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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2016 12:00pm EDT
china. then you come forward again, and there is a sense of well, union, ronald reagan promised to cut government and lower taxes but government is getting bigger and taxes are getting higher even though reagan is great republican icon of our day. back then there was discontent. this becomes a theme in your book that time and again, widespan republican officials, elected officials, take back america or in trump's language make america the 1950's america that they were more comfortable with especially the white southern male. >> guest: you are right. nixon is a fascinating figure and one of the most liberal presidents we had ever ironically. he opened the relations to china and created the environmental protection agency and osha and indexed social security. so a lot of conservatives were disappointed in nixon. i talked about a group of conservatives who announced they were suspending their support for nixon. it was a conservative member from iowa who ran against nixon and his bumper stickers had a no left turn sign on them. and then reagan finally came along -- jerry ford was also seen
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2015 12:00pm EST
recognition when he started coming to look at china a nine-month process of deciding how to fix the quote-unquote good war, and the reason i put that in quotes easy and so-called iraq had done more which always meant to afghanistan in his mind what he was sort of leading people to believe that he's not antiwar he's just anti-iraq war post by can i interject one question on that? do you think that was genuine or you think that was some political cover in 2008 because they want people to think he was a pacifist? >> guest: i would more cynical and assume that it was a political decision except for how he pitched himself as you lower approach, unafraid to go into pakistan and get an operative. it became a big deal at the time the mobile independent do just that to get osama bin laden. so i think he did have a theory of the case when he was countable using military power and when he was comfortable acting in a lateral as commander-in-chief. i think he was not an antiwar guy. i really believe that. i think he is a cautious guy with the use of military but i think he is not fully antiwar a
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2012 12:00pm EDT
cultures are always invoking either china or iran or turkey. the about the greatness of their empires in the past come et cetera and the united states tends to be more future oriented. in this particular case he found the trauma of the hostage crisis in the iranian revolution is still very formative in the mind of americans who are in response of americans who are in response of americans who are in response he ran policy? >> guest: ambassador ryan crocker told me one time that the arenas are the most historical or this historical society. and every time we have the negotiations come including the most recent one, they bring a that many of historical grievances. sl is on their mind. the third u.s. policy makers really think they are to appear for the first 10 years, clearly the hostage issue was foremost in american policymakers to nine. the iran-contra happened swatch colors the next 15 years. why are we going to risk an opening to the ring and suicide have been to iranian and over a series of incidents where iran has spurred u.s. effort for roper schmoll, we seem to be captured by. the
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2011 12:00am EST
because it did not fit with their world view they were china anti-iraq and al qaeda did not fit with their world view. there were of office eight years and had not process the fact anon state actor could be serious threat to. >> host: that is a fair criticism. but the other side is after 9/11 did things that are highly controversial and o produce over board but it sounds like we would argue were pretty effective to blunt the future threat. >> sure. three down the wall between the fbi and cia was long overdue some information gathered could be handed to law-enforcement and these were no-brainers but it took 9/11 to happen. there was an interesting experiment and the book of what would happen was if not an 11 the democratic party would be out of business. [laughter] >> host: because they would be blamed? >> it would have all happened under their watch. it is a bipartisan failure like george did you bush the administration to act more criticism but both did not respond to uss cole. mike sheehan the ambassador for counterterrorism famously said what will it take a guide at its hacking th
CSPAN
Feb 13, 2011 9:00pm EST
years predicts china and turkey will challenge the remaining superpower in the coming decade in ways the government may not currently anticipate. he talks with the executive editor of the foreign policy magazine, susan glasser. >>> george, thank you so much for joining us. i'm thrilled to have the chance to talk to you in debt about your new book the next decade. i see that it represents a little bit of what is the right word, the narrowing of the frame of ambition from the last book on the next 100 years so you have now taken on the slightly more manageable next ten years or perhaps that's actually more and noble, the next ten years. we can talk about that a little bit of the next hour to get some of your counter intuitive viewers i think about the world is headed and the d'huez encounters with that world whether it is on israel or china and your view of the rise or russia and i think the interesting things to say that are not exactly what you're going to pick up from reading the papers every day. so let's go ahead and jump into that conversation. the next ten years for the next thr
CSPAN
Feb 20, 2011 12:00pm EST
over china, or russia or i think you have some interesting things to say that are not exactly what you're going to pick up from reading the papers every day. so let's go ahead and jump right in to that conversation. the next 10 years, what are the three most surprising takeaways that you are offering people in this book? >> guest: i think first that the war on terror has been overdone. now that terrorism is not a profound danger but as a monochromatic structure of foreign policy. it simply is unsustainable. there are too many other things happening in the world. the second thing i suppose that china has profound economic problems at this point. it's grown magnificently and will continue to grow but it's going to go through adjustments there i suppose the most important thing i'm arguing is the next 10 years is really about the relationship between what i call empire and republic, between the vast global power of the united states, the difficulty in managing that and retaining republican forms of government. eisenhower spoke about the military-industrial complex. i'm going beyond th
CSPAN
Aug 4, 2012 10:00pm EDT
china or iran or turkey, they are invoking the greatness of their empire and the past asatir and the united states tends to be more future oriented. in this particular case, you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis in the and the trauma the iranian revolution is still very formative in the minds of americans who are responsible for iran policy? >> guest: it is and ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that the iranians are the most historical or the least historical society. in this case i think certainly the iranians every time we have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow the iranians bring up a whole litany of historical agreement so it's always on their mind. whether u.s. policymakers realize it or not, they are too. for the first 10 years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was foremost in american policymakers mind. the iran-contra happens which closes the relationship of the next 15 years. we saw what happened to reagan and then, and over a series of time where iran has spurred u.s. efforts to -- for reproach. we seem to be
CSPAN
Feb 14, 2011 12:00am EST
, is given we've been in the argument a long time that china has profound economic problems at this point. it's grown in 0 years. it will continue to grow, but it's going to go through an adjustment. the most important thing to argue is the next 10 years is really about the relationship what i call empire of republic. it's between the vast global power of the united states, the difficulty in managing that and retaining republican forms of government. the military industrial complex, i'm going beyond that. i'm saying the requirements of managing an international system in which we are the only global power with the institutions that we have, you know, the complexity of our intelligence organizations create the situation where no one has a clear idea of what everyone is doing aside from creating unnecessary chaos in the world, it creates real challenges for the republic. i need to maintain a democratic society in the face of this both accumulating and nontransparent power. i'd say those three things. >> host: the word balancing i think is a word that appears a lot in the course of the
CSPAN
Feb 12, 2011 10:00pm EST
years predicts china and turkey will challenge the remaining superpower in the coming decade in ways the government may not currently anticipate. he talks with the exit is editor of foreign policy magazine, susan glasser. >> host: george, thank you so much. i'm glad to have the chance to talk to you in him that about your new book. i see that it represents a little bit of what's the right word, the narrowing of the frame of ambition from alaska on the next 100 years, you have now taken on perhaps a slightly more manageable next ten years or perhaps that is more unknowable, the next ten years. i think we can talk about that over the next hour, and some of your very counter intuitive views about what direction you see the world headed, and in particular the u.s. encounters with that world, whether it's on israel or her china and your view or russia. i can to have interesting things to say that are not exactly what you're going to pick up from reading the papers every day. let's go ahead and jump right into that conversation. the next ten years. what are the three most surprising to tak
CSPAN
Aug 5, 2012 9:00pm EDT
, that other cultures are always invoking whether it's china or iran or turkey, they're invoking the greatnessover their empires in the past, etc. , and the united states tends to be more future-oriented. but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and the trauma of the iranian revolution is still very formative in the minds of americans who were responsible for iran policy? >> guest: it is. body ryan crocker told me -- ambassador ryan crocker told me that the iranians are the most historical or the least historical society. in this case certainly the iranians every time we have a negotiation, including the most recent ones and moscow, the iranians bring up a whole litany of historical grievances, so it's always on their mind. whether u.s. policymakers realize it or not, they are too. for the first ten years after the revolution, clearly the hostage issue was formost in american policymakers' mind. then iran contra happens which sort of colors the relationship for the next 15 years, why are we going to risk an opening to the iranians when we saw what h
CSPAN
Jan 9, 2011 12:00pm EST
nuclear weapons, not just to get china and russia, but let's look at iran. let's look at north korea. looks like a cube. the thick of the carrier. smart targets, smart targets, nuclear weapons we don't watch or nuclear nuclear weapons we don't want to nuclear policy to be. and so this is laid out sort of the january before the bush administration comes in. and then their nuclear posture he adopts many of the same suggestions. that could be great minds think alike, but certainly could be at least aggressive minds think alike. or it could be in fact they had a significant influence in the way this nuclear ply was put together. >> host: you can agine norm auguine was busy helping. >> guest: well, it's really an amazing, amazing crew. you have to give them credit. they really figured out how to work the system. poster they do it ceaselessly 24/7. there's a lot of money and make it well-paid to do it. casco precisely. but the biggest campaign contributor in the defense industry, one of the biggest lobbying spenders right up there with boeing. and a lot of work to do now because of the def
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2011 9:00pm EST
concerned with antiballistic defense and china and iraq and al qaeda didn't fit with the view. part is the had been out of office for eight years and they haven't processed the fact that in on state actor like al qaeda could be a serious threat. >> host: i think that is certainly a fair criticism but as you said, the other side is that after 9/11 the suddenly became three alarmed and some of which were highly controversial, some of which went overboard but a lot of which i would argue so it's like you would argue as well or pretty effective in al qaeda. >> guest: bringing it on the war of the fbi and the cia was long overdue. so the information gathered in the intelligence operation could be handed to law enforcement. these were sort of no-brainers but it took 9/11 for it to happen. there's an interesting thought experiment i don't do in the book but what would have happened if our core was in office on 9/11? my personal view is the democratic party would be out of business. >> host: there would be blamed for the attack. >> guest: it would have happened under their watch. it's a bip
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 2:00pm EDT
. and china, which is to say china is probably running through the end of its course of making argument we're simply a developing country, we can't afford to bear the burdens of international leadership that the united states has been paying. the first sign china wants to be recognized as the second largest economy in the world, growing toward eating at some point in the next couple of decades the largest economy in the world. at some point those conversations are going to meet. and the question of who pays the bill for global leadership and what is required in order to sustain that is going to come. i want to back up, december 31, 1991. you call the breakpoint in history. the collapse of the soviet union is what happened on that day. and the birth of the post-soviet era, not only in american foreign policy but in terms of literally rewriting the map of the world as we knew it. two decades later we're going to mark the anniversary this year. things haven't necessary turned out as some of the optimists would have had them. we have not seen a tidal wave of democracy and freedom wash acros
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 1:00pm EDT
president. in china, he's a hard-liner in some ways on war issues. vietnam, another issue where he's had a very mixed record. but i think the problem he had in the context of the book and this discussion on presidents on race and african-americans is that he couldn't be relied on to stay with a principle or a conviction if the politics told him to do something else. that was the perception and that's the way a lot of people think of nixon, of course, his nickname was tricky dick. it wasn't that he did everything wrong. it's just that he couldn't be relied on to do what was right in the crunch if politics dictated something else. that's the way i look at it. >> host: much of your book really does deal with the inside of the white house and some still with the outside beginning with johnson. we began to see african-american cabinet members. >> guest: yes. >> host: obama has clinton and 15% respectfully. >> guest: right. >> host: if you put your predictors hat on looking ahead, will that now be the bar for presidents in terms of cabinet members? >> guest: well, not necessarily. but i th
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2011 1:00am EDT
environmentally insensitive president. he -- overtures to china and hard liner in some ways op the -- on the war issues. vietnam where he had a mixed record. i think the president he had in the context of the book and the discussion on president at race and african-american, he couldn't be relied on to stay with a principal or conviction if the politics told him to do something else. that's the perception. that's a lot a lot of people think of nixon. his nickname was ricky dick. wasn't that he did everything wrong, he couldn't be relied on to do what was right in the crunch if politics dictated something else. that's how i look at it. >> host: much of your book deals with the inside of the white house. some of it does deal with the outside. beginning with johnson, african-american cabinet members. obama has -- clinton and obama are the high flier of 13 and 15% republickively. -- respectively. if you put your predictors hat, will that be the barf cabinet members african-american? >> guest: not necessarily. obama hasn't named a much higher number of african-americans percentage wise
CSPAN
Apr 10, 2011 12:00pm EDT
environmentally sensitive president. he had overtures to china, hard-liners in some way on war issues. vietnam, another issue worth he had a mixed record. but i think the problem he had in the context of the book and this discussion on the presence and race and african-americans, he can be relied on to stay with a principle or conviction if the politics told him to do something else. that was the perception and that's what a lot of people think of nixon. his nickname was tricky dignity when he did everything wrong, it's just he couldn't be relied on to do what was right in the crotch if policy to get some else. that's what i look at. >> host: lots of your book deals with the inside of the white episode the dusty with the outside. beginning with johnson we begin to see african-american cabinet members. obama has clinton and obama are the highlighters, highfliers of 13 and 15% effectively. if you put your predictor have done looking ahead, will that not be the bar for presence in terms of cabinet members? >> guest: not necessary but i think that obama hasn't named a much higher number o
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2011 12:00am EST
-- of the pacific rim, all the way to canada and all the way out through japan and china and korea, and the conversation was different. about global trade and free trade, and i actually always thought in that sense the countries had more in common with their asian counterparts than their latin american counterparts. >> is it how they see themselves in their stage of development? >> i think it is. you look at places like chile, now quite developed, colombia getting there. a country click brazil is interesting because on the one hand it's leading the -- one of the leaders in the global economy but with huge income distribution difficulties that keep it more on the developing countryside. if you look at the poorest countries in, say, central america, like guatemala, for instance, you're talking about places where you can't even reach the farmers in the highlands bay highway, and so their problems are to build infrastructure so they can join the 20th century economy. forget the 21st century economy. so you have radically different levels of development. when you think about the radically di
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2014 12:00am EST
. as i said, china and russia have different views how they understand privacy. those are not the regimes we think should be involved in making the final determineses how the internet will be govern it but that where is the next struggle will be taking plus as we move forward trying to figure out the interests. >> for the interest0s of time we'll have to call it there. i want to thank the audience. i appreciate your questions and thank the panelists very much on both sides of me. gene, you wanted to say something. >> the book is for sale. >> if you're interested, we'll have books outside and will be there to give you the honor of our signatures,. >> and we will have question ifs you want to come up afterwards. that's fine. thank you very much. can [inaudible conversations] >> every weekend booktv offers programming focused on nonfiction authors and books. keep watching for more here on c-span 2 and watch any of our past programs online at booktv.org. >> coming up next on booktv, "after words," this week, lindsay mark lewis, the inside story about how fundraisers allowed billionair
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2015 12:00pm EST
thinking about simply in order to announce that it is dead. we do not want russia china rand intervening in latin america, and i don't think quite frankly venezuelans, cubans or ecuadorians do either. >> host: back to the book. part of your criticism of president obama which is much in the book, not the only one criticized. you refer to him as compared to the legendary king -- explained to the readers. >> guest: the viking king who stood on the shore line and commanded the tides recede to prove his godlike powers. when the president says the tide of war is receiving, he can only observe that hide receding. he cannot command it to show we can s.o.b. said you know what? the war in iraq is over and we're going to put an end to what used to be called the war on terrorism. president of the national defense university and may 2013 give a speech effectively saying exactly that, and we cannot allow this war on terror to define our generation. so we're going to change our attention to something else. and by the way, great news, al-qaeda, core al-qaeda us on the path to defeat and all
CSPAN
Feb 4, 2017 10:00pm EST
. >> nixon to china moment comes only nixon can sit down to not be accused of being on the reds and only trump can do an immigration deal and not be accused of amnesty mark, our friend will say amnesty but programmed to say amnesty and no one will hear him if he doesn't focus on amnesty. dges on some of the specifics you laid out -- most -- would require a lot more spending. infrastructure spending, immigration, you talk resupplying the military so i'm a starve the beast conservative explain to me the value of more spending to get what we want. >> most of the long-term deficit is tied up in entitlement reform and last chapter in the book is about raising retirement age subsequently over many years incrementally to advance to 70, 72 given what's happened with human aging. unchaining and doing things to reform and back to states with a cap on what they get and reform with medicare with voucher had and i'm not afraid of the v word and those are huge savings what's not a lot of money is $85 billion and that's what since president obama got $805 billion my argument to make it easy for st
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2015 12:00am EST
territorial amibitions and showed that with the invasion of georgia. i looked at china and the microaggressions, to borrow a term in the east and south china sea, to anyone with an understanding of the first world war, you cannot -- the origins of the first world war are a story of crisis at the periphery backing crises at the center. i looked at iran continuing to move towards nuclear capability and iraq descending into increasing chaos as -- what we then called al qaeda resurged. so i had this idea we were entering into a period of global disorder and i fleshed that out in an 8,000 word article in "commentary" magazine. after writing the article i thought here is a theme -- in fact what really unites this theme is that all of this is happening as america has turned inward, and we already have as i said this, historical experience of what happens in the world when america turns inward. there's a connection, and so it was on that bay si is started to write the book. >> oo commercial question, your publisher, sentinel conservative imprint of penguin random house, what what's fir
CSPAN
Apr 10, 2017 11:32pm EDT
corporate tax rate would kill china faster than any tariff. so that's why puts it at the forefront. the way he has worked the phone on carrier for example another big companies to get them to stay here, he really has been juggling these executives to get them to stay and expand. you'll see more of that. you can argue it's only a thousand jobs here there. it's symbolic that he's making the effort what is important. >> host: you talk about an underestimated candidate. that's the understatement of the year. how did he stay confident. i was always amazed by how confident he remained even though the washington media establishment everybody seemed a goats should be the nominee. it seems like an almost impossibly confident people person. did you notice that about him and how to think that played into his victory? >> guest: he's an optimist, he is a can do guy. he doesn't think anything is impossible. he never thought the election was impossible. even here at the end finally got beat down by the constant mainstream media saying you can't win. he told his wife and he said publicly, we might not win
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2017 9:00pm EST
in the corporate tax rate would triple china and mexico more than any paragraph which is why the need to at the forefront of the program. the way that he has worked for companies here is worthy of lyndon johnson. he has been owning these executives to get them to stay and you will see more of that. you could argue it's only a thousand jobs here and there. it's symbolic that he's making the effort, that's what's important. >> host: you talk about him as an underestimated candidate. i guess you could see i say it e understatement of the year. how did he stay confident i was always amazed by how confident he remained even though the media establishment and his own party, everybody seemed dead set against him being the nominee into being the president. he seems like an almost impossibly competent person. did you notice that about him and how did you think that played into his victory? >> host: he's an optimist and he is supremely confident. that is one of the things that appealed to the voters he is a can-do guy and doesn't think anything is impossible. even he at the end finally got
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2015 10:00pm EST
us one way or another whether it's the militants of islamic state whether it's china's general seeking to kick us out of east asia, whether his russian politicians seeking to revise the conclusions of the cold war. >> host: you mention in your subtitle the new isolationism and the coming global disorder. why coming? >> guest: i won't say who it was but a prominent person who read and liked this book said i liked it very much. the only word is the word coming which should be the current global disorder but in fact i think it's going to be you ain't seen nothing yet. i think it's going to be worse. for example of falling oil prices all of us are celebrating as consumers driving a car and not having to pay four bucks for a gallon of gas and we think that it gives us leverage over countries like russia and iran that perhaps we didn't enjoy before. my sense in fact is that russia and iran will become more dangerous as oil prices decline because they are now going to seek other ways to get out of their economic predicament. typically you think of a country like argentina in the early
CSPAN
Feb 26, 2017 12:00pm EST
would cripple china and mexico faster than any tariff. the way he has worked the phone, carrier, for example, and other big companies to induce them to stay here, he really has been jawboning these executives to get them to stay and expanding i think you'll see more of that. you could argue it's only 1000 jobs year and 100 a thousand jon there. it's symbolic that is making the effort i think is what's important. >> host: one of the more interesting parts of the book as we talk about it as an underestimate candidate. i guess you could say that's an understatement of the year. how did he stay confident? i was always amazed about how confident he remained even though you're right, the washington media establishment, his own party, everybody was dead set against them being the nominee and debts against him being the president. he just seems like an almost impossibly confident person. did you notice that about him, and how do you think that played into his victory? >> guest: he's an optimist. he is supremely confident. i think that's one of the things that appeal to voters. he is a can-do
CSPAN
Jun 4, 2016 10:00pm EDT
curtail. >> that is remarkable to her mom was born in mainland china then when they got to be a little older was a communist revolution and then they went to taiwan. they met briefly on the mainland to my father-in-law had taken a liking to her so he searched two years to find her. and got married and had three daughters that he was ambitious said was in america three years by himself he was a ship's captain in taiwan any wanted to be more than that. is over three years he worked multiple jobs and called for my late mother iman in the three daughters to come over. a cable from a freighter they were the only people other than the crude and the boat finally ended up in a small apartment in queens and ended up with six daughters and only a lawyer but he'd put a bill to very successful shipping business and that is the kind of story that you see all across america which is another reason why even when we are frustrated about our attitudes of illegal immigration brought here against our will the sons and daughters are risktakers for the people that come here illegally they tend to be
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2016 8:27pm EDT
house it is a very restricted society. the same as china as far as the internet is concerned. and freedom house also ranks iran in their last annual report as the bottom of the list as far as freedom of the internet is concerned. and despite all of the difficulties, the shutdown of the -- the blocking of the poplar sites and so forth, our website just last year jumped 46% percent as far as views were concerned and that was mainly thank do is the jcpoa and the nuclear deal. we are moving forward with our internet despite all of the difficulties iran is creating and i am sure it is going to continue. >> host: you have been watching the "the communicators" at the voice of america broadcasting more here in washington, d.c.. more of our tour next week. >> c-span's washington journal live every day with news and policy issues that impact you and coming up tuesday morning, jacob hacker, institutional for social and policy studies, director at yale university will join us to discuss the economic performance of the state and how historically blue and red states stack up over medium income,
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2016 8:00pm EST
story. >> guest: her mon and dad, born in mainland china, when they were young they were dodging the japanese invasion of china. then when guy dot older there was the communist revolution. they separately managed to get out of mainland china and go to taiwan, and they had met briefly on the mainland, and my father-in-law had taken a liking to her so he searched in tie -- taiwan for two years to find her. they got heard, had three daughters can my wife, elaine is is the oldest but he was an ambitious young man himself wanted to do better. so he came to america three years by himself, worked multiple jobs, trying to get start in the shipping business. he had been a ships captain. in taiwan. he wanted to by more than that. and so he -- for three years worked multiple johns to -- jobs to get a start. he called for "late more than mother in law. they came over on a freighter. finally ended up in a small paper in queens. and he kept working, and kept having kids. ended up with six daughters, four of whom have gone to harvard business school, one is a slacker, only a lawyer. and he built a
CSPAN
Jun 12, 2016 10:00am EDT
immigration in this country. >> her mom and dad born in mainland china. they were dodging the japanese in china. when they got to be a little bit older there was the communist revolution. they separately manage today get out of mainland china and go to taiwan and they had met briefly on the mainland and my father-in-law had taken to her and he searched in taiwan to find her. they got married and had three daughters. my wife is the oldest one. he came to america for three years by himself, worked multiple jobs trying to get a start in the shipping business. he had been a ship's captain in taiwan. he wanted to be more than that. he for three years worked multiple jobs to get a start, he called for my late mother, they came over on a freighter. they were the only people other than the boat and boat commodity on a big freighter. finally ended up in a small apartment in queens and he kept working and kept having kids, they ended up with six daughters, four of whom have gone to harvard business school. [laughter] >> guest: he build a very successful shipping business and, you know, that is the
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2016 1:30pm EDT
remarkable story. >> her mom and dad born inr mainland china, when they were young they were dodging the japanese invasion of china. then when they got to be a little bit older, there was the communist revolution. they separately managed to get out of mainland china and go to taiwan. they had met briefly on the mainland my father-in-law had taken a liking to her so he searched in two years in taiwan to find her. they got married, have three daughters over there, my wife elaine is the oldest but he was an ambitious young man. he wanted to do better. so he came to america three years by himself, worked multiple jobs trying to get a start in the shipping business. he had been a ship's captain in taiwan. he wanted to be more than that. so for three years he worked multiple jobs to get his start, he called for my late mother-in-law in the three daughters to come over. they didn't have enough money for an airline ticket. they came over on a freighter. they were the only people other than the crew on a big crater.ep finally ended up in a small apartment in queens and he kept working. he kep
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2016 4:00am EDT
and dad born in mainland china, the japanese invasion of china, when they got to be a little older it was the communist revolution. they go to taiwan. they met briefly on the mainland and my father-in-law searched in taiwan for two years to find her, they got married, had three daughters, my wife elaine is the oldest but he was ambitious, wanted to do better so he came to america, three years by himself, trying to get a start in the shipping business, he had been a ship's captain in taiwan, he wanted to be more than that, he got his start, called from a late mother in law, had enough money for an airline ticket, came over on a freighter, they were the only people with the bulk commodity, finally ended up in a small apartment in queens and kept working and ended up with six daughters, four had gone to harvard business school, and built a very successful -- that is the kind of story you see all across america which is another reason why even when we are frustrated by immigration, we were virtually all of us unless we were african-americans brought here against our will, the sons and dau
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