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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2016 10:00pm EDT
. >> why not buick making cars in china now, buick, why not h1v workers. these are taken white-collar jobs, they're taking your kid's jobs. why not time on that? >> trump continues the conversation and responds to every question posed to him and turns the conversation back to himself. if you're a hillary clinton and you don't want to run a campaign on what you believe or who you're taking money from, you want to run a campaign that's referendum on donald trump's character and so if you're donald trump, why would you continue to keep that conversation alive? >> what do you mean? >> why wouldn't you turn the issue -- exactly right. or about what he believes, if i'm elected, this is what this is way it will be. >> that's exactly right. you know what percentage of clothe that is we buy in america are made in america? 3%. >> i believe it. he wants to change it so that your ties will be made here. >> you follow the stuff as close as anybody and you're clearly, you have emotional skin in the game and if you watch trump go off meanl, do you call him, do you call people on his campaign. >> no,
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2016 6:00am EST
have moved to california and outsourced to china and engineers that remain behind are designing products more mexican and off-shore workers and i'm waiting for entrepreneurs to put me back to work and so 40 million born adults, that's a lot of people looking for innovation and super vision and entrepreneurialism to put them back to work and without that, if you dilute resources, slow growth relative to the west of the economy. >> we are facing high inequality, slow wage growth, it seems like it's a natural thick to do is use the tax code to redistribute. that's not what you want to do. >> well, i certainly recognize that as a possibility and maybe useful in some places. if you're a 50-year-old worker who spent your whole life working in one endeavor and trained in that endeavor and you lose your job it'll be awfully hard to get a job so there's cost and we need to be thoughtful about that. and that talent is working inside of institutions like google, like silicon valley which greatly amplify their productivity. those institutions were built very slowly over time through success
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2015 10:00pm EDT
what was the motive? where she on the payroll with china? is that what they are alleging? so i really don't think she should spend so much time being protected but they have a more full picture of who i am the good and the bad and the ugly. >> is an interesting case study with men and women in these positions to attract criticism said this is easy for corporate executives to be in a similar position. go back to the unusual roles to navigate of family and politics that they would push and prod to talk about even at a young age there is a wonderful anecdote to ask your the a in your career to come with you i am gathering that is not just a party. >> maybe he was seven or six or five i would say we're going to a party given in the car. so i told him to get ready. but then they don't realize how loud their whispering they said listen if she says if it is a party ask her if somebody will give a speech. if they give a speech it is not a party. [laughter] >> but if there was says of barrier but my guess is it enables you to keep integrating your family as so many women struggle with t
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2016 10:00pm EDT
and hong kong and old china vs. new china. so it probably isn't of a tax rate so overtime with those capabilities that is why it is a mistake to see what would happen to bill gates? that is and really relevant what about silicon valley to slow the gradual accumulation with those capabilities show me where the tax rate is high. >> kovach to the '50s television has created enormous mass markets turning back with two decades of the great depression me have fallen behind. there were numerous reasons a lot of agriculture into manufacturing. >> but nobody pays 90 percent. but corporate taxes were lower than. that was very circumstantial. going back because of the capital-intensive the large corporations general motors and kodak are very capital intensive. they plan to transfer through you have more restaurants we happen to be in the information intensive area. with more of investment phillip said the large corporation has a difficult time innovating in succeeding for such a large pool. >> but we could come to another era where retry to use stop global warming and it all could change with a
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2015 9:00pm EDT
immigration. the average high skilled immigrants from china or india creates five jobs for the nativeborn americans. the second thing is the guestworker programs available stop being exploited coming to the united states and so on and so forth and we can make real progress going down the list understanding that it takes a lot of years. >> host: this is a good feedback from your personal journey and how that works in the book to the point that you talk about practical help. you referenced hope just now. now for you what does that mean? i had flashbacks to guess we can , hope and change. we talked politicians and the political system that talks about the hope. but you gave it a new emphasis for the gop. you talk about it in terms of being a practical help. what do you mean by that? >> guest: it is what we have come to understand hope and change for 2008 in and the obama campaign, it was all about i hope the government will help me and that's to say i hope you hit the lottery. i hope i don't get hit by a car today. you can hope all you want about events that are more or less outsi
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2015 9:00pm EDT
united states of america. what was her motive that she was on the payroll of china i don't really think she should spend so much time being protective of herself. i think she should open herself up. i did that in the senate race and i think they think they got a more full picture of who i was, the good the bad and the ugly. >> i think that think that is an interesting lesson or case study that occurs outside the realm of politics as well. because they attract so much criticism that bunker mentality is probably easy for corporate executive to be in a similar position let's go back to the very interesting and i think unusual role that you've given to navigating family in politics in a way that i certainly never read in any of the male senator memoirs. your daughter maddie was the one who pushed and prodded you and there's this wonderful anecdote where your early in your public career and you're asking your son to get ready to come with you to what you called was a party but i'm gathering was certainly not just a party. >> i was going to a political event when they were very young. h
CSPAN
Sep 25, 2016 3:00pm EDT
being made in china is such a point. he wants to change it so your ties will be made here. >> host: you follow this up as closely as anybody and clearly you have a lot of emotional skin in this game. when you watch trump on television and you think he goes off message, do you call him? you call people on his campaign? >> guest: no? >> guest: now, a tweet. >> host: do you think he listens? >> guest: i'm not saying necessarily to me. i think he totally listens to criticism. we have seen it over and over again where he will make a mistake and sometimes the full-fledged clarification. he absolutely listens to people and he is a quick study. he's obviously very smart. he's going in the direction we want to go when. one of the things they make fun of the media for because i think it is a time filler. they kept attacking them for no policy specifics. one thing i've learned from my fondest editor was the way he used to edit me was to unexampled me. i'm a lawyer so i like to make a statement and had 20 examples. he would say ann, give one example and move on. i got to this chapter and i tho
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2015 11:51pm EDT
crisis. think of china, late 1970s. india, 1991. think of asia, 1997. and after that, the countries in regions enacted large structural reforms. as for russia, the man looking into the abyss is vladimir putin and russia is not going to change until he is gone. thank you. [applause] >> okay. the bar will be open after the session is over with. either that or coffee will be offered. thank you for your presentations. we have a few minutes left for questions for the panel. i would -- we have ay here with a microphone. if you could wait or two the microphone so everybody can hear you. if you could just raise your hand, identify yourself briefly, and in the interest of time, if you please ask a question and if possible keep it as short and to the point as possible. so, anyone would like to start? down here. >> sherry from voice of america. dr. wilson said we shouldn't worry too much about china's stock market crash. i'm just wondering, the other experts, do you hold similar view on that? >> i think you do have to worry about it but it's probably for something that my colleague would agree
CSPAN
Sep 4, 2016 11:00am EDT
: good question. >> guest: why not buick making cars in china? buick. why not h1b workers question mark these are taking white-collar jobs, these are taking kids jobs. it's not just taking your nanny job anymore. how about a little time on that? >> host: one of the reasons perhaps because trump continues the conversation and respond to every question posed to him. eventually he turns the conversation back to himself and your hillary clinton and you don't want to run a campaign based on what you believe or what you might do, you want to run a campaign that's a referendum on doldrums character so if you're donald trump, why would you continue to keep that conversation alive? >> guest: what you mean? >> host: why would you help hillary clinton by talking about yourself? >> guest: why isn't he talking about her correction? >> host: if i'm elected, this is what america will look like. that's not the point. the point is if elected, everyone else says this is what we hear. >> guest: not exactly right. the close that we buy in america are made of america, it's like three percent on i belie
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2014 8:00pm EST
and now the rise of china and the nuclear program even the president announced he wants to cut the military and others are getting this message the united states doesn't have the will or the wherewithal to stand against iran's around the world so clinton cut the defense budget and when you cut spending and maintain a certain level of revenue you're going to get a balanced budget and a surplus and that's what is happening in the states. i have a whole chapter in the book on what is happening in the states. we have indiana, louisiana, georgia, a lot of states doing fantastic job spellings in budgets committee assessed the state constitutions require them and i wish we could have been at the federal that at the federal level but also the policies. in indiana they send people checks when they have enough money. this is amazing to me. they say we need all this money. the federal government of course if you haven't spent it all spend it all because your budget might be cut next year but in indiana they send you a check what a remarkable thing. >> host: that brings us to another topic tha
CSPAN
Aug 30, 2015 12:00pm EDT
. we know the average high skilled immigrant from a place like china or india creates five jobs for nativeborn americans. this is really important. the second in as the guestworker programs for the poor people stop being exploited and so on and so forth that we can make real progress going down the list, understanding it takes a whole bunch of years. >> moving back into the narrative, a good way back from your personal journey and how that works in the boat to the point talk about practical help. what is that? what does that mean? i had flashbacks to guess we can, keep hope alive, hope and change. we talk politicians in the political system talks a lot about hope. it is almost a 10-cent word at this point. but you gave it a new emphasis for gop. what do you mean by that? >> opus we understand it from hope and change from 2008 obama campaign, it was really all about i hope the government will help me. i hope i hit the lottery. hope i don't get hit by a car today. the whole point you want for the events outside your control. that is not the traditional understanding of hope. there's g
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2016 10:00pm EST
china and discovered his door was jammed and got a driver to help him jimmy the door. a passerby saw it, thought something was skew, and the police came and discovered it was professor gates home but there was talk and tension. professor gates was lured, if you believe that story, which i think he is telling the truth of course, on to his porch and then arrested. the president said this is my friends. and he said he acted stupidly and when he said that it caused an entire week of controversy. professor gates and the arresting officer were brought to the white house with vice president joe biden and president obama for what was dubbed a beer summit to resolve the broader structural issues. that set the tone for the president's engagement with race. it is controlled and as rare as possible. >> host: that moment was a foreshadowing of things to come. he spoke the conversation of racial profiling and toward the end of the term we had treyvon martin could have been his son. talk about the relationship and that link through your book. you talk about martin and ferguson and talk about the i
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2016 9:00pm EDT
time discussing this? why not make cars in china now and each of the workers seeking white-collar jobs. >> one of the reasons perhaps he continues a conversation posed to him and he sees it turned back to himself. you don't want to run a campaign on what you can do or take the money from. you want to run a campaign that is a referendum on the character and so if you are donald trump y. but you continue to keep that conversation a life? why would you help hillary clinton by talking about your self -- >> guest: >> host: if i'm elected this is what america will look like. >> guest: the clothes that we buy in america made america are 3%. that's the whole point he wants to change it so that your ties will be made here. >> host: when you watch them on television and you think he goes off message and i'm sure you feel the way, do you call people on his campaign -- >> no, i tweet. >> host: do you think he listens? >> guest: sometimes a full-fledged clarification like after the visa debate, he absolutely listens and is a quick study. he is going in the direction we want to go. they kept at
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2015 12:02pm EDT
china? is that what these people are latching? china is getting our e-mails without help from anybody. i don't really think she should spend so much time being protective of personal. i think she's got to open herself a. i did that in the senate race and to think missourians got more full picture of william, the good, the bad, and the ugly. >> host: i think that is sort of an interesting lesson our case study that applies outside of the route of politics because there so few women in these positions, because they attract so much criticism, that bunker mentality i think is probably easy for corporate executives to be in a similar position. it's easy for any woman facing back. let's go back to the very interesting and i think unusual role that you've given to navigating the family and politics in a way that i certainly have never in any of the sort of male senator's memoirs. your daughter maddie was going to push you to endorse barack obama. you talk a lot about in the book didn't even at a young age is a wonderful anecdote what you're asking early in your career, your public career and
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2015 12:00am EDT
, all this e-mail stuff. exactly what was her motive? is she on the payroll for china is? that what people are alleging? china is getting our e-mail without any help from anybody. i don't really think she should spend so much time being protective of herself. she has to open herself up. i did that in the senate race and i think missourians got a fuller picture of who i am, the good, the squad the ugly. >> host: that it is an interesting lesson or okayed study that a -- case study that replies outside of the realm of politics because there are so few women in these positions, attract so much criticism, the bunker mentality is probably easy for a corporate executive to be in a similar position. it's easy for any woman facing that. let's go back to the very interesting and i think unusual role that you have given to navigating the family and politics in a way that i certainly never read in any of the sort of male senators' memoirs. your daughter, mady, was the one who pushed and prodded you in 2008 to endorse barack obama. you talk about in the book them even at a young age -- there's
CSPAN
Oct 15, 2015 8:02pm EDT
she on the payroll of china? china is getting e-mails without any help from anybody. i don't think she should spend so much time being protective of herself. she has to open up. i did that in the senate race and i think missourians got a full picture of the good, bad and ugly. >> host: that is an interesting case study that applies outside of the realm of politics because there are so few women in the positions and they attract so much criticism that bunker mentality my guess is it is easy for a corporate executive to be in a similar position. it is easy for any women facing that accent up. let's go back to the very interesting and i think unusual role you have given to n navigating the family and politics i never read in the male senator memoirs and you talk about the antidote where you are asking early in your public career, and asking your son to get ready to come with you to what was a party but i am gathering not just a party. >> guest: i was going to a political event. when they were young i would say we are going to a party. let's get in the car. we would go to a political e
CSPAN
Apr 20, 2014 12:00pm EDT
the rise of china and iran's nuclear program, even the president announced he wants to cut the military more. others are getting this message that the united states doesn't have the will much less the wherewithal to stand against tyrants around the world. clinton got the defense budget and when to cut spending and you maintain a certain level of revenue, you're going to get a balanced budget, probably a surplus. i have a chapter in the book on what's happening in the states. we have indiana, louisiana, georgia, a lot of states out there who are doing fantastic jobs, many of them balanced budgets are state constitutions require them. i wish we would have at the federal level. but also because of the policy. in indiana, the star state in my view of the country, they send people checks when they have enough money. this is an amazing thing to me. they say, we don't need all this money. the federal government of course, the word goes out, the into the fiscal year if you haven't spent it all, spend it all because you budget might be cut next year. in indiana this int injured jay. wha
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2016 9:00pm EST
we ever had. it was he who opened the united states to china and established relations. it was he who signed the bill creating the environmental protection agency. he created osha, the occupational safety and health administration he indexed social security. a lot of lot of these conservatives who were very disappointed in nixon, they talk about a group of conservatives who say they were suspending their support for nixon. he didn't do very well, in the campaign against nixon but he did run against him. then reagan finally came and jerry ford was also seen by many of them as insufficiently conservative when he took over from nixon. he picked rockefeller, the great liberal enemy as conservative. he was certainly, compared to to them very liberal and a spender in new york. so ford had to appease him by dumping rockefeller and putting toll on the ticket. he barely lost jimmy carter. reagan did not rollback abortion rights. reagan could not reduce the size of government. as i no, the size of government was almost exactly the same when he left office is when he took over. he ran very l
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2016 12:00pm EDT
china. then you come forward again, and there is a sense of well, union, ronald reagan promised to cut government and lower taxes but government is getting bigger and taxes are getting higher even though reagan is great republican icon of our day. back then there was discontent. this becomes a theme in your book that time and again, widespan republican officials, elected officials, take back america or in trump's language make america the 1950's america that they were more comfortable with especially the white southern male. >> guest: you are right. nixon is a fascinating figure and one of the most liberal presidents we had ever ironically. he opened the relations to china and created the environmental protection agency and osha and indexed social security. so a lot of conservatives were disappointed in nixon. i talked about a group of conservatives who announced they were suspending their support for nixon. it was a conservative member from iowa who ran against nixon and his bumper stickers had a no left turn sign on them. and then reagan finally came along -- jerry ford was also seen
CSPAN
Jun 3, 2016 8:57pm EDT
speech in china question yes, humans writes. >> we should not forget that she led internationally that way as first lady. again, going into areas where they were not even accustomed to shaking a woman's hand. she took that that kind of leadership. so, here we are, 2016 we have great leadership. thank goodness you're on the board. we like that. we look forward to more women seeking out opportunities to run for office and because of emily's list the have some place to call and ask about what it takes and what i need to do and what kind of support can i give. i want to tell you, i don't know how you give advice whether it's serving on the board or women calling you or picking up some story, but don't ever stop. >> thank you. enjoy the book because it has wonderful stories of victory and progress and social change for women and families. it absolutely does. >> it absolutely does and i meant it when i said that i think it should be required reading. it identifies other women and younger women to take up the mantle and get involved in this struggle for equal and just representation. hav
CSPAN
Apr 18, 2016 12:00am EDT
were with the tone of safety. >> what ailed foreign'' way and in china this bed is pouring into areas been accustomed to here we are. 2016 powerful with breach leadership. thank god you're on the board. i like that. we look forward to more women to seek opportunities to run for office and they have some place to call and ask about what it takes what do i need to do what support can i give? i know how you give advice whether it is sitting on the board or if they call you but don't ever stop. >> thank you. >> enjoy the book has wonderful stories of victory in progress and social change for women and families. >> absolutely i meant it when i said it should be required reading because then that reminds us all of the sacrifices women have made and what they have done to you can guess to this point. and then to get involved in the struggle and as you have said they then as they're willing to and look across the aisle. >> that this place is better because i am proud of you so many women are proud to what i fink you will see is links in 2016 whole fleet with the first women president but they
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2017 10:00pm EST
corporate tax rate would cripple china and mexico faster than any tariffs which i i would he needed to put itty front of the program. the way her worked on the phone on carrier and other big companies to induce them to stay here, it's worthy of lyndon johnson. he had been jaw-boning the executives to get them to stay and expand and you'll see more offer that. now you can argue oh, it's only a thousand jobs here and a thousand jobs there. it's symbol lick that he is making -- symbolic he is making thers is what is important. >> host: one of hoe nor interesting parts of the book you talk about him as an underestimated candidate. the underestimate of the year. how did he stay confident that dish was always amazed by how confident he remained even though, you're right, the washington media establishment, his own party, everybody seemed dead set against him being the nominee and then decide set against him being the president. seems like an almost impossibly confident person. disoutside notice that about hem and how do you think that played into his victory? >> guest: he is an optimist.
CSPAN
Sep 24, 2017 9:00pm EDT
a strong china and india, you have strong nations like turkey that we previously relied on and who were economically backward and we could tell what to do but we can't do that anymore and they don't need us anymore. large places in latin america and i think that is very true and i think that you start to see this unraveling on american foreign policy and very much satisfied what's happening in this country on a foreign-policy level i think the united states is very lost. what do you think about that for >> who are we if we are not that country and if china is more powerful than us i think it is earthshaking to people whether they want to admit it or not think about what we are saying that we are unhappy unless we are running everything and if we have power over other people or people defer to us, i think even though we take that for granted i don't think people are conscious of the fact that's part of their philosophy and worldview and i think that the have to talk about what that means for the future for the confusion going on right now. >> host: i want to read part of this book w
CSPAN
Sep 23, 2017 10:00pm EDT
president obama which what is america's role in the world because now you have a strong china, strong india, strong nations like turkey that we previously relied on an were economically backward it and we could tell what to do but we can't do that anymore. they don't use anymore. places in latin america and africa, think it's very true. you start to see this unraveling of american foreign policy on a government policy level. and very much set aside was happening in the country but on a foreign policy level i think the united states is lost. what you think? >> and then think about what that means to individuals. who are we if we are not that country, who are we if china is that powerful or as powerful as us. that's earthshaking to us, it requires a complete reconsideration of our identity and sense of self. that could be a wonderful thing. her saying essentially were unhappy unless are running everything. and if we have power over other people or people defer to us, even though we take that for granted i don't think people are conscious of the fact that they feel that way. i think we r
CSPAN
Feb 20, 2017 12:00am EST
networks in the '60s but all three networks would china in. -- china and began. warmonger or in a lunatic. but in this election uh tipping point was reached for technological reasons no longer getting back from a television set. and the ratings will stop to drop this so they consider those alternative sources so like town all ordained the caller is important and trump realizes this when nobody does. but then the of voters begin to realize the be is it in bed with the government and the big establishment. and the two cable outlets reinforce that narrative of the mainstream bbn voters for their first-ever skeptical. if you saw something on tv it must be true now is the opposite. so those two changes. >> look at that situation now with that lowest approval rating with us saturation by the media about president trump's so far. so it is the media having a pretty vague impact despite reaching out to these avenues? >> so the sample in is questionable one of the samples so some do an honest mistake and based on the assumption pet the turnout of this was identical with christians and jews one and
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2017 10:59am EDT
what is america's role in the world because now you have a strong china, you have a strong india. you have strong nations like turkey that we've previously relied on and who were economically backward and we could tell what to do. we can't do that anymore and they're making their own decisions. and they don't need us anymore. market places in latin america and africa, too. you start to see this unravelling of american foreign policy on a governmental policy level. and very much, you know, set aside what's happening in this country, but i think on a foreign policy level. i think that the united states is very lost. what do you think about that? >> and then think what that means to individuals? because who are we if we're not that country? who are we if china is as powerful or more powerful than us? it's this kind of, i think, earth shaking to a lot of people whether they want to admit it or not. it requires a complete reconsideration of our sense of our self and that could be can wonderful thing. think about what we're saying here. we're saying essentially we're unhappy unless we'
CSPAN
Apr 16, 2016 10:00pm EDT
about that great speech in china? >> guest: human rights and women's rights. >> host: that's right. we should not forget that she led internationally that way, you know, as first lady. she took that kind of leadership. >> guest: right. >> host: okay, here we are, 2016, emily's list powerful. thank god that you are still serving on the board. i like that. >> guest: thank you. >> host: we look forward for more women seeking out opportunities to run for offices. they have some place to call and ask about what it takes and what do i need to do and what kind of support i can give and i want to tell you, i don't know how you get advice, serving on the board, women calling you or picking up some story but don't ever stop. >> guest: thank you. i won't. enjoy the book because it has wonderful stories about victory and progress and social change for women and families. >> host: it absolutely does and i meant it that i said it should be required reading because not only does it remind us all of the sacrifices that women have made and the work that they have done to get us to this point, but i
CSPAN
Jun 4, 2017 11:00am EDT
investigation and hthey look at e-mails and all this stuff. they just china flashlight at one place. almost at random in certain ways. if it took the flashlight and went to some other place in milwaukee county would define the same thing? i think they probably would. >> host: one of the things in the book you say ferguson was kind of hidden in plain sight. can you give a specific example of something that really kind of moo91 reporting in there, that angered you or would you be like i need to write this book to explain what's going on and make this not hidden anymore? >> guest: i had the experience we went down and i would just be talking to people all day. what i found was i could do this on a air. aren't there an ally tv program i could take my microphone, to an african-american resident of ferguson and say tell me about your experience with cops. you can just tell when people are like telling the truth about traumatic things and when, this is just people just telling me stories that were shocking. i mean, the state senator who tells a story about like, in high school a fire truck was at, i
CSPAN
Apr 24, 2016 12:00pm EDT
way to empower women and what about the great speech in china? guest: women's rights are human rights and human rights are women's rights. host: that's right and i think we should not forget that she led internationally that way, you know, as first lady and again going into areas where they were not even accustomed to shake any woman's hand. guest: that's right. host: and so, okay, here we are 2016, emily's list powerful with great leadership. thank god you are still serving on the board. i like that. guest: thank you. host: we look forward to more women seeking out opportunities to run for office and because of emily's list they have someplace to call and to ask about what it takes and what to i need to do and what kind of support can i give and i want to tell you, i don't know how you get advice whether or not it's a serving on the board or women calling you or picking up some story, but don't ever stop. guest: thank you. i won't and enjoy the book because it has wonderful stories of victory and progress and social change for women and families. host: it absolutely does and i meant
CSPAN
May 27, 2017 10:00pm EDT
gram explores the relationships between china and the u.s. in destined for car. and sean mckeek n takes a closer look at the edgnd of the rule or the russian leadership. watch were many of the authors in the near future on booktv on c-span2. >> democracy is the most radical profound idea in the history of human civilization. [laughter] and it's so radical and so profound that we have a hard time maintaining it. thinking through its implications, constantly being grounded and returned to our conceptions of like freedom. and so leads to ways our democracy has gone bad through outsourcing it to lead and this book is about waying our democracy has gone bad by essentially putting subsection of our -- population under conditions that are not really free in the sort fundamental way that we want to be free is they relate in that way in materials of the specifics of this look, i mean, i grew u up in the bronx like my core identity -- [laughter] in the bronx in the 1980s. which was which i would never trade for a million years in terms of what it meant to me in terms of the way that i think
CSPAN
Jul 23, 2017 12:01pm EDT
to sell the products in china. what i most disturbed by something out of because got nearly enough media attention which is the chinese government has detained labor monitors who were investigating conditions in one of her factories. that would seem to me to be a very tangible benefit. and i think allegation is not that these governments are being directed to do this by trump. it's just that they see this president has not divested, and they believe that these are favors that they can do to get themselves into the good graces of a president who was clearly clearly very, very concerned about his personal and family wealth. you don't need to prove that ivanka is on the phone going to arrest those people. that's not the allegation or delegate would be that the chinese government would think that would be a helpful thing to do, to get rid of those pesky whistleblowers. >> host: one of the points you make in the book is that this is not anything new, that you talk about the decades that the clintons have been using their foundation as a place where people could give money to curry favor
CSPAN
Feb 4, 2017 10:00pm EST
. >> nixon to china moment comes only nixon can sit down to not be accused of being on the reds and only trump can do an immigration deal and not be accused of amnesty mark, our friend will say amnesty but programmed to say amnesty and no one will hear him if he doesn't focus on amnesty. dges on some of the specifics you laid out -- most -- would require a lot more spending. infrastructure spending, immigration, you talk resupplying the military so i'm a starve the beast conservative explain to me the value of more spending to get what we want. >> most of the long-term deficit is tied up in entitlement reform and last chapter in the book is about raising retirement age subsequently over many years incrementally to advance to 70, 72 given what's happened with human aging. unchaining and doing things to reform and back to states with a cap on what they get and reform with medicare with voucher had and i'm not afraid of the v word and those are huge savings what's not a lot of money is $85 billion and that's what since president obama got $805 billion my argument to make it easy for st
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2017 9:00pm EST
in the corporate tax rate would triple china and mexico more than any paragraph which is why the need to at the forefront of the program. the way that he has worked for companies here is worthy of lyndon johnson. he has been owning these executives to get them to stay and you will see more of that. you could argue it's only a thousand jobs here and there. it's symbolic that he's making the effort, that's what's important. >> host: you talk about him as an underestimated candidate. i guess you could see i say it e understatement of the year. how did he stay confident i was always amazed by how confident he remained even though the media establishment and his own party, everybody seemed dead set against him being the nominee into being the president. he seems like an almost impossibly competent person. did you notice that about him and how did you think that played into his victory? >> host: he's an optimist and he is supremely confident. that is one of the things that appealed to the voters he is a can-do guy and doesn't think anything is impossible. even he at the end finally got
CSPAN
Apr 10, 2017 11:32pm EDT
corporate tax rate would kill china faster than any tariff. so that's why puts it at the forefront. the way he has worked the phone on carrier for example another big companies to get them to stay here, he really has been juggling these executives to get them to stay and expand. you'll see more of that. you can argue it's only a thousand jobs here there. it's symbolic that he's making the effort what is important. >> host: you talk about an underestimated candidate. that's the understatement of the year. how did he stay confident. i was always amazed by how confident he remained even though the washington media establishment everybody seemed a goats should be the nominee. it seems like an almost impossibly confident people person. did you notice that about him and how to think that played into his victory? >> guest: he's an optimist, he is a can do guy. he doesn't think anything is impossible. he never thought the election was impossible. even here at the end finally got beat down by the constant mainstream media saying you can't win. he told his wife and he said publicly, we might not win
CSPAN
Feb 12, 2017 12:00pm EST
has not created a perception that he will be kind on this issue. guest: the nixon to china moment comes and if only next it could sit down and not be accused of city-- being soft on the red and only trump can do an immigration deal and not be accused of amnesty, i mean, some people will. but, no one will hear him. host: on some of the specifics, you lay out, most would require more spending. guest: yes. host: infrastructure, the military, so i am a start of the beast conservative, so explain to me the value of more spending to get what we want. guest: most of the long-term deficit despite entitlement reform in the last chapter of the book is about raising the retirement age sequentially over many years incrementally to where it's 70 to 72 given what's happened with human aging. doing things that will reform entitlement, block it granting medicaid to the states with a limit on what they get and reform medicare with vouchers and i'm not afraid of the v word. was not a lot of money is $85 million and that's since eight-- president obama got a hundred 50 million my argument is to give
CSPAN
Feb 5, 2017 9:04pm EST
china moment comes, only nixon can sit down with mao and not be accused of being soft on the red, and only trump can do animes deal and not be accused of -- some people will, amnesty, about he is programmed to say amnesty and no one will hear him when donald trump says this is not amnesty. >> host: on to the specifics, you lay out most would require a lot mow spend -- more spending, infrastructure, military, so i'm a conservative. explain to me the value of spending more to get what. >> guest: most of the long-term deficit is into it. ment reform and last chapter in book is about raising the retirement age sequentially over many years, incrementally to it's 70-72 given what happened if a human aging. unchaining coal la that block grants medicaid to the states with a cap and reform with medicare with crouchers and i'm not afraid of the v word. those are huge savings what is not a lot of moan is $80 billion. my argue. is to make it easy for the steelers fans we'll give them a tenth of what we gave president obama, 85 billion, and spendded through local agencies he can build. 85 billion
CSPAN
Feb 26, 2017 12:00pm EST
would cripple china and mexico faster than any tariff. the way he has worked the phone, carrier, for example, and other big companies to induce them to stay here, he really has been jawboning these executives to get them to stay and expanding i think you'll see more of that. you could argue it's only 1000 jobs year and 100 a thousand jon there. it's symbolic that is making the effort i think is what's important. >> host: one of the more interesting parts of the book as we talk about it as an underestimate candidate. i guess you could say that's an understatement of the year. how did he stay confident? i was always amazed about how confident he remained even though you're right, the washington media establishment, his own party, everybody was dead set against them being the nominee and debts against him being the president. he just seems like an almost impossibly confident person. did you notice that about him, and how do you think that played into his victory? >> guest: he's an optimist. he is supremely confident. i think that's one of the things that appeal to voters. he is a can-do
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2017 10:00pm EDT
when there is a shuttered factory gets more complex than china took those jobs and so what i am concerned about is one make come off this sugar high what happens then? what happens with the cool jobs when they don't return. isis in arizona for example we have a coal plant in arizona called the navajo generating station. for years they have been trying to keep it open protecting against environmental regulations that were threatening its close and could make a cost-effective given the regulations. we got to now when some of those regulations might be right-sized or pro. >> at the bend the market changed completely and natural gas is so cheap that overnight that was simply not economically viable. so it's closing down but it would be easier to say we are going to get this regulation that's stopping us from keeping this plant going but in truth it's the market and that's the case with a lot of manufacturing like they say we are doing a lot more of it. we are just doing it more efficiently but those are hard truths that we are going to have to either talk about now or talk about lat
CSPAN
Aug 20, 2017 12:04pm EDT
more complex than china to those jobs. and so what i am concerned about is when we come off this sugar high, what happens then? what happens when those coal jobs don't return? let me just say in arizona, for example, we have a coal plant in northern arizona called the navajo generation station. for years when trying to keep it open protecting it against onerous regulations, environmental regulations that were threatening its close and it just could make a cost effective giving the regulations. but then we got to now when maybe some of those regulations might be right sized or more appropriate. but then the market changed completely and natural gas is so cheap that, overnight, that was simply not economically viable for the future. you couldn't impose that on ratepayers so is closing down. but it would be easy to say no, it's regulation that's keeping this, or stopping us in keeping this plant going. but in truth now it's the market and that's the case with a lot of manufacturing. like as it would a lot more of it, just more efficiently and requiring fewer workers. but those are h
CSPAN
Jun 10, 2017 10:00pm EDT
sometimes china and russia. that world of state to state relations is still very very important and i think of it as the chessboard world because it is the world of how do we essentially beat our adversaries and we think about a movie and we try to anticipate what mood they're going to make. and that world is there and it is very important. but equally important is what i call the world on the web. that world of criminal networks including terrorists but also traffickers of arms and the world of business which is increasingly big networks supply chains. global corporations and the world of nongovernmental organizations. i think of all of those actors as webmasters as increasingly important actors. but we don't have strategies how to bring them together. this book is a book that says if we are going to have a world with a chessboard and strategies of how to deal with conflict between states and cooperation between states we also need a set of strategies for how to design networks for specific people. good to reconnect how fluid connect them? how do we run the networks to meet challenges or t
CSPAN
Jun 4, 2016 10:00pm EDT
curtail. >> that is remarkable to her mom was born in mainland china then when they got to be a little older was a communist revolution and then they went to taiwan. they met briefly on the mainland to my father-in-law had taken a liking to her so he searched two years to find her. and got married and had three daughters that he was ambitious said was in america three years by himself he was a ship's captain in taiwan any wanted to be more than that. is over three years he worked multiple jobs and called for my late mother iman in the three daughters to come over. a cable from a freighter they were the only people other than the crude and the boat finally ended up in a small apartment in queens and ended up with six daughters and only a lawyer but he'd put a bill to very successful shipping business and that is the kind of story that you see all across america which is another reason why even when we are frustrated about our attitudes of illegal immigration brought here against our will the sons and daughters are risktakers for the people that come here illegally they tend to be
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2016 8:27pm EDT
house it is a very restricted society. the same as china as far as the internet is concerned. and freedom house also ranks iran in their last annual report as the bottom of the list as far as freedom of the internet is concerned. and despite all of the difficulties, the shutdown of the -- the blocking of the poplar sites and so forth, our website just last year jumped 46% percent as far as views were concerned and that was mainly thank do is the jcpoa and the nuclear deal. we are moving forward with our internet despite all of the difficulties iran is creating and i am sure it is going to continue. >> host: you have been watching the "the communicators" at the voice of america broadcasting more here in washington, d.c.. more of our tour next week. >> c-span's washington journal live every day with news and policy issues that impact you and coming up tuesday morning, jacob hacker, institutional for social and policy studies, director at yale university will join us to discuss the economic performance of the state and how historically blue and red states stack up over medium income,
CSPAN
Jun 5, 2016 9:00pm EDT
china. when they were young, they were dodging the japanese invasion of china. then when they got to be a little bit older, there was the communist revolution. they separately managed to get out of mainland china and go to taiwan. and they had met briefly on the mainland, and my father-in-law had taken a liking to her, so he searched in taiwan for two years to find her. they got married, had three daughters over there. my wife, elaine, is the oldest. but he was an ambitious young man. he wanted to do better. so he came to america for three years by himself, worked multiple jobs trying to get a start in the shipping business. he had been a ship's captain in taiwan. he wanted to be more than that. and so he, for three years, worked multiple jobs to get his start. he called for my late mother-in-law and the three daughters to come over, and they didn't have enough money for an airline ticket. they came over on a freighter. they were the only people other than the crew and the bulk commodity on a big freighter. finally ended up in a small apartment in queens. and he kept working and kept ha
CSPAN
Jul 1, 2016 1:30pm EDT
mainland china, the japanese invasion of china, when they got to be a little older it was the communist revolution. they go to taiwan. they met briefly on the mainland and my father-in-law searched in taiwan for two years to find her, they got married, had three daughters, my wife elaine is the oldest but he was ambitious, wanted to do better so he came to america, three years by himself, trying to get a start in the shipping business, he had been a ship's captain in taiwan, he wanted to be more than that, he got his start, called from a late mother in law, had enough money for an airline ticket, came over on a freighter, they were the only people with the bulk commodity, finally ended up in a small apartment in queens and kept working and ended up with six daughters, four had gone to harvard business school, and built a very successful -- that is the kind of story you see all across america which is another reason why even when we are frustrated by immigration, we were virtually all of us unless we were african-americans brought here against our will, the sons and daughters o
CSPAN
Jun 12, 2016 10:00am EDT
immigration in this country. >> her mom and dad born in mainland china. they were dodging the japanese in china. when they got to be a little bit older there was the communist revolution. they separately manage today get out of mainland china and go to taiwan and they had met briefly on the mainland and my father-in-law had taken to her and he searched in taiwan to find her. they got married and had three daughters. my wife is the oldest one. he came to america for three years by himself, worked multiple jobs trying to get a start in the shipping business. he had been a ship's captain in taiwan. he wanted to be more than that. he for three years worked multiple jobs to get a start, he called for my late mother, they came over on a freighter. they were the only people other than the boat and boat commodity on a big freighter. finally ended up in a small apartment in queens and he kept working and kept having kids, they ended up with six daughters, four of whom have gone to harvard business school. [laughter] >> guest: he build a very successful shipping business and, you know, that is the
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