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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jun 22, 2014 9:00pm EDT
talk about how we can do just that. >> so with china it has resulted as you put it out in the super consumer products and that's a good thing for everybody but certainly it hasn't helped american manufacturing. you almost never hear anybody complain about that. why? >> guest: because most people are not -- most people haven't lost your jobs or are getting lower paid jobs. a very small percentage of -- relatively small percentage of americans are actually participating in a manufacturing. certainly substantially less than it was before. and so if you are a professional or someone that works in the service industry in your looking at getting something for substantially lower price because it's been manufactured overseas, you're happy to go to wal-mart. as you notice how wal-mart is now very focused. we have an ad campaign for the last year almost talking about how they are trying to move things back to america to encourage manufacturing here in this country. so i ca think even those who've benefited greatly like wal-mart from this globalization and having these products made overseas
CSPAN
Jun 21, 2014 10:00pm EDT
that. was that the trade gap with china has resulted as you pointed out in cheaper consumer products for everybody and i guess that's a good thing but it certainly hasn't helped american manufacturing. you almost never hear anybody complain about that. why? >> guest: well because most people aren't in manufacturing. most people have lost their jobs are getting lower paying jobs. a small percentage well, relatively small percentage of americans are participating in manufacturing. certainly substantially less than it was before so if you are a professional or someone who works in the service industry and you are looking at getting something for substantially lower price because it's been manufactured overseas you are happy to go to walmart but as you know tucker walmart is now very focused. the ad campaign for the last are almost talking about how they are trying to move things back to america to try to encourage manufacturing here in this country. i think he even those who have benefited greatly like walmart from this globalization are having these products made overseas see
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2016 10:50pm EST
personal level, many families in china are making decisions. >> i can't let you to go without talking a little bit about what's on everybody's mind which is the chinese economy. you were a wall street journal for a long time. when you look at what's happening in china, do you see a country that is on the prefaces of an economic transformation, a hard landing or do you see a place that is doing something else? >> i see china in a much more challenge economically. in the past it was all low hanging fruit. there were all the things they did that was all easy to do. the gains for very quick and rapid. now this is the hard part, the things they have to do to keep growth. they're going to have to do a lot more with a lot less people. you have to increase productivity. chinese university are pretty bad. that's why we see such a huge flood of graduate students in the american institution. the reason we have smart graduates is not because of the universities, it's because of natural talent. >> i don't see a very hopeful people picture going ahead. i don't know that green societies mixed with vib
CSPAN
Feb 7, 2010 10:45am EST
fighting words. >> that's worse than tea. >> guest: exactly. china taxed whiskey created a rebellion in my home state of pennsylvania -- >> host: that's where it was, yeah. >> guest: yeah, pennsylvania. washington, it's an incredible story. he thinks i actually keep the laws, there's this rebellion. the former general raises, calls militia up and leads them personally at the head of the militia -- >> host: the president is out there at the head. >> guest: into western pennsylvania to put down the rebellion. i think confident that his appearance by itself, as it does, frightens them into dispersing. >> host: but he also told the governor of a state that he wanted the militia called up. >> guest: right. he said -- >> host: now, that was not, i mean, that was -- >> guest: that was remarkable. >> host: yeah. >> guest: and it was the first decision of its kind. you're the prosecutor and i'm legal counsel, not the prosecutor, but if you recall also, he decides to pardon the people who are responsible for the rebellion and orders what was a u.s. attorney to drop its prosecutions, and the u.
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2010 9:00pm EST
attack on china and eisenhower is the only one who voted no. it takes the votes of the cabinet and everybody says no and he says the eyes have it. he is the boss and says that is the craziest idea. >> host: washington was military and he new-line but did not need to use it and eisenhower was the same way jfk? confer with congress? >> jfk of the cuban missile crisis with congress at least an active for blockade being the active for they called it a blockade but it was inactive for anti-undertook that without any permission from congress or any attack from cuba. now there was a longer-term threat to by the change in the balance of power but the soviets are not gassing up the missiles. >> host: lbj, a vietnam war? it continue to be funded. nixon? in vietnam right before a brief negotiation here we are. it is watergate. but then the curve of presidential power by congress in here presidents for all these years have pushed the envelope to foreign domestic policy over the edge. it is a two bit burglary for political information that curbs the president's foreign policy powers. how does i
CSPAN
Feb 1, 2010 12:00am EST
an attack on china and eisenhower is the only one who voted no. it's like linda's famous quote takes a vote in the cabinet and from bases know. she says i and the vote is all know, the ayes have it and eisenhower still is the boss and says that is the craziest idea you guys have ever thought of. >> host: the old military. our first president, washington was military and he knew rank and was free to use it and eisenhower was the same way. >> guest: no difference from eisenhower. >> host: because he was in charge. jfk, naval blockade of cuba confer with congress. >> guest: the finest moment in office was the cuban missile crisis, no authorization consultation of congress manages and engages in active war blocking the island of cuba is an active war and called it a quarantine but it was an act of war and he undertook that without any mission from congress and any attack from cuba. there was a longer-term threat attack by the change in the balance of power but the soviets were not gassing up the missiles to launch an attack on this either. >> host: lbj, the imam war funded, refunded, con
CSPAN
Apr 3, 2011 11:00pm EDT
thought of as an environmentally sensitive precipice. overtures to china and he is a hard liner in some ways, war issues. vietnam, another issue he has a mixed record. but i think the problem he had in the context of the book and this discussion on the president's race is he couldn't be relied on to state the principle or conviction if the politics told him to do something else. the was the perception and the way a lot of people think of mix and of course his nickname was tricky dick. it's not that he did everything wrong it's just he could then be relied on to do what was right in the crunch of politics dictated something else. that's the way i look at. >> host: much of your book deals with the inside of the white house but some of it deals with the outside russia beginning with johnson, clinton and obama are the highlighters of 13 and 15% effectively. if you put your predictor had on looking ahead, with that now be the lawyer for president in terms of cabinet members? >> guest: not necessarily but i think that obama hasn't named a much higher number of african-americans percentage wis
CSPAN
Apr 2, 2011 10:00pm EDT
-sensitive president. he had overtures to china. he's a hard liner in some ways on the war issues. vietnam, another issue where he's got a very mixed record. but i think the problem he had in the context of the book and this discussion on presidents and race and african-americans is that he couldn't be relied on to say the with a principle or a conviction if politics told him to do something else. that was the perception, and that's the way a lot of people think of nixon. of course, his nickname was tricky dick. it wasn't that he did everything wrong, it's just that he couldn't be relied on to do what was right in the crunch if politics dictated something else. that's the way i look at it. >> host: much of your book really duds deal with -- does deal with the inside of the white house, but some does deal with the outside. obama has -- clinton and obama are the high flyers of 13 and 15% respectively. >> guest: right. >> host: if you put your predicter's hat on looking ahead, will that now be the bar for presidents in terms of cabinet members that are -- >> guest: well, not necessar
CSPAN
Apr 10, 2017 11:32pm EDT
corporate tax rate would kill china faster than any tariff. so that's why puts it at the forefront. the way he has worked the phone on carrier for example another big companies to get them to stay here, he really has been juggling these executives to get them to stay and expand. you'll see more of that. you can argue it's only a thousand jobs here there. it's symbolic that he's making the effort what is important. >> host: you talk about an underestimated candidate. that's the understatement of the year. how did he stay confident. i was always amazed by how confident he remained even though the washington media establishment everybody seemed a goats should be the nominee. it seems like an almost impossibly confident people person. did you notice that about him and how to think that played into his victory? >> guest: he's an optimist, he is a can do guy. he doesn't think anything is impossible. he never thought the election was impossible. even here at the end finally got beat down by the constant mainstream media saying you can't win. he told his wife and he said publicly, we might not win
CSPAN
Feb 20, 2017 12:00am EST
networks in the '60s but all three networks would china in. -- china and began. warmonger or in a lunatic. but in this election uh tipping point was reached for technological reasons no longer getting back from a television set. and the ratings will stop to drop this so they consider those alternative sources so like town all ordained the caller is important and trump realizes this when nobody does. but then the of voters begin to realize the be is it in bed with the government and the big establishment. and the two cable outlets reinforce that narrative of the mainstream bbn voters for their first-ever skeptical. if you saw something on tv it must be true now is the opposite. so those two changes. >> look at that situation now with that lowest approval rating with us saturation by the media about president trump's so far. so it is the media having a pretty vague impact despite reaching out to these avenues? >> so the sample in is questionable one of the samples so some do an honest mistake and based on the assumption pet the turnout of this was identical with christians and jews one and
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2017 10:00pm EST
corporate tax rate would cripple china and mexico faster than any tariffs which i i would he needed to put itty front of the program. the way her worked on the phone on carrier and other big companies to induce them to stay here, it's worthy of lyndon johnson. he had been jaw-boning the executives to get them to stay and expand and you'll see more offer that. now you can argue oh, it's only a thousand jobs here and a thousand jobs there. it's symbol lick that he is making -- symbolic he is making thers is what is important. >> host: one of hoe nor interesting parts of the book you talk about him as an underestimated candidate. the underestimate of the year. how did he stay confident that dish was always amazed by how confident he remained even though, you're right, the washington media establishment, his own party, everybody seemed dead set against him being the nominee and then decide set against him being the president. seems like an almost impossibly confident person. disoutside notice that about hem and how do you think that played into his victory? >> guest: he is an optimist.
CSPAN
Feb 26, 2017 12:00pm EST
would cripple china and mexico faster than any tariff. the way he has worked the phone, carrier, for example, and other big companies to induce them to stay here, he really has been jawboning these executives to get them to stay and expanding i think you'll see more of that. you could argue it's only 1000 jobs year and 100 a thousand jon there. it's symbolic that is making the effort i think is what's important. >> host: one of the more interesting parts of the book as we talk about it as an underestimate candidate. i guess you could say that's an understatement of the year. how did he stay confident? i was always amazed about how confident he remained even though you're right, the washington media establishment, his own party, everybody was dead set against them being the nominee and debts against him being the president. he just seems like an almost impossibly confident person. did you notice that about him, and how do you think that played into his victory? >> guest: he's an optimist. he is supremely confident. i think that's one of the things that appeal to voters. he is a can-do
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2017 9:00pm EST
in the corporate tax rate would triple china and mexico more than any paragraph which is why the need to at the forefront of the program. the way that he has worked for companies here is worthy of lyndon johnson. he has been owning these executives to get them to stay and you will see more of that. you could argue it's only a thousand jobs here and there. it's symbolic that he's making the effort, that's what's important. >> host: you talk about him as an underestimated candidate. i guess you could see i say it e understatement of the year. how did he stay confident i was always amazed by how confident he remained even though the media establishment and his own party, everybody seemed dead set against him being the nominee into being the president. he seems like an almost impossibly competent person. did you notice that about him and how did you think that played into his victory? >> host: he's an optimist and he is supremely confident. that is one of the things that appealed to the voters he is a can-do guy and doesn't think anything is impossible. even he at the end finally got
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)