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Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jun 22, 2015 12:00am EDT
different as china, turkey, afghanistan, the united states, the middle east and north africa going through various instances of saying enough and when i mentioned china i think they were detained and five remain in detention because of the feminist protest. in afghanistan she is lynched for her views even though according to the traditions they say to the men most importantly no weatherman will touch her in reference to a woman that is raped and murdered and here in the united states in response to the police brutality we saw three women who after the murder of trayvon martin started the hash tag #blacklivesmatter. be they women of the middle east or the u.s. commanded the example women in india and hundreds and thousands protested. and there's the issue of women of color speaking out because i think that is historically in silence to the combination of things don't talk about these because it's going to make us look bad or because they give ammunition to the races to use against men so we have a double burden to bear and that is for the middle east and everywhere but these are the reasons
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2014 10:00pm EST
single civilization, whether it's in china, india, europe, middle east, developed a system whereby a small aristocracy comprising at most five percent of the population, took away the surplus of produce grown by the peasants and kept them at subsistence level in poverty and degradation and used this wealth they'd taken to fund their civilization or project. this could only have been done by force. they had this peasant somehow had to be subdued. so 90% of the population throughout -- for five thousand years were kept in distress and anger. now, as historians tell us, without this terrible system we would probably not have developed beyond a primitive level as a species, because this system supported a privilegedcast with the people who had the less sure to explore the arts and sciences on which civilization depended. plus, whether your economy is biased oning a actual tour, the only way you can, if you like, crease your gross national product is by acquiring more land and more peasants to farm it. consequencely, warfare was the only way for the economy to grow, and plunder was essent
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2014 9:00pm EST
depended on hacker culture and that meant whether it is china, india, europe, the middle east developed a system whereby the small comprising 5% of the population took away the surplus of the produce grown by the peasants and kept them at a subsistence level in the poverty and degradation and used the wealth that they have taken to fund their civilization project. this could only have been done by force. they somehow had to be subdued as did 90% of the population. for 5,000 years they were kept in distress and anger. now historians tell us that without this terrible system we probably wouldn't have developed beyond the primitive level as a species because the system supported the class with the people that had a measure to explore the arts and sciences on which the civilization depended. plus, when you are economy is based on a culture, the only way that you can increase your gross national product is by acquiring more land and presence. consequentially it became essential to the economy and it was the only way for the economy to grow and plunder and it was essential to supporting the ari
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2014 12:00am EST
on agriculture. and that meant that a small -- in every single civilization, whether it's in china, india, europe, the middle east, developed an inequity system where a small aristocracy comprising five percent of the population took away the surplus of produce and kept the peasants in at subsis stance and used the wealth they'd taken to fund their civilization project. this could only have been done by force. they had this peasant somehow how to be subdued. so 90% of the population throughout -- for 5,000 years, were kept in distress and anger. now, -- so, as historians tell us, without terrible system we november heat developed beyond as a species because this supported a privilegedcast with the people who had the leisure to explore the arts and sciences on which civilization depended. plus, where we all economy is based on agriculture, the only way you can, if you like, increase your gross national product is by acquiring more land and more peasants to farm it. consequently, warfare became essential to the economy. the only way for the economy to grow, and plunder, too, was also
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2014 8:59pm EST
civilization, whether china, india, europe, the middle east developed a system whereby a small aristocracy comprising at most 5 percent of the population took away the progress grown by the presence and kept them at subsistence level and used his wealth that they had taken to fund their civilization projects. this could only only have been done by force. they had this peasantry subdued. subdued. some 90 percent of the population throughout 5,000 years were kept in distress and anger. now, as historians tell us, without this terrible system we would probably not have developed beyond a primitive level as a species because the system supported a privileged caste with the people had the leisure to explore the arts and sciences, plus when your a economy is based upon agriculture, the only way that you can, if you like, like, increase your gross national product is by acquiring more land and more peasants to farm it. consequently warfare became essential to the economy. plunder was also essential to supporting the aristocratic lifestyle. that, of course, because we are meaning seeking creatures
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2014 8:00pm EST
and now the rise of china and the nuclear program even the president announced he wants to cut the military and others are getting this message the united states doesn't have the will or the wherewithal to stand against iran's around the world so clinton cut the defense budget and when you cut spending and maintain a certain level of revenue you're going to get a balanced budget and a surplus and that's what is happening in the states. i have a whole chapter in the book on what is happening in the states. we have indiana, louisiana, georgia, a lot of states doing fantastic job spellings in budgets committee assessed the state constitutions require them and i wish we could have been at the federal that at the federal level but also the policies. in indiana they send people checks when they have enough money. this is amazing to me. they say we need all this money. the federal government of course if you haven't spent it all spend it all because your budget might be cut next year but in indiana they send you a check what a remarkable thing. >> host: that brings us to another topic tha
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2013 8:00pm EST
1979, china, the rise of deng xiaoping and the beginning of a turn towards the markets and to mao and his cultural revolution. poland as you mentioned the election of the polish pope pope john paul ii in his return to his homeland and the precursor of the solidarity movement. great britain and and the election of margaret thatcher and the tom alt over the british economy that has been really lost as part of the historical narrative of written after thatcher. i'm looking forward to coming back to that a number five of course the one probably the most people think of first when they think of 1979, the iranian revolution the toppling of the shah and the hostage crisis. wow that's an awful lot of ground to cover. let's start with thatcher. there has just been huge outpourings of tributes to thatcher on the occasion of her death. magazine covers revisited. your book takes apart some of the myths of margaret thatcher. >> guest: well i tried to do that. it's always a challenge because you want to show why somebody is worth knowing about in the first place. there have been a lot of revisionis
CSPAN
Apr 20, 2014 12:00pm EDT
the rise of china and iran's nuclear program, even the president announced he wants to cut the military more. others are getting this message that the united states doesn't have the will much less the wherewithal to stand against tyrants around the world. clinton got the defense budget and when to cut spending and you maintain a certain level of revenue, you're going to get a balanced budget, probably a surplus. i have a chapter in the book on what's happening in the states. we have indiana, louisiana, georgia, a lot of states out there who are doing fantastic jobs, many of them balanced budgets are state constitutions require them. i wish we would have at the federal level. but also because of the policy. in indiana, the star state in my view of the country, they send people checks when they have enough money. this is an amazing thing to me. they say, we don't need all this money. the federal government of course, the word goes out, the into the fiscal year if you haven't spent it all, spend it all because you budget might be cut next year. in indiana this int injured jay. wha
CSPAN
Apr 12, 2014 10:00pm EDT
the rise of china and iran's nuclear program. the president has announced he wants to cut the military and putin and others are getting this message that the united states is not the will much less the wherewithal to stand against tyrants around the world. when you maintain a certain level of revenue yeah you're going to get a budget surplus and that is what is happening in the states. i have a chapter in the book on what's happening in the states. we have indiana and louisiana. at georgia and a lot of states out there who are doing fantastic jobs many of them with balanced budgets. the state constitutions require it but also because of their policies. in the end the star state of the country send people checks when they have enough money. this is an amazing thing to me. they say well we don't need all this money. the federal government the word goes out at the end of the fiscal year and a few have been spent at all spend it all because your budget may be cut next year but in the end they send you a check. what a remarkable thing. >> that brings us to another topic that you su
CSPAN
Dec 18, 2011 12:00pm EST
competition with them. the british takeover of the whole of the subcontinent. and china remains independent as an empiricism, in practice, it is economically hollowed out. and ultimately it goes down in 1911, exactly a century ago. in that sense i think writing the book taught me an important lesson about the nature of the historical process, that we shouldn't think if history is cyclical. we shouldn't think of it as gradual, seasonal or biological but we should rather think of it more in terms of complex, adaptive systems, the kind of things the study at the hoover institute. there are natural phenomenon's of behavior like this but it's very interesting to realize that civilizations are governed by similar laws, these complexes in the natural world. >> host: you mentioned in your book watching your own children grow up in england you had the uneasy feeling they were learning less history and you had learned at their age, and you write quote watching the financial crisis unfolds i realized that they were far from alone. for it seemed as if only a handful of people in the banks and treasures
CSPAN
May 13, 2013 12:00am EDT
of afghanistan which happenin' 1979. chine. china. the rise of dung xiaoping and his beginning of a turn towards the markets and an end to mao and his cultural revolution. poland, as we mentioned, the election on the polish pope john paul ii and his return to his homeland and the precursor of the solidarity movement. great britain, the election of margaret thatcher and the real thumb put over the british economy that has been lost as part of the historical narrative of britain after thatcher. so, i'm looking forward to coming back to that. and then number five, the one people thing about first, the iranian revolution. the toppling of the shah and the hostage crisis. that's an awful lot of ground to cover. let's start with thatcher. there's just been huge outpouring of honors for thatcher. and your book takes apart ofsome of the myth office margaret thatcher. >> guest: i tried to do that but it's always a challenge because you want to show why somebody is worth knowing about in the first place, right? there's been a lot of revisionist histories of thatcher, a lot of people correct so
CSPAN
May 20, 2013 12:00am EDT
with china. he was very instrumental from china and this is something that we know in the record. there were many others, mark says stephen and part of the economic policy and did want the soviet-style economy as it turns out from recent research at the time harry dexter white came across as the keynesian tradition and the counterpart of the post world war two global financial architecture and it is mind-boggling. >> guest: but there are hundreds of agents. some still have not been identified that the renewal for a fact there is something around 500 agents that have been identified that has come after the fall of the soviet union. >> host: but what was the key intercept that facilitated thisd this identification of 500? >> it was an archive set up going between the embassies and consulates back to russia or moscow. the western union was ordered to start making copies and the idea was to break the code and read them to find out whether south -- soviet allies wanted to make a better allies and when the codebreakers started to work on the cables is started to realize the soviet union was a
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2009 3:00pm EST
do something. >> host: pakistan and china have long relations. >> guest: for a long time. had been a landslide bridging islamabad in pakistan and koosh car in china. it was called a highway. it is the paul simon in the world. that ties built this to open up trade. about a week earlier there had been a fan slide that had blocked a vote on the pakistani side. the pakistanis couldn't move the rocks out of the way and the chinese were figures. they built a road. we did everything and there is a landslide. at least get the rocks out of the way. there was always in tension. then the masseuses were kidnapped. the army and the range of the pakistan rangers and the police also met at the mosque on july 3. and for 10 days, there was this stand up and occasional firing. you could hear glass across town. would stand up on the roof of my house and watch fireballs coming off of the top of the red mosque. finally the government, commandos pushed in, and they trapped ghazi inside the basement of the mosque and there was a shootout and ghazi was killed. now as we mentioned earlier, it was a very, ver
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2009 11:00am EDT
called a highway that is the tallest ever in the road china had built this to open trade and one week earlier there had been a landslide that had blocked the road on the pakistani side. they could not move the rocks out of the way and the chinese are furious saying we built the road just when there is a landslide at least get the rocks out of the way. there was attention than the masseuse was kidnapped. the army and pakistani rangers and police and military force around the mosque on july 3rd and 410 days there was a standoff you can hear blast across town we would stand upon the roof of my house and watch the fireballs coming up and finally the commandos pushed and they trapped gazi in the basement and there's a shootout and gazi was killed. as you mentioned earlier there is the awkward moment for me because the government had a paraded his dead bloated body in front of the television and said we got him and my response watching was okay, we got him that if he had been so instrumental in introducing me to another world that my contact was done as well. he was a friend in a weird
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2013 9:00am EDT
of afghanistan which happened in 1979. china, the rise of show ping and you are return to the markets and mao and cultural revolution. poland as we mentioned. the election of the polish pope, john paul ii and return to the homeland and precursor of the solidarity movement. great britain, the election of margaret thatcher and real tumult over the british economy that has been really lost as part of the historical narrative of britain after after thatcher. i'm looking forward to coming after that. number five the one most people think of first when they think of 1979, the iranian revolution and toppling of the shah and the hostage crisis in 1979. wow, that is awful lot of ground to cover. let's start with thatcher. there are huge out pourings of tribute to the thatcher on occasion of her death. magazine covers and revisiting. >> host: it is always a challenge. you want to show why somebody is worth knowing about in the first place, right? there are revision it histories of thatcher. people correcting misperceptions about her. you have to establish why she is important in the first place
CSPAN
Mar 14, 2010 12:00pm EDT
like china or russia or other nations of the world and to protect ourselves, in response to the humanitarian crisis and have a nuclear deterrent against the nuclear threat, the list goes on and on of various challenges the military has. in my view, it requires an annual budget of roughly 4 percent of gdp right now 3.8% and total federal spending is over time approximately 20% of gdp. so it should be 20% i apologize for taking that course but sometimes we say we are spending so much more than any other nation in the world, why should we spend any more than the military? they spend far less. but actually, if you go behind the numbers, they don't report all military spending and the cost for instance of standing of the army, not a volunteer army the cost as much lower. if you look at a comparable basis china is suspending 10% that have level of the of the united states if we did with the same cost for the various resources. and russia likewise is spending a good deal more than a report which suggest we really cannot continue to pare down the military might we must be confident that
CSPAN
May 18, 2013 10:00pm EDT
powerful systems to do things with force and energy. and they dominated different portfolios with china. and with the loss of china and this is something we know from the record some were just marxist not necessarily identified as agents. he was doing a lot of the economic policy and basically did one these soviet-style government. >> host: so did white but at the time harry dexter white came across as the new dealer but an economist who was in the keynesian tradition and a counterpart with creation of post-world war two global financial architecture and it is incredible and mind-boggling. >> guest: that hundreds of agents not all of them are famous but they still have not been identified with 500 agents that they can all of the fall of the soviet union and for what facilitated this identification. >> there several archives. to go between russian and soviet embassies in council it back to moscow. this and with 1943 and the idea was to break the code to find out what the soviet allies really wanted so we could be better allies. infiltrating it everywhere but it was hard work and they too
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2012 10:00pm EST
to what is happening in the east and asia, the rise of china and hear you talk about what you think should be the dual roles of the united states in the future. in the west, the u.s. should remain i suppose in its role as a promoter and guarantor of greater order unity. in the east you distinguish america's role saying that we should be the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain that a little bit more, why these need to be separate roles? >> guest: because of the case of europe, we were engaged in two world wars and we had to be engaged in these two world wars. because these two world wars were still fought on the premise that the victor would dominate the world and i think it is correct to say and morally right to say that the world would be better off without hitlerism or stalinism. this is no longer the issue. the danger today in my view is if we do not do the things i say in my book, and i'm thinking of is strategically, the world will succumb to greater and greater turmoil in the future. the world is now not only composed of competitive states that s
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2011 12:00am EST
because it did not fit with their world view they were china anti-iraq and al qaeda did not fit with their world view. there were of office eight years and had not process the fact anon state actor could be serious threat to. >> host: that is a fair criticism. but the other side is after 9/11 did things that are highly controversial and o produce over board but it sounds like we would argue were pretty effective to blunt the future threat. >> sure. three down the wall between the fbi and cia was long overdue some information gathered could be handed to law-enforcement and these were no-brainers but it took 9/11 to happen. there was an interesting experiment and the book of what would happen was if not an 11 the democratic party would be out of business. [laughter] >> host: because they would be blamed? >> it would have all happened under their watch. it is a bipartisan failure like george did you bush the administration to act more criticism but both did not respond to uss cole. mike sheehan the ambassador for counterterrorism famously said what will it take a guide at its hacking th
CSPAN
Mar 7, 2010 9:00pm EST
responsibilities and missions then let's say a nation like china or russia or other nations in the world and to protect ourselves and respond to humanitarian crises to have a nuclear deterrent against a nuclear threat to have missile defense the list goes on and on and on of the challenges the military has. in my view it requires an annual budget of roughly 4% of gdp. right now about 3.8% of gdp and total federal spending but approximately 20% of the gdp. so we are seeing the the defense budget ought to be about 20% of the total gdp. a lot of percentages. i apologize for taking that course. but i think sometimes we say we are spending so much more than any other nation in the world why should we be spending any more on the military? because they spend for less than we do actually as you go behind their numbers and find they don't report all of their military spending and the costs for instance standing up an army where they have conscription, not paid volunteer army, the costs are lower so when you look at a more comparable basis china is spending a lot at 10% the level of the united states
CSPAN
Jan 29, 2012 9:00pm EST
asia in the rise of china coming in here to talk about what you think should be the whole of the united states in the future. in the west the u.s. should remain i suppose in its role of a promoter and a guarantor of the creature and a broader unity. in the east be distinguished america's role saying that we should be the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain that a little bit more why these need to be separate roles? >> guest: in the case of europe we were engaged in the world for and had to be engaged in the world war because the two world wars were still fought on a promise that the victor would dominate the world, and i think it is correct to say that the world wouldn't be better off if it was a stalinism. today that is no longer the issue. in the east is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view is that if we do not do the things i say in my book, and i'm thinking of it strategically, the world will succumb to greater and greater turmoil. the world is now not only composed of competitive states that should be as possible coopera
CSPAN
Feb 5, 2012 11:00am EST
the east, in asia. the rising china. and here you talk about what you think should be there to ogle of the united states in the future. in the west, the u.s. should remain as a provider and guarantor of crater, cracker community. and it used to distinguish america's role saying we should eat the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain more why pc to be be separate roles? >> guest: because in the case of europe, and two world wars we had to be engaged in these two world wars because these two world wars worse though thought on the premise that big two would dominate the world. and i think it is correct to say and morally right to say that the worlds wouldn't be better off if there was hitlerism. today that is no longer the issue. the issue is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view is that if we do not do the same if a fan made up and am thinking of it strategically, though, to crater and greater is not only composed of competitive states if possible composed and nature historical continuity. it is composed of what i call global politic
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2012 12:00am EST
, and asia, the rise of china, are you talk about, the dual role of the united states in the future, it will remain in its early promoter and guarantor of greater and broader unity. in the east to distinguish america's role, saying we should be the balance there and conciliator between major powers. can you explain him or why need to be separate roles? >> in the case of europe, in two world wars we had to be engaged in these two world wars because these two world wars were still thoughts on the premise that dirt. it is correct to say and morally right to say that the world wouldn't be better off if the or with hitler. today that is no longer the issue in the issue is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view and if we do not do the things they say in my book and i'm thinking of it strategically, the world will calm to greater and greater turmoil, confusion. the world is now not only composed of competitive states they should we have possible cooperative states, it is also composed and this is a very major goal historical continuity. it is composed of what i call globa
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2011 9:00pm EST
concerned with antiballistic defense and china and iraq and al qaeda didn't fit with the view. part is the had been out of office for eight years and they haven't processed the fact that in on state actor like al qaeda could be a serious threat. >> host: i think that is certainly a fair criticism but as you said, the other side is that after 9/11 the suddenly became three alarmed and some of which were highly controversial, some of which went overboard but a lot of which i would argue so it's like you would argue as well or pretty effective in al qaeda. >> guest: bringing it on the war of the fbi and the cia was long overdue. so the information gathered in the intelligence operation could be handed to law enforcement. these were sort of no-brainers but it took 9/11 for it to happen. there's an interesting thought experiment i don't do in the book but what would have happened if our core was in office on 9/11? my personal view is the democratic party would be out of business. >> host: there would be blamed for the attack. >> guest: it would have happened under their watch. it's a bip
CSPAN
Aug 26, 2012 4:00pm EDT
carry out. our military has a far boder array of responsibility and missions than a nation like china or russia or other nations in the world. and to protect ourselves to protect our seedlings to respond to humid tear crisis and have a missile defense and list goes on and on in various challenges our military has. in my view, requires an annual budget of 4 percent of gdp. right now we're 3.8% of our gdp. total spending is about 20% of the gdp. we're saying the defense budget ought to be 20%. there are a lot of percentage. i apologize for taking that course. i think sometimes we say, gosh, we're spending so much more than any other nation in the world. why should we be sp spending any more on the military? they spend far less than we do. as you go behind the numbers and find they don't report all of their military spending and their cost, for instance, of standing up an army they have con sings, not a paid voluntary arm army. their costs are lower. china is not spending at 10% the level at the united states but something close the level of half the united states. if we were paying with
CSPAN
May 26, 2013 12:00pm EDT
with force and energy. they, they dominated different portfolios. loughlin curry's portfolio was china. he was very instrumental in the loss of china and, indeed, this was, you know, something we know, we know on the record. so there were many others, there were some who were just, you know, marxists. they weren't necessarily identified as agents early on. rexford tug welshing this very important -- >> host: what was he doing? >> guest: he was doing the economic policy, and he basically did want a soviet-style economy -- >> host: so hid harry -- so did harry dexter white as it turns out from recent research. at the time, harry dexter white came across as a new dealer, but an economist who was in the keynesian tradition. in fact, he was a counterpart to keynes in creation of post-world war ii global financial architecture. it's incredible, it's mind-boggling. >> guest: but i think the important thing to remember is there are hundreds of agents. >> host: yeah. >> guest: not all of them are famous. there are some who still have not been identified, but we know for a fact there was somethi
CSPAN
May 12, 2013 9:00pm EDT
takeover that happened in 1979. china, the rise of the turn to the end of mao and his cultural revolution. poland as we mentioned that election of pope john paul ii and the return to his homeland and the solidarity movement. great britain, but the election of margaret thatcher and i think it's been lost as part of the historical narrative of britain after margaret thatcher. so i am looking forward to coming back to that. then number five of course the one most people think of first when they think of the 1979 iranian revolution and the hostage crisis in 1979. that is an awful lot of ground to cover. let's start with margaret thatcher. there's been a huge outpouring of tributes to thatcher won the magazine covers and revisiting. your book takes apart some of the myths of margaret thatcher. >> guest: i tried to do that. it's always a challenge because we want to show why somebody is worth knowing about. there's been a lot of revisions come a lot of people correcting the misconceptions about her but of course first you have to establish why it's important in the first place and very few peop
CSPAN
Mar 27, 2010 10:00pm EDT
policy. very experienced. i do sing in the book as again i try to be fair, the china business i think was not good. i know people made a lot out of the toast and there was more going on in brent scowcroft toast to the chinese leadership but trademark and square -- >> host: what more could you have done at trademark and square because that was the downside of his realism which was if you're an idealist and tenements where happens you react and pushback on china. if you are a free list you say that is to affairs >> guest: i've been critical of democratic and democratic presidents with. i don't think the case can be made that when we cooperate with china things get better. i think if he tally of the sheet i don't think the case can be made. i was one of the people of my organization, jack kemp, rumsfeld all signed on to permit normal trade relations. i didn't. they should be tougher, things should be tougher now. we are we too easy now. >> host: why? >> guest: they are doing is bad. policies are bad, they kill girls. i think that is a terrible, terrible thing and they do all sorts of oth
CSPAN
Mar 29, 2010 12:00am EDT
push back on china. if you are a realist to say that is our internal affairs. they still intend to be critical of the presidency in china. i just don't think the case can be made that when we cooperate with china things get better. i think if you tally up the sheet i don't think the case can be made. i was one of the only people in my organization of power america jack kemp, jeane kirkpatrick, rumsfeld also signed on to read i didn't. i think they should be tougher. everything should be tougher now. we are we too easy now. >> host: why? >> guest: because what they're doing are bad. the policies are bad. they kill girls. that is a terrible thing it a dual source of the repressive things. >> host: i think a repressive society that represses the free flow of information and will end up losing to and what city in to get which is a messy economy will but right now at least allows the free expression and that will be one of the strolls in this world. >> guest: i agree with you and the interesting polls recently to have seen a lot of americans are not sure that we will be dominant in the fut
CSPAN
Mar 28, 2010 9:00pm EDT
which is if you are an idealist and trademark men's wear happens you react and push back on china. if you are a real list you see this internal affairs. >> guest: i have tended to be critical of a democrat and republican presidents both. i don't think the case can be made that when we cooperate with china things get better. i think if you tally up the sheet i don't think that -- i was one of the only people at my organization of power america, jack kemp, rumsfeld, they all signed on to the normal trade relations. i didn't. i think they should be tougher and things should be tougher now. i think we are way too easy now. >> host: why? >> guest: because what you're doing is bad. the policies are bad. they kill girls. i just really think that is a terrible, terrible thing and they do all sorts of other repressive things. post, i also think that a repressive society that represses the free flow of information and -- will end up losing to india which is a messy economy right now but at least it allows free expression and that's going to be one of the struggles coming up in the world. >> gue
CSPAN
May 19, 2013 12:00pm EDT
. so afghanistan and the communist takeover of afghanistan which happened in 1979. china, the rise of deng xiaoping and his beginning of a turn towards the market and in the mao and this cultural revolution. poland as we mentioned, the election of the polish pope john paul ii and his return to his homeland in sort of a precursor to the solidarity movement great britain, the election of margaret thatcher and the real pommel over the british economy which i think haspart of the hie of britain after thatcher. some looking for becoming back to that. vin number five of course, the one probably that most people think of first when you think of 1979, the iranian revolution, the toppling of the shah and the hostage crisis in 1979. wow, that's an awful lot of ground to cover. let's start with thatcher. there's this huge outpouring, tribute to thatcher on the occasion of her death. and i've seen covers. your book takes apart some of the myth of margaret thatcher. >> guest: i tried to do that. it's always a challenge because you want to show why somebody is worth knowing about in the first place
CSPAN
May 11, 2013 10:00pm EDT
over of afghanistan which happened in 1979, china, the rise of deng xiaoping and the beginning of a turn towards the merchant annan and two now this cultural revolution. poland as you mentioned and the election of pope john paul ii and his return to his homeland after the precursor of the solidarity movement. great britain and the election of margaret thatcher and the british economy which i think is really been lost as a part of that political narrative of britain after thatcher and coming back to that and number five of course the one probably most people think of first when they think of 1979, the iranian revolution, a shot in the hostage crisis in 1979. wow, that's an awful lot of ground to cover but let's start with thatcher. there was a huge outpouring of tributes to thatcher on her death with magazine covers. your book takes apart some of the myths of margaret thatcher. >> guest: i try to do that. it's always a challenge because you want to show why someone is worth knowing about. there have been a lot of revisionist history of thatcher and a lot of people correcting some mis
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2011 7:00pm EDT
not quite as dapper, but is driven. there are people who broke china when they walk in the china shop and were sorted and told forward by the sense of the danger we face. richard clarke is another one who straddles two administrations and certainly became a major part of the story during the 9/11 commission. talked to me about richard clarke. just go clarke and o'neill were sold brothers. they really thought each other as having the same kind of drive, same obsessiveness, the same intolerance of bureaucratic resistance and people are shufflers. they wanted to get to and consequently the also had in common the fact that they had a lot of enemies. it was clerk who spotted o'neill and began to promote him. actually offered him his own job as a counterterrorism czar at the nsc in the white house. it could well have done that was a prompt in fact are that caused someone in fbi hierarchy to torpedo o'neill. they would never have wanted to report to him in the white house. it would have been intolerable for them. it was hard enough being his boss. romeo was irascible and tumultuous. he
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2010 12:00am EST
when you could go to china. >> one of the great unsung heros bill were the board in 19211 of the key radical black journalists of the 1950's and '60's and goes to the soviet union the late forties and into china and the fifties and run the best key black journalists in cuba during the revolution and a friend and ally of malcolm x. the key domestic ideas called the freedom no party will be one of three black independent political parties in 1960's. one is the mississippi freedom democratic party led by the sharecropper from louisville lot of mississippi who was not allowed to be seated at the 1964 dnc in atlantic city new jersey. the other will be their freedom organization which is nicknamed the black panther party and that starts with the grass roots from the snic activists especially stoke the car michael. were the is interesting as a black power active is to went to jail for refusing to fight in the warm one say for policy based on human rights we before carter talks about that william where they was talking about this. part of the robeson generation a group of activist to com
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 10:00pm EST
know when you could not go to china. >> guest: absolutely. william were the is a great great example of one of these unsung heroes. born in 1921. he is one of the key radical black journalists of the 1950's and '60's. he goes into the soviet union in the late 1940's. he goes into china in the 1950's. he is one of the key black journalists who is in cuba during the cuban revolution. he is a friend and ally of malcolm x. his key domestic idea is something called the freedom now party, and it is really going to be one of three black independent political parties in the 1960's. one is the freedom now party. the other is the mississippi freedom democratic party. led by a man who was not allowed to be seated at the 1964 democratic national convention in atlantic city, new jersey, and the other is going to be the lounge county freedom organization which is nicknamed the black panther party, which is in alabama. that is started with grass-roots locals with the help of activists. and when we think about william worthy, worthy is very interesting. he is a black power activist who is also a pac
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 9:00pm EST
role as an african-american journalists. he first wanted to go into china when it was -- you couldn't go to china. >> guest: absolutely. william is an example of one of these unsung heroes of the period. bill worthy was born in 1921. he is one of the key radical black journalists of the 1950's and 60's. he goes into the soviet union in the late 1940's. he goes into china in the 1950's , when of the key black journalists in cuba during the cuban revolution. he is a friend and ally of malcolm x. his key domestic idea is something called the freedom now party and it's really going to be one of three black independent political parties in the 1960's. one is the freedom now party and the other is the mississippi freedom democratic party led by trail hammer the sharecropper from mississippi who was not allowed to be seated at the 1964 democratic national convention in atlantic city new jersey. and the other is going to be the lowndes county freedom organization which is nicknamed the black panther party which is an bonds county alabama, and that started with grassroots locals with the help
CSPAN
Apr 16, 2017 9:00pm EDT
it which appeareds store china, rich, iran, korea, and terrorism. and so that's are the main threats that we need to address and i'm hoping that under the trump administration they will get more efforts, both resources people and leadership, to tackle these tough problems. >> one of the most impressive parts of the book is you look at different case studies of different countries. ju just systemed china, russia, north korea, iran, isis and the islamic state. want to delve into example wes have seen of the use of information warfare by the countries. the first one is north korea. the general public is well aware of the sony hack because it got so much media coverage. that's of course the hack in response to the movie of the interview. why was this such a significant event when it comes to information warfare? you spend a lot of time talking about this. >> guest: i do a deep dive on the sony hack which took place in 2014, and it was based on the north korean government's recognition that they were really opposed to this movie "the interview" what i call comedy -- not that good of a mov
CSPAN
Sep 24, 2017 9:00pm EDT
a strong china and india, you have strong nations like turkey that we previously relied on and who were economically backward and we could tell what to do but we can't do that anymore and they don't need us anymore. large places in latin america and i think that is very true and i think that you start to see this unraveling on american foreign policy and very much satisfied what's happening in this country on a foreign-policy level i think the united states is very lost. what do you think about that for >> who are we if we are not that country and if china is more powerful than us i think it is earthshaking to people whether they want to admit it or not think about what we are saying that we are unhappy unless we are running everything and if we have power over other people or people defer to us, i think even though we take that for granted i don't think people are conscious of the fact that's part of their philosophy and worldview and i think that the have to talk about what that means for the future for the confusion going on right now. >> host: i want to read part of this book w
CSPAN
Sep 23, 2017 10:00pm EDT
president obama which what is america's role in the world because now you have a strong china, strong india, strong nations like turkey that we previously relied on an were economically backward it and we could tell what to do but we can't do that anymore. they don't use anymore. places in latin america and africa, think it's very true. you start to see this unraveling of american foreign policy on a government policy level. and very much set aside was happening in the country but on a foreign policy level i think the united states is lost. what you think? >> and then think about what that means to individuals. who are we if we are not that country, who are we if china is that powerful or as powerful as us. that's earthshaking to us, it requires a complete reconsideration of our identity and sense of self. that could be a wonderful thing. her saying essentially were unhappy unless are running everything. and if we have power over other people or people defer to us, even though we take that for granted i don't think people are conscious of the fact that they feel that way. i think we r
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2017 10:59am EDT
what is america's role in the world because now you have a strong china, you have a strong india. you have strong nations like turkey that we've previously relied on and who were economically backward and we could tell what to do. we can't do that anymore and they're making their own decisions. and they don't need us anymore. market places in latin america and africa, too. you start to see this unravelling of american foreign policy on a governmental policy level. and very much, you know, set aside what's happening in this country, but i think on a foreign policy level. i think that the united states is very lost. what do you think about that? >> and then think what that means to individuals? because who are we if we're not that country? who are we if china is as powerful or more powerful than us? it's this kind of, i think, earth shaking to a lot of people whether they want to admit it or not. it requires a complete reconsideration of our sense of our self and that could be can wonderful thing. think about what we're saying here. we're saying essentially we're unhappy unless we'
CSPAN
Oct 10, 2017 9:30pm EDT
stands for china russia iran korea and trigger some --'s terrorism. i'm hoping that they will get more effort and resource people and leadership to tackle these tough problems. >> host: one of the most impressive part is what the different case studies and you've just named china russia and north korea, iran and the islamic state. i wanted to delve into some of these areas that we have seen 80s specific countries. the first one that i would like to go to is north korea. the general public is aware of the sony hack because it got so much media coverage and its in response to the movie the interview. why was this such a significant event because we spent a lot of time talking about this in the book. >> guest: i do a deep dive into the sony attack that took place in 2014, and it was based on the north korean government recognition that they were opposed this movie the to this e interview, which was what i call a ribald comedy. it wasn't that good of a movie that it was important in exposing the kind of problems north korea poses. it needs to be understood coming and i don't think a lot of
in the world because i have a strong china and india. you have strong nations like turkey that we previously relied on an were economically backward i could tell what to do. we can't do that anymore. the marks places in latin america and africa too. it's very true we start to see this unraveling of american foreign policy on a policy lev level. set aside what's happening in country think the united states is very lost. what you think? >> and then think about what that means to individuals. who are we if we are not the country, who are we china is as powerful or more powerful as us. it's earthshaking to a lot of people whether they want to minute, it requires a reconsideration of our identity. that could be a wonderful thing. think about it were saying or unhappy unless were running everything. if we have power over of the people, or people defer to us. even though we take that for granted people are conscious of the fact that they feel that way. we really have to talk about the fear of what that these the future. i drove a lot of election and confusion of what's going on. >> based
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