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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2016 9:00pm EDT
agenda because now that china and india have gone to war the cia is ready to replace the pakistan knees and they were right. they began to support the tibetan resistance and no flight started to come out of india to the chinese. also flights that would only come out of pakistan in 1963 and 64 there would come out secretly firebases in india and it was one of those flights that discovered the chinese are in the final stages to test their first nuclear weapons and to give the united states a crucial intelligence china was on the verge of becoming a nuclear weapon state. >> alleges like to say and ambassador at -- a word about the ambassador john galbraith was a tall man 6-foot 6 inches board ontario canada and a graduate of the ontario school of agriculture and moved to the united states did dkb economist and wrote several books and the star of harvard university. in dkb advisor to kennedy. and he kept the diary in he later published that diary is is a memoir. that whether or not. to say at least we know you actually said that. the diary is a fascinating piece politically unaware and unkn
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2015 12:00am EST
china to put pressure on the soviets, and for the sake of that you may have to make compromises with say the pakistani government, if you have no other concerns you might not make. i think any judgment you make about form policy has to be done, not on a case-by-case basis but in a strategic framework. in his his early writing and i do talk about in the book he says it is in the nature of statesmanship that you have to make choices and you are free to make these choices. their choices between evil and the challenges to decide what the lesser of two evils is. kissinger says this is their right from the very earliest writing. that is the problem, that is the choice that there is sometimes no good options. there there are just evils that you have to choose between. >> all that is persuasive but i would put that in a real policy camp in the sense of seeking stability for the sake of peace, or not annihilation. having to look the other way on the repression on pakistan or his decision and joint decision on the bombing of cambodia. or something you do engage some of this in the book, his ro
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2011 12:00am EST
because it did not fit with their world view they were china anti-iraq and al qaeda did not fit with their world view. there were of office eight years and had not process the fact anon state actor could be serious threat to. >> host: that is a fair criticism. but the other side is after 9/11 did things that are highly controversial and o produce over board but it sounds like we would argue were pretty effective to blunt the future threat. >> sure. three down the wall between the fbi and cia was long overdue some information gathered could be handed to law-enforcement and these were no-brainers but it took 9/11 to happen. there was an interesting experiment and the book of what would happen was if not an 11 the democratic party would be out of business. [laughter] >> host: because they would be blamed? >> it would have all happened under their watch. it is a bipartisan failure like george did you bush the administration to act more criticism but both did not respond to uss cole. mike sheehan the ambassador for counterterrorism famously said what will it take a guide at its hacking th
CSPAN
Feb 14, 2011 12:00am EST
, is given we've been in the argument a long time that china has profound economic problems at this point. it's grown in 0 years. it will continue to grow, but it's going to go through an adjustment. the most important thing to argue is the next 10 years is really about the relationship what i call empire of republic. it's between the vast global power of the united states, the difficulty in managing that and retaining republican forms of government. the military industrial complex, i'm going beyond that. i'm saying the requirements of managing an international system in which we are the only global power with the institutions that we have, you know, the complexity of our intelligence organizations create the situation where no one has a clear idea of what everyone is doing aside from creating unnecessary chaos in the world, it creates real challenges for the republic. i need to maintain a democratic society in the face of this both accumulating and nontransparent power. i'd say those three things. >> host: the word balancing i think is a word that appears a lot in the course of the
CSPAN
Feb 12, 2011 10:00pm EST
years predicts china and turkey will challenge the remaining superpower in the coming decade in ways the government may not currently anticipate. he talks with the exit is editor of foreign policy magazine, susan glasser. >> host: george, thank you so much. i'm glad to have the chance to talk to you in him that about your new book. i see that it represents a little bit of what's the right word, the narrowing of the frame of ambition from alaska on the next 100 years, you have now taken on perhaps a slightly more manageable next ten years or perhaps that is more unknowable, the next ten years. i think we can talk about that over the next hour, and some of your very counter intuitive views about what direction you see the world headed, and in particular the u.s. encounters with that world, whether it's on israel or her china and your view or russia. i can to have interesting things to say that are not exactly what you're going to pick up from reading the papers every day. let's go ahead and jump right into that conversation. the next ten years. what are the three most surprising to tak
CSPAN
Apr 11, 2010 6:00pm EDT
all to the port from where it will go to china. there it will turn into cars and smoke and certain cities that spring up overnight. to a growth rate that leaves economists breathless, into weapons to make war. everyone is asleep except for the centuries who take one and half hour shifts. finally i could look at the stars. when i was a child growing up on the banks of the miniature river i used to think of the crickets -- i used to think that the sound of the crickets, which always started up at twilight, was the sound of the stars roughing up, getting ready to shine. i am surprised at how much love being here. there is no where else in the world that i would rather be. who should i be to night? conrad under the stars. maybe dee dee will come tomorrow. they arrive in the early afternoon. i can see them from a distance about 15 of them in olive green and uniforms running towards us, even from a distance from the way they run i can tell they are the heavy hitters, the people's revolutionary army for home laser-guided rifles, for whom the counterterrorism and jungle warfare training co
CSPAN
Feb 13, 2011 9:00pm EST
years predicts china and turkey will challenge the remaining superpower in the coming decade in ways the government may not currently anticipate. he talks with the executive editor of the foreign policy magazine, susan glasser. >>> george, thank you so much for joining us. i'm thrilled to have the chance to talk to you in debt about your new book the next decade. i see that it represents a little bit of what is the right word, the narrowing of the frame of ambition from the last book on the next 100 years so you have now taken on the slightly more manageable next ten years or perhaps that's actually more and noble, the next ten years. we can talk about that a little bit of the next hour to get some of your counter intuitive viewers i think about the world is headed and the d'huez encounters with that world whether it is on israel or china and your view of the rise or russia and i think the interesting things to say that are not exactly what you're going to pick up from reading the papers every day. so let's go ahead and jump into that conversation. the next ten years for the next thr
CSPAN
Feb 20, 2011 12:00pm EST
over china, or russia or i think you have some interesting things to say that are not exactly what you're going to pick up from reading the papers every day. so let's go ahead and jump right in to that conversation. the next 10 years, what are the three most surprising takeaways that you are offering people in this book? >> guest: i think first that the war on terror has been overdone. now that terrorism is not a profound danger but as a monochromatic structure of foreign policy. it simply is unsustainable. there are too many other things happening in the world. the second thing i suppose that china has profound economic problems at this point. it's grown magnificently and will continue to grow but it's going to go through adjustments there i suppose the most important thing i'm arguing is the next 10 years is really about the relationship between what i call empire and republic, between the vast global power of the united states, the difficulty in managing that and retaining republican forms of government. eisenhower spoke about the military-industrial complex. i'm going beyond th
CSPAN
Mar 16, 2013 10:00pm EDT
calling out to china for recognition. they are still calling out to america in some way or another. yes go they are and when america doesn't respond they get very upset more so than in china doesn't respond. no matter its faults the u.s. should stand up for democracy and human rights etc. so whatever the history of the united states, whatever the interest that it has to pursue, that is the expectation. >> host: he you write that it's almost like a catch-22. one official says if we intervene they say we are meddling and if we stay back they say where to standing up for human rights? no matter what we do we do we ae on with some site of criticism. >> guest: that is the fate of the superpower. it is a catch-22. people want you to deliver for them but they don't necessarily want to give you what it takes to deliver further so it's all about your own interest. i do quote this official who says we are damned if we do and damned if we don't. the pendulum swings constantly and cystic wiggle thing. look at syria now. people are very upset in syria and in the region and here in the u.s.. you
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2011 9:00pm EST
say, i don't want to go overseas. the guy down the road went joe seas, went to mexico, went to china. they undercut me. if i don't move my factory, i'm finished. frankly, i blame the free traders, blame them, and i used to be one of them. we used to be friends until i got a level saying i was doing the devil's work. i was opposed to free trade. i'm with you on that. my sense is that some of the business guys say, look, in the global economy they dump me in. i work for this company, and i've got to save the company, but if someone said the problem, ralph, is this, that the vital interests of the united states, and the vital interests of the fortune 500 are the # 00 or whatever it is, they used to be the same in this country, and they diverged. their intrirses, and, look, if what's good for general motors is moving factories overseas, than what's good for general motors is not good for the united states of america. >> host: it's happening with the solar industry. we were ahead from the world, and now the factories move to china because china gives them the store. >> guest: what do you
CSPAN
Mar 18, 2013 12:00am EDT
calling out to china for recognition. they were still calling out for america in some way or another. >> guest: they are, and when america doesn't respond people get very upset. more so than if china does not respond. there's still a feeling within the arab world and other regions, i think as well, that no matter its faults the u.s. should stand up for democracy, human rights, et cetera. so whatever the history of the united states, whatever the interests it has to pursue, that is the expectation. >> host: you write it's almost like a catch-22. one official says, if we intervene, they say we are immediateling. with we stay back they say, why aren't you standing up for human rights? so we're always on some side of criticism. >> guest: that's the fate of a superpower. it is a catch-22. people want you to deliver for them, but they don't necessarily want to give you what it takes to deliver for others, so it's all about your own interests, and i do quote this official who says, we're kind of damned if we do, damned if we don't. the pendulum swings constantly. it's cyclical thing. look a
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2009 3:00pm EST
do something. >> host: pakistan and china have long relations. >> guest: for a long time. had been a landslide bridging islamabad in pakistan and koosh car in china. it was called a highway. it is the paul simon in the world. that ties built this to open up trade. about a week earlier there had been a fan slide that had blocked a vote on the pakistani side. the pakistanis couldn't move the rocks out of the way and the chinese were figures. they built a road. we did everything and there is a landslide. at least get the rocks out of the way. there was always in tension. then the masseuses were kidnapped. the army and the range of the pakistan rangers and the police also met at the mosque on july 3. and for 10 days, there was this stand up and occasional firing. you could hear glass across town. would stand up on the roof of my house and watch fireballs coming off of the top of the red mosque. finally the government, commandos pushed in, and they trapped ghazi inside the basement of the mosque and there was a shootout and ghazi was killed. now as we mentioned earlier, it was a very, ver
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2009 11:00am EDT
called a highway that is the tallest ever in the road china had built this to open trade and one week earlier there had been a landslide that had blocked the road on the pakistani side. they could not move the rocks out of the way and the chinese are furious saying we built the road just when there is a landslide at least get the rocks out of the way. there was attention than the masseuse was kidnapped. the army and pakistani rangers and police and military force around the mosque on july 3rd and 410 days there was a standoff you can hear blast across town we would stand upon the roof of my house and watch the fireballs coming up and finally the commandos pushed and they trapped gazi in the basement and there's a shootout and gazi was killed. as you mentioned earlier there is the awkward moment for me because the government had a paraded his dead bloated body in front of the television and said we got him and my response watching was okay, we got him that if he had been so instrumental in introducing me to another world that my contact was done as well. he was a friend in a weird
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 12:00pm EDT
revolution, no one was calling out to china for recognition. they were still going out for america in some way or another trip to the are. and when america doesn't respond people get upset. more so than if china doesn't respond. there's still a feeling within the arab world and other regions i think as well. that no matter the fall, the u.s. should stand up for democracy, human rights, et cetera. so whatever the history of the united states, what are the interests that has to pursue, that is the expectation. >> host: but you write it's almost like a catch-22. quote one official who says if we intervene, they say we are meddling. if we stay back basic why are just an effort human rights? so no matter what we do we are in some kind of criticism. >> guest: that is the fate of the superpower. it is a catch-22. people want you to deliver for them, but they don't necessary want to give you what it takes to deliver for others. so it's all about your own interest. i do quote this official who says we're damned if we do, damned if we don't. the pendulum swings constantly. it's a cyclical thing
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2011 9:00pm EST
concerned with antiballistic defense and china and iraq and al qaeda didn't fit with the view. part is the had been out of office for eight years and they haven't processed the fact that in on state actor like al qaeda could be a serious threat. >> host: i think that is certainly a fair criticism but as you said, the other side is that after 9/11 the suddenly became three alarmed and some of which were highly controversial, some of which went overboard but a lot of which i would argue so it's like you would argue as well or pretty effective in al qaeda. >> guest: bringing it on the war of the fbi and the cia was long overdue. so the information gathered in the intelligence operation could be handed to law enforcement. these were sort of no-brainers but it took 9/11 for it to happen. there's an interesting thought experiment i don't do in the book but what would have happened if our core was in office on 9/11? my personal view is the democratic party would be out of business. >> host: there would be blamed for the attack. >> guest: it would have happened under their watch. it's a bip
CSPAN
May 12, 2013 12:00pm EDT
challenges china. the administration has argued that this is completely separate from the middle east and we have a choice of either middle east or china. so petitte to asia. interpreted in the middle east. pivot toward asia and pivot away from. think about it. from ruler to public intellectual. americans want to wash their hands from the middle east. some my argument is not so fast. and the least is still strategically important, strategically vital. a lot at stake there, but it is also not separate from the china issue. it is a mistake. is another big mistake to think that our arrival in china, the asia-pacific. the middle east, completely irrelevant. but rather i think the middle east will also be an iran of american chinese rivalry. moving west. there energy needs are from the middle east and central asia. they looked out. the art from central asia to pakistan. set up countries that are of vital interest to stability of western china. they're looking for markets. building pipelines doorways. so for the chinese, rising strategic concern and interest whereas we sort of thing that these thi
CSPAN
May 5, 2013 9:00pm EDT
challenge is china. >> host: yes. >> guest: the administration has argued that this is completely separate from the middle east. we have a choice of either middle east or china. the pivot to asia was interpreted in the middle east to -- pivot away from the middle east. if you ask middle east and think about it from ruler to public intelligent -- the americans want to wash their hands from it. my argument is not so fast. the middle east is still strategically important and vital to us. we have a lot at stake there. it's also not separate from the china issue. it's a mistake. another big mistake to think that it's in asia-pacific. and middle east is completely irrelevant. but rather, i think, middle east would also be an arena of american chinese. the chinese are moving west. i the energy needs from middle east and central asia. they look at the arc from central asia to pakistan as their set of countries that are vital interest to civility of western china. they are looking for markets. for the chinese, middle east is a rising strategic concern and interest. where we think that thes
CSPAN
May 4, 2013 10:00pm EDT
: our biggest problem is global issue in china pity the administration has argued that this is completely separate from the middle east coming and we have a choice of either middle east or china. so the term pivoting towards asia was towards asia and pivot away from the middle east. they think about it from ruler to public intellectual americans want to wash their hands of this. so my argument is not -- the middle east is strategically important and vital. we have a lot at stake but it's also not separate from the china issue. it's a mistake. it's another big mistake to think that china is in the asia-pacific. and the middle east is completely irrelevant. but rather might think the middle east will also be in the a reena moving west and they move from the middle east and central asia. they look at the arc of central asia to pakistan come in here and abroad if you want to call it. i said that countries that are of a vital interest to the stability of western china. they are looking for markets, building pipelines, roads into this region. so, for the chinese come in the middle ea
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 2:00pm EDT
. and china, which is to say china is probably running through the end of its course of making argument we're simply a developing country, we can't afford to bear the burdens of international leadership that the united states has been paying. the first sign china wants to be recognized as the second largest economy in the world, growing toward eating at some point in the next couple of decades the largest economy in the world. at some point those conversations are going to meet. and the question of who pays the bill for global leadership and what is required in order to sustain that is going to come. i want to back up, december 31, 1991. you call the breakpoint in history. the collapse of the soviet union is what happened on that day. and the birth of the post-soviet era, not only in american foreign policy but in terms of literally rewriting the map of the world as we knew it. two decades later we're going to mark the anniversary this year. things haven't necessary turned out as some of the optimists would have had them. we have not seen a tidal wave of democracy and freedom wash acros
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2011 12:00am EST
jobs and industry to china. why, and they've devastated the family. they have separated children from their parents. >> guest: right. >> host: we have a lot of documentation. how does this mix in the book? there's one nice quote from the president of ibm how the industrial america is abandoning. >> guest: i agree with almost everything you said. look, they had no -- look, when you put pornography on the internet for children and the rest of it, whether it's hollywood or the businesses, you're right, they're corrupt human beings that do that, and i'm against that. you and i were opposed nafta and the other things, but i will say, you know, in only partial defense of business guys, when i travel to the country in 1992 and 1996, i talked to guys who said, pat, i don't want to go overseas. the guy down the rote moved his factory to mexico or chie china. they are undercutting me. if i don't go, i'm finished. i blame the ideological free traders. i blame them, and i used to be one of them, friedman and i were friends until he wrote me a letter saying i'm doing the devil's work. i was oppose
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2013 9:00pm EDT
was calling out to china for recognition. they were still calling out for america in some way or another. >> guest: they are. and when america doesn't respond, people get very upset. more so than if china doesn't respond. because there is the till a feeling -- still a feeling within the arab world and other regions, i think, as well that no matter its faults, the u.s. should stand up for democracy, human rights, etc. so whatever the history of the united states, whatever the interests that it has to pursue, that is expectation. >> host: but you write it's almost like a cash 22. >> guest: it is. >> host: i think you quote one official who says if we intervene, they say we're meddling. if we stay back, they say why aren't you standing up for civil rights. >> guest: absolutely. and i think that is the fate of a superpower, right? it is a catch 22. people want you to deliver for them, but they don't necessarily want to give you what it takes to deliver for others. so it's all about your own, your own interests. and, um, i do quote the this official who say we're kind of damned if we
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2011 12:00am EST
-- of the pacific rim, all the way to canada and all the way out through japan and china and korea, and the conversation was different. about global trade and free trade, and i actually always thought in that sense the countries had more in common with their asian counterparts than their latin american counterparts. >> is it how they see themselves in their stage of development? >> i think it is. you look at places like chile, now quite developed, colombia getting there. a country click brazil is interesting because on the one hand it's leading the -- one of the leaders in the global economy but with huge income distribution difficulties that keep it more on the developing countryside. if you look at the poorest countries in, say, central america, like guatemala, for instance, you're talking about places where you can't even reach the farmers in the highlands bay highway, and so their problems are to build infrastructure so they can join the 20th century economy. forget the 21st century economy. so you have radically different levels of development. when you think about the radically di
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2017 12:01am EDT
lesser extent china and the united states and others including europe. i think the balance of power is weaker than it was. nato in many ways demilitarized after the end of the cold war. russia did many things but it is clearly not demilitarized. indeed, that is the principle instrument of russian foreign policy. china has remilitarized in certain ways. certain shifts in the balance and power and they go with the change and balances of economic wealth. you have had the rise of non-state actors most dramatically the al-qaeda and isis. you have medium states, the north korea and iran who could be a real factor in their regions. you have enormous flows from viruses whether they are real or computer, to guns, to drugs, to greenhouse gases, to components of missiles or bombs, the hacking of things that hackers would send around the world. you name it. essentially anyone and anything that knows across the borders with tremendous speed and volume. so, i think, the old rules, the ones that to one extent or another helped us through four centuries have essentially been overwhelmed by this com
CSPAN
Sep 24, 2017 9:00pm EDT
a strong china and india, you have strong nations like turkey that we previously relied on and who were economically backward and we could tell what to do but we can't do that anymore and they don't need us anymore. large places in latin america and i think that is very true and i think that you start to see this unraveling on american foreign policy and very much satisfied what's happening in this country on a foreign-policy level i think the united states is very lost. what do you think about that for >> who are we if we are not that country and if china is more powerful than us i think it is earthshaking to people whether they want to admit it or not think about what we are saying that we are unhappy unless we are running everything and if we have power over other people or people defer to us, i think even though we take that for granted i don't think people are conscious of the fact that's part of their philosophy and worldview and i think that the have to talk about what that means for the future for the confusion going on right now. >> host: i want to read part of this book w
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2017 12:00pm EDT
lesser extent china, and the united states and others, including europe. i think the balance of power is weaker than it was. nato in many ways demilitarized after the end of the cold war. russia did many things but it has asserted not demilitarized. that's the principle instrument of russian foreign policy. china has militarized in significant ways. so there's certain shifts and a balance of power in some ways commensurate with the change in balances of economic wealth. you that the rise of all sorts of nonstate actors come most dramatically the al qaeda and isis who now can also wield significant power. you have medium states, north korea, iran, who could be a real factor in the regions. and then above all i think there's a globalizationand you've got these enormous flows of just about everything from vises, whether they are real or computer, two guns to drugs to greenhouse gases, the component of missiles, more bombs, to hack into the things that hackers would send around the world, you name it. essentially anyone and anything that goes to cross borders with tremendous speed and tre
CSPAN
Sep 23, 2017 10:00pm EDT
president obama which what is america's role in the world because now you have a strong china, strong india, strong nations like turkey that we previously relied on an were economically backward it and we could tell what to do but we can't do that anymore. they don't use anymore. places in latin america and africa, think it's very true. you start to see this unraveling of american foreign policy on a government policy level. and very much set aside was happening in the country but on a foreign policy level i think the united states is lost. what you think? >> and then think about what that means to individuals. who are we if we are not that country, who are we if china is that powerful or as powerful as us. that's earthshaking to us, it requires a complete reconsideration of our identity and sense of self. that could be a wonderful thing. her saying essentially were unhappy unless are running everything. and if we have power over other people or people defer to us, even though we take that for granted i don't think people are conscious of the fact that they feel that way. i think we r
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2017 10:59am EDT
what is america's role in the world because now you have a strong china, you have a strong india. you have strong nations like turkey that we've previously relied on and who were economically backward and we could tell what to do. we can't do that anymore and they're making their own decisions. and they don't need us anymore. market places in latin america and africa, too. you start to see this unravelling of american foreign policy on a governmental policy level. and very much, you know, set aside what's happening in this country, but i think on a foreign policy level. i think that the united states is very lost. what do you think about that? >> and then think what that means to individuals? because who are we if we're not that country? who are we if china is as powerful or more powerful than us? it's this kind of, i think, earth shaking to a lot of people whether they want to admit it or not. it requires a complete reconsideration of our sense of our self and that could be can wonderful thing. think about what we're saying here. we're saying essentially we're unhappy unless we'
in the world because i have a strong china and india. you have strong nations like turkey that we previously relied on an were economically backward i could tell what to do. we can't do that anymore. the marks places in latin america and africa too. it's very true we start to see this unraveling of american foreign policy on a policy lev level. set aside what's happening in country think the united states is very lost. what you think? >> and then think about what that means to individuals. who are we if we are not the country, who are we china is as powerful or more powerful as us. it's earthshaking to a lot of people whether they want to minute, it requires a reconsideration of our identity. that could be a wonderful thing. think about it were saying or unhappy unless were running everything. if we have power over of the people, or people defer to us. even though we take that for granted people are conscious of the fact that they feel that way. we really have to talk about the fear of what that these the future. i drove a lot of election and confusion of what's going on. >> based
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