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20090604
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Sep 5, 2016 3:00am EDT
threats now don't connie lee packaged it is rush-hour or china or germany. that increasingly facing the threats that have nothing to do with those formal decisions to have a loosely organized network. they don't look like what we think of as crime to cause death or destruction on non scale with the use of military force by states. but if you decide, one way is to say we have a world of the whole continuum for the state conflict on one end it does look more like individual crime. how do we categorize that? we have a big area in between traditional war but we have legal system that does not allow for in between either picked one with this set or it is not in to get this set that are diametrically the opposite so if we decide and i don't know how, but what is an armed conflict? what is a war? is that track a weapon? the airplane? the box cover? they killed a lot of people. what is a combat and? somebody who doesn't belong to any military with planning and supporting with any plot that will eventually hurt people? do have any special level? we have no idea so we have an arbitrary decisi
CSPAN
Sep 5, 2016 5:00pm EDT
the u.s. faces now don't competely packaged and it's russia or china or germany, and look, you can tell they're coming because a whole bunch of people wearing uniforms driving tanks are rolling towards us. enclosingly we're facing threats that cross borders and may not have anything to do with the formal decisions made by states or the militaries. loose lie organized networks. cyber threats and so forth, and they don't look like what we normally think of as crime because sometimes these are threats that can cause death or destruction on a scale that historically is associated with the use of military force by states. but they don't look like war, either. and if you decide that you're going to -- the problem it, one way to put it would be to say wy have a world in which there are threats this whole continuum, from the traditional mass state-on-state conflict at one end of the continuum. at the other entough that looks more like individual crimes. a guy drives a truck out there a crowded nice. so we have threats along this continuum with a big area in between, traditional crime, trad
CSPAN
Apr 12, 2015 9:00pm EDT
-- >> guest: there was an effort and pledge that became a great wall of china beyond which they could move which was from the presidency from 94 until 2009 there was no tax increase, the longest period with no tax increase its only when it's only when they were all democrats in 1993 and again in the 2009 when they passed the tax increase. that period as soon as they got control of the house increased again. the reason you say no tax increases is to force the discussion about spending reform and government reform and prioritizing. if the tax increases aren't an option, the government never reforms, just all the things we've been doing some smart, some stupid. it just keeps accumulating the articles and there's never an effort to decide whether some of this stuff doesn't work anymore. the pledge is what forced to the sequester and do u. live under for the next ten years. because of that the people that care about the national defense talk about the legislation to reduce the number of civilian and pleased at the pentagon at about 100000 say $85 million in five years, 170 billion in ten y
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2016 12:00pm EDT
and, oh, it's russia or, oh, it's china, or, oh, its germany and you can tell they're coming because there are whole bunch of people wearing uniforms driving tanks are rolling towards us that increasingly we're facing threat that cross borders, that may not have anything to do with the formal decisions made by states or their militariesful we thieves loosely organized networks. we have cyber threats and so forth. and and they don't look like what we normally think of as crime because sometimes these are threats that can cause death or destruction on a scale that historically is associated with the u.s. of military force by states. but they don't look like war, either. and if you decide that you're going to -- the problem is --ec one way to put it would be to say we have a world in which there are threats along this whole continuum, from traditional masker state-on-state armed conflict at one end of the continuum, on the eend we have individual crime. a guy drives a truck through a crowded nice how much do we categorize that? so we have threats alonging this continuum, with a big area
CSPAN
Apr 13, 2015 12:00am EDT
tax credit. >> guest: it was coburn. the pledge became a great wall of china beyond which politicians couldn't move. as long as the republicans have the house, senate or governorship which was from '94 till 2009 there was no tax increase -- longest period in american history with no tax increase. only when they were all democrats in 1993 and in 2009 when they passed a tax increase only the democratic voters. that was the longest period without tax increase as soon as the republicans got control of the house no tax increase again. the reason you say this is to force a discussion about spending areform. if tax increases were an option government never reforms itself. we will add these on top and raise taxes and it is like a ship that keeps accumulating and there is never an effort to decide whether some of this stuff doesn't help. the pledge forced the sequester and spending cap we are under for the next ten years. because of that people who care about national defense are talking about talabort's legislation to reduce the number of civilian employees at the pentagon by a 10
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2015 8:57pm EDT
great wall of china beyond which options couldn't move. as long as the republicans have the house, senate, or governor from 1994 until 2009 there is no tax increase in american history. it was the longest time in american history with no tax increase. it was when when they are all democrats in 1993 on that in 2009 when they passed a tax increase, all democratic votes. that period was the longest. without the tax increase, as soon as republicans got control the house no tax increase again. the reason why say no tax increases is to force a discussion about spending reform and government reform. if tax increases are an option government never reforms itself. all the things we have been doing, some smart some stupid, we just keep doing those. it's like a ship that just keeps it cumulative barnacles. there's never an effort to decide whether some of the stuff doesn't work anymore. the pledge is what force the sequester and the spending cap that we live under for the next ten years. because because of that, people who care deeply about national defense art talking about calvert's legisl
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2014 12:00am EDT
out in some detail, is true of vietnam, china. >> host: going on about watergate with his top aides, haldeman, ehrlichman, you. they're rambling and not focused and no kind of, let's march through this and make a decision, and he will just say something, almost at random, and then hall -- haulds man will say something. >> and then 30 minutes later have the same conversation with somebody else, if not the same person. >> host: and say contradictory things. >> guest: exactly. >> host: at one opinion you called debt -- i love the metaphor -- as as a participant, you as his counsel at that time, not in the inner circle, but you say this was the devil's merry-go-round should that was a met afor i picked up as i was writing. i thought about the circular nature of the watergate conversations, and how the same tune and the same circles repeated. sometimes a slight difference but basically over and over. but the man with the lever is right in the middle is richard nixon and never pulls it. that's why i said this is the devil's merry-go-round because these conversations were not at a very hig
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2015 12:00pm EST
recognition when he started coming to look at china a nine-month process of deciding how to fix the quote-unquote good war, and the reason i put that in quotes easy and so-called iraq had done more which always meant to afghanistan in his mind what he was sort of leading people to believe that he's not antiwar he's just anti-iraq war post by can i interject one question on that? do you think that was genuine or you think that was some political cover in 2008 because they want people to think he was a pacifist? >> guest: i would more cynical and assume that it was a political decision except for how he pitched himself as you lower approach, unafraid to go into pakistan and get an operative. it became a big deal at the time the mobile independent do just that to get osama bin laden. so i think he did have a theory of the case when he was countable using military power and when he was comfortable acting in a lateral as commander-in-chief. i think he was not an antiwar guy. i really believe that. i think he is a cautious guy with the use of military but i think he is not fully antiwar a
CSPAN
Apr 11, 2015 10:00pm EDT
china. as long as they had the governorship from 1994 till 2009 there was no tax increase in -- the longest period in american history with no tax increase. only when they were all democrats democrat s in 1993, and then in 2009 when they passed the tax increase only with democratic votes. that period is the longest period without tax increases. as soon as the republicans got control of the house no tax increases again. so, the reason why you say no tax increases is to force a discussion about spending reform and government reform and prioritizing. if tax increases are an option government never reforms itself. they just -- all the things we have been doing, some smart, some stupid, keep doing those and i have two new ideas and add those and raise taxes. it's like a ship that keeps accumulating bar nells and there's never an effort to decide whether some of this stuff doesn't wok anymore. the pledge forced the sequester and the spending cap. because of that people who care deeply about national defers are talking about calvert's legislation to reduce the number of civilian employees
CSPAN
Apr 19, 2015 12:00pm EDT
china beyond which politicians couldn't do. as long as the republicans have had the house, senate or governorship which was some or presidency from 94 till 2009 there was no tax increase in american history, the longest period in american history with no tax increase. it was only when they're all democrat in 1993 and no republican voted and then in 2009 when they passed a tax increase only with democratic votes. that period as long as good without tax increases. esses republicans got control of the house, no tax increases again. so the reason why you say no tax increases is to force a discussion about spending reform and government reform and prioritizing. if tax increases are an option, government never reformed itself. all the things we've been doing some smart come some stupid to keep toledo's attitude ideas that will add on top and raise taxes. it'sis like a ship to keep speculating barnacles and is never an effort to decide whether some of the stuff doesn't work anymore. the pledge is what force is a question and a spending cap that we live under for the next 10 years. becaus
CSPAN
May 12, 2013 12:00pm EDT
challenges china. the administration has argued that this is completely separate from the middle east and we have a choice of either middle east or china. so petitte to asia. interpreted in the middle east. pivot toward asia and pivot away from. think about it. from ruler to public intellectual. americans want to wash their hands from the middle east. some my argument is not so fast. and the least is still strategically important, strategically vital. a lot at stake there, but it is also not separate from the china issue. it is a mistake. is another big mistake to think that our arrival in china, the asia-pacific. the middle east, completely irrelevant. but rather i think the middle east will also be an iran of american chinese rivalry. moving west. there energy needs are from the middle east and central asia. they looked out. the art from central asia to pakistan. set up countries that are of vital interest to stability of western china. they're looking for markets. building pipelines doorways. so for the chinese, rising strategic concern and interest whereas we sort of thing that these thi
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2012 12:00pm EDT
cultures are always invoking either china or iran or turkey. the about the greatness of their empires in the past come et cetera and the united states tends to be more future oriented. in this particular case he found the trauma of the hostage crisis in the iranian revolution is still very formative in the mind of americans who are in response of americans who are in response of americans who are in response he ran policy? >> guest: ambassador ryan crocker told me one time that the arenas are the most historical or this historical society. and every time we have the negotiations come including the most recent one, they bring a that many of historical grievances. sl is on their mind. the third u.s. policy makers really think they are to appear for the first 10 years, clearly the hostage issue was foremost in american policymakers to nine. the iran-contra happened swatch colors the next 15 years. why are we going to risk an opening to the ring and suicide have been to iranian and over a series of incidents where iran has spurred u.s. effort for roper schmoll, we seem to be captured by. the
CSPAN
Jan 29, 2012 9:00pm EST
asia in the rise of china coming in here to talk about what you think should be the whole of the united states in the future. in the west the u.s. should remain i suppose in its role of a promoter and a guarantor of the creature and a broader unity. in the east be distinguished america's role saying that we should be the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain that a little bit more why these need to be separate roles? >> guest: in the case of europe we were engaged in the world for and had to be engaged in the world war because the two world wars were still fought on a promise that the victor would dominate the world, and i think it is correct to say that the world wouldn't be better off if it was a stalinism. today that is no longer the issue. in the east is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view is that if we do not do the things i say in my book, and i'm thinking of it strategically, the world will succumb to greater and greater turmoil. the world is now not only composed of competitive states that should be as possible coopera
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2012 12:00am EST
, and asia, the rise of china, are you talk about, the dual role of the united states in the future, it will remain in its early promoter and guarantor of greater and broader unity. in the east to distinguish america's role, saying we should be the balance there and conciliator between major powers. can you explain him or why need to be separate roles? >> in the case of europe, in two world wars we had to be engaged in these two world wars because these two world wars were still thoughts on the premise that dirt. it is correct to say and morally right to say that the world wouldn't be better off if the or with hitler. today that is no longer the issue in the issue is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view and if we do not do the things they say in my book and i'm thinking of it strategically, the world will calm to greater and greater turmoil, confusion. the world is now not only composed of competitive states they should we have possible cooperative states, it is also composed and this is a very major goal historical continuity. it is composed of what i call globa
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 9:00pm EDT
secret routes across china. the operator service human traffickers better in that for the money at christians whose religious beliefs and impel them to help their number three in brothers and sisters. thanks to the underground railroad which has been operating for about 12 years and an increasing number of north koreans are reaching safety in the south and a few other countries the explosion in the number of north koreans who gotten out of the recent years is very striking. south korea keeps track of the north koreans to reach south korea, and let me share with you just a couple of the numbers. in 1990, only nine north koreans were able to reach south korea. last year 2,700 north koreans reached safety in the south. so, the people who get out now have formed -- there are enough of them that they are educating us about truth of our trivia and there's been several books published about life in north korea, and we now have a much better picture of what the truth of the existence is. .. >> you can't even mail a letter so the exiles created a black market in information. they hire chine
CSPAN
Aug 4, 2012 10:00pm EDT
china or iran or turkey, they are invoking the greatness of their empire and the past asatir and the united states tends to be more future oriented. in this particular case, you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis in the and the trauma the iranian revolution is still very formative in the minds of americans who are responsible for iran policy? >> guest: it is and ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that the iranians are the most historical or the least historical society. in this case i think certainly the iranians every time we have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow the iranians bring up a whole litany of historical agreement so it's always on their mind. whether u.s. policymakers realize it or not, they are too. for the first 10 years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was foremost in american policymakers mind. the iran-contra happens which closes the relationship of the next 15 years. we saw what happened to reagan and then, and over a series of time where iran has spurred u.s. efforts to -- for reproach. we seem to be
CSPAN
May 5, 2013 9:00pm EDT
challenge is china. >> host: yes. >> guest: the administration has argued that this is completely separate from the middle east. we have a choice of either middle east or china. the pivot to asia was interpreted in the middle east to -- pivot away from the middle east. if you ask middle east and think about it from ruler to public intelligent -- the americans want to wash their hands from it. my argument is not so fast. the middle east is still strategically important and vital to us. we have a lot at stake there. it's also not separate from the china issue. it's a mistake. another big mistake to think that it's in asia-pacific. and middle east is completely irrelevant. but rather, i think, middle east would also be an arena of american chinese. the chinese are moving west. i the energy needs from middle east and central asia. they look at the arc from central asia to pakistan as their set of countries that are vital interest to civility of western china. they are looking for markets. for the chinese, middle east is a rising strategic concern and interest. where we think that thes
CSPAN
May 4, 2013 10:00pm EDT
: our biggest problem is global issue in china pity the administration has argued that this is completely separate from the middle east coming and we have a choice of either middle east or china. so the term pivoting towards asia was towards asia and pivot away from the middle east. they think about it from ruler to public intellectual americans want to wash their hands of this. so my argument is not -- the middle east is strategically important and vital. we have a lot at stake but it's also not separate from the china issue. it's a mistake. it's another big mistake to think that china is in the asia-pacific. and the middle east is completely irrelevant. but rather might think the middle east will also be in the a reena moving west and they move from the middle east and central asia. they look at the arc of central asia to pakistan come in here and abroad if you want to call it. i said that countries that are of a vital interest to the stability of western china. they are looking for markets, building pipelines, roads into this region. so, for the chinese come in the middle ea
CSPAN
Aug 5, 2012 9:00pm EDT
, that other cultures are always invoking whether it's china or iran or turkey, they're invoking the greatnessover their empires in the past, etc. , and the united states tends to be more future-oriented. but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and the trauma of the iranian revolution is still very formative in the minds of americans who were responsible for iran policy? >> guest: it is. body ryan crocker told me -- ambassador ryan crocker told me that the iranians are the most historical or the least historical society. in this case certainly the iranians every time we have a negotiation, including the most recent ones and moscow, the iranians bring up a whole litany of historical grievances, so it's always on their mind. whether u.s. policymakers realize it or not, they are too. for the first ten years after the revolution, clearly the hostage issue was formost in american policymakers' mind. then iran contra happens which sort of colors the relationship for the next 15 years, why are we going to risk an opening to the iranians when we saw what h
CSPAN
Jan 9, 2011 12:00pm EST
nuclear weapons, not just to get china and russia, but let's look at iran. let's look at north korea. looks like a cube. the thick of the carrier. smart targets, smart targets, nuclear weapons we don't watch or nuclear nuclear weapons we don't want to nuclear policy to be. and so this is laid out sort of the january before the bush administration comes in. and then their nuclear posture he adopts many of the same suggestions. that could be great minds think alike, but certainly could be at least aggressive minds think alike. or it could be in fact they had a significant influence in the way this nuclear ply was put together. >> host: you can agine norm auguine was busy helping. >> guest: well, it's really an amazing, amazing crew. you have to give them credit. they really figured out how to work the system. poster they do it ceaselessly 24/7. there's a lot of money and make it well-paid to do it. casco precisely. but the biggest campaign contributor in the defense industry, one of the biggest lobbying spenders right up there with boeing. and a lot of work to do now because of the def
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2015 12:52am EDT
ethanol? >> the pledge became the great wall of china as long as they had that governorship of presidency from 94 through 2009 no tax increase only when they were all democrats in 1993 then in 2009 that period as soon as republicans got control there is a tax increase again you say that to force a discussion about spending reform and prioritizing. of the things we have been doing and did just keeps the key mediating barnacles there is never enough to decide if someone's in the spending cap. because of that those who cared bin to save $85 million in five years with 170 billion in 10 years for which you need to get to the sequester numbers. but you never have these discussions there is a war going on. and rolled toward to they set up the entire appropriations committee and also a to add unnecessary spending one of the recommendations is senator roberts has put together legislation to that effect i hope we can get that enacted. >> host: there is one way for example, with the tax reform plan but on a individual side they raise rates they call that a tax cut that is definitely spending. with t
CSPAN
Apr 23, 2017 12:01pm EDT
called cricket, china, russia, iran, korea and terrorism and so those are the main threats that we need to address and thing that -- i'm hoping that under the trump administration they will get more efforts, both resources people and leadership to tackle the tough problems. >> host: one of the most impressive parts of the books is you look at different case studies of different countries, you named, china, russia, north korea, iran and isis, islamic state and i wanted to delve into some of the examples that we have seen of the u.s. of information warfare by these specific countries, the first one i would like to go to is north korea. i think the general public is well aware of the sony hack because it got so much media coverage, that's, of course, the hack in response to the movie of the interview. why was this such a significant event when it comes to information warfare because you spend a lot of time talking about that in this book? >> guest: i do a deep dive on the sony hack which took place in 2013 and based on the north korean government recognition that they were really oppo
CSPAN
Apr 17, 2017 12:03am EDT
of the most impressive parts of the book looking at the case studies with china russia north korea and diocese of the islamic state with the use of information warfare the first-ever the to look at is north korea. the general public is well aware of the sony hack because it got so much media coverage. why was this such a significant even to? >> i do spend time on the sony pact that took place 2014 based on the north korean governments recognition that they were opposed to a comedy was not negative for movie bed exposing of what north korea exposes. this is crimes against humanity regime. they have exposed at and identified it pieta still dealing with this regime that does more unspeakable things to its people. but the sony had was really the first time a government had attacked for political gain. so with the sony pictures they took information the was extremely damaging with the software that was used to destroy the entire network it was a harbinger of things to come. for research for the book i interviewed a north korean defector he actually trained hacker said north korea and is
CSPAN
Oct 10, 2017 9:30pm EDT
stands for china russia iran korea and trigger some --'s terrorism. i'm hoping that they will get more effort and resource people and leadership to tackle these tough problems. >> host: one of the most impressive part is what the different case studies and you've just named china russia and north korea, iran and the islamic state. i wanted to delve into some of these areas that we have seen 80s specific countries. the first one that i would like to go to is north korea. the general public is aware of the sony hack because it got so much media coverage and its in response to the movie the interview. why was this such a significant event because we spent a lot of time talking about this in the book. >> guest: i do a deep dive into the sony attack that took place in 2014, and it was based on the north korean government recognition that they were opposed this movie the to this e interview, which was what i call a ribald comedy. it wasn't that good of a movie that it was important in exposing the kind of problems north korea poses. it needs to be understood coming and i don't think a lot of
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)