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CSPAN
Nov 1, 2014 12:39am EDT
society. in other words, that is what america had in the 19th century and europe have began to china, korea and india are leaving right now and why the breakup of the extended family taking care of somebody like him is occurring because that worked only by insulating beyond. young women to provide the care and then on top of that coming you know, his sons. imagine reaching your '80s waiting to inherit the land. having your economic future still depending on your dad. .. >> >> and the things that he did was recognize the most life-threatening thing is that if they fell and broke their hip on average only a six months they would survive. so more important of the mammogram and colonoscopy was preventing them from falling and he knew how to do that how to examine the fee to look at the toenails and calluses and to arrange for a podiatrist and even see if they could reach their feet and he would sit back and let them struggle in two's the about at home and then went further to recognize people have a much higher risk of falling and then would reduce the drug. >> host: and he could do that
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2015 8:56pm EST
, what china, china, korea, and india are leaving right now. the breakup of the extended family is occurring because that worked only by enslaving the young young women to provide the care and on top of it his sons imagine reaching your 80s still waiting to inherit your land? having your economic future still dependent upon your dad. the economic the economic progress occurs because you give your people freedom. they moved to the cities, often take different lines of work, leave the elders behind and we did not have a plan in the 19th century for what happens to people left behind. what we have decided medicine we will take care of it. >> turn it over to the healthcare field and they will fix and take care of and treat. it. >> my dad is having trouble with memory or falls in the home. we like fixing problems. but some problems you can't fix. you can make them go away. you can say, well, you can you can try xyz or go see another specialist. and that is the failure of our understanding. there are things to fight for besides just living longer. >> when we go through school it seems li
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2014 9:53pm EDT
have a plan in the 19th century for what happens to people left behind. india, china don't either. and what we have decided, madison will take care of it . >> host: turn it over to the medical field and it will fix and treat. >> guest: trouble with memory or falls in the home. taken to the doctor and a fix that. you take them to the doctor and say, we have a procedure that we can do, therapy we can offer. sometimes you can't fix. some of these, you cannot make them go away. well, i can try extra like ozzie argosy and other specialists that is the failure of our understandings. living longer are trying to repair unrepairable problems . >> host: when we go through school, it seems like medical school attracts good people. the type of high school student that wants to be a nurse is a remarkable person and this sort of person of interviews for medical school is a remarkable person. they come out in this dilemma. is this confusion or preparedness, a sense of this is out of my lead. better things go wrong when you have such great people going to their profession. faced with dealing with a pr
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2014 12:00am EDT
? >> guest: in other words that is what mrs. hat in the 19th 19th century, what europe and china and korea and india are leaving right now and why. the breakup of the extended family, taking care of somebody like him, is occurring because that it worked only by enslaving the young. young women, to provide the care, and then on top of it, his sons. national reaching your 80s, still waiting to inherit your land. having your economic future still dependent on your dad. and the economic progress of the world occurs because you give young people freedom. they, work with where they want, live where they want, marry woman they want. they move to the cities. often take different lines of work. often leave the elders behind, and we depend have a plan -- we didn't have a machine for what happens to people left behind. india, china, korea don't, either. and what we have decided, medicine will take care of it. >> host: just turn it over to the health care field and they'll fix and take care of and treat. >> guest: my dad is having trouble with memory or having falls in the home. well, let's take him t
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2014 11:00am EST
19 century. it's what your pet in 19 century. it's what china, korea and india are leaving right now, and why. the breakup of the extende extem taking their selection is occurring because that works only by enslaving the young. young women to provide the care, and then on top of it isn't something imagine reaching your 80s still waiting to inherit your land. having the economic future still dependent on your data. the economic progress of the world occurs because you give young people from they can work with you, live what they want and marry whom they want to be moved to the city for often they take different lines of work. the often leave the elderly, the elders behind. we didn't have a plan in the 19 century for what happens to people left behind india, china, korea don't either. and what we have decided medicine will take care of it. host lecture turned over to the health care and they will fix and take care of and treat. >> guest: my grandfather, my dad is having trouble with memory or he's having falls in the home. let's take them to the doctor and the doctor will fix that. we
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2014 10:00pm EDT
19th century and china and india are leaving right now. leaving the extended family to take care of him worked only by enslaving the young. young women supervise the care and on top of that his sons. imagine reaching they are waiting to inherit your lab. the economic progress of the world occurs because it gives people freedom. they can work where they want and live where they want to marry whom they want. they live to the cities i'm often take different lines of work. they often leave elders behind and we didn't have a plan in the 19th century for what happens to people left behind. the india china and korea don't either and what we have decided medicine will take care of it. >> host: just turned over to health care and they will fix and take care of entry. >> guest: my dad was having trouble with memory or he is fought -- having falls in the home. let's taken to the doctor and what happens quickly take them to the doctor and say we like fixing problems. we have a procedure we can do for that, therapy we can offer. sometimes we can't make them go away and we throw up our hands. and we
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2016 9:54pm EST
, mei fong joins us on afterward to talk about her book, "one child: the story of china's most radical experiment" about the one child policy in china and its impact on the country. this is about one hour. >> mei fong, welcome to "after words". you just published your first book. it's a remarkable book. i enjoyed it immensely. it's the subject of a lot of discussion. the book is called "one child: the story of china's most radical experiment". in a minute we will talk about why you chose this subject and how you went about answering the questions on your mind. first i think it would be helpful to define for people what it is we are actually talking about. what is china's one child policy? >> evan, the the one child policy is really a bit of in misnomer. it's a name we used to describe a set of rules that china has used to regulate the population. theoretically, you could lightly call at 1.5 child five child for a long time. now they have moved it to a two child policy, but it's laws and regulations. >> it's not one law, but a basket of policies. >> that's right. >> when did it happen?
CSPAN
Oct 10, 2016 12:00am EDT
important to work in haiti or china? i know mandarin. so they said no it is most important that we staffed the embassy in baghdad. so there was a lot of discussion but yet the evidence in the cable suggests that officers willingly and wholeheartedly energetically each to accomplish some impressive things while they were there even without their knowledge of arabic or wrote without the knowledge of the region but the tools that they had been given and being creative and improvising. i think it is one of public diplomacy's success stories. it is hard to use the word success in the same sentence because things are in the air but the cable suggest a trajectory of officers who answered the call, were loyal and did with the initiation asked asked, search, and accomplished. >> host: you mention the assistant secretary of state for educational cultural affairs at the time. . . and it was very striking, his mark on that period. >> it became the largest in the world and we had other programs as well. my colleagues put on theatrical performances and had standing room only crowds coming and in
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2016 12:00pm EST
ended at the subject of a lot of discussion these days among china. the book is called tran 11 -- "one child." first i think it would be helpful to find for people what we are talking about. so what is china's one child policy? >> one child policy is really a misnomer. it is just a name that we use to describe a set of rules and illustrations that china has placed to regulate the population. theoretically you could more likely call it 1.5 child for a long time and of course the two child policy. in reality with regulations. >> not one not particularly, but a basket of these. when did it happen? when did it begin? >> 1979, 1980 when the communist party supposedly took members saying we are raising everybody to move to one child family. it was really telling. >> people sometimes imagine the policy that would've gone into effect under chairman mao, but it went to affect under xiaoping. what was going on at the time it was so important people imagine they needed the safety of a policy level? >> now had passed away. china had come off the cultural revolution. people are poor and als
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2016 12:00am EST
discontinued one china policy and its impact on the country and talks about her book the story of china's most radical experiment with ethanol snowe's office of the national book award-winning age of ambition. >> mei fong, welcome to "after words." you published your first book and i end joyed immensely. it's the subject of a lot of discussion among the analysts. the book is one child at the story of china's most radical experiment and in a minute we will talk about why you chose the subject and how you went about answering some of the questions on your mind but first it would be helpful to define what it is we are talking about so what is china's one child policy? >> guest: the one child policy is a bit of a misnomer. it's just a name that we use to describe a set of rules and restrictions china has placed to regulate the population and the size of the family. theoretically you could collect 1.5 child for a long time and now of course they moved it to a two child policy. but it's a lot of regulations. >> so it's not one law but a sort of basket of policies. when did it happen and
CSPAN
Jun 8, 2014 9:00pm EDT
: it's just beginning to converge with the nascent moment in china and now also beginning to converge in the automated transfer logistics and turn it so they are expanding to the free internet committee energy internet, the automated logistics contract created a super internet called the internet of things and these are then placing sensors across the entire economic system to monitor the flow of data so we have the sense is now conducting the resource flows feeding the data from the production lines, warehouses by distribution centers have the sensors on the smart roads that are conducting the grid. we have sensors connecting vehicles and offices. that data coming in across the economies of these internet communications, energy, internet and logistics internet is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. by 2030 perhaps 112 yen sensors and i know later on we will talk about the questions of privacy and data security so it is exhilarating and frightening at the same time. there's a lot of possibilities enabled of challenges that what is interes
CSPAN
Aug 20, 2014 9:19pm EDT
internet is just now beginning to converge but the nation's energy internet in europe and now china. and also beginning to converge with a fledgling an automated logistics' the internet. it is expanding into three, information, energy, automated transport or logistics' and creating one super internet of the internet of things. and these three internet seven placing sensors across the system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting three source close, sensors feeding data in from production lines, warehouses, distribution centers, sensors on smart roads, sensors that are connecting the electricity grid so that we know what the appliances are doing at any moment, since disconnecting vehicles and offices and stores. that big a data coming in across the economy to these three internets, communications, energy, and logistics' is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. and what this is -- we now have 13 billion censors out there. ibm says in 2020 there will be 50 billion. and by 2013 perhaps 100 trillion sensors connecting everyt
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2014 10:00pm EST
single civilization, whether it's in china, india, europe, middle east, developed a system whereby a small aristocracy comprising at most five percent of the population, took away the surplus of produce grown by the peasants and kept them at subsistence level in poverty and degradation and used this wealth they'd taken to fund their civilization or project. this could only have been done by force. they had this peasant somehow had to be subdued. so 90% of the population throughout -- for five thousand years were kept in distress and anger. now, as historians tell us, without this terrible system we would probably not have developed beyond a primitive level as a species, because this system supported a privilegedcast with the people who had the less sure to explore the arts and sciences on which civilization depended. plus, whether your economy is biased oning a actual tour, the only way you can, if you like, crease your gross national product is by acquiring more land and more peasants to farm it. consequencely, warfare was the only way for the economy to grow, and plunder was essent
CSPAN
Mar 16, 2014 12:00pm EDT
. >> guest: china right now is a good example of a country that describes a strong sense of superiority. we have been humiliated by the west. that's nice for us. that's what happens. >> host: amy chua, jed rubenfeld, thank you for us to talk about "the triple package." >> guest: thank you very much. >> here's a look at works being published this week.
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2016 8:00pm EDT
teefor . . . i think it would be helpful to define what we are walking about. what is china's one-child policy? >> guest: the one-child policy is a bit of a misnomer. it is a name we use to describe a set of rules, restrictions, that china has placed to regulate family population and the size of the family. theoretically you could call it 1.5 child and ten it moved to a two-child policy. >> host: it is not one law but a basket of policies. >> guest: that is right. >> host: when did it happen? when did it go into effect? >> guest: i say 1980 when the communist party sent out an open letter to the members saying we are adviceing everyone to move to a one-child family. -- advise. >> host: you are saying this went under effect under ping. what was going on in china that was so important that people imagined they needed an idea of the policy like this? >> mao had just passed away and the population was growing. there was a worry that china's population was going to overwhelm the showers and there wouldn't be enough to go around and they really need today do something. >> host: you writ
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2015 10:54pm EDT
. it's e3 secbaclly timely to have this discussion today because of what's hg bpew ng in china, and of course impth the u.s. stock market. the problems that are causing the meltdown of china's stock market are not limited to china alone, many of the same economic faile mes that h urnt china afft the rest of the worlds. huge debts, corruption, lack of e span3 saren ge, lack ocare the rare ce of law and general lack of economic freedom. as you will lea on from teathas difanusn many mistakes china and others make are always also be in debt by the s led miw stration. we should not be surprised that that our economy is in trouble to and we have lost the particular ability to lead the world out of trouble. which culm se me all of oe m rcrticipants, particularly grat will be talking about. to get us startei hapant impll deliver sdiie rema, he wears many hats and has a wide range of experience in e spade and econdiiic policy and the law. 2001 to 2005, roughly the same thousand fivsome rou3 huly the same time i was at the state department, grant was secretary ocare comiliaerce of national t. a
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2016 9:00pm EDT
agenda because now that china and india have gone to war the cia is ready to replace the pakistan knees and they were right. they began to support the tibetan resistance and no flight started to come out of india to the chinese. also flights that would only come out of pakistan in 1963 and 64 there would come out secretly firebases in india and it was one of those flights that discovered the chinese are in the final stages to test their first nuclear weapons and to give the united states a crucial intelligence china was on the verge of becoming a nuclear weapon state. >> alleges like to say and ambassador at -- a word about the ambassador john galbraith was a tall man 6-foot 6 inches board ontario canada and a graduate of the ontario school of agriculture and moved to the united states did dkb economist and wrote several books and the star of harvard university. in dkb advisor to kennedy. and he kept the diary in he later published that diary is is a memoir. that whether or not. to say at least we know you actually said that. the diary is a fascinating piece politically unaware and unkn
CSPAN
Jun 7, 2014 10:00pm EDT
just now beginning to converge with the nascent energy internet in europe and now in china and also beginning to converge with a fledgling automated logistics internet so the internet is expanding to three internets read the information internet the automated transport and logistics internet and creating one super and in the net called the internet of things. these three internets are then placing sensors across the entire economic system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting resource flows. we have sensors feeding data in from production lines, warehouses and distribution centers. we have centers on smart groves connecting electricity grid so we know what the appliances are doing at any moment. we have sensors connectinconnectin connecting vehicles in offices and stores. that big data coming in across the economy to these free internet communication energy internet and the distance internet is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. we now have 14 billion sensors out there now and ibm says in 2020, 50 billion senso
CSPAN
Mar 9, 2014 9:00pm EDT
control and finish. have a last sentence. >> guest: i was just going to say that china right now is a very good example of a country described by china scholars as, you know, strong sense of superiority with massive dose of -- we have been humiliated by the west, so that's a nice boil for us, and we'll see what happens. >> host: amy chua, jed rubenfeld, thank you for joining us to talk about "the triple package. >> guest: thank you so much. >> that was "after words," booktv's signature program in which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, legislators and others familiar with their material. after words with air as every weekend on booktv at 10 p.m. on saturday, 12 and 9 p.m. on sunday and 12 a.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" online. go to booktv.org and click on "after words" in the booktv series and top you cans list on the upper -- topics list on the upper right side of the page. >> here is a look at some books that are being published this week: got to talk about the update of the addition of their book the new digital age in which
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2014 9:00pm EST
depended on hacker culture and that meant whether it is china, india, europe, the middle east developed a system whereby the small comprising 5% of the population took away the surplus of the produce grown by the peasants and kept them at a subsistence level in the poverty and degradation and used the wealth that they have taken to fund their civilization project. this could only have been done by force. they somehow had to be subdued as did 90% of the population. for 5,000 years they were kept in distress and anger. now historians tell us that without this terrible system we probably wouldn't have developed beyond the primitive level as a species because the system supported the class with the people that had a measure to explore the arts and sciences on which the civilization depended. plus, when you are economy is based on a culture, the only way that you can increase your gross national product is by acquiring more land and presence. consequentially it became essential to the economy and it was the only way for the economy to grow and plunder and it was essential to supporting the ari
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2014 12:00am EST
on agriculture. and that meant that a small -- in every single civilization, whether it's in china, india, europe, the middle east, developed an inequity system where a small aristocracy comprising five percent of the population took away the surplus of produce and kept the peasants in at subsis stance and used the wealth they'd taken to fund their civilization project. this could only have been done by force. they had this peasant somehow how to be subdued. so 90% of the population throughout -- for 5,000 years, were kept in distress and anger. now, -- so, as historians tell us, without terrible system we november heat developed beyond as a species because this supported a privilegedcast with the people who had the leisure to explore the arts and sciences on which civilization depended. plus, where we all economy is based on agriculture, the only way you can, if you like, increase your gross national product is by acquiring more land and more peasants to farm it. consequently, warfare became essential to the economy. the only way for the economy to grow, and plunder, too, was also
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2014 8:59pm EST
civilization, whether china, india, europe, the middle east developed a system whereby a small aristocracy comprising at most 5 percent of the population took away the progress grown by the presence and kept them at subsistence level and used his wealth that they had taken to fund their civilization projects. this could only only have been done by force. they had this peasantry subdued. subdued. some 90 percent of the population throughout 5,000 years were kept in distress and anger. now, as historians tell us, without this terrible system we would probably not have developed beyond a primitive level as a species because the system supported a privileged caste with the people had the leisure to explore the arts and sciences, plus when your a economy is based upon agriculture, the only way that you can, if you like, like, increase your gross national product is by acquiring more land and more peasants to farm it. consequently warfare became essential to the economy. plunder was also essential to supporting the aristocratic lifestyle. that, of course, because we are meaning seeking creatures
CSPAN
Oct 16, 2016 12:00pm EDT
haiti. i spoke four years learning mandarin, shouldn't i be worked in china? the administration said, no, it's most important, it is our priority that we fully staff the embassy in baghdad and there was a lot of discussion, some of it became public as i mentioned in the chapter and yet the evidence from the cables suggest that officers went willingly wholeheartedly, energyically and established impressive things even without knowledge of arabic, i have been without in-depth knowledge of the region but given the tools that they were given, improvising and being creative and getting out trying to relate to people and i think it's one of public diplomacies success stories and i understand it's hard to talk about the -- use the word success in iraq in the same sentence because things are still so very much up in the air, but the cables suggest a trajectory of officers who answer the call, were loyal, served and accomplished impressive things. >> you mentioned the assistant secretary of state for educational cultural affairs at the time and then you also mentioned embassador adam -- >> yes. >
CSPAN
Apr 29, 2012 9:00pm EDT
tendency. take a more significant one. when i was in china recently, i learned that in chinese hospitals there are enormous queues, long waiting lines. people come from the countryside sometimes waiting for days to see a doctor. and it's giving rise to an industry, entrepreneurs hire people, homeless people or others, to wait in the line to get the appointment ticket which is very cheap, and then they sell those tickets. it's like ticket scalping outside a world series game or a concert sell the ticket to the highest bidder. now, this is for access to see a doctor in a hospital. and so the question arises when should the principal of the queue -- first come, first served -- govern, and when should the ability to pay govern? the answer may be different for amusement parks and for hospitals, but these are the kinds of questions i think we need to begin to debate and to discuss and to be aware of. >> host: you mentioned where do we figure out the difference, where's the line between markets deciding how much you're going to pay for this -- >> guest: right. >> host: -- and somehow the public
CSPAN
Apr 30, 2012 12:00am EDT
strong illustrations of this tendency take a more significant one. when i was in china recently learned that in chinese hospitals there are enormous queues, long waiting lines. people come from the country sometimes countrysides waiting for days to see a doctor, and it's given rise to an industry. entrepreneurs hire people, homeless people are others waiting in line to get the ticket which is very cheap. and then they sell those tickets. it's like ticket scalping outside of a world series game or concert, sell it to the highest bidder. now this is for access to see a doctor and hospital. and so, the question arises when should the principle first-come, first-served, first-served governor, and when should the ability to pay governor? the answer may be different for amusement parks and hospitals the these are kind of questions i think we need to begin to debate and to discuss and to be aware of. >> host: you mentioned where we feel the difference, where's the line in the market society and how much are you willing to pay for this, and somehow the public democracy deciding am i going to wa
CSPAN
Jan 8, 2011 10:00pm EST
development, so i point to the fact china might be a very dirty place today but it's because both the price they pay for this added pollution for the acid rain and the environmental consequences of this very fast cold growth they are engaged is i daresay to develop less important, less relevant than providing jobs to millions and millions of farmers that are being displaced. so right now their calculations in society the pollution is worth it. now as they move up the environmental and economic ladder this choice will change because we are suddenly adding an extra job and will not be as perfect for getting this extra chunk of pollution and they would become a little bit more like us. boustany you also talked about in the u.s. we pay people to take your garbage away and buried somewhere and another country v.p. singh more and putting a high price on it causes people may be to recycle more and that in some other places people will spend their days going through garbage in order so it's a resource because they feel they can line eight. >> guest: this hypothetical girl in india making a living i
CSPAN
Jan 9, 2011 9:00pm EST
development, and so i point to the fact that china might be a very dirty place today, but it's because the price that they pay for the added pollution kof the acid rain, all of the environmental consequences of this very fast, cold fuel the growth of that they are engaging in right now is at their stage of development was important, less relevant than providing jobs to millions and millions of farmers that are being displaced. so right now their calculation to the society is the pollution is worth it. now as they move up the environmental and the economic ladder, this choice will change because suddenly adding an extra job will not be as perfect for, you know, adding this extra chunk and they become a little bit more like us. >> host: you also talk about how we in the u.s. we pay people to take our garbage away and bury it somewhere and in other countries to pay even more and putting a high price causes people to maybe recycle more and then in some other places people will spend their days going through garbage in order -- it's a resource for them because they can feel they can
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2011 12:00am EST
function of our stage of development, and so i point to the fact that china, china might be a very, very dirty place today, but it's because the price that they pay for this, you know, added pollution for the acid rain and all the environmental consequences of this very fast, coal-fueled growth they are engaged in right now. at their stage of development, it's less important and less relevant than providing jobs to millions and millions of farmers that are being displaced from the rural economy. right now, their calculations as a society is the pollution is worth it. now, as they move up, the environment -- the economic ladder i mean, this choice changes because adding an extra job will not be as worth it for, you know, adding this extra chunk of pollution, and they will become more like us. >> host: you talk about how in the u.s. we pay people to take our garbage away and bury it somewhere, and another countries they pay even more and putting a high price on it causes people to recycle more, and then in other places, people will spend their dayings going through garbage in order -- so i
CSPAN
Sep 2, 2012 9:00pm EDT
. that's why they see the middle class of china and india in particular as representing that growth. that's the whole heart of things. whereas in the u.s., more stable now, and the folks at the bottom don't have the money to buy like they once did. >> host: you know, when president obama says something of this type publicly, he's castigated said to be attacking people who create wealth in america, and it's said when he said you didn't build it that the larger society contributed the legal structure, the bridges, the roads, he is said to be demeaning small business owners in america, would you agree or disagree? >> guest: no, absolutely not. he's absolutely right. it could have been phrased more elegantly, perhaps, but he's absolutely right. that's like us saying we did this ourselves. we didn't. we had all kinds of help. the idea that one person or two people do everything -- the best example is steve jobs and apple. apple derived enormous ben facilities from the advanced research project agency that really started the interpret. it was not al gore. does he pay tribute to that? abso
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2009 12:00am EST
it can work anywhere, australia, china, india, and hopefully if aid likes it. they sent 71 of their top project managers to see how it's done, and it's one of the examples i use in this book. >> host: i want to talk a little bit more later about the ways in which -- the ways that you might want to -- about how one goes about getting people to invest in this point of view. reading the book would be a start. i want to know why you invested in it? you write about reading tarzan backs, dr. dolittle. i find it hard to think of you as jane, but you're a different kind of jane. >> guest: i was very jealous of that stupid jane. >> host: how so? >> guest: because i wanted to be with rzan myself. anyway. from the time i was born -- i was interested in animals, animals, animals, animals. i'm going to go to africa and live with animals and write books about them. at a time when girls didn't do those sort of thing. world war ii was raging. we didn't have enough money for a bicycle, let alone a car. that's why i didn't go to university, couldn't afford it. but i had an amazing mother, and she wou
CSPAN
Jan 3, 2010 11:00am EST
replicate this around other wilderness areas. you know, it would work anywhere. australia, china, india, and so hopefully usaid loves it. they sent a 71 of their top project managers to see how it's done. and it's one of the examples i use in this book. >> host: i want to talk a bit more about, later, about the ways in which -- the ways that you might want kashmir or about how one goes about getting people to invest in his. obvious he, reading the book would be a start it but i want to know why it is you invested in a. you write about creating tarzan books, reading doctor doolittle. i find it difficult to think of you as jane, even though you are jane. you would have been a different kind of jane, i think, but where did your passion come from? >> guest: i was very jealous of that stupid jane. [laughter] >> host: how so? >> guest: because i wanted to be tarzan to make myself. [laughter] >> host: will. >> guest: but anyway, from the time i was born apparently i was only interested in animals, animals, animals. books about animals. 11 years old i'm going to go to africa and live wit
CSPAN
Sep 9, 2012 12:00pm EDT
you can understand why they're coming from. the middle class in china endorse the middle class. middle class in india, brazil, you name it. and that's why they say the u.s. is kind of irrelevant. >> host: thermos looking for growth. that's the part of the whole stock receipt. they want growth with companies took the multinational connect in such operations and revenue streams. that's where they want growth and that's why they see the middle class in china and india in particular mr. presenting macro. they don't have the bottom unshared money to buy what they once did. >> host: when someone says something of this type publicly, use cap related india said to be attacking people who create wealth in america. when he said he didn't know, the larger society contributes the legal structure, bridges and roads, he said to be demeaning small-business owners in america. do you agree or disagree? >> guest: he's absolutely right. it could've been phrased more elegantly perhaps. he's absolutely right. loopy late gemini saying we developed this ourselves. we didn't do it ourselves. we had al
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 9:00pm EDT
china and other places and of course incredibly fascinating. but my book is about errors that have been made here in the united states and europe. it has absolutely nothing to do with china, the education, all the structural problems like infrastructure, things like energy policy that don't have anything to do with china and are essential to get right to make sure the u.s. and european countries are on track. >> host: it's almost as if there's a couple of different books in one book. there is your story of the decline of the west, your story of the rise of the east and the lines are going to cross. >> guest: i think this is you can argue there's an absolute part for short talking about the west and its isolation and issues going out there and going in an amazing time and other european economies have done the unthinkable moving hundreds of millions of people out of poverty so this is going to naturally be able to question as well. >> host: let's talk about what is going wrong in the west. >> guest: first of all its important that in terms of the context of my work i talk about the
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2011 12:00pm EST
the soviet union or china or cuba, whatever, you name it. again and again and again. and we are not learning any of it. and the reason why is the wretched, wretched states -- state of our universities. that are not teaching this stuff, that are currently biased, that do not believe in ideology diversity at all. and by the way, are way overpriced while we are at it. i'll stop there, how's that? >> this event was hosted by the heritage foundation in washington, d.c.. for more information visit heritage.org. >> coming up next, book tv presents "after words," an hour-long program where we invite guest hosts to interview authors. this week "new york times" editorial board member eduardo porter discusses the history of white people are willing to pay what they do for the things that are important to their lives. in his latest book, "the price of everything," the former "wall street journal" argued -- wright argues goods and services are not your thing with a cost. decisions also have a price, and those costs shape our everyday lives. mr. porter discusses "the price of everything" with yah
CSPAN
Sep 1, 2012 10:00pm EDT
class in china dwarfs the middle class now. the middle class in india, brazil, you name it. and it is why they say the u.s. is irrelevant. >> guest: there are is looking for growth. that is the heart of the whole financial aristocracy. they want growth in stocks and they want the companies that have the multinational connections and operations and revenue streams. that is where they want growth and that is why they see the middle-class in china and india in particular is representing that growth. that is the whole hearted that were in the u.s. we are stable now and the folks at the bottom don't have the money to buy like they once did. >> host: you know when president obama says something up this type publicly, he is castigated and he he is said to be attacking people who create wealth in america. it said, when he said you didn't build it that the largest society contributed the legal structure and the bridges on the roads, he is demeaning small small-business owners in america. do you agree or disagree? >> guest: absolutely now. he is absolutely right. it could have been phrased m
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2011 9:00pm EST
65%. the chinese took 23%. a lot of people don't even know china was in the war. a million yugoslavs, they took a 3% and so it goes on. so the statistics are not all of it but they are still amazing that you have, for example if you were a russian soldier you had a one in four chance of being killed. if you were a british soldier you had a one in 20 chance and as an american soldier one and 30. there's something else that's very important and one has to qualify this by saying it's almost insulting to say to people who went through the experience where the people had it is the privilege of historians of people in the comfortable television studio to say here but if you were a g.i. or a british soldier with your meats blown to bits around you to have someone coming around the corner and say it is much worse on the russian front this is insulting. if you are an american or british housewife struggling with rations and say did you know that they are eating jell-o, that fathers are selling their daughters? we always have to maintain that sense of humility and we must never forget here we
CSPAN
Apr 11, 2010 6:00pm EDT
all to the port from where it will go to china. there it will turn into cars and smoke and certain cities that spring up overnight. to a growth rate that leaves economists breathless, into weapons to make war. everyone is asleep except for the centuries who take one and half hour shifts. finally i could look at the stars. when i was a child growing up on the banks of the miniature river i used to think of the crickets -- i used to think that the sound of the crickets, which always started up at twilight, was the sound of the stars roughing up, getting ready to shine. i am surprised at how much love being here. there is no where else in the world that i would rather be. who should i be to night? conrad under the stars. maybe dee dee will come tomorrow. they arrive in the early afternoon. i can see them from a distance about 15 of them in olive green and uniforms running towards us, even from a distance from the way they run i can tell they are the heavy hitters, the people's revolutionary army for home laser-guided rifles, for whom the counterterrorism and jungle warfare training co
CSPAN
Sep 16, 2012 9:00pm EDT
columbus thinking he was in china, japan, india, and that made it strands for into the european languages and stock. i guess on the one hand we consoles columbus for others. he didn't show up and say there are humans here. it had to be somewhat uttered and disempower so the whole colonial mentality was problematic. other terms can also be pretty ambiguous or confusing. you know, whether it is native if you say a native from minneapolis or minneapolis native does that mean a native american or someone that has lived there for their entire life. and so, you know, there is ambiguity, same as indigenous people to most parts of the world. and so there are some ambiguities, but there is an effort to find, you know, respectful ways to talk about things. in canada they've changed that terminology from their reserves to first nations to find emphasis in the united states on the nationhood on the troubled governments rather than on thinking of them just as cultural enclaves. certainly the tribal terms ourself referenced and they are always faced. at the same time it sounds a little centric to use t
CSPAN
Jan 29, 2012 9:00pm EST
asia in the rise of china coming in here to talk about what you think should be the whole of the united states in the future. in the west the u.s. should remain i suppose in its role of a promoter and a guarantor of the creature and a broader unity. in the east be distinguished america's role saying that we should be the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain that a little bit more why these need to be separate roles? >> guest: in the case of europe we were engaged in the world for and had to be engaged in the world war because the two world wars were still fought on a promise that the victor would dominate the world, and i think it is correct to say that the world wouldn't be better off if it was a stalinism. today that is no longer the issue. in the east is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view is that if we do not do the things i say in my book, and i'm thinking of it strategically, the world will succumb to greater and greater turmoil. the world is now not only composed of competitive states that should be as possible coopera
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2011 12:00am EST
interesting, and the other thing she noticed is there was a lot of ships coming from china to the u.s. fully laiden, but going back half empty because, you know, the things that america exports to china are not bulky. it's more intellectual property and iou's from the government. she thought, i'll load the waste paper on the half empty ships, send it back to china, and recycle it there. she used her contact back in china to set up factories, recycle it into card board boxes and you put the tvs in those boxes and send it back to america. she's now a billionaire in china and straddling both countries, and she's able to link the two. >> host: did she face -- what was the approach or the response by the chinese government in her setting up the factories? did she find any red tape? were there any hurdles to doing that? >> guest: i'm sure there was quite a lot of red tape, but, you know, very often in china, if you want to do business there, it's not a simple, you know, there are a bunch of laws, and if you follow them, you are okay. it's a lot more about knowing the right people and knowing who y
CSPAN
Dec 18, 2011 9:00pm EST
of ships coming from china to the u.s. fully laden. but going back half empty because, you know, the things that america exports to china tend not to be very bulky. it's like movies and intellectual property and ious from the goth. government. and so she thought, well, hold on, why don't i load up this waste paper on these half empty ships, send it back to china and recycle it there. so she used her contacts to set up some factories to recycle this stuff into cardboard boxes and, of course, she put tvs into them and send them back to america. she's now one of the richest women in china. completely straddling both countries. her family straddles both countries, and she's able to link the two. >> host: and, robert, what was the approach by the, or the response by the chinese government in her setting up the factories? did she find any red tape, was there any, were there any hurd p les to doing that? >> i'm sure there was quite a lot of red tape. very often in china if you want to do business there, it's not a simple, you know, there are a bunch of laws, and if you follow them, you're o
CSPAN
Feb 5, 2012 11:00am EST
the east, in asia. the rising china. and here you talk about what you think should be there to ogle of the united states in the future. in the west, the u.s. should remain as a provider and guarantor of crater, cracker community. and it used to distinguish america's role saying we should eat the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain more why pc to be be separate roles? >> guest: because in the case of europe, and two world wars we had to be engaged in these two world wars because these two world wars worse though thought on the premise that big two would dominate the world. and i think it is correct to say and morally right to say that the worlds wouldn't be better off if there was hitlerism. today that is no longer the issue. the issue is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view is that if we do not do the same if a fan made up and am thinking of it strategically, though, to crater and greater is not only composed of competitive states if possible composed and nature historical continuity. it is composed of what i call global politic
CSPAN
Mar 21, 2011 12:00am EDT
on in the east and china and the other places. of course, it's fascinating, but my book is really about the errors made here in the united states and europe. it's a home-grown program on policy nothing to do with china, things like education, all the structural problems like infrastructure and energy problems that have nothing to do with china and essential to get right to make sure the u.s. and european countries are back on track. >> host: it's like a couple different books in one book. there's the story of the decline of the west, the rise of the east, and the basic premise of the lines are going to cross. >> guest: you can argue there's an absolute part for sure talking about the west in isolation and what the issues are going on there, and then, of course, we live in an amazing time of china and other emerging economies have done the unthinkable, moving hundreds of thousands of people out of poverty. of course, that's answering the ire relative question as well which is what i've done in the book. >> host: let's start by talking about what's going wrong in the west. >> guest:
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2012 12:00am EST
, and asia, the rise of china, are you talk about, the dual role of the united states in the future, it will remain in its early promoter and guarantor of greater and broader unity. in the east to distinguish america's role, saying we should be the balance there and conciliator between major powers. can you explain him or why need to be separate roles? >> in the case of europe, in two world wars we had to be engaged in these two world wars because these two world wars were still thoughts on the premise that dirt. it is correct to say and morally right to say that the world wouldn't be better off if the or with hitler. today that is no longer the issue in the issue is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view and if we do not do the things they say in my book and i'm thinking of it strategically, the world will calm to greater and greater turmoil, confusion. the world is now not only composed of competitive states they should we have possible cooperative states, it is also composed and this is a very major goal historical continuity. it is composed of what i call globa
CSPAN
Feb 13, 2011 9:00pm EST
years predicts china and turkey will challenge the remaining superpower in the coming decade in ways the government may not currently anticipate. he talks with the executive editor of the foreign policy magazine, susan glasser. >>> george, thank you so much for joining us. i'm thrilled to have the chance to talk to you in debt about your new book the next decade. i see that it represents a little bit of what is the right word, the narrowing of the frame of ambition from the last book on the next 100 years so you have now taken on the slightly more manageable next ten years or perhaps that's actually more and noble, the next ten years. we can talk about that a little bit of the next hour to get some of your counter intuitive viewers i think about the world is headed and the d'huez encounters with that world whether it is on israel or china and your view of the rise or russia and i think the interesting things to say that are not exactly what you're going to pick up from reading the papers every day. so let's go ahead and jump into that conversation. the next ten years for the next thr
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 10:00pm EDT
east and what's going on in china and other places, and of course it is incredibly fascinating. but my book is really about the errors that have been made here in the united states and in europe. there is a homegrown problems are not policy, and it has absolutely nothing to do with china. things like education, the structural problems like infrastructure, things like the energy policy that don't have anything to do with china and really are essentials to get right to make sure the u.s. and european countries are on the right track. >> host: is almost like there's a couple of different books in one book. there is your story of the decline of the west. the rise of the east, and i guess the basic premise is that the lines are going to cross. >> you can argue that there is an absolute part talking about the west and its isolation and with the issues are going on there and of course we live in an easing time when china and the other emerging economies have done the unthinkable moving these people of poverty so it is going to be in the year relevant question as well which is what i have d
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