. why is this such an enormous fight within the immigration economic field? >> it has been over the last ten years or so that economists have begin to document the negative impact of trade on works the u.s.a. market. before the last ten years it was said to be very small and very sort of numerically relevant and now it's nobody -- showing that trade as an impact and some people, some americans have ends up behind by trade. this immigration is part of the trade. there's a couple of reasons wife it has so difficult and why it is -- why the debates still going on and -- for the next few years
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2016 9:00pm EST
are immigration put american workers in competition with other workers, whether they are in china or mexico or whether they are directly in the united states in terms of immigration. and certainly the economics would lead us to believe more competition would have a downward pressure on wages. but there's been an awful lot of research into this is what you challenge them to immigration to try to make a different argument that suggests that isn't true in the affect is that we would be led kind of logically to believe are not in fact what's going on. why is this such an enormous fight in the economic field? >> guest: i have to return to trade because you raised a point of trade. in the last ten years or so, economists have begun to document the negative impact of trade on the workers in the u.s. market. before it was thought to be very small and numerically relevant and now there is a new body of work schilling trade has an impact and some people have been left behind by trade. immigration is actually in part trade to measure the impact. there's a couple of reasons why it's so difficult
CSPAN
Aug 20, 2014 9:19pm EDT
internet is just now beginning to converge but the nation's energy internet in europe and now china. and also beginning to converge with a fledgling an automated logistics' the internet. it is expanding into three, information, energy, automated transport or logistics' and creating one super internet of the internet of things. and these three internet seven placing sensors across the system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting three source close, sensors feeding data in from production lines, warehouses, distribution centers, sensors on smart roads, sensors that are connecting the electricity grid so that we know what the appliances are doing at any moment, since disconnecting vehicles and offices and stores. that big a data coming in across the economy to these three internets, communications, energy, and logistics' is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. and what this is -- we now have 13 billion censors out there. ibm says in 2020 there will be 50 billion. and by 2013 perhaps 100 trillion sensors connecting everyt
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2014 10:02pm EST
for nothing or not just for a thousand dollars a year. my slogan now i believe china had a slogan they are going to build a 100 harvard equivalent. i think we need to build 100 berkeley's. we need to have two or three dozen every state so we don't have every high school kid in america competing to get into one of 12 schools in some of those can go for free. >> host: if you get and, true so you want great access but you also want standards for the schools so they will still be competitive. >> guest: let's be clear about this. for the kid who can get into princeton or harvard it's amazing. three or 4% of their student body our kids from the bottom quarter. we are not talking about a lot of kids. >> host: we are trying to increase first-generation students and we have a program for an additional scholarship at not only a scholarship at a mentor -- mentorship. they are mentored by all kinds of alumni in its negotiating an environment that is very different than the one in which they came so they are comfortable. they are bright enough to get through it and do well but there are cultur
CSPAN
Jun 15, 2014 12:00pm EDT
information internet is just now beginning to converge with the energy internet in europe and now in china and also beginning to converge their fledgling automated transport and logistics. the information internet company energy in her neck, the automated transport and logistics internet creating the internet of things and they are placing centers across the economic system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting resource flows. we have sensors feeding data from production line, warehouses, distribution centers. we have sensors on martin, sensors connect to the electricity grid so we know what the appliances are doing them in a moment. sensors connecting vehicles and offices and stores it that big data coming in across the economy to these three internet, communication, energy, internet which is its internet is providing a wealth of data about what goes on any given moment across the economy. we now have 14 billion sensors out there now in ibm says in 202,050,000,000,000 sensors connecting everything with everyone. it's exhilarating and challenges. what's interesting fr
CSPAN
Jun 7, 2014 10:00pm EDT
just now beginning to converge with the nascent energy internet in europe and now in china and also beginning to converge with a fledgling automated logistics internet so the internet is expanding to three internets read the information internet the automated transport and logistics internet and creating one super and in the net called the internet of things. these three internets are then placing sensors across the entire economic system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting resource flows. we have sensors feeding data in from production lines, warehouses and distribution centers. we have centers on smart groves connecting electricity grid so we know what the appliances are doing at any moment. we have sensors connectinconnectin connecting vehicles in offices and stores. that big data coming in across the economy to these free internet communication energy internet and the distance internet is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. we now have 14 billion sensors out there now and ibm says in 2020, 50 billion senso
CSPAN
Jun 8, 2014 9:00pm EDT
: it's just beginning to converge with the nascent moment in china and now also beginning to converge in the automated transfer logistics and turn it so they are expanding to the free internet committee energy internet, the automated logistics contract created a super internet called the internet of things and these are then placing sensors across the entire economic system to monitor the flow of data so we have the sense is now conducting the resource flows feeding the data from the production lines, warehouses by distribution centers have the sensors on the smart roads that are conducting the grid. we have sensors connecting vehicles and offices. that data coming in across the economies of these internet communications, energy, internet and logistics internet is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. by 2030 perhaps 112 yen sensors and i know later on we will talk about the questions of privacy and data security so it is exhilarating and frightening at the same time. there's a lot of possibilities enabled of challenges that what is interes
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2016 10:30am EST
canadians would export it to china. it is not that big a deal. >> the greenhouse atmosphere will have any the way. >> less canada changes its policies, the same. >> thank you, i really enjoyed the conversation and congratulations on the book. >> c-span, where history unfolds daily. in 1979 c-span was created as a public service by america's cable television company that is brought to you today by your cable or satellite provider. >> a ton of things happening constantly that are affecting our politics and the ways things get changed in this country, there are many ways things get changed. my favorite example is in new york everybody is familiar with governor andrew cuomo and how hard andrew cuomo fought against raising the minimum wage up to the moment he decided he wanted to take credit for it. >> it wasn't his idea? >> it
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2014 7:00pm EST
u.s. pursues double standards that we criticize russia for doing things we don't criticize china for saudi arabia. the russians have of course said that rush is a european country. they are a member of the council of europe. they have signed onto conventions into agreements where they are supposed to adhere to the atlantic norms which of course china hasn't done in saudi arabia hasn't done that it is true that i think the u.s. has in the past not been consistent in the way that it has criticize russia for some things that happened domestically and not criticize some of russia's neighbors. i go into this in the book azerbaijan because they are strategic partners for the united states released in the war on terror. i think the obama administration has been pretty skilled at dealing with these issues. the reset when it worked and it hasn't worked so well and the last year or two explicitly differentiated between working with russia on these common interests like arms control them like i ran like missile defense like afghanistan and saying it was a two track policy and it was separated f
CSPAN
May 13, 2012 9:00pm EDT
gulf coast so that it could be refined to china. we wouldn't get any of that oil. but more importantly because of the kind of toxic stuff is it is very corrosive. we have had a lot of oil spills in canada and you would be risking to help the safety of the american people to do it. to benefit the foreign corporation selling dirty oil to china you have to have thousands and thousands of jobs but then it turned out the numbers it's a temporary job which are important for those workers but the jobs are very few so for the point of view it wasn't worth it. >> host: the southern part of that pipeline. >> guest: sure. the southern part of the building there are apparently some choke points that the existing production could be facilitated without having to go through canada, so that part which was never in dispute. the actual claim of the aquifer and the farmland were going to be put at risk because of the root of the pipeline and because the kind of product, for the placement of the pipeline and toxicity of the product was going to shut release farmland. that was never true about
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 12:00pm EDT
over farmlands and aquifers to the gulf coast. so it can be refined and shipped to china. we wouldn't get any of that oil. more importantly, because of the kind of toxic stuff it is, it is very corrosive. we would have a lot of oil spills in canada, it would be risking america's beauty and the health and safety of america. to benefit a foreign corporation selling dirty oil to china. they are not that many jobs that would be connected to it. the permanent jobs are very few. it is my point of view that it wasn't worth it. >> host: we think about the southern partner of that pipeline? >> guest: the southern part, there are some chokepoints that existing web productions could be facilitated. without having to go to the dirty stuff from canada. that part, which was never in dispute, it was in the actual claim that the aquifer and farmland would be put at risk, but because of the route of the pipeline and the placing of it and the toxicity of the product, it was going to jeopardize farmland. that was never true about the southern part. you don't have a problem with the product, and in that
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2009 12:00am EST
it can work anywhere, australia, china, india, and hopefully if aid likes it. they sent 71 of their top project managers to see how it's done, and it's one of the examples i use in this book. >> host: i want to talk a little bit more later about the ways in which -- the ways that you might want to -- about how one goes about getting people to invest in this point of view. reading the book would be a start. i want to know why you invested in it? you write about reading tarzan backs, dr. dolittle. i find it hard to think of you as jane, but you're a different kind of jane. >> guest: i was very jealous of that stupid jane. >> host: how so? >> guest: because i wanted to be with rzan myself. anyway. from the time i was born -- i was interested in animals, animals, animals, animals. i'm going to go to africa and live with animals and write books about them. at a time when girls didn't do those sort of thing. world war ii was raging. we didn't have enough money for a bicycle, let alone a car. that's why i didn't go to university, couldn't afford it. but i had an amazing mother, and she wou
CSPAN
Sep 17, 2012 12:00am EDT
or problem. the term indian, was christopher columbus thinking he was in china and japan, and these are indians and that made its transfer into european languages and stuck. i guess on the one hand we can fault columbus for -- he didn't show up and say, oh, there are humans here. it had to be someone other, and disempowered to the whole colonial mentality was problematic. so other terms can also be pretty ambiguous or confusing. whether it's native, if you say i'm native from minneapolis or a minneapolis native, dot that mean a native american who lives there or somebody who lived there an entire life. so already ambiguities. indigenous people to most parts of the world. so there's ambiguities. but there is an effort to find respectful ways to talk about things. in canada they've changed he terminology from reserve to first nation, and i think there's an effort to find emphasis in the united states on the nationhood of tribal governments rather than on thinking of them just as cultural enclaves, and so there's been an effort with that. sortly the tribal term reference of people. you
CSPAN
Sep 16, 2012 9:00pm EDT
columbus thinking he was in china, japan, india, and that made it strands for into the european languages and stock. i guess on the one hand we consoles columbus for others. he didn't show up and say there are humans here. it had to be somewhat uttered and disempower so the whole colonial mentality was problematic. other terms can also be pretty ambiguous or confusing. you know, whether it is native if you say a native from minneapolis or minneapolis native does that mean a native american or someone that has lived there for their entire life. and so, you know, there is ambiguity, same as indigenous people to most parts of the world. and so there are some ambiguities, but there is an effort to find, you know, respectful ways to talk about things. in canada they've changed that terminology from their reserves to first nations to find emphasis in the united states on the nationhood on the troubled governments rather than on thinking of them just as cultural enclaves. certainly the tribal terms ourself referenced and they are always faced. at the same time it sounds a little centric to use t
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 10:00pm EST
have civil society there to take care of the elderly. china -- china already has what is called a slow-motion human catastrophe where you are going to have literally hundreds of millions of people who are elderly with no state support whatsoever in terms of pension and health care and very little money to support them because they have this one-child policy and almost no progeny of their own. so what are the chinese going to do with her old people? it's a terrifying question. >> host: well, if you are convinced that this is a disaster of some kind what works and what doesn't? what can be done? what if anything can the government do to encourage women or families to have more children? >> guest: [inaudible] that is how we sell books. [laughter] people have been trying to do this for a long time. seasseas are augusta saw they ha fertility problem and the empire. he tried to get people to get married and have kids and it didn't work or that the soviet union had a fertility problem so stalin commissioned a motherhood medal giving it out to women who had five or more children. you can
CSPAN
Sep 15, 2012 10:00pm EDT
china, japan and that made its transfer into european language and it stuck. i guess on the one hand we can come up with -- he didn't show up and say there are humans here, right? it had to be someone other and this empowers the whole colonial mentality where is problematic but terms can be pretty ambiguous or confusing. whether it's native, from minneapolis or minneapolis native does that mean and native american from there or just someone who has lived there their entire life? so their there are ambiguities and their indigenous people in most parts of the world and so there is some ambiguities but there is an effort to find respectful ways to talk about things. and canada candidate they have change the terminology from reserves to first nation and i think there is an effort to find emphasis in the united states on the nationhood of travel governments rather than on you know thinking of them just as cultural enclaves so there has been an effort with that. certainly the tribal terms self reference, you can always call dakota people to code and you can always called ojibwe people at jeb
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2009 10:00pm EST
think so but, again, perreault set up the caps very well, beagle always a horse and a bull in a china shop and i think gordon fared well in his second nhl game. this is a who is still place for a young player to play. the onus is on the veterans' shoulders when you are banged up to get the two point >> joe: and alex ovechkin returned this week after a 15- day absence and he came back with all that energy in new york. last couple of games, from him have not been his all world self. we saw flashes of it tonight. locker and, guys, please do chime in. when you have been in the line- up for that long, does it take you long to get the stride? >> craig: i think it's timing. it's timing to release the shot, timing when you get the puck. do you see it that way, alan? >> alan: most definitely. what makes it harder for is not having the other weapons, semin and nun. it's easier to key on one guy. one goal scorer. and fleischer went more into a passer mode. he was looking to move the puck too much and was not settled in that big line. while the other players out of the line-up, he has to concentr
CSPAN
Jun 3, 2012 9:00pm EDT
built, the canadians would just export it to china. it's actually not that big a deal -- >> host: right. the greenhouse -- [inaudible] are going to happen out of their way. >> guest: unless canada changes its policy towards the sands. >> host: well, thank you very much. i really enjoyed the conversation, and congratulations again on the book. >> guest: thank you very, very much. >> here's a list of best-selling conservative books. no order of appearance on their web site as of may 31st. first, mark levin writes about conservative approaches to education, immigration, health care and more in "liberty and tyranny." second, conservative talk radio host laura ingraham writes about her take on the obama administration in "the obama diaries." and that's followed by sarah palin's "going rogue." fourth on the list is glenn beck's "common sense." the abuses of power by government. then in "guilty," ann coulter argues that liberals pretend to be victims as part of their attack strategy on conservative positions. sixth, glenn beck makes the list for a second time with his novel, "the overto
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2011 10:00pm EST
coming from china to the u.s. but going back half empty because you know the things that america exports to china tend not to be very bulky, things like movies and intellectual property and things from the government. she thought hold on, why don't i load up all this waste paper onto these half empty ships, send it back to china and recycle it there so you have contacts back in china to set up factories, to recycle the stuff into card or boxes and then of course you have cardboard boxes to send back to america. she is a billionaire and straddling both countries. her family struggles both countries and she's able to link to them. >> host: robert, what was the response by the chinese government in her setting up the factory? did she find any red tape? were there any hurdles to doing that? >> guest: i'm sure there was quite a lot of red tape but very often in china, if he wants to do business there, it's not simple. there are a bunch of laws and if you follow them you are okay. it's a lot more knowing the right people in knowing who you can trust and who you can't and that is one of
CSPAN
Jun 2, 2012 10:00pm EDT
prediction. even if keystone were not built, the canadians would export it through china. it is not that big of a deal. >> host: the greenhouse gas issue will happen either way. >> guest: unless canada changes as policy. >> host: thank you very much. i enjoyed the conversation and congratulations for the book. >> guest: thank you very very much. ..
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2011 12:00am EST
interesting, and the other thing she noticed is there was a lot of ships coming from china to the u.s. fully laiden, but going back half empty because, you know, the things that america exports to china are not bulky. it's more intellectual property and iou's from the government. she thought, i'll load the waste paper on the half empty ships, send it back to china, and recycle it there. she used her contact back in china to set up factories, recycle it into card board boxes and you put the tvs in those boxes and send it back to america. she's now a billionaire in china and straddling both countries, and she's able to link the two. >> host: did she face -- what was the approach or the response by the chinese government in her setting up the factories? did she find any red tape? were there any hurdles to doing that? >> guest: i'm sure there was quite a lot of red tape, but, you know, very often in china, if you want to do business there, it's not a simple, you know, there are a bunch of laws, and if you follow them, you are okay. it's a lot more about knowing the right people and knowing who y
CSPAN
Dec 18, 2011 9:00pm EST
of ships coming from china to the u.s. fully laden. but going back half empty because, you know, the things that america exports to china tend not to be very bulky. it's like movies and intellectual property and ious from the goth. government. and so she thought, well, hold on, why don't i load up this waste paper on these half empty ships, send it back to china and recycle it there. so she used her contacts to set up some factories to recycle this stuff into cardboard boxes and, of course, she put tvs into them and send them back to america. she's now one of the richest women in china. completely straddling both countries. her family straddles both countries, and she's able to link the two. >> host: and, robert, what was the approach by the, or the response by the chinese government in her setting up the factories? did she find any red tape, was there any, were there any hurd p les to doing that? >> i'm sure there was quite a lot of red tape. very often in china if you want to do business there, it's not a simple, you know, there are a bunch of laws, and if you follow them, you're o
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2017 9:00pm EDT
. becomes political. >> host: you are talking to that state capitalism, china and brazil and these countries that don't have barriers between the private sector and the government. i remember being in china during the time they were coming out to be met witwemet with the generay were asking about the espionage how does all of that play out? >> host: i have to think about where it is today. it doesn't have the free-market capitalism. china is in some trouble in this because they've never quite made that transition from the command system to prevent free-market capitalism systems. they have capitalism and quite a bit of free-market activity. but the government still uses the banks to channel money into the state owned industries and it's very hard. they interviewed somebody at the bank of china ten years ago and they were trying to figure this out. it's very hard to do because the state owned industries. it's hard to cut them off but you have some estimates that the banks and china have performing loans that don't pay anything. >> host: ike like you i spent some time there after the
CSPAN
Jul 17, 2017 12:00am EDT
waiver of trademarks to sell their products in china when i am most disturbed by that hasn't gotten enough media attention that the chinese government has detained a labor monitors that were investigating in one of ivanka factory so that would be very tangible benefit and the allegation isn't that they are directed to do this by trump but they see this president has not divested and they believed this is what they can do to get themselves into the good graces of president who is very concerned run his personal and family wealth. ya have to prove ivanka is on the phone saying arrest these people. the allegation is the chinese government would think it would be helpful thing to do to get rid of those pesky whistle-blowers. >> to make the point this is not anything new you talk about the tech gave brandes' the decades the clintons reusing their foundation if they could curry favors. >> right. the overarching goal is getting it out before a major crisis was to challenge the narrative because job is so unlike any president before there is this idea that if only he could be impeached ever
CSPAN
Jul 15, 2017 10:00pm EDT
waiver of trademarks to sell their products in china but i am most disturbed that hasn't got enough media attention is the chinese government has detained laborer monitors that were investigating one of the phone does -- ivanka factories. but they see this president has not divested and they believe these are the favors into good graces of a president who is very concerned of his personal and family wealth soties six is on the phone to say rest to those people that the chinese government would think that it would be helpful to do to get rid of those whistle-blowers. >> one of the points you make in the book that this isn't anything new talking about the clintons using bear foundation as a place that people could curry favor so could you tell us how that stage was set?. >> my over arching goal was to ruth tried to challenge this because he is so unlike any president before there is the idea that if he could only be in peach that everything would be fine. i'm not saying one way or another but if he has impeachable offenses that he should be impeached but that is where we were before t
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2017 12:00am EDT
era, though, of state capitalism. because it's not just us anymore, of course, it's china and brazil and these countries that don't have barriers really between the private sector and government. i remember actually being in china once during -- around about the time that the snowden leaks were coming out. >> guest: right. >> host: and i met with a pla general, and i was asking her about industrial espionage and, you know, these issues that a lot of american firms complain about in china. and she said, well, of course we're spying on everyone. corporations, other countries. there was no division. so in an era in which the highest growth is coming from areas that have a fundamentally different ideology about capitalism, how does all that play out for america? >> guest: well, china has come a long way. you have to think about where china was compared to where it is today. yeah, it doesn't have free market capitalism in our sense, but it sure has come a long way from america -- from maoism. and china's in some trouble -- >> host: debt. [laughter] >> guest: yeah, absolutely, debt. and th
CSPAN
Jul 23, 2017 12:01pm EDT
to sell the products in china. what i most disturbed by something out of because got nearly enough media attention which is the chinese government has detained labor monitors who were investigating conditions in one of her factories. that would seem to me to be a very tangible benefit. and i think allegation is not that these governments are being directed to do this by trump. it's just that they see this president has not divested, and they believe that these are favors that they can do to get themselves into the good graces of a president who was clearly clearly very, very concerned about his personal and family wealth. you don't need to prove that ivanka is on the phone going to arrest those people. that's not the allegation or delegate would be that the chinese government would think that would be a helpful thing to do, to get rid of those pesky whistleblowers. >> host: one of the points you make in the book is that this is not anything new, that you talk about the decades that the clintons have been using their foundation as a place where people could give money to curry favor
CSPAN
Jun 12, 2017 12:00am EDT
arrive in china and russia, i think of it as the chessboard world. it is the world of how to we essentially beat our adversari adversaries. we think about a move that we try to anticipate the moves they make. that world is there an important. equally important is the world of the web. the web of criminal networks including terrorists and arms traffickers in the world of business which is big network supply chains. in the world of nongovernmental organizations. i think of these as web actors is increasingly important actors. we don't have strategies on how to bring them together. this book is a book that says ever going to have a world of strategies and how to deal with conflict between's dates we also need strategies on how to design networks for specific people. who do we connect, how do we connect them and run those networks to advance our goals. this book is a stres part of th. >> is a timely book very much. just building on what you said in your opening remarks, let me just go to what i thought was an effective quote that to depth argument in the book where you say on pages
CSPAN
Jul 8, 2017 1:03am EDT
, about north korea or china or russia that state to state relations is very important and i think about that as the chess board and how we be our adversaries and anticipating on the lives they will make but equally important is what i call the world of the web and as the of world as business and of those actors so this is say book to save the world of the chess board dealing with conflict before states and of how to design the networks for specific people to meet those challenges are fans of gold. >> so just a building on what you said in his opening remarks, so let me go to what was a pretty effective '' with that argument you say and pages number nine and 10 so using those pood -- ability to operate but side by side with corporate in civil and criminal actors so of the web of networks so is it their realist and then the networks? or how do you see that? and the field that we have both been that endless debate between the liberal internationalist so had you pursuits of values that is overplayed and i strongly believe that we have to pursue our values so i would also say we have t
CSPAN
Jun 11, 2017 8:54pm EDT
think about north korea or iran or sometimes china and russia, that world of state to state relations is still very, very important, and i think of it as the chess board world but it's the world of how do we essentially beat our at vers ears and we think d- -- adversaries and we think about a move and try to anticipate their move. that world there is and it's very important, but equally important is what i call the world of the web. that world of criminal networks, including terrorists, but also arms trackers and drug trackers. the world of business, which increasingly big networks supply chains, global corporations and the world of nongovernmental organizations. i think of all those actors as web actors, as increasingly important actors but we don't have strategies for how to bring them together. so, this book is a book that says, if we are going to have a world of a chessboard and strategies how you dollar -- deal with conflict between states and cooperation between state wes need strategies how to design networks for pick people. who do we connect, how do we connect them, how do we
CSPAN
Jun 10, 2017 10:00pm EDT
sometimes china and russia. that world of state to state relations is still very very important and i think of it as the chessboard world because it is the world of how do we essentially beat our adversaries and we think about a movie and we try to anticipate what mood they're going to make. and that world is there and it is very important. but equally important is what i call the world on the web. that world of criminal networks including terrorists but also traffickers of arms and the world of business which is increasingly big networks supply chains. global corporations and the world of nongovernmental organizations. i think of all of those actors as webmasters as increasingly important actors. but we don't have strategies how to bring them together. this book is a book that says if we are going to have a world with a chessboard and strategies of how to deal with conflict between states and cooperation between states we also need a set of strategies for how to design networks for specific people. good to reconnect how fluid connect them? how do we run the networks to meet challenges or t
CSPAN
Jul 7, 2017 9:00pm EDT
if you think about north korea or iran or sometimes china and russia, that world of state to state relations is still very very important. and i think of it as the chessboard world. because it is the world of how due we essentially be adversaries and rethink about a movie and trying to anticipate what move they are going to make. that world is there and it is very important. equally important is what i call the world of the web. that world of criminal networks. including terrorists but also arms traffickers and drug traffickers. the world of business. which is increasingly big network supply chain, global corporations. and the world of nongovernmental organizations. i think of all of those actors as web actors as increasingly important actors. but we don't have strategies for how to bring them together. so this book is a book that says if we are going to have a world of a chessboard and strategies of how you deal with conflict between states and cooperation between states, we also need a set of strategies for how to design networks for specific people. who do we connect, how do we
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2017 3:26pm EDT
a wave of trademarks to trump and eivanka to sell products in china. i'm most disturbed by that the chinese government has detained labor monitors who were investigating conditions in one of ivanka's factories. that would seem to me to be a very tangible benefit and the allegationings not that these governments are being directed to do this by trump. it's that they see that this president has not divested, and they believe that these are favors they can do to get themselves into the good graces of a president who is clearly, clearly, very, very concerned about his personal and family wealth. right so you don't need to prove that ivanka is on the phone going, arrest those people. no. that's not the allegation. the allegation would be that the chinese government would think it would be a helpful thing to do, to get rid of the pesky whistleblowers. >> host: one point in the book is this is not anything new, that you talk about the decades that the clintoneds had been using their foundation as a place where people could give money to curry favor with them. i wonder if you could tell us
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