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20090604
20171211
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16
CSPAN
Mar 14, 2010 12:00pm EDT
like china or russia or other nations of the world and to protect ourselves, in response to the humanitarian crisis and have a nuclear deterrent against the nuclear threat, the list goes on and on of various challenges the military has. in my view, it requires an annual budget of roughly 4 percent of gdp right now 3.8% and total federal spending is over time approximately 20% of gdp. so it should be 20% i apologize for taking that course but sometimes we say we are spending so much more than any other nation in the world, why should we spend any more than the military? they spend far less. but actually, if you go behind the numbers, they don't report all military spending and the cost for instance of standing of the army, not a volunteer army the cost as much lower. if you look at a comparable basis china is suspending 10% that have level of the of the united states if we did with the same cost for the various resources. and russia likewise is spending a good deal more than a report which suggest we really cannot continue to pare down the military might we must be confident that
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2011 12:00am EST
interesting, and the other thing she noticed is there was a lot of ships coming from china to the u.s. fully laiden, but going back half empty because, you know, the things that america exports to china are not bulky. it's more intellectual property and iou's from the government. she thought, i'll load the waste paper on the half empty ships, send it back to china, and recycle it there. she used her contact back in china to set up factories, recycle it into card board boxes and you put the tvs in those boxes and send it back to america. she's now a billionaire in china and straddling both countries, and she's able to link the two. >> host: did she face -- what was the approach or the response by the chinese government in her setting up the factories? did she find any red tape? were there any hurdles to doing that? >> guest: i'm sure there was quite a lot of red tape, but, you know, very often in china, if you want to do business there, it's not a simple, you know, there are a bunch of laws, and if you follow them, you are okay. it's a lot more about knowing the right people and knowing who y
CSPAN
Dec 18, 2011 9:00pm EST
of ships coming from china to the u.s. fully laden. but going back half empty because, you know, the things that america exports to china tend not to be very bulky. it's like movies and intellectual property and ious from the goth. government. and so she thought, well, hold on, why don't i load up this waste paper on these half empty ships, send it back to china and recycle it there. so she used her contacts to set up some factories to recycle this stuff into cardboard boxes and, of course, she put tvs into them and send them back to america. she's now one of the richest women in china. completely straddling both countries. her family straddles both countries, and she's able to link the two. >> host: and, robert, what was the approach by the, or the response by the chinese government in her setting up the factories? did she find any red tape, was there any, were there any hurd p les to doing that? >> i'm sure there was quite a lot of red tape. very often in china if you want to do business there, it's not a simple, you know, there are a bunch of laws, and if you follow them, you're o
CSPAN
Aug 26, 2012 4:00pm EDT
carry out. our military has a far boder array of responsibility and missions than a nation like china or russia or other nations in the world. and to protect ourselves to protect our seedlings to respond to humid tear crisis and have a missile defense and list goes on and on in various challenges our military has. in my view, requires an annual budget of 4 percent of gdp. right now we're 3.8% of our gdp. total spending is about 20% of the gdp. we're saying the defense budget ought to be 20%. there are a lot of percentage. i apologize for taking that course. i think sometimes we say, gosh, we're spending so much more than any other nation in the world. why should we be sp spending any more on the military? they spend far less than we do. as you go behind the numbers and find they don't report all of their military spending and their cost, for instance, of standing up an army they have con sings, not a paid voluntary arm army. their costs are lower. china is not spending at 10% the level at the united states but something close the level of half the united states. if we were paying with
CSPAN
Mar 16, 2013 10:00pm EDT
calling out to china for recognition. they are still calling out to america in some way or another. yes go they are and when america doesn't respond they get very upset more so than in china doesn't respond. no matter its faults the u.s. should stand up for democracy and human rights etc. so whatever the history of the united states, whatever the interest that it has to pursue, that is the expectation. >> host: he you write that it's almost like a catch-22. one official says if we intervene they say we are meddling and if we stay back they say where to standing up for human rights? no matter what we do we do we ae on with some site of criticism. >> guest: that is the fate of the superpower. it is a catch-22. people want you to deliver for them but they don't necessarily want to give you what it takes to deliver further so it's all about your own interest. i do quote this official who says we are damned if we do and damned if we don't. the pendulum swings constantly and cystic wiggle thing. look at syria now. people are very upset in syria and in the region and here in the u.s.. you
CSPAN
Mar 18, 2013 12:00am EDT
calling out to china for recognition. they were still calling out for america in some way or another. >> guest: they are, and when america doesn't respond people get very upset. more so than if china does not respond. there's still a feeling within the arab world and other regions, i think as well, that no matter its faults the u.s. should stand up for democracy, human rights, et cetera. so whatever the history of the united states, whatever the interests it has to pursue, that is the expectation. >> host: you write it's almost like a catch-22. one official says, if we intervene, they say we are immediateling. with we stay back they say, why aren't you standing up for human rights? so we're always on some side of criticism. >> guest: that's the fate of a superpower. it is a catch-22. people want you to deliver for them, but they don't necessarily want to give you what it takes to deliver for others, so it's all about your own interests, and i do quote this official who says, we're kind of damned if we do, damned if we don't. the pendulum swings constantly. it's cyclical thing. look a
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2011 10:00pm EST
coming from china to the u.s. but going back half empty because you know the things that america exports to china tend not to be very bulky, things like movies and intellectual property and things from the government. she thought hold on, why don't i load up all this waste paper onto these half empty ships, send it back to china and recycle it there so you have contacts back in china to set up factories, to recycle the stuff into card or boxes and then of course you have cardboard boxes to send back to america. she is a billionaire and straddling both countries. her family struggles both countries and she's able to link to them. >> host: robert, what was the response by the chinese government in her setting up the factory? did she find any red tape? were there any hurdles to doing that? >> guest: i'm sure there was quite a lot of red tape but very often in china, if he wants to do business there, it's not simple. there are a bunch of laws and if you follow them you are okay. it's a lot more knowing the right people in knowing who you can trust and who you can't and that is one of
CSPAN
Mar 7, 2010 9:00pm EST
responsibilities and missions then let's say a nation like china or russia or other nations in the world and to protect ourselves and respond to humanitarian crises to have a nuclear deterrent against a nuclear threat to have missile defense the list goes on and on and on of the challenges the military has. in my view it requires an annual budget of roughly 4% of gdp. right now about 3.8% of gdp and total federal spending but approximately 20% of the gdp. so we are seeing the the defense budget ought to be about 20% of the total gdp. a lot of percentages. i apologize for taking that course. but i think sometimes we say we are spending so much more than any other nation in the world why should we be spending any more on the military? because they spend for less than we do actually as you go behind their numbers and find they don't report all of their military spending and the costs for instance standing up an army where they have conscription, not paid volunteer army, the costs are lower so when you look at a more comparable basis china is spending a lot at 10% the level of the united states
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 12:00pm EDT
revolution, no one was calling out to china for recognition. they were still going out for america in some way or another trip to the are. and when america doesn't respond people get upset. more so than if china doesn't respond. there's still a feeling within the arab world and other regions i think as well. that no matter the fall, the u.s. should stand up for democracy, human rights, et cetera. so whatever the history of the united states, what are the interests that has to pursue, that is the expectation. >> host: but you write it's almost like a catch-22. quote one official who says if we intervene, they say we are meddling. if we stay back basic why are just an effort human rights? so no matter what we do we are in some kind of criticism. >> guest: that is the fate of the superpower. it is a catch-22. people want you to deliver for them, but they don't necessary want to give you what it takes to deliver for others. so it's all about your own interest. i do quote this official who says we're damned if we do, damned if we don't. the pendulum swings constantly. it's a cyclical thing
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 12:00pm EST
united states in a way similar to the the way mainland china deals with united states. the problem is, of course, you don't have human rights, very give human rights record in cuba and in these from the u.s. perspective it is really don't have democratic elections and i was in the most powerful organizations in cuba right now are the cuban communist party and still the cuban military. cuban generals have made millions of dollars off of the recent increase in tourist trade to cuba and i am not sure what i certainly don't think that those groups want to see a normalization of relations with united states that would in any way threaten their position but once the castros have gone from the scene, events may very well force their hand or just simply be too powerful for them. who knows? i don't have a better crystal ball than anybody else, but i really do think that there are lots of people who wouldn't like to make money in cuba and that capitalist incentive i think over time will become even more powerful. other questions? richard. >> have you foresee the possibility that the hierarch
CSPAN
Nov 19, 2012 6:30am EST
and the west to china and the east, the powers of globalization in the digital era, how too -- how to deal with the 1.6 muslims in the world, the threats of iranian nuclear power, and i also look at internal threats; low birthrates, assimilation, and, again, whether we can, in effect, succeed at a time when we are more successful than ever in being integrated into our society. it's a new phenomenon, and that's really why i wanted to write the book. i also write about that from an israeli perspective. i've been to israel maybe 40 times, three times this year alone. during the carter and clinton administrations, i was deeply involved in policies between the u.s. and israel, but i also write from the perspective of someone who has relatives in israel, who has spent many, many years and times in israel. so it's a unique perspective looking from the outside in and from the inside out. >> host: so, ambassador, israel was one of the few foreign policy issues in the 2012 campaign. mitt romney saying you won't see any sunlight between the u.s. and israel. is the u.s. relationship and vice vers
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2013 9:00pm EDT
was calling out to china for recognition. they were still calling out for america in some way or another. >> guest: they are. and when america doesn't respond, people get very upset. more so than if china doesn't respond. because there is the till a feeling -- still a feeling within the arab world and other regions, i think, as well that no matter its faults, the u.s. should stand up for democracy, human rights, etc. so whatever the history of the united states, whatever the interests that it has to pursue, that is expectation. >> host: but you write it's almost like a cash 22. >> guest: it is. >> host: i think you quote one official who says if we intervene, they say we're meddling. if we stay back, they say why aren't you standing up for civil rights. >> guest: absolutely. and i think that is the fate of a superpower, right? it is a catch 22. people want you to deliver for them, but they don't necessarily want to give you what it takes to deliver for others. so it's all about your own, your own interests. and, um, i do quote the this official who say we're kind of damned if we
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2011 12:00am EST
-- of the pacific rim, all the way to canada and all the way out through japan and china and korea, and the conversation was different. about global trade and free trade, and i actually always thought in that sense the countries had more in common with their asian counterparts than their latin american counterparts. >> is it how they see themselves in their stage of development? >> i think it is. you look at places like chile, now quite developed, colombia getting there. a country click brazil is interesting because on the one hand it's leading the -- one of the leaders in the global economy but with huge income distribution difficulties that keep it more on the developing countryside. if you look at the poorest countries in, say, central america, like guatemala, for instance, you're talking about places where you can't even reach the farmers in the highlands bay highway, and so their problems are to build infrastructure so they can join the 20th century economy. forget the 21st century economy. so you have radically different levels of development. when you think about the radically di
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2015 9:00pm EST
- soviets but neil is our rulers that had ambitions. i looked at china and understanding this with the first world war, it is sort of a crisis at the periphery and at the center. and that includes increasing chaos that was researched. so i had this idea that we were at entering this is a period of global disorder. and i flushed out this article in world magazines and i thought that in fact what really unites this is that all of this is happening as america has turned this way. and we already had this historical experience of what happens in the world when america turns inward, there is a connection. so it was on this basis that i started to write the book. >> host: the publisher is a conservative of 10 when books. when was the first printed? >> guest: you know i don't know i think that we are somewhere near 30,000 at this point, probably more. >> host: how many have sold? do no? >> guest: the last i saw was about 14,000 or so but again, i'm almost reluctant to say this because i could be wrong. and the lovely thing about c-span, as people that watch the show, whether they agree wit
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2015 12:00pm EST
thinking about simply in order to announce that it is dead. we do not want russia china rand intervening in latin america, and i don't think quite frankly venezuelans, cubans or ecuadorians do either. >> host: back to the book. part of your criticism of president obama which is much in the book, not the only one criticized. you refer to him as compared to the legendary king -- explained to the readers. >> guest: the viking king who stood on the shore line and commanded the tides recede to prove his godlike powers. when the president says the tide of war is receiving, he can only observe that hide receding. he cannot command it to show we can s.o.b. said you know what? the war in iraq is over and we're going to put an end to what used to be called the war on terrorism. president of the national defense university and may 2013 give a speech effectively saying exactly that, and we cannot allow this war on terror to define our generation. so we're going to change our attention to something else. and by the way, great news, al-qaeda, core al-qaeda us on the path to defeat and all
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2015 10:00pm EST
us one way or another whether it's the militants of islamic state whether it's china's general seeking to kick us out of east asia, whether his russian politicians seeking to revise the conclusions of the cold war. >> host: you mention in your subtitle the new isolationism and the coming global disorder. why coming? >> guest: i won't say who it was but a prominent person who read and liked this book said i liked it very much. the only word is the word coming which should be the current global disorder but in fact i think it's going to be you ain't seen nothing yet. i think it's going to be worse. for example of falling oil prices all of us are celebrating as consumers driving a car and not having to pay four bucks for a gallon of gas and we think that it gives us leverage over countries like russia and iran that perhaps we didn't enjoy before. my sense in fact is that russia and iran will become more dangerous as oil prices decline because they are now going to seek other ways to get out of their economic predicament. typically you think of a country like argentina in the early
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16