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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2014 9:00pm EST
criticize them for things we don't china or saudi arabia for. russia is a european country, they are a member of the counsel of europe, and signed on to conventions of agreements where they are supposed to adhere to the norms and china and saudi arabia haven't done that. it is true the u.s. has not been consistent for criticizing russia and not their neighbors and i go into this in the book because they are important partners for the united states at least in the war on terror. i think the obama administration has been pretty skilled at dealing with these issues. the reset, when it worked, and it hasn't in the last year or two, worked with russia on common interest like iran, missile defense and afghanistan and saying it was a two-track policy and separated from what what the was happening domestically in russia. this has changed in the last year, well the last couple years, since putin has thrown out other u.s. ngo's and we had the acts that banned the adoption of russian children. the u.s. congress, if you look at the entire, again 23-year period that i am look at, hasn't been a sour
CSPAN
Feb 1, 2014 10:00pm EST
criticize russia for doing things that we don't criticize china for. the russians have of course said that russia is a european country. there are a number -- member of the consulate of your been signed off on conventions do agreements where they are supposed to adhere to these norms which of course china hasn't done and saudi arabia hasn't done but it is true that i think the u.s. has in the past not been consistent in the way that it has criticized russia for something should happen to drastically and not criticize some of russia's neighbors in azerbaijan and kazakhstan. you think the obama administration has been pretty skilled at dealing with these issues. when at work and it hasn't worked so well in the last two years differentiated between working with rush on these common interests like arms control, like iran like missile defense, like afghanistan and saying it was it to track policy in the woods separate what was happening domestically and russia. it has been fairly quiet and reserved in what is happening domestically. this has changed a little bit in the last year since, or
CSPAN
Feb 9, 2014 12:03pm EST
russia for doing things we don't criticize china for, saudi arabia. the russians have of course that russia is a european country. their member of the council of era. they signed up to agreements where they are supposed to adhere to these alien tick marks, which of course china hasn't done to my saudi arabia hasn't done. but the u.s. in the past has not been consistent in the way it is criticize for some things that happened domestically and not criticize some of russia's neighbors. i go into this in the book because there's strategic partners for the united states at least in the war on terror. the obama administration has been pretty scaled at dealing with these issues. the reset when it worked and how that works so well in the last year or two explicitly differentiated between working with russia on common interests like arms control, like her rant, like missile defense, like afghanistan and he was separated from what was happening domestically and russia. it's been fairly quiet and reserved in what it has said about what is happening domestically. this has changed a little b
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2013 8:00pm EST
1979, china, the rise of deng xiaoping and the beginning of a turn towards the markets and to mao and his cultural revolution. poland as you mentioned the election of the polish pope pope john paul ii in his return to his homeland and the precursor of the solidarity movement. great britain and and the election of margaret thatcher and the tom alt over the british economy that has been really lost as part of the historical narrative of written after thatcher. i'm looking forward to coming back to that a number five of course the one probably the most people think of first when they think of 1979, the iranian revolution the toppling of the shah and the hostage crisis. wow that's an awful lot of ground to cover. let's start with thatcher. there has just been huge outpourings of tributes to thatcher on the occasion of her death. magazine covers revisited. your book takes apart some of the myths of margaret thatcher. >> guest: well i tried to do that. it's always a challenge because you want to show why somebody is worth knowing about in the first place. there have been a lot of revisionis
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2014 12:00am EDT
agreed by both side, both the liberals and the conservatives. >> host: we talk about china. where is china in all this? described as sort of america's banker, and i interested in -- you talked about the rhetoric from republican politics, mitt romney talking about naming -- shaming china as the currency manipulator on day one -- >> guest: never happened. >> host: talked about the economic nationalism -- >> guest: that's right. economic nationalism has always been a theme in america. people like pat buchanan who talk about this, been on the fringes of the debate it if you look at the 19th century, america was the great protectionist country. that's historical. the fact is, as someone described to me, the american industrial base was built behind a high tariff wall. that is just what happened. the argument on the right is very much -- has been about -- or shaded into the, as you say, x actually it's not just about economic nationalism. it's also about having a level playing field. so if i'm exporting cars into china, i have 15% tariff to get my goods into china, whereas if i'm a chinese
CSPAN
Aug 4, 2012 10:00pm EDT
china or iran or turkey, they are invoking the greatness of their empire and the past asatir and the united states tends to be more future oriented. in this particular case, you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis in the and the trauma the iranian revolution is still very formative in the minds of americans who are responsible for iran policy? >> guest: it is and ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that the iranians are the most historical or the least historical society. in this case i think certainly the iranians every time we have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow the iranians bring up a whole litany of historical agreement so it's always on their mind. whether u.s. policymakers realize it or not, they are too. for the first 10 years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was foremost in american policymakers mind. the iran-contra happens which closes the relationship of the next 15 years. we saw what happened to reagan and then, and over a series of time where iran has spurred u.s. efforts to -- for reproach. we seem to be
CSPAN
Aug 5, 2012 9:00pm EDT
, that other cultures are always invoking whether it's china or iran or turkey, they're invoking the greatnessover their empires in the past, etc. , and the united states tends to be more future-oriented. but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and the trauma of the iranian revolution is still very formative in the minds of americans who were responsible for iran policy? >> guest: it is. body ryan crocker told me -- ambassador ryan crocker told me that the iranians are the most historical or the least historical society. in this case certainly the iranians every time we have a negotiation, including the most recent ones and moscow, the iranians bring up a whole litany of historical grievances, so it's always on their mind. whether u.s. policymakers realize it or not, they are too. for the first ten years after the revolution, clearly the hostage issue was formost in american policymakers' mind. then iran contra happens which sort of colors the relationship for the next 15 years, why are we going to risk an opening to the iranians when we saw what h
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2012 12:00pm EDT
cultures are always invoking either china or iran or turkey. the about the greatness of their empires in the past come et cetera and the united states tends to be more future oriented. in this particular case he found the trauma of the hostage crisis in the iranian revolution is still very formative in the mind of americans who are in response of americans who are in response of americans who are in response he ran policy? >> guest: ambassador ryan crocker told me one time that the arenas are the most historical or this historical society. and every time we have the negotiations come including the most recent one, they bring a that many of historical grievances. sl is on their mind. the third u.s. policy makers really think they are to appear for the first 10 years, clearly the hostage issue was foremost in american policymakers to nine. the iran-contra happened swatch colors the next 15 years. why are we going to risk an opening to the ring and suicide have been to iranian and over a series of incidents where iran has spurred u.s. effort for roper schmoll, we seem to be captured by. the
CSPAN
Feb 5, 2012 11:00am EST
the east, in asia. the rising china. and here you talk about what you think should be there to ogle of the united states in the future. in the west, the u.s. should remain as a provider and guarantor of crater, cracker community. and it used to distinguish america's role saying we should eat the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain more why pc to be be separate roles? >> guest: because in the case of europe, and two world wars we had to be engaged in these two world wars because these two world wars worse though thought on the premise that big two would dominate the world. and i think it is correct to say and morally right to say that the worlds wouldn't be better off if there was hitlerism. today that is no longer the issue. the issue is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view is that if we do not do the same if a fan made up and am thinking of it strategically, though, to crater and greater is not only composed of competitive states if possible composed and nature historical continuity. it is composed of what i call global politic
CSPAN
Feb 14, 2011 12:00am EST
, is given we've been in the argument a long time that china has profound economic problems at this point. it's grown in 0 years. it will continue to grow, but it's going to go through an adjustment. the most important thing to argue is the next 10 years is really about the relationship what i call empire of republic. it's between the vast global power of the united states, the difficulty in managing that and retaining republican forms of government. the military industrial complex, i'm going beyond that. i'm saying the requirements of managing an international system in which we are the only global power with the institutions that we have, you know, the complexity of our intelligence organizations create the situation where no one has a clear idea of what everyone is doing aside from creating unnecessary chaos in the world, it creates real challenges for the republic. i need to maintain a democratic society in the face of this both accumulating and nontransparent power. i'd say those three things. >> host: the word balancing i think is a word that appears a lot in the course of the
CSPAN
Feb 13, 2011 9:00pm EST
years predicts china and turkey will challenge the remaining superpower in the coming decade in ways the government may not currently anticipate. he talks with the executive editor of the foreign policy magazine, susan glasser. >>> george, thank you so much for joining us. i'm thrilled to have the chance to talk to you in debt about your new book the next decade. i see that it represents a little bit of what is the right word, the narrowing of the frame of ambition from the last book on the next 100 years so you have now taken on the slightly more manageable next ten years or perhaps that's actually more and noble, the next ten years. we can talk about that a little bit of the next hour to get some of your counter intuitive viewers i think about the world is headed and the d'huez encounters with that world whether it is on israel or china and your view of the rise or russia and i think the interesting things to say that are not exactly what you're going to pick up from reading the papers every day. so let's go ahead and jump into that conversation. the next ten years for the next thr
CSPAN
Aug 26, 2012 4:00pm EDT
carry out. our military has a far boder array of responsibility and missions than a nation like china or russia or other nations in the world. and to protect ourselves to protect our seedlings to respond to humid tear crisis and have a missile defense and list goes on and on in various challenges our military has. in my view, requires an annual budget of 4 percent of gdp. right now we're 3.8% of our gdp. total spending is about 20% of the gdp. we're saying the defense budget ought to be 20%. there are a lot of percentage. i apologize for taking that course. i think sometimes we say, gosh, we're spending so much more than any other nation in the world. why should we be sp spending any more on the military? they spend far less than we do. as you go behind the numbers and find they don't report all of their military spending and their cost, for instance, of standing up an army they have con sings, not a paid voluntary arm army. their costs are lower. china is not spending at 10% the level at the united states but something close the level of half the united states. if we were paying with
CSPAN
May 13, 2013 12:00am EDT
of afghanistan which happenin' 1979. chine. china. the rise of dung xiaoping and his beginning of a turn towards the markets and an end to mao and his cultural revolution. poland, as we mentioned, the election on the polish pope john paul ii and his return to his homeland and the precursor of the solidarity movement. great britain, the election of margaret thatcher and the real thumb put over the british economy that has been lost as part of the historical narrative of britain after thatcher. so, i'm looking forward to coming back to that. and then number five, the one people thing about first, the iranian revolution. the toppling of the shah and the hostage crisis. that's an awful lot of ground to cover. let's start with thatcher. there's just been huge outpouring of honors for thatcher. and your book takes apart ofsome of the myth office margaret thatcher. >> guest: i tried to do that but it's always a challenge because you want to show why somebody is worth knowing about in the first place, right? there's been a lot of revisionist histories of thatcher, a lot of people correct so
CSPAN
May 19, 2013 12:00pm EDT
. so afghanistan and the communist takeover of afghanistan which happened in 1979. china, the rise of deng xiaoping and his beginning of a turn towards the market and in the mao and this cultural revolution. poland as we mentioned, the election of the polish pope john paul ii and his return to his homeland in sort of a precursor to the solidarity movement great britain, the election of margaret thatcher and the real pommel over the british economy which i think haspart of the hie of britain after thatcher. some looking for becoming back to that. vin number five of course, the one probably that most people think of first when you think of 1979, the iranian revolution, the toppling of the shah and the hostage crisis in 1979. wow, that's an awful lot of ground to cover. let's start with thatcher. there's this huge outpouring, tribute to thatcher on the occasion of her death. and i've seen covers. your book takes apart some of the myth of margaret thatcher. >> guest: i tried to do that. it's always a challenge because you want to show why somebody is worth knowing about in the first place
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2013 9:00am EDT
of afghanistan which happened in 1979. china, the rise of show ping and you are return to the markets and mao and cultural revolution. poland as we mentioned. the election of the polish pope, john paul ii and return to the homeland and precursor of the solidarity movement. great britain, the election of margaret thatcher and real tumult over the british economy that has been really lost as part of the historical narrative of britain after after thatcher. i'm looking forward to coming after that. number five the one most people think of first when they think of 1979, the iranian revolution and toppling of the shah and the hostage crisis in 1979. wow, that is awful lot of ground to cover. let's start with thatcher. there are huge out pourings of tribute to the thatcher on occasion of her death. magazine covers and revisiting. >> host: it is always a challenge. you want to show why somebody is worth knowing about in the first place, right? there are revision it histories of thatcher. people correcting misperceptions about her. you have to establish why she is important in the first place
CSPAN
May 11, 2013 10:00pm EDT
over of afghanistan which happened in 1979, china, the rise of deng xiaoping and the beginning of a turn towards the merchant annan and two now this cultural revolution. poland as you mentioned and the election of pope john paul ii and his return to his homeland after the precursor of the solidarity movement. great britain and the election of margaret thatcher and the british economy which i think is really been lost as a part of that political narrative of britain after thatcher and coming back to that and number five of course the one probably most people think of first when they think of 1979, the iranian revolution, a shot in the hostage crisis in 1979. wow, that's an awful lot of ground to cover but let's start with thatcher. there was a huge outpouring of tributes to thatcher on her death with magazine covers. your book takes apart some of the myths of margaret thatcher. >> guest: i try to do that. it's always a challenge because you want to show why someone is worth knowing about. there have been a lot of revisionist history of thatcher and a lot of people correcting some mis
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2012 9:00am EST
. >> guest: i think it's going to be a military virtual equal of the united states, china, and an economic equal, so we're going to a bipolar world. secondly, i think the american state, the nation-state, the government is in deep trouble, ralph. it cannot balance its budgets or secure its borders or win its wars or stop the hemorrhaging of its manufacturing base overseas. we lost six million manufacturing jobs in the first decade of the 21st century, some 55,000 factories shut down. the united states is declining as a great superpower and a great nation. but i think the most important thing i see is that america is disintegrating. i think it was lee hamilton that said the seven riff gal forces are becoming dominant in our society, and i think if you look at our country you will see that ethnically in terms of class, philosophy and ideology and in terms of race each, the united states seems to be breaking down into enclaves of people who separate from each other and do not much like each other and even detest each other. and so in that sense america will be a legal entity, i think
CSPAN
Mar 14, 2010 12:00pm EDT
like china or russia or other nations of the world and to protect ourselves, in response to the humanitarian crisis and have a nuclear deterrent against the nuclear threat, the list goes on and on of various challenges the military has. in my view, it requires an annual budget of roughly 4 percent of gdp right now 3.8% and total federal spending is over time approximately 20% of gdp. so it should be 20% i apologize for taking that course but sometimes we say we are spending so much more than any other nation in the world, why should we spend any more than the military? they spend far less. but actually, if you go behind the numbers, they don't report all military spending and the cost for instance of standing of the army, not a volunteer army the cost as much lower. if you look at a comparable basis china is suspending 10% that have level of the of the united states if we did with the same cost for the various resources. and russia likewise is spending a good deal more than a report which suggest we really cannot continue to pare down the military might we must be confident that
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2012 10:00pm EST
to what is happening in the east and asia, the rise of china and hear you talk about what you think should be the dual roles of the united states in the future. in the west, the u.s. should remain i suppose in its role as a promoter and guarantor of greater order unity. in the east you distinguish america's role saying that we should be the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain that a little bit more, why these need to be separate roles? >> guest: because of the case of europe, we were engaged in two world wars and we had to be engaged in these two world wars. because these two world wars were still fought on the premise that the victor would dominate the world and i think it is correct to say and morally right to say that the world would be better off without hitlerism or stalinism. this is no longer the issue. the danger today in my view is if we do not do the things i say in my book, and i'm thinking of is strategically, the world will succumb to greater and greater turmoil in the future. the world is now not only composed of competitive states that s
CSPAN
Mar 7, 2010 9:00pm EST
responsibilities and missions then let's say a nation like china or russia or other nations in the world and to protect ourselves and respond to humanitarian crises to have a nuclear deterrent against a nuclear threat to have missile defense the list goes on and on and on of the challenges the military has. in my view it requires an annual budget of roughly 4% of gdp. right now about 3.8% of gdp and total federal spending but approximately 20% of the gdp. so we are seeing the the defense budget ought to be about 20% of the total gdp. a lot of percentages. i apologize for taking that course. but i think sometimes we say we are spending so much more than any other nation in the world why should we be spending any more on the military? because they spend for less than we do actually as you go behind their numbers and find they don't report all of their military spending and the costs for instance standing up an army where they have conscription, not paid volunteer army, the costs are lower so when you look at a more comparable basis china is spending a lot at 10% the level of the united states
CSPAN
Jan 29, 2012 9:00pm EST
asia in the rise of china coming in here to talk about what you think should be the whole of the united states in the future. in the west the u.s. should remain i suppose in its role of a promoter and a guarantor of the creature and a broader unity. in the east be distinguished america's role saying that we should be the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain that a little bit more why these need to be separate roles? >> guest: in the case of europe we were engaged in the world for and had to be engaged in the world war because the two world wars were still fought on a promise that the victor would dominate the world, and i think it is correct to say that the world wouldn't be better off if it was a stalinism. today that is no longer the issue. in the east is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view is that if we do not do the things i say in my book, and i'm thinking of it strategically, the world will succumb to greater and greater turmoil. the world is now not only composed of competitive states that should be as possible coopera
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2012 12:00am EST
, and asia, the rise of china, are you talk about, the dual role of the united states in the future, it will remain in its early promoter and guarantor of greater and broader unity. in the east to distinguish america's role, saying we should be the balance there and conciliator between major powers. can you explain him or why need to be separate roles? >> in the case of europe, in two world wars we had to be engaged in these two world wars because these two world wars were still thoughts on the premise that dirt. it is correct to say and morally right to say that the world wouldn't be better off if the or with hitler. today that is no longer the issue in the issue is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view and if we do not do the things they say in my book and i'm thinking of it strategically, the world will calm to greater and greater turmoil, confusion. the world is now not only composed of competitive states they should we have possible cooperative states, it is also composed and this is a very major goal historical continuity. it is composed of what i call globa
CSPAN
Feb 12, 2011 10:00pm EST
years predicts china and turkey will challenge the remaining superpower in the coming decade in ways the government may not currently anticipate. he talks with the exit is editor of foreign policy magazine, susan glasser. >> host: george, thank you so much. i'm glad to have the chance to talk to you in him that about your new book. i see that it represents a little bit of what's the right word, the narrowing of the frame of ambition from alaska on the next 100 years, you have now taken on perhaps a slightly more manageable next ten years or perhaps that is more unknowable, the next ten years. i think we can talk about that over the next hour, and some of your very counter intuitive views about what direction you see the world headed, and in particular the u.s. encounters with that world, whether it's on israel or her china and your view or russia. i can to have interesting things to say that are not exactly what you're going to pick up from reading the papers every day. let's go ahead and jump right into that conversation. the next ten years. what are the three most surprising to tak
CSPAN
May 5, 2013 9:00pm EDT
challenge is china. >> host: yes. >> guest: the administration has argued that this is completely separate from the middle east. we have a choice of either middle east or china. the pivot to asia was interpreted in the middle east to -- pivot away from the middle east. if you ask middle east and think about it from ruler to public intelligent -- the americans want to wash their hands from it. my argument is not so fast. the middle east is still strategically important and vital to us. we have a lot at stake there. it's also not separate from the china issue. it's a mistake. another big mistake to think that it's in asia-pacific. and middle east is completely irrelevant. but rather, i think, middle east would also be an arena of american chinese. the chinese are moving west. i the energy needs from middle east and central asia. they look at the arc from central asia to pakistan as their set of countries that are vital interest to civility of western china. they are looking for markets. for the chinese, middle east is a rising strategic concern and interest. where we think that thes
CSPAN
Feb 20, 2011 12:00pm EST
over china, or russia or i think you have some interesting things to say that are not exactly what you're going to pick up from reading the papers every day. so let's go ahead and jump right in to that conversation. the next 10 years, what are the three most surprising takeaways that you are offering people in this book? >> guest: i think first that the war on terror has been overdone. now that terrorism is not a profound danger but as a monochromatic structure of foreign policy. it simply is unsustainable. there are too many other things happening in the world. the second thing i suppose that china has profound economic problems at this point. it's grown magnificently and will continue to grow but it's going to go through adjustments there i suppose the most important thing i'm arguing is the next 10 years is really about the relationship between what i call empire and republic, between the vast global power of the united states, the difficulty in managing that and retaining republican forms of government. eisenhower spoke about the military-industrial complex. i'm going beyond th
CSPAN
May 4, 2013 10:00pm EDT
: our biggest problem is global issue in china pity the administration has argued that this is completely separate from the middle east coming and we have a choice of either middle east or china. so the term pivoting towards asia was towards asia and pivot away from the middle east. they think about it from ruler to public intellectual americans want to wash their hands of this. so my argument is not -- the middle east is strategically important and vital. we have a lot at stake but it's also not separate from the china issue. it's a mistake. it's another big mistake to think that china is in the asia-pacific. and the middle east is completely irrelevant. but rather might think the middle east will also be in the a reena moving west and they move from the middle east and central asia. they look at the arc of central asia to pakistan come in here and abroad if you want to call it. i said that countries that are of a vital interest to the stability of western china. they are looking for markets, building pipelines, roads into this region. so, for the chinese come in the middle ea
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2011 9:00pm EST
say, i don't want to go overseas. the guy down the road went joe seas, went to mexico, went to china. they undercut me. if i don't move my factory, i'm finished. frankly, i blame the free traders, blame them, and i used to be one of them. we used to be friends until i got a level saying i was doing the devil's work. i was opposed to free trade. i'm with you on that. my sense is that some of the business guys say, look, in the global economy they dump me in. i work for this company, and i've got to save the company, but if someone said the problem, ralph, is this, that the vital interests of the united states, and the vital interests of the fortune 500 are the # 00 or whatever it is, they used to be the same in this country, and they diverged. their intrirses, and, look, if what's good for general motors is moving factories overseas, than what's good for general motors is not good for the united states of america. >> host: it's happening with the solar industry. we were ahead from the world, and now the factories move to china because china gives them the store. >> guest: what do you
CSPAN
Sep 24, 2012 12:00am EDT
be celebrated. .. america actually has a surplus. so when you look with china, with a $6 billion surplus when it comes to services and a huge deficit when it comes to manufacturing. so, the iranians done correctly, which is figuring out how to match capital with good ideas is import in and having complex innovation is healthy for america system. the problem is short-term. short-term thinking where companies conmen and bankrupt companies for short-term gain instead of thinking what is the valuable long-term model of the rate of return? that has to do with corporate government laws and figuring out how we can have incentives and instructors that don't require an incentivize manager to make long-term decisions instead of macramÉ seeing the quarterly office. >> dgc and if these incentives that could be changed to incentivize? >> absolutely. but think a lot of the department of commerce help small and medium-sized businesses. 50% of their jobs to train our small come and medium-sized companies and small have an advantage because they are doing things. they can afford automation, maki
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2011 12:00pm EST
i think wúwúwúwú china is rising so fast it's going to be a military virtual equal of the united states.óúwú and equal so we're going to a bipolar world. secondly i think the american state, the nationstate, the government is in big trouble ralph. ópóúóúwpóúwpóúóúóúóúóúóp wú wú wúwú wúóú wp óúwú wúwúwúwú wú wp wpwpwp wúwúwú óú wpwpwpwúóúwú wúwúwúwúwpwúópwpwú wúwúóp wúóú óp wú wúwúwúwpwú óúwú wúwpwúwúwú wúwúwú wúwú óp wpóp óúóú wúwúóp wpwú óúwúwúwúwú óúóúwúóúwúwúwúóúóúóúwp wúwúwúwúwúóúóúóúwúwúópópwúóúwúwúwúwpwúwúwpwúwúwúwúwúóúwú wúwú wú wú wp ópwp óp óp óúóúwp wúwúwúwpwúwúwpwú some 55,000 factories shutwp down. the united states is declining as a great superpower to greatóúwp óú nation. wúwú butóp iwúwúwú think the most important thing iwp see is america is disintegrating. i think it was lee hamilton whowúwú said that the centrifugal forces are wpbecomingóúwp dominant inwúwp amewprican society. and i think if you
CSPAN
May 12, 2013 9:00pm EDT
takeover that happened in 1979. china, the rise of the turn to the end of mao and his cultural revolution. poland as we mentioned that election of pope john paul ii and the return to his homeland and the solidarity movement. great britain, but the election of margaret thatcher and i think it's been lost as part of the historical narrative of britain after margaret thatcher. so i am looking forward to coming back to that. then number five of course the one most people think of first when they think of the 1979 iranian revolution and the hostage crisis in 1979. that is an awful lot of ground to cover. let's start with margaret thatcher. there's been a huge outpouring of tributes to thatcher won the magazine covers and revisiting. your book takes apart some of the myths of margaret thatcher. >> guest: i tried to do that. it's always a challenge because we want to show why somebody is worth knowing about. there's been a lot of revisions come a lot of people correcting the misconceptions about her but of course first you have to establish why it's important in the first place and very few peop
CSPAN
Jan 9, 2011 12:00pm EST
nuclear weapons, not just to get china and russia, but let's look at iran. let's look at north korea. looks like a cube. the thick of the carrier. smart targets, smart targets, nuclear weapons we don't watch or nuclear nuclear weapons we don't want to nuclear policy to be. and so this is laid out sort of the january before the bush administration comes in. and then their nuclear posture he adopts many of the same suggestions. that could be great minds think alike, but certainly could be at least aggressive minds think alike. or it could be in fact they had a significant influence in the way this nuclear ply was put together. >> host: you can agine norm auguine was busy helping. >> guest: well, it's really an amazing, amazing crew. you have to give them credit. they really figured out how to work the system. poster they do it ceaselessly 24/7. there's a lot of money and make it well-paid to do it. casco precisely. but the biggest campaign contributor in the defense industry, one of the biggest lobbying spenders right up there with boeing. and a lot of work to do now because of the def
CSPAN
Nov 19, 2011 10:00pm EST
industry to china. so why isn't -- and they've devastated the family. they have separated chirp from their family. oaoaoaoaoaoaoaoaououououououoaouououoaoaouoaoaoaoañananaln@n.jótótó÷ótótótótótótótótótótótótótótó÷ótótótó÷ótótó÷ó÷ótótótwúó÷wpwpwpótwpwpwpwpw÷w÷w÷w÷w÷w÷w÷w÷ótw÷wtw÷w÷wtwtwtó÷ó÷ó÷ó÷ótó÷ó÷ótó÷ótótótótó÷ótótwúwúótó÷ >> when you put pornography onwúwú the internet for children andó÷ all the rest of it whether it's hollywood or the businesses,ó÷ót you're right, there are corrupt human beings that do that.wúót and i'm against that.wtót and you and i were opposed naftaópó÷ and these others. but only in partial defense ofótó÷ business guys when i traveled the company in '92 and '96, iwúwp talked to textile guys. i don't wantwú to go overseas. the guyó÷ over the road moved his factory to mexico, to china, they're undercutting me.ótó÷ if i don't move my factory, i'mó÷wú finished. i blame ideological freewúwú traders. i blamed them, and i used to beó÷ót one of them. milton
CSPAN
Jun 30, 2013 9:00pm EDT
in time i should have crossed the 38th parallel and gone all the way to china when i had just saved it. i saved it for you guys. you were the civilian overseers in the next 24 months he decided not to do something that was against my advice. you took my advice and years later you're criticizing me for not doing what you say that i should have done. so he honored the civilian relationship and he made it clear in the number of essays that, while he liked douglas macarthur personally and he respected his military acumen, that he was in error because he jeopardized that very valuable relationship and tension between civilian and military authority. >> host: i would love to hear a little bit more about that tension and that support the between the leaders of the states that you discussed and the commanders that you discussed. is that kind of, his full support from the leadership of the country necessary to have a savior general? >> guest: it is in its very controversial because these are generals who, at the 11th hour when the policy of the state and usually the commander in chief presid
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 2:00pm EDT
. and china, which is to say china is probably running through the end of its course of making argument we're simply a developing country, we can't afford to bear the burdens of international leadership that the united states has been paying. the first sign china wants to be recognized as the second largest economy in the world, growing toward eating at some point in the next couple of decades the largest economy in the world. at some point those conversations are going to meet. and the question of who pays the bill for global leadership and what is required in order to sustain that is going to come. i want to back up, december 31, 1991. you call the breakpoint in history. the collapse of the soviet union is what happened on that day. and the birth of the post-soviet era, not only in american foreign policy but in terms of literally rewriting the map of the world as we knew it. two decades later we're going to mark the anniversary this year. things haven't necessary turned out as some of the optimists would have had them. we have not seen a tidal wave of democracy and freedom wash acros
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2011 12:00am EST
-- of the pacific rim, all the way to canada and all the way out through japan and china and korea, and the conversation was different. about global trade and free trade, and i actually always thought in that sense the countries had more in common with their asian counterparts than their latin american counterparts. >> is it how they see themselves in their stage of development? >> i think it is. you look at places like chile, now quite developed, colombia getting there. a country click brazil is interesting because on the one hand it's leading the -- one of the leaders in the global economy but with huge income distribution difficulties that keep it more on the developing countryside. if you look at the poorest countries in, say, central america, like guatemala, for instance, you're talking about places where you can't even reach the farmers in the highlands bay highway, and so their problems are to build infrastructure so they can join the 20th century economy. forget the 21st century economy. so you have radically different levels of development. when you think about the radically di
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2011 12:00am EST
jobs and industry to china. why, and they've devastated the family. they have separated children from their parents. >> guest: right. >> host: we have a lot of documentation. how does this mix in the book? there's one nice quote from the president of ibm how the industrial america is abandoning. >> guest: i agree with almost everything you said. look, they had no -- look, when you put pornography on the internet for children and the rest of it, whether it's hollywood or the businesses, you're right, they're corrupt human beings that do that, and i'm against that. you and i were opposed nafta and the other things, but i will say, you know, in only partial defense of business guys, when i travel to the country in 1992 and 1996, i talked to guys who said, pat, i don't want to go overseas. the guy down the rote moved his factory to mexico or chie china. they are undercutting me. if i don't go, i'm finished. i blame the ideological free traders. i blame them, and i used to be one of them, friedman and i were friends until he wrote me a letter saying i'm doing the devil's work. i was oppose
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 12:00am EST
does business as usual with china. he goes into panama, in december '89 -- never forgot that because i had -- born on the 4th of july was opening that day, and the american people loved it. they backed the invasion. it was our backyard, it was a war on drugs and that was new issue now. communist had been forgotten. noriega was the new stalin, and then a year later, we had this iraq 1, and that's another untold story. iraq 1 was really depressing when you go into all the false intelligence and the doctoring of the photos. do you want to tell us about that? it breaks my heart personally, and as a veteran of the vietnam war, i see the next ten years we drift. we don't take advantage of the possibles with the soviet union, to keep it stable. we privatize with russia and then by the time the bush 43 comes in, it's not only squandered but the nightmare begins. so it's heartbreaking. >> did you want to comment? >> we see it as a lost opportunity. there's a lot of lost opportunities in the 20th 20th century, in march 5, 1965, when stall yip dies, the stove yet leaders reach out the u
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2009 10:00pm EST
america. so in asia, that's been the case for a while. china has had a sense of kind of growing american weakness for a while and as america's creditor, feels they've got more leverage over the united states, less inclined to, you know, be supportive on other geopolitical areas where we need their help in iran, north korea, etc. lots of south america and latin america, things look up. europe is having a hard time and the united states is having a hard time. but the question, this person said, is what happened to capitalism. you know, this talk of regulation, that the bailouts and whatnot, there's just a real fear about where america is headed in this regard. you see that reflected in some of our major companies, too, who don't like the uncertainty about health care reform, don't like the uncertainty about energy policy, about tax policy. i've spoken to c.e.o.'s who say, hey, where is the impetus for economic growth? we don't see it in the united states. there's no real impetus for investment. this is a real point of contention right now, as the administration is trying to get the private
CSPAN
Oct 10, 2017 9:30pm EDT
stands for china russia iran korea and trigger some --'s terrorism. i'm hoping that they will get more effort and resource people and leadership to tackle these tough problems. >> host: one of the most impressive part is what the different case studies and you've just named china russia and north korea, iran and the islamic state. i wanted to delve into some of these areas that we have seen 80s specific countries. the first one that i would like to go to is north korea. the general public is aware of the sony hack because it got so much media coverage and its in response to the movie the interview. why was this such a significant event because we spent a lot of time talking about this in the book. >> guest: i do a deep dive into the sony attack that took place in 2014, and it was based on the north korean government recognition that they were opposed this movie the to this e interview, which was what i call a ribald comedy. it wasn't that good of a movie that it was important in exposing the kind of problems north korea poses. it needs to be understood coming and i don't think a lot of
CSPAN
Apr 23, 2017 12:01pm EDT
called cricket, china, russia, iran, korea and terrorism and so those are the main threats that we need to address and thing that -- i'm hoping that under the trump administration they will get more efforts, both resources people and leadership to tackle the tough problems. >> host: one of the most impressive parts of the books is you look at different case studies of different countries, you named, china, russia, north korea, iran and isis, islamic state and i wanted to delve into some of the examples that we have seen of the u.s. of information warfare by these specific countries, the first one i would like to go to is north korea. i think the general public is well aware of the sony hack because it got so much media coverage, that's, of course, the hack in response to the movie of the interview. why was this such a significant event when it comes to information warfare because you spend a lot of time talking about that in this book? >> guest: i do a deep dive on the sony hack which took place in 2013 and based on the north korean government recognition that they were really oppo
CSPAN
Apr 14, 2017 10:00pm EDT
behaviors that are discouraged. there's growing friction between russia and china and the united states and others including: europe. the the balance of power is weaker than it was. nato in many ways has been demilitarized at the end of the cold war. russia did many things but is not demilitarized. that the people interest instrument of russian policy. china has demilitarized insignificant ways. there has been certain shifts in the balance of power, and entering it with the changes of balance economic wealth. you have the rise of all sorts of nonstate actors dramatically, al qaeda and isis who now can also wield power. you have medium states, north korea, iran could be a real factor in their regions. above all you have globalization and you have these enormous flows of just about everything from viruses, real or computer, two to guns, drugs, the greenhouse gases, components of missiles or bombs, hackers would send around the world, you name it. essentially, anyone or or anything that goes across borders with tremendous speed and tremendous volume. so, the old rules, the one to on
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2015 12:00am EST
territorial amibitions and showed that with the invasion of georgia. i looked at china and the microaggressions, to borrow a term in the east and south china sea, to anyone with an understanding of the first world war, you cannot -- the origins of the first world war are a story of crisis at the periphery backing crises at the center. i looked at iran continuing to move towards nuclear capability and iraq descending into increasing chaos as -- what we then called al qaeda resurged. so i had this idea we were entering into a period of global disorder and i fleshed that out in an 8,000 word article in "commentary" magazine. after writing the article i thought here is a theme -- in fact what really unites this theme is that all of this is happening as america has turned inward, and we already have as i said this, historical experience of what happens in the world when america turns inward. there's a connection, and so it was on that bay si is started to write the book. >> oo commercial question, your publisher, sentinel conservative imprint of penguin random house, what what's fir
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2015 12:00pm EST
thinking about simply in order to announce that it is dead. we do not want russia china rand intervening in latin america, and i don't think quite frankly venezuelans, cubans or ecuadorians do either. >> host: back to the book. part of your criticism of president obama which is much in the book, not the only one criticized. you refer to him as compared to the legendary king -- explained to the readers. >> guest: the viking king who stood on the shore line and commanded the tides recede to prove his godlike powers. when the president says the tide of war is receiving, he can only observe that hide receding. he cannot command it to show we can s.o.b. said you know what? the war in iraq is over and we're going to put an end to what used to be called the war on terrorism. president of the national defense university and may 2013 give a speech effectively saying exactly that, and we cannot allow this war on terror to define our generation. so we're going to change our attention to something else. and by the way, great news, al-qaeda, core al-qaeda us on the path to defeat and all
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2015 10:00pm EST
us one way or another whether it's the militants of islamic state whether it's china's general seeking to kick us out of east asia, whether his russian politicians seeking to revise the conclusions of the cold war. >> host: you mention in your subtitle the new isolationism and the coming global disorder. why coming? >> guest: i won't say who it was but a prominent person who read and liked this book said i liked it very much. the only word is the word coming which should be the current global disorder but in fact i think it's going to be you ain't seen nothing yet. i think it's going to be worse. for example of falling oil prices all of us are celebrating as consumers driving a car and not having to pay four bucks for a gallon of gas and we think that it gives us leverage over countries like russia and iran that perhaps we didn't enjoy before. my sense in fact is that russia and iran will become more dangerous as oil prices decline because they are now going to seek other ways to get out of their economic predicament. typically you think of a country like argentina in the early
CSPAN
Jun 12, 2017 12:00am EDT
arrive in china and russia, i think of it as the chessboard world. it is the world of how to we essentially beat our adversari adversaries. we think about a move that we try to anticipate the moves they make. that world is there an important. equally important is the world of the web. the web of criminal networks including terrorists and arms traffickers in the world of business which is big network supply chains. in the world of nongovernmental organizations. i think of these as web actors is increasingly important actors. we don't have strategies on how to bring them together. this book is a book that says ever going to have a world of strategies and how to deal with conflict between's dates we also need strategies on how to design networks for specific people. who do we connect, how do we connect them and run those networks to advance our goals. this book is a stres part of th. >> is a timely book very much. just building on what you said in your opening remarks, let me just go to what i thought was an effective quote that to depth argument in the book where you say on pages
CSPAN
Jun 11, 2017 8:54pm EDT
think about north korea or iran or sometimes china and russia, that world of state to state relations is still very, very important, and i think of it as the chess board world but it's the world of how do we essentially beat our at vers ears and we think d- -- adversaries and we think about a move and try to anticipate their move. that world there is and it's very important, but equally important is what i call the world of the web. that world of criminal networks, including terrorists, but also arms trackers and drug trackers. the world of business, which increasingly big networks supply chains, global corporations and the world of nongovernmental organizations. i think of all those actors as web actors, as increasingly important actors but we don't have strategies for how to bring them together. so, this book is a book that says, if we are going to have a world of a chessboard and strategies how you dollar -- deal with conflict between states and cooperation between state wes need strategies how to design networks for pick people. who do we connect, how do we connect them, how do we
CSPAN
Jul 7, 2017 9:00pm EDT
if you think about north korea or iran or sometimes china and russia, that world of state to state relations is still very very important. and i think of it as the chessboard world. because it is the world of how due we essentially be adversaries and rethink about a movie and trying to anticipate what move they are going to make. that world is there and it is very important. equally important is what i call the world of the web. that world of criminal networks. including terrorists but also arms traffickers and drug traffickers. the world of business. which is increasingly big network supply chain, global corporations. and the world of nongovernmental organizations. i think of all of those actors as web actors as increasingly important actors. but we don't have strategies for how to bring them together. so this book is a book that says if we are going to have a world of a chessboard and strategies of how you deal with conflict between states and cooperation between states, we also need a set of strategies for how to design networks for specific people. who do we connect, how do we
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