Skip to main content

About your Search

20090604
20171212
STATION
DATE
2011 11
2012 9
2017 6
2014 5
2015 4
2010 3
2013 3
2009 2
2016 1
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Aug 20, 2014 9:19pm EDT
internet is just now beginning to converge but the nation's energy internet in europe and now china. and also beginning to converge with a fledgling an automated logistics' the internet. it is expanding into three, information, energy, automated transport or logistics' and creating one super internet of the internet of things. and these three internet seven placing sensors across the system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting three source close, sensors feeding data in from production lines, warehouses, distribution centers, sensors on smart roads, sensors that are connecting the electricity grid so that we know what the appliances are doing at any moment, since disconnecting vehicles and offices and stores. that big a data coming in across the economy to these three internets, communications, energy, and logistics' is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. and what this is -- we now have 13 billion censors out there. ibm says in 2020 there will be 50 billion. and by 2013 perhaps 100 trillion sensors connecting everyt
CSPAN
Sep 6, 2014 10:00pm EDT
it back to china and say guess who i had my picture taken with? [laughter] .. >> >> to be a part of introducg
CSPAN
Jun 15, 2014 12:00pm EDT
information internet is just now beginning to converge with the energy internet in europe and now in china and also beginning to converge their fledgling automated transport and logistics. the information internet company energy in her neck, the automated transport and logistics internet creating the internet of things and they are placing centers across the economic system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting resource flows. we have sensors feeding data from production line, warehouses, distribution centers. we have sensors on martin, sensors connect to the electricity grid so we know what the appliances are doing them in a moment. sensors connecting vehicles and offices and stores it that big data coming in across the economy to these three internet, communication, energy, internet which is its internet is providing a wealth of data about what goes on any given moment across the economy. we now have 14 billion sensors out there now in ibm says in 202,050,000,000,000 sensors connecting everything with everyone. it's exhilarating and challenges. what's interesting fr
CSPAN
Jun 7, 2014 10:00pm EDT
just now beginning to converge with the nascent energy internet in europe and now in china and also beginning to converge with a fledgling automated logistics internet so the internet is expanding to three internets read the information internet the automated transport and logistics internet and creating one super and in the net called the internet of things. these three internets are then placing sensors across the entire economic system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting resource flows. we have sensors feeding data in from production lines, warehouses and distribution centers. we have centers on smart groves connecting electricity grid so we know what the appliances are doing at any moment. we have sensors connectinconnectin connecting vehicles in offices and stores. that big data coming in across the economy to these free internet communication energy internet and the distance internet is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. we now have 14 billion sensors out there now and ibm says in 2020, 50 billion senso
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2016 10:30am EST
canadians would export it to china. it is not that big a deal. >> the greenhouse atmosphere will have any the way. >> less canada changes its policies, the same. >> thank you, i really enjoyed the conversation and congratulations on the book. >> c-span, where history unfolds daily. in 1979 c-span was created as a public service by america's cable television company that is brought to you today by your cable or satellite provider. >> a ton of things happening constantly that are affecting our politics and the ways things get changed in this country, there are many ways things get changed. my favorite example is in new york everybody is familiar with governor andrew cuomo and how hard andrew cuomo fought against raising the minimum wage up to the moment he decided he wanted to take credit for it. >> it wasn't his idea? >> it
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 9:00pm EST
. china already has a slow motion catastrophe where you are going to have literally hundreds of millions of people who are elderly with no state support whatsoever in the pension health care and very little money to support them because as the one child policy they have one of their own and so what are the chinese we do? and it's a terrifying question. >> host: if you are convinced this is a ruling disaster of some kind, what works or what doesn't, what can the government do to encourage women or families to have more children? >> guest: that's how we sell books. people have been trying to do this for all long time. caesar augustus past the bachelor tax to get people married and have kids and that didn't work. they have a fertility problem and they have a motherhood metal to have five or more children. you can get them on ebay. they've spent the better part working hard. the other countries say the fertility rates aren't that hot and they have the rate of 6.1 to 6.7. all the evidence suggests that is because of innovation and they have a great deal for north africa and the difference in
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 10:00pm EST
have civil society there to take care of the elderly. china -- china already has what is called a slow-motion human catastrophe where you are going to have literally hundreds of millions of people who are elderly with no state support whatsoever in terms of pension and health care and very little money to support them because they have this one-child policy and almost no progeny of their own. so what are the chinese going to do with her old people? it's a terrifying question. >> host: well, if you are convinced that this is a disaster of some kind what works and what doesn't? what can be done? what if anything can the government do to encourage women or families to have more children? >> guest: [inaudible] that is how we sell books. [laughter] people have been trying to do this for a long time. seasseas are augusta saw they ha fertility problem and the empire. he tried to get people to get married and have kids and it didn't work or that the soviet union had a fertility problem so stalin commissioned a motherhood medal giving it out to women who had five or more children. you can
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 9:00pm EDT
china and other places and of course incredibly fascinating. but my book is about errors that have been made here in the united states and europe. it has absolutely nothing to do with china, the education, all the structural problems like infrastructure, things like energy policy that don't have anything to do with china and are essential to get right to make sure the u.s. and european countries are on track. >> host: it's almost as if there's a couple of different books in one book. there is your story of the decline of the west, your story of the rise of the east and the lines are going to cross. >> guest: i think this is you can argue there's an absolute part for short talking about the west and its isolation and issues going out there and going in an amazing time and other european economies have done the unthinkable moving hundreds of millions of people out of poverty so this is going to naturally be able to question as well. >> host: let's talk about what is going wrong in the west. >> guest: first of all its important that in terms of the context of my work i talk about the
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2011 12:00am EST
function of our stage of development, and so i point to the fact that china, china might be a very, very dirty place today, but it's because the price that they pay for this, you know, added pollution for the acid rain and all the environmental consequences of this very fast, coal-fueled growth they are engaged in right now. at their stage of development, it's less important and less relevant than providing jobs to millions and millions of farmers that are being displaced from the rural economy. right now, their calculations as a society is the pollution is worth it. now, as they move up, the environment -- the economic ladder i mean, this choice changes because adding an extra job will not be as worth it for, you know, adding this extra chunk of pollution, and they will become more like us. >> host: you talk about how in the u.s. we pay people to take our garbage away and bury it somewhere, and another countries they pay even more and putting a high price on it causes people to recycle more, and then in other places, people will spend their dayings going through garbage in order -- so i
CSPAN
Feb 10, 2013 12:00pm EST
care of the elderly. china is already happening it's already happening what they call a slow motion human catastrophe. where you are going have hundred of millions, literally hundreds of mills of -- millions of people who are elderly with no state support whatsoever in terms of pension and health care. and very little money to support them. they have as one child policy almost no project any of their own. what are the chinese going do with the old people? it's a terrifying question. >> host: if you're convinced it's a rolling datesser ever some kind. what works or what doesn't? what can be done? what, if anything, could the government to do encourage families to have more children? >> guest: nothing works. we're doomed. that's how we -- so people have been trying to do this for a long time. caesar agust ties saw he had a fertility problem. he passed a tax thing to make people have more problems. the soviet union had a medal to women to who had five or more children. you can get them on ebay now. they are cool. they didn't work. as i said in france and the nordic countries have spent
CSPAN
Jan 8, 2011 10:00pm EST
development, so i point to the fact china might be a very dirty place today but it's because both the price they pay for this added pollution for the acid rain and the environmental consequences of this very fast cold growth they are engaged is i daresay to develop less important, less relevant than providing jobs to millions and millions of farmers that are being displaced. so right now their calculations in society the pollution is worth it. now as they move up the environmental and economic ladder this choice will change because we are suddenly adding an extra job and will not be as perfect for getting this extra chunk of pollution and they would become a little bit more like us. boustany you also talked about in the u.s. we pay people to take your garbage away and buried somewhere and another country v.p. singh more and putting a high price on it causes people may be to recycle more and that in some other places people will spend their days going through garbage in order so it's a resource because they feel they can line eight. >> guest: this hypothetical girl in india making a living i
CSPAN
Mar 14, 2010 12:00pm EDT
like china or russia or other nations of the world and to protect ourselves, in response to the humanitarian crisis and have a nuclear deterrent against the nuclear threat, the list goes on and on of various challenges the military has. in my view, it requires an annual budget of roughly 4 percent of gdp right now 3.8% and total federal spending is over time approximately 20% of gdp. so it should be 20% i apologize for taking that course but sometimes we say we are spending so much more than any other nation in the world, why should we spend any more than the military? they spend far less. but actually, if you go behind the numbers, they don't report all military spending and the cost for instance of standing of the army, not a volunteer army the cost as much lower. if you look at a comparable basis china is suspending 10% that have level of the of the united states if we did with the same cost for the various resources. and russia likewise is spending a good deal more than a report which suggest we really cannot continue to pare down the military might we must be confident that
CSPAN
Jun 25, 2012 12:00am EDT
getting their guns from the united states. they're getting them from cheaper sources like china and central america you. go into, why was arizona chosen? on the bored, a prosecond amendment state to it's easy to believe violence on the cartels. you look at the politics and people behind the program, arizona was chosen for political reasons, not necessarily to actually stop gun trafficking into mexico. >> host: did the fact the homeland security secretary, janet napolitano, having been the previous governor of arizona, have any role in this? >> guest: absolutely. the person i think you had a very big role was actually her former staffer, his name is former u.s. attorney for arizona, dennis burke. he served as napolitano in the's staffer when she was the attorney general of arizona and served as her chief of staff while she was governor of arizona and followed her into the obama administration at her southeastern homeland securities a individualor before president obama appointed him to u.s. attorney in arizona. he is the guy who oversaw trafficking of guns into mexico from the ground
CSPAN
Jun 23, 2012 10:00pm EDT
sources like china and central america. you go into well why was arizonan chosin? it's on the border, it is a second amendment state where it's easy to blame cartel violence on the gun dealers there and you look above politics and the people behind the program which we can get into a little later arizona was chosen for political reasons, not necessarily to actually stop gun trafficking into mexico. >> host: did the fact that the homeland security secretary janet napolitano having the the previous devine have any role from your point of view? >> guest: absolutely the person that had a very big role was actually her former staffer former u.s. attorney from arizona dennis burke to read now he served as janet napolitano staffer when she was the attorney general of arizona and served as the chief of staff while she was governor of arizona and followed her into the obama administration as the senior homeland security adviser for president obama appointed him to the u.s. attorney in arizona. now he was the guy that oversaw trafficking of guns into mexico from the ground level and the memos
CSPAN
Aug 26, 2012 4:00pm EDT
carry out. our military has a far boder array of responsibility and missions than a nation like china or russia or other nations in the world. and to protect ourselves to protect our seedlings to respond to humid tear crisis and have a missile defense and list goes on and on in various challenges our military has. in my view, requires an annual budget of 4 percent of gdp. right now we're 3.8% of our gdp. total spending is about 20% of the gdp. we're saying the defense budget ought to be 20%. there are a lot of percentage. i apologize for taking that course. i think sometimes we say, gosh, we're spending so much more than any other nation in the world. why should we be sp spending any more on the military? they spend far less than we do. as you go behind the numbers and find they don't report all of their military spending and their cost, for instance, of standing up an army they have con sings, not a paid voluntary arm army. their costs are lower. china is not spending at 10% the level at the united states but something close the level of half the united states. if we were paying with
CSPAN
Feb 13, 2011 9:00pm EST
years predicts china and turkey will challenge the remaining superpower in the coming decade in ways the government may not currently anticipate. he talks with the executive editor of the foreign policy magazine, susan glasser. >>> george, thank you so much for joining us. i'm thrilled to have the chance to talk to you in debt about your new book the next decade. i see that it represents a little bit of what is the right word, the narrowing of the frame of ambition from the last book on the next 100 years so you have now taken on the slightly more manageable next ten years or perhaps that's actually more and noble, the next ten years. we can talk about that a little bit of the next hour to get some of your counter intuitive viewers i think about the world is headed and the d'huez encounters with that world whether it is on israel or china and your view of the rise or russia and i think the interesting things to say that are not exactly what you're going to pick up from reading the papers every day. so let's go ahead and jump into that conversation. the next ten years for the next thr
CSPAN
Jul 1, 2012 11:00am EDT
cheaper sources like china and central america. you go into why was arizona chosen? it's on the border, it's a pro-second amendment states is easy to blame cartel violence on the gun dealers there. you look at the politics and the people behind the program, which we can get into later, arizona was chosen for political reasons, not necessary to i to stop gun trafficking into mexi mexico. >> edifact homeland security secretary janet napolitano having been a previous governor of arizona had any role in this, from your point if you? >> absolutely. the person i think you at a very big role was actually her former staffer come his name is former u.s. attorney for arizona dennis burke. he served as janet napolitano staffer when she was the attorney general of arizona. and serve as her chief of staff while she was governor of arizona and followed her into the obama administration as her senior homeland security adviser for president obama appointed him to u.s. attorney in arizona. he was the guy who oversaw trafficking of guns into mexico from the ground-level on the doj side, and the m
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2011 9:00pm EST
say, i don't want to go overseas. the guy down the road went joe seas, went to mexico, went to china. they undercut me. if i don't move my factory, i'm finished. frankly, i blame the free traders, blame them, and i used to be one of them. we used to be friends until i got a level saying i was doing the devil's work. i was opposed to free trade. i'm with you on that. my sense is that some of the business guys say, look, in the global economy they dump me in. i work for this company, and i've got to save the company, but if someone said the problem, ralph, is this, that the vital interests of the united states, and the vital interests of the fortune 500 are the # 00 or whatever it is, they used to be the same in this country, and they diverged. their intrirses, and, look, if what's good for general motors is moving factories overseas, than what's good for general motors is not good for the united states of america. >> host: it's happening with the solar industry. we were ahead from the world, and now the factories move to china because china gives them the store. >> guest: what do you
CSPAN
Sep 24, 2012 12:00am EDT
be celebrated. .. america actually has a surplus. so when you look with china, with a $6 billion surplus when it comes to services and a huge deficit when it comes to manufacturing. so, the iranians done correctly, which is figuring out how to match capital with good ideas is import in and having complex innovation is healthy for america system. the problem is short-term. short-term thinking where companies conmen and bankrupt companies for short-term gain instead of thinking what is the valuable long-term model of the rate of return? that has to do with corporate government laws and figuring out how we can have incentives and instructors that don't require an incentivize manager to make long-term decisions instead of macramÉ seeing the quarterly office. >> dgc and if these incentives that could be changed to incentivize? >> absolutely. but think a lot of the department of commerce help small and medium-sized businesses. 50% of their jobs to train our small come and medium-sized companies and small have an advantage because they are doing things. they can afford automation, maki
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2011 12:00pm EST
the soviet union or china or cuba, whatever, you name it. again and again and again. and we are not learning any of it. and the reason why is the wretched, wretched states -- state of our universities. that are not teaching this stuff, that are currently biased, that do not believe in ideology diversity at all. and by the way, are way overpriced while we are at it. i'll stop there, how's that? >> this event was hosted by the heritage foundation in washington, d.c.. for more information visit heritage.org. >> coming up next, book tv presents "after words," an hour-long program where we invite guest hosts to interview authors. this week "new york times" editorial board member eduardo porter discusses the history of white people are willing to pay what they do for the things that are important to their lives. in his latest book, "the price of everything," the former "wall street journal" argued -- wright argues goods and services are not your thing with a cost. decisions also have a price, and those costs shape our everyday lives. mr. porter discusses "the price of everything" with yah
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2012 9:00am EST
. >> guest: i think it's going to be a military virtual equal of the united states, china, and an economic equal, so we're going to a bipolar world. secondly, i think the american state, the nation-state, the government is in deep trouble, ralph. it cannot balance its budgets or secure its borders or win its wars or stop the hemorrhaging of its manufacturing base overseas. we lost six million manufacturing jobs in the first decade of the 21st century, some 55,000 factories shut down. the united states is declining as a great superpower and a great nation. but i think the most important thing i see is that america is disintegrating. i think it was lee hamilton that said the seven riff gal forces are becoming dominant in our society, and i think if you look at our country you will see that ethnically in terms of class, philosophy and ideology and in terms of race each, the united states seems to be breaking down into enclaves of people who separate from each other and do not much like each other and even detest each other. and so in that sense america will be a legal entity, i think
CSPAN
Mar 21, 2011 12:00am EDT
on in the east and china and the other places. of course, it's fascinating, but my book is really about the errors made here in the united states and europe. it's a home-grown program on policy nothing to do with china, things like education, all the structural problems like infrastructure and energy problems that have nothing to do with china and essential to get right to make sure the u.s. and european countries are back on track. >> host: it's like a couple different books in one book. there's the story of the decline of the west, the rise of the east, and the basic premise of the lines are going to cross. >> guest: you can argue there's an absolute part for sure talking about the west in isolation and what the issues are going on there, and then, of course, we live in an amazing time of china and other emerging economies have done the unthinkable, moving hundreds of thousands of people out of poverty. of course, that's answering the ire relative question as well which is what i've done in the book. >> host: let's start by talking about what's going wrong in the west. >> guest:
CSPAN
Jul 19, 2009 9:00pm EDT
$4.5 a gallon last year that "lake with no name: a true story of love and conflict in modern china" team was receiving more phone calls and government regulation like in california with 8032 that governor schwarzenegger signed in 2006, are you optimistic there is a positive synergy that eco barons light speed 18 will be better able to achieve their goal as the government steps in and regulates carvin? >> guest: i think it depends on whether we get serious about imposing those regulations and and linking economic incentives and put the environmental responsible thing to do and it has to be part of the same process. look at the history of renewable energy development. carter was the last president to pay attention to those of us use any substantive way. the one and only press conference on the roof off the white house says that jimmy carter showing off his new solar panels that they were symbolic for a green stimulus if you will. they were not calling it that than the that's what it was. it was incentives, tax breaks and other government programs to stimulate the development of solar
CSPAN
Mar 7, 2010 9:00pm EST
responsibilities and missions then let's say a nation like china or russia or other nations in the world and to protect ourselves and respond to humanitarian crises to have a nuclear deterrent against a nuclear threat to have missile defense the list goes on and on and on of the challenges the military has. in my view it requires an annual budget of roughly 4% of gdp. right now about 3.8% of gdp and total federal spending but approximately 20% of the gdp. so we are seeing the the defense budget ought to be about 20% of the total gdp. a lot of percentages. i apologize for taking that course. but i think sometimes we say we are spending so much more than any other nation in the world why should we be spending any more on the military? because they spend for less than we do actually as you go behind their numbers and find they don't report all of their military spending and the costs for instance standing up an army where they have conscription, not paid volunteer army, the costs are lower so when you look at a more comparable basis china is spending a lot at 10% the level of the united states
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 12:00pm EST
united states in a way similar to the the way mainland china deals with united states. the problem is, of course, you don't have human rights, very give human rights record in cuba and in these from the u.s. perspective it is really don't have democratic elections and i was in the most powerful organizations in cuba right now are the cuban communist party and still the cuban military. cuban generals have made millions of dollars off of the recent increase in tourist trade to cuba and i am not sure what i certainly don't think that those groups want to see a normalization of relations with united states that would in any way threaten their position but once the castros have gone from the scene, events may very well force their hand or just simply be too powerful for them. who knows? i don't have a better crystal ball than anybody else, but i really do think that there are lots of people who wouldn't like to make money in cuba and that capitalist incentive i think over time will become even more powerful. other questions? richard. >> have you foresee the possibility that the hierarch
CSPAN
Nov 19, 2012 6:30am EST
and the west to china and the east, the powers of globalization in the digital era, how too -- how to deal with the 1.6 muslims in the world, the threats of iranian nuclear power, and i also look at internal threats; low birthrates, assimilation, and, again, whether we can, in effect, succeed at a time when we are more successful than ever in being integrated into our society. it's a new phenomenon, and that's really why i wanted to write the book. i also write about that from an israeli perspective. i've been to israel maybe 40 times, three times this year alone. during the carter and clinton administrations, i was deeply involved in policies between the u.s. and israel, but i also write from the perspective of someone who has relatives in israel, who has spent many, many years and times in israel. so it's a unique perspective looking from the outside in and from the inside out. >> host: so, ambassador, israel was one of the few foreign policy issues in the 2012 campaign. mitt romney saying you won't see any sunlight between the u.s. and israel. is the u.s. relationship and vice vers
CSPAN
Jun 24, 2012 9:00pm EDT
guns from the united states, they're getting them from cheaper sources like china and central america. why was arizona chosen? it's on the border, it's a pro-second amendment state, so it's easy to blame violence on the cartels there. you look at the politics bind that, arizona was chosen for political reasons, not necessarily to stop gun trafficking into mexico. >> host: did the fact that the homeland security secretary, janet napolitano, having been from arizona have any role in this? >> guest: absolutely. her former staffer, former u.s. attorney for arizona dennis burke, served as janet napolitano's staffer when she was the attorney general of arizona and served as her chief of staff while she was governor of arizona and followed her into the obama administration as her senior homeland security adviser before president obama appointed him to u.s. attorney in arizona. now, he was the guy who oversaw trafficking of guns into mexico from the ground level on the doj side, and the memos prove that he was in full approval of these guys coming into gun shops, buying guns and sendi
CSPAN
Nov 19, 2011 10:00pm EST
industry to china. so why isn't -- and they've devastated the family. they have separated chirp from their family. oaoaoaoaoaoaoaoaououououououoaouououoaoaouoaoaoaoañananaln@n.jótótó÷ótótótótótótótótótótótótótótó÷ótótótó÷ótótó÷ó÷ótótótwúó÷wpwpwpótwpwpwpwpw÷w÷w÷w÷w÷w÷w÷w÷ótw÷wtw÷w÷wtwtwtó÷ó÷ó÷ó÷ótó÷ó÷ótó÷ótótótótó÷ótótwúwúótó÷ >> when you put pornography onwúwú the internet for children andó÷ all the rest of it whether it's hollywood or the businesses,ó÷ót you're right, there are corrupt human beings that do that.wúót and i'm against that.wtót and you and i were opposed naftaópó÷ and these others. but only in partial defense ofótó÷ business guys when i traveled the company in '92 and '96, iwúwp talked to textile guys. i don't wantwú to go overseas. the guyó÷ over the road moved his factory to mexico, to china, they're undercutting me.ótó÷ if i don't move my factory, i'mó÷wú finished. i blame ideological freewúwú traders. i blamed them, and i used to beó÷ót one of them. milton
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2011 12:00am EST
jobs and industry to china. why, and they've devastated the family. they have separated children from their parents. >> guest: right. >> host: we have a lot of documentation. how does this mix in the book? there's one nice quote from the president of ibm how the industrial america is abandoning. >> guest: i agree with almost everything you said. look, they had no -- look, when you put pornography on the internet for children and the rest of it, whether it's hollywood or the businesses, you're right, they're corrupt human beings that do that, and i'm against that. you and i were opposed nafta and the other things, but i will say, you know, in only partial defense of business guys, when i travel to the country in 1992 and 1996, i talked to guys who said, pat, i don't want to go overseas. the guy down the rote moved his factory to mexico or chie china. they are undercutting me. if i don't go, i'm finished. i blame the ideological free traders. i blame them, and i used to be one of them, friedman and i were friends until he wrote me a letter saying i'm doing the devil's work. i was oppose
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2011 12:00pm EST
i think wúwúwúwú china is rising so fast it's going to be a military virtual equal of the united states.óúwú and equal so we're going to a bipolar world. secondly i think the american state, the nationstate, the government is in big trouble ralph. ópóúóúwpóúwpóúóúóúóúóúóp wú wú wúwú wúóú wp óúwú wúwúwúwú wú wp wpwpwp wúwúwú óú wpwpwpwúóúwú wúwúwúwúwpwúópwpwú wúwúóp wúóú óp wú wúwúwúwpwú óúwú wúwpwúwúwú wúwúwú wúwú óp wpóp óúóú wúwúóp wpwú óúwúwúwúwú óúóúwúóúwúwúwúóúóúóúwp wúwúwúwúwúóúóúóúwúwúópópwúóúwúwúwúwpwúwúwpwúwúwúwúwúóúwú wúwú wú wú wp ópwp óp óp óúóúwp wúwúwúwpwúwúwpwú some 55,000 factories shutwp down. the united states is declining as a great superpower to greatóúwp óú nation. wúwú butóp iwúwúwú think the most important thing iwp see is america is disintegrating. i think it was lee hamilton whowúwú said that the centrifugal forces are wpbecomingóúwp dominant inwúwp amewprican society. and i think if you
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2011 12:00am EST
-- of the pacific rim, all the way to canada and all the way out through japan and china and korea, and the conversation was different. about global trade and free trade, and i actually always thought in that sense the countries had more in common with their asian counterparts than their latin american counterparts. >> is it how they see themselves in their stage of development? >> i think it is. you look at places like chile, now quite developed, colombia getting there. a country click brazil is interesting because on the one hand it's leading the -- one of the leaders in the global economy but with huge income distribution difficulties that keep it more on the developing countryside. if you look at the poorest countries in, say, central america, like guatemala, for instance, you're talking about places where you can't even reach the farmers in the highlands bay highway, and so their problems are to build infrastructure so they can join the 20th century economy. forget the 21st century economy. so you have radically different levels of development. when you think about the radically di
CSPAN
Jul 26, 2009 12:00pm EDT
environment for development. to turn it into a question, if someone in china or india to rapidly growing questions were to read this book, there is optimism in your book. would you be optimistic that we would find eco barons in those two countries? or i believe most of the eco barons were people in the united states. >> well, yeah, the focus is on the united states. for a variety of reasons. one of them being that the united states is in a position to really lead in these areas and by example. and i don't think that we have done that. certainly we haven't on climate in recent years. maybe that is changing. i think that there are individuals in other developing countries and in booming economies like in india who are looking to develop new energy and new transportation technology that would be more environmental friendly. china is putting an electric and an electric hybrid vehicle on the market, one of their nature battery companies has developed its. and i haven't seen it in person but i have read about and apparently it is quite impressive and quite affordable. more so than the vehicles
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2015 9:00pm EST
- soviets but neil is our rulers that had ambitions. i looked at china and understanding this with the first world war, it is sort of a crisis at the periphery and at the center. and that includes increasing chaos that was researched. so i had this idea that we were at entering this is a period of global disorder. and i flushed out this article in world magazines and i thought that in fact what really unites this is that all of this is happening as america has turned this way. and we already had this historical experience of what happens in the world when america turns inward, there is a connection. so it was on this basis that i started to write the book. >> host: the publisher is a conservative of 10 when books. when was the first printed? >> guest: you know i don't know i think that we are somewhere near 30,000 at this point, probably more. >> host: how many have sold? do no? >> guest: the last i saw was about 14,000 or so but again, i'm almost reluctant to say this because i could be wrong. and the lovely thing about c-span, as people that watch the show, whether they agree wit
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2015 12:00am EST
territorial amibitions and showed that with the invasion of georgia. i looked at china and the microaggressions, to borrow a term in the east and south china sea, to anyone with an understanding of the first world war, you cannot -- the origins of the first world war are a story of crisis at the periphery backing crises at the center. i looked at iran continuing to move towards nuclear capability and iraq descending into increasing chaos as -- what we then called al qaeda resurged. so i had this idea we were entering into a period of global disorder and i fleshed that out in an 8,000 word article in "commentary" magazine. after writing the article i thought here is a theme -- in fact what really unites this theme is that all of this is happening as america has turned inward, and we already have as i said this, historical experience of what happens in the world when america turns inward. there's a connection, and so it was on that bay si is started to write the book. >> oo commercial question, your publisher, sentinel conservative imprint of penguin random house, what what's fir
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2015 12:00pm EST
thinking about simply in order to announce that it is dead. we do not want russia china rand intervening in latin america, and i don't think quite frankly venezuelans, cubans or ecuadorians do either. >> host: back to the book. part of your criticism of president obama which is much in the book, not the only one criticized. you refer to him as compared to the legendary king -- explained to the readers. >> guest: the viking king who stood on the shore line and commanded the tides recede to prove his godlike powers. when the president says the tide of war is receiving, he can only observe that hide receding. he cannot command it to show we can s.o.b. said you know what? the war in iraq is over and we're going to put an end to what used to be called the war on terrorism. president of the national defense university and may 2013 give a speech effectively saying exactly that, and we cannot allow this war on terror to define our generation. so we're going to change our attention to something else. and by the way, great news, al-qaeda, core al-qaeda us on the path to defeat and all
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2015 10:00pm EST
us one way or another whether it's the militants of islamic state whether it's china's general seeking to kick us out of east asia, whether his russian politicians seeking to revise the conclusions of the cold war. >> host: you mention in your subtitle the new isolationism and the coming global disorder. why coming? >> guest: i won't say who it was but a prominent person who read and liked this book said i liked it very much. the only word is the word coming which should be the current global disorder but in fact i think it's going to be you ain't seen nothing yet. i think it's going to be worse. for example of falling oil prices all of us are celebrating as consumers driving a car and not having to pay four bucks for a gallon of gas and we think that it gives us leverage over countries like russia and iran that perhaps we didn't enjoy before. my sense in fact is that russia and iran will become more dangerous as oil prices decline because they are now going to seek other ways to get out of their economic predicament. typically you think of a country like argentina in the early
CSPAN
Jun 12, 2017 12:00am EDT
arrive in china and russia, i think of it as the chessboard world. it is the world of how to we essentially beat our adversari adversaries. we think about a move that we try to anticipate the moves they make. that world is there an important. equally important is the world of the web. the web of criminal networks including terrorists and arms traffickers in the world of business which is big network supply chains. in the world of nongovernmental organizations. i think of these as web actors is increasingly important actors. we don't have strategies on how to bring them together. this book is a book that says ever going to have a world of strategies and how to deal with conflict between's dates we also need strategies on how to design networks for specific people. who do we connect, how do we connect them and run those networks to advance our goals. this book is a stres part of th. >> is a timely book very much. just building on what you said in your opening remarks, let me just go to what i thought was an effective quote that to depth argument in the book where you say on pages
CSPAN
Jun 11, 2017 8:54pm EDT
think about north korea or iran or sometimes china and russia, that world of state to state relations is still very, very important, and i think of it as the chess board world but it's the world of how do we essentially beat our at vers ears and we think d- -- adversaries and we think about a move and try to anticipate their move. that world there is and it's very important, but equally important is what i call the world of the web. that world of criminal networks, including terrorists, but also arms trackers and drug trackers. the world of business, which increasingly big networks supply chains, global corporations and the world of nongovernmental organizations. i think of all those actors as web actors, as increasingly important actors but we don't have strategies for how to bring them together. so, this book is a book that says, if we are going to have a world of a chessboard and strategies how you dollar -- deal with conflict between states and cooperation between state wes need strategies how to design networks for pick people. who do we connect, how do we connect them, how do we
CSPAN
Jul 7, 2017 9:00pm EDT
if you think about north korea or iran or sometimes china and russia, that world of state to state relations is still very very important. and i think of it as the chessboard world. because it is the world of how due we essentially be adversaries and rethink about a movie and trying to anticipate what move they are going to make. that world is there and it is very important. equally important is what i call the world of the web. that world of criminal networks. including terrorists but also arms traffickers and drug traffickers. the world of business. which is increasingly big network supply chain, global corporations. and the world of nongovernmental organizations. i think of all of those actors as web actors as increasingly important actors. but we don't have strategies for how to bring them together. so this book is a book that says if we are going to have a world of a chessboard and strategies of how you deal with conflict between states and cooperation between states, we also need a set of strategies for how to design networks for specific people. who do we connect, how do we
CSPAN
Jul 8, 2017 1:03am EDT
, about north korea or china or russia that state to state relations is very important and i think about that as the chess board and how we be our adversaries and anticipating on the lives they will make but equally important is what i call the world of the web and as the of world as business and of those actors so this is say book to save the world of the chess board dealing with conflict before states and of how to design the networks for specific people to meet those challenges are fans of gold. >> so just a building on what you said in his opening remarks, so let me go to what was a pretty effective '' with that argument you say and pages number nine and 10 so using those pood -- ability to operate but side by side with corporate in civil and criminal actors so of the web of networks so is it their realist and then the networks? or how do you see that? and the field that we have both been that endless debate between the liberal internationalist so had you pursuits of values that is overplayed and i strongly believe that we have to pursue our values so i would also say we have t
CSPAN
Jun 10, 2017 10:00pm EDT
sometimes china and russia. that world of state to state relations is still very very important and i think of it as the chessboard world because it is the world of how do we essentially beat our adversaries and we think about a movie and we try to anticipate what mood they're going to make. and that world is there and it is very important. but equally important is what i call the world on the web. that world of criminal networks including terrorists but also traffickers of arms and the world of business which is increasingly big networks supply chains. global corporations and the world of nongovernmental organizations. i think of all of those actors as webmasters as increasingly important actors. but we don't have strategies how to bring them together. this book is a book that says if we are going to have a world with a chessboard and strategies of how to deal with conflict between states and cooperation between states we also need a set of strategies for how to design networks for specific people. good to reconnect how fluid connect them? how do we run the networks to meet challenges or t
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)