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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Apr 3, 2016 11:00am EDT
today. there's some great research this is one of our economic power in china or india combined. i think people who look at the evidence-based case you want to get from here today. they are very pragmatic. you are not an ideological about things. they know it matters to our future. i think that's kind of an important point, given that's why your book is laid this out in such an important way. >> guest: i also think, right, the stakes could not be-or in this election. every remaining republican candidate for president has taken a very extreme position on women's health and women's rights. so it's not only that we're going backward, going forward and beat to death someone who really prioritizes and speeds this up. there's also a big danger of falling backward of what's at risk. voting rights for millions of african-american women. african-american women have the highest turnout of any group in the country now. latinas, the question with the supreme court allow obama's immigration orders to go through, or millions of women going to be deported? will women continue to have reproductive
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2015 12:03am EST
u.s. but china, japan great storytelling and personality and a narrative. so now i'm going to ask you to go out on a lan or the end of a long extension cord and tell us what you think people should be driving in 2025 or 2030 the people here in this room and the people watching on c-span and across the country. >> the timeline for developing automobiles are so extended that you don't have to go too far out on the extension to nick those predictions. you know that by 2025 there is a mandate in california and these other states that says 3.3 million electric vehicles minimum are going to be on the road so that is the floor and not the ceiling. we know that companies have already created their timeline for deploying certain kinds of vehicles in the technology. they have a strategic roadmap for gravy aiding their level of economy starting in 2020 moving into 2025 by which they start to have the fully autonomous systems. they will get into electric cars. >> it depends what you want to drive us if you this if you want to drive an electric vehicle will be about to to drive an electric veh
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2013 12:00pm EST
slow boat to china. they really have no interest this lighting candles or reading names. >> right. >> host: and then there's a group, well intention anded, i'm not critical, who want to light the candles, who want to participate. >> guest: uh-huh. >> host: it's an interesting take on how human beings grieve or react to tragedy. >> guest: yeah. very differently. and i think there has to be space for that. there can't just be, like, one path. this group in philadelphia that i spent time with them, most of them -- not all of them, but most of them were like the first group you mentioned. they have their own memorials in philly. they go up to ground zero once a year maybe. but that's all. they do things with their community and friends in philadelphia, and it stays very private and very personal. whereas, and they kind of, you know, they're aware of the other things going on, but that's not what they want. >> host: yeah. now, we only have a few minutes left and, of course, we've got to focus in the last few minutes, lessons learned. >> guest: yeah. >> host: lessons learned from these
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2016 10:00pm EST
china and discovered his door was jammed and got a driver to help him jimmy the door. a passerby saw it, thought something was skew, and the police came and discovered it was professor gates home but there was talk and tension. professor gates was lured, if you believe that story, which i think he is telling the truth of course, on to his porch and then arrested. the president said this is my friends. and he said he acted stupidly and when he said that it caused an entire week of controversy. professor gates and the arresting officer were brought to the white house with vice president joe biden and president obama for what was dubbed a beer summit to resolve the broader structural issues. that set the tone for the president's engagement with race. it is controlled and as rare as possible. >> host: that moment was a foreshadowing of things to come. he spoke the conversation of racial profiling and toward the end of the term we had treyvon martin could have been his son. talk about the relationship and that link through your book. you talk about martin and ferguson and talk about the i
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2016 12:00pm EDT
to china, discovered his door was jammed in cambridge, massachusetts, got his driver to help them jimmy opened the door. a passerby saw it and thought something was askew. call the police. they came. discovered it was professor gates home. there was some tension. professor gates was subsequently lured, if you believe the story, onto his porch and then arrested. the president said, this is my friend and says, people would think the police were acting stupidly. he said, let's not deny that racial profiling is a problem. what he said those words, that caused an entire weeks with of controversy. eventually the arresting officer and professor gates were brought to the white house with vice president biden and president obama for what was dubbed a beer summit to personally resolve broader issues. that did set the tone for president obama's subsequent engagement with race. >> host: in that moment really, the foreshadowing of things to come, he unknowingly sparked a conversation on racial profiling. toward the end of that 1st term we had trade on martin. he talk about that in the 1st chap
CSPAN
Aug 26, 2013 12:00am EDT
b tt the book. on the anniversary date to take the boat to china. they have no interest in lighting candles and reading names. then there is a group, well intentioned, but they want to light the candles and they want a public memorial and want to purchase at eight. it's an interesting take on how humans grieve and react. >> guest: there can't just be one. the group in philadelphia that i spent time with, most of them more like the first group. they preferred to do things privately. they have their own memorials and they go to ground 0 tons a year may be. but it's very private and very personal. they are aware of the other things going on but that isn't what they want. >> host: we have a few minutes left and of course lessons learned from these battles. the book talks loudly about the battles fought and the underlying reasons for those battles but it does offer some interesting -- an interesting recipe or agenda items for the next time. what lessons to learn about the battles for ground zero that may stand the public and policymakers in good stead the next time? >> guest: be truly tr
CSPAN
Apr 17, 2011 9:00pm EDT
failure of socialism and a national basis and the soviet union or china before they are or india during its socialist days between the independent and its civilization in the 90's. but also with unlike the american public school system, the mexican public weal companies, state-run industry and venezuela come up places like that. they all have similar sorts of failures with misallocation of capital and incentives for production. it's a lot heavier than the book is by the way. >> host: and the book is -- the book goes through both the theoretical cases of socialism and then the series of object lessons in countries, regimes, ideas that demonstrate the way in which these failures as you see them how they developed and what they have in common, and what is the nature of the truth of how they operate versus how they describe themselves or how they propagandize for themselves what strikes me as interesting as we are talking about this, and i presume that you wrote this book because it was published in large measure because we are living in a time where great controversy about the nature of th
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2013 10:00pm EDT
interested in the battles the you discuss in the book on the anniversary date they take a slow boat to china was not plighting candles or read the names but then there is a group of well intentioned, i uncritical of the group but they want a public memorial and want to participate it is interesting take how people react to a tragedy. >> guest: very different way. >> guest: they hope to do their own memorial and maybe they go up once per year but they do things for their community and friends in philadelphia. they are aware of the other things going on but that is not what they want. >> host: we only have if you minutes left but lessons learned to -- from the battles. but the underlying reasons for those battles but the book does offer an interesting recipe or agenda item for the next time. would have you learned about the battles for ground zero for policymakers for next time? >> guest: be more transparent in truly transparent not just to seem that way but to trust the public with more. people need to know and they can no more behind the scenes rather than the us. where you draw the lines wh
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2010 12:00am EST
when you could go to china. >> one of the great unsung heros bill were the board in 19211 of the key radical black journalists of the 1950's and '60's and goes to the soviet union the late forties and into china and the fifties and run the best key black journalists in cuba during the revolution and a friend and ally of malcolm x. the key domestic ideas called the freedom no party will be one of three black independent political parties in 1960's. one is the mississippi freedom democratic party led by the sharecropper from louisville lot of mississippi who was not allowed to be seated at the 1964 dnc in atlantic city new jersey. the other will be their freedom organization which is nicknamed the black panther party and that starts with the grass roots from the snic activists especially stoke the car michael. were the is interesting as a black power active is to went to jail for refusing to fight in the warm one say for policy based on human rights we before carter talks about that william where they was talking about this. part of the robeson generation a group of activist to com
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2011 7:00am EST
china, tryinlaitoor ets house. and neighbors the two black men barack ying to put a dmostr tooc the neighbor called the police and says i dones. know if they'o barack cominng to break in but they are. better check out. by the time the police come henry louis gates jr. is in his house. police officers say can you show me some id. he shows his id and the police officer is somewhat skeptical. one thing leads to anothein b they have words. gates is quite upset, things racial discrimination has something to do with it. >> host: was the arrogance? >> guesds maybe. let's sd. argument that he was short tempered and sd. being deferential to the officer but even suppose he was being arrmerant. being arrogant with respect would allow us officer a crimlii i hope not. i also hope police officers, well-trained police officers would be barack ained to deal w the citizenry and not arrest people simply because a citous for the sake of argument was being arrogan's and any effect the officer arrests henry louis gates even though the pan wfeareor showed s this becomes a firestorm. the president is asjr
CSPAN
Feb 1, 2010 12:00am EST
an attack on china and eisenhower is the only one who voted no. it's like linda's famous quote takes a vote in the cabinet and from bases know. she says i and the vote is all know, the ayes have it and eisenhower still is the boss and says that is the craziest idea you guys have ever thought of. >> host: the old military. our first president, washington was military and he knew rank and was free to use it and eisenhower was the same way. >> guest: no difference from eisenhower. >> host: because he was in charge. jfk, naval blockade of cuba confer with congress. >> guest: the finest moment in office was the cuban missile crisis, no authorization consultation of congress manages and engages in active war blocking the island of cuba is an active war and called it a quarantine but it was an act of war and he undertook that without any mission from congress and any attack from cuba. there was a longer-term threat attack by the change in the balance of power but the soviets were not gassing up the missiles to launch an attack on this either. >> host: lbj, the imam war funded, refunded, con
CSPAN
Apr 24, 2011 12:00pm EDT
union or china or india during its socialist days between its independence. mexican public will companies, state run industries in venezuela, places like that. they all have similar sorts of figures with the misallocation of capital. a version of incentives for production. >> host: we are sitting here talking. >> guest: a lot heavier than the book. it goes through of the theoretical case against socialism and then a series of odd-lessons. countries, regimes, ideas, the masters the ways in which these failures, as you see them, how they develop, what they have in common, and what is the nature of the truth about how they operate versus how they describe themselves or how they propagandize for themselves. what strikes me as interesting. we are talking about this, and peppers and you wrote this book in that it was published in large measure because they are living at a time of kate -- great controversy about the nature of the scope, the size of the u.s. government. it reminded me of the fact that i am about to turn 50. and i grew up in the 1970's there was no shame for someone to d
CSPAN
Sep 14, 2013 10:00am EDT
to china, no interest in lighting candles for reading names. then there is a group, well intentioned, i am not critical of the group, who want a public memorial, want to participate. it is an interesting take on how human beings grief or react to tragedy. >> very differently. there can't just be one topic. this group in philadelphia i spent time with. most of them, like a first group you mentioned perdue--do things privately. they have their own memorial facility, grew up in ground zero once a year but they do things with their community and friends in philadelphia, very private and personal. whereas they are aware of the this things that are -- that is not what they want. >> host: we only have a few minutes left and we need to focus on lessons learned, lessons learned from these battles. the book talks not only about the battles fought and the underlying reasons for those battles, but the book does offer some interesting recipe or agenda items for the next time. what lessons do we learn about these battles for ground zero that may stand the public and policymakers in good stead next
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2012 10:00pm EST
states, quote, lost china, as ifs, of course, it was ours to lose. but this was very fresh in the memory of some of mike johnson, who had been in the congress since 1937, and was majority leader in the early '50s when the first minority and then majority leader of the senate during the heyday of mccarthyism, and he saw what this did the dem track party and what it did to truman and didn't want tote happen to him. so a combination of good politics and he felt he had no choice but to do it. said that all the time. he had no exit strategy. >> host: a couple of things in the book about this point that kind of struck me. i didn't realize that richard russell was really reluctant -- did not want to go deeper into vietnam. so there was support among people who had impeccable foreign policy credentials to not go further so he would have -- >> guest: he was the head of the senate committee. >> host: some significant support so it was still johnson's decision to make. he could have done something different. on the other side of this, i'm still struck by how johnson was well aware -- i mean,
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2013 9:00pm EDT
book on the anniversary date they take a boat to china and they have no interest in lighting candles or reading the names. they want a public memorial and want to participate. it is an interesting take on how human beings aggrieved or react to tragedy. >> guest: this group in philadelphia that i spent time with, most of them were like the first group you mentioned. they prefer to do things privately and they have their own memorial. they got there once a year may be that it's very private and very personal. they are aware of the better things going on but that isn't what they want. >> host: of course we have to focus the last few minutes of the lessons learned from these battles. the book talks probably about the battles that are fought and the underlying reasons for those battles, but the book does offer some interesting -- an interesting recipe or agenda items for the next time. and what lessons do we learn about the battles for grout zero -- to ground zero that are in a good step the next time? >> guest: be truly transparent and the trust the public with more. i think people need
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 9:00pm EST
role as an african-american journalists. he first wanted to go into china when it was -- you couldn't go to china. >> guest: absolutely. william is an example of one of these unsung heroes of the period. bill worthy was born in 1921. he is one of the key radical black journalists of the 1950's and 60's. he goes into the soviet union in the late 1940's. he goes into china in the 1950's , when of the key black journalists in cuba during the cuban revolution. he is a friend and ally of malcolm x. his key domestic idea is something called the freedom now party and it's really going to be one of three black independent political parties in the 1960's. one is the freedom now party and the other is the mississippi freedom democratic party led by trail hammer the sharecropper from mississippi who was not allowed to be seated at the 1964 democratic national convention in atlantic city new jersey. and the other is going to be the lowndes county freedom organization which is nicknamed the black panther party which is an bonds county alabama, and that started with grassroots locals with the help
CSPAN
Apr 3, 2011 11:00pm EDT
thought of as an environmentally sensitive precipice. overtures to china and he is a hard liner in some ways, war issues. vietnam, another issue he has a mixed record. but i think the problem he had in the context of the book and this discussion on the president's race is he couldn't be relied on to state the principle or conviction if the politics told him to do something else. the was the perception and the way a lot of people think of mix and of course his nickname was tricky dick. it's not that he did everything wrong it's just he could then be relied on to do what was right in the crunch of politics dictated something else. that's the way i look at. >> host: much of your book deals with the inside of the white house but some of it deals with the outside russia beginning with johnson, clinton and obama are the highlighters of 13 and 15% effectively. if you put your predictor had on looking ahead, with that now be the lawyer for president in terms of cabinet members? >> guest: not necessarily but i think that obama hasn't named a much higher number of african-americans percentage wis
CSPAN
Mar 27, 2010 10:00pm EDT
policy. very experienced. i do sing in the book as again i try to be fair, the china business i think was not good. i know people made a lot out of the toast and there was more going on in brent scowcroft toast to the chinese leadership but trademark and square -- >> host: what more could you have done at trademark and square because that was the downside of his realism which was if you're an idealist and tenements where happens you react and pushback on china. if you are a free list you say that is to affairs >> guest: i've been critical of democratic and democratic presidents with. i don't think the case can be made that when we cooperate with china things get better. i think if he tally of the sheet i don't think the case can be made. i was one of the people of my organization, jack kemp, rumsfeld all signed on to permit normal trade relations. i didn't. they should be tougher, things should be tougher now. we are we too easy now. >> host: why? >> guest: they are doing is bad. policies are bad, they kill girls. i think that is a terrible, terrible thing and they do all sorts of oth
CSPAN
Sep 4, 2011 9:00pm EDT
henry louis gates, very well known academic is in his house, he's coming back from china trying to get in his house, a neighbor sees two black men trying to push a door to get in. they'd neighbor calls the police and says i don't know if these guys are trying to break in that maybe what to chicken out. by that time the police, and the police officers as i'm checking this out let me show some i.t. she seems to be somewhat skeptical, one thing leads to another, the of words, professor gates is quite upset and things that racial discrimination has something to do with the police officer. >> host: was the arrogance and sensitivity? >> guest: mabey. mabey. let's suppose the sake of argument that the -- that henry louis gates was short tempered and let's suppose he wasn't being differential to which the officer and even suppose he was being arrogant. is being arrogant with respect to a police officer a crime? i don't think so. i hope not and i would also hope that police officers, well trained police officers would be trained to deal with the citizenry and not arrest people simply because th
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2010 9:00pm EST
board of 1812 along with as he told her to rescue his public papers a set of china and a set of silver -- >> guest: is about, barbara with the british marching toward the white house. >> host: and she isn't leaving the white house to read she has ordered the staff to make her dinner. >> guest: the american army ran away but dalia said i would put one in each window of the house and fight to the end. >> host: that is a little more than a hostess. >> guest: she was an extraordinary woman in that respect and would keep her head and situations most people not just a woman but a man would be completely upset and lose all contact with reality but not hurt and also she played such an important role in madison's life in a disaster like this. there was talk after the british durham, the white house and the capitol and other major buildings there was talk of assassinating madison was bringing him up as he become a rather heated president but when dalia went out on the street people saw her and they cheered. >> host: she really rescued him. he was a rather bland person. >> guest: he wore b
CSPAN
Sep 1, 2013 11:00am EDT
discuss in the book. on the anniversary date, they take a slow boat to china. they have no interest in lighting candles are reading names. mma is a group of well-intentioned. i'm not critical of the group, but who want to light the candles, who want a public palm oil, who want to participate. it's an interesting take on human beings create the react to tragedy. >> guest: i think there has to be space for that. this group in philadelphia that i spent time at, most of them, not all of them, but most of them preferred to do things privately. they had their own memorials. they go to ground 01 year may be. they do thing with their community imprints in philadelphia and say they are private and personal. they are aware of other things going on, but that's not what they want. >> we'll may have a few minutes left and of course you've got to focus on the last few minutes, lessons learned, lessons learned from these battles. now the book talks not only about the battles for in the underlying reasons for those battles, but the book does offer some interesting -- an interesting recipe or agenda it
CSPAN
Apr 16, 2011 10:00pm EDT
deficit with china anymore and that sort of thing and the thinking is almost always distractive because the truth is you are not the most effective producer of all the stuff your people need to consume. so if you want to take all that the turkey has a social principle and extended across the whole country what you get a something a lot like north korea. that combined with central planning which of course causes the economy to be radically dysfunctional and not produce anywhere near what it could or should in any end up with a is a sighted people -- they are the same koreans north of the border as they are south of the border and the same history in the same culture in the same genetic that ran in the whole thing. south korea's extraordinarily wealthy, prosperous place and there parts are parts of it that look 20 years ahead of the united states and in north korea their people eating wild grass and sometimes each other. because they are so reduced. i have an acquaintance who served in the north korean military and he managed to escape into the united states some years ago and his rations
CSPAN
Jul 26, 2009 12:00pm EDT
environment for development. to turn it into a question, if someone in china or india to rapidly growing questions were to read this book, there is optimism in your book. would you be optimistic that we would find eco barons in those two countries? or i believe most of the eco barons were people in the united states. >> well, yeah, the focus is on the united states. for a variety of reasons. one of them being that the united states is in a position to really lead in these areas and by example. and i don't think that we have done that. certainly we haven't on climate in recent years. maybe that is changing. i think that there are individuals in other developing countries and in booming economies like in india who are looking to develop new energy and new transportation technology that would be more environmental friendly. china is putting an electric and an electric hybrid vehicle on the market, one of their nature battery companies has developed its. and i haven't seen it in person but i have read about and apparently it is quite impressive and quite affordable. more so than the vehicles
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 10:00pm EST
know when you could not go to china. >> guest: absolutely. william were the is a great great example of one of these unsung heroes. born in 1921. he is one of the key radical black journalists of the 1950's and '60's. he goes into the soviet union in the late 1940's. he goes into china in the 1950's. he is one of the key black journalists who is in cuba during the cuban revolution. he is a friend and ally of malcolm x. his key domestic idea is something called the freedom now party, and it is really going to be one of three black independent political parties in the 1960's. one is the freedom now party. the other is the mississippi freedom democratic party. led by a man who was not allowed to be seated at the 1964 democratic national convention in atlantic city, new jersey, and the other is going to be the lounge county freedom organization which is nicknamed the black panther party, which is in alabama. that is started with grass-roots locals with the help of activists. and when we think about william worthy, worthy is very interesting. he is a black power activist who is also a pac
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2011 7:00pm EST
coming back from china trying to get in his house. a neighbor sees to black man trying to push the door to get them. the neighbor calls the police. i don't know if these guys are trying to break-in, but maybe they are. by the time the police come police officers has in checking this out. professor gates it shows his id. the police officer is somewhat skeptical. one thing leads to another. they have words. professor gates is quite upset. >> let's suppose for the sake of argument that it was. with respect, i hope is that a crime. i would also hope the police officers, well trained police officers would be trained to deal with the citizenry and not arrest people simply because the citizen was for the sake of argument being arrogant. in any event the officer arrests henry gates even though the professor, it showed that this was his house. this becomes something of a firestorm. a press conference. the president has asked. the president, barack obama says, first of all, i don't know the facts, but given what i do know, am i going to say this was racial discrimination? no peace treaty doe
CSPAN
Apr 2, 2011 10:00pm EDT
-sensitive president. he had overtures to china. he's a hard liner in some ways on the war issues. vietnam, another issue where he's got a very mixed record. but i think the problem he had in the context of the book and this discussion on presidents and race and african-americans is that he couldn't be relied on to say the with a principle or a conviction if politics told him to do something else. that was the perception, and that's the way a lot of people think of nixon. of course, his nickname was tricky dick. it wasn't that he did everything wrong, it's just that he couldn't be relied on to do what was right in the crunch if politics dictated something else. that's the way i look at it. >> host: much of your book really duds deal with -- does deal with the inside of the white house, but some does deal with the outside. obama has -- clinton and obama are the high flyers of 13 and 15% respectively. >> guest: right. >> host: if you put your predicter's hat on looking ahead, will that now be the bar for presidents in terms of cabinet members that are -- >> guest: well, not necessar
CSPAN
Sep 3, 2011 10:00pm EDT
henry louis gates, very well known academic is in his house. he's coming back from china trying to get in his house. a neighbor sees two black men trying to push a door to get in. the neighbor calls the police and says i dhaka know if these guys are trying to break in that meeting are you ought to go check it out but the police come and henry louis is in his house, the police officers as i am checking this out says show me some idea. he shows his ied and the police officer still seems to be somewhat skeptical. one thing leads to another. they have words, the professor is quite upset and thinks that racial discrimination has something to do with the police officer. >> host: was the arrogance and insensitivity? >> guest: mabey. let's suppose henry louis gates was short tempered and suppose he wasn't being deferred until towards the officer but even suppose he was being arrogant with respect to a police officer or a crime i don't think so. i hope not and i would also hope the police officers, well trained police officers would be trained to deal with the citizenry and not arrest people si
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 10:00pm EST
public papers, a set of china, a set of silver which she had to waggon -- >> guest: with the british marching toward the white house. >> host: and she's not leaving the white house, she has ordered the staff to make her donner. >> guest: the whole american army ran away but dalia said if i had a can and i would put one in each window of the house and fight to the end. >> host: said that is a little more than a hostess, isn't it? >> guest: she was an extraordinary woman in that respect and would keep her head in situations that most people, not just a woman but a man would be completely upset and lose all contact with reality but not her and also she played such an important role in madison's life in a disaster like this there was talk after the british burned the white house capital and major buildings the was talk of assassinating madison and he became a rather heated president but when dalia went out on the street people saw her and they cheered. >> host: she rescued him. he was a bland person. >> guest: he wore black all the time, he had a very soft wastes and was very charming an
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2010 12:00am EST
with as he told her rescue his public papers, a set of china, a set of silver -- >> guest: with the british white marching towards the white house. >> host: she is not leaving the white house. she ordered the staff to make her dinner. >> guest: the whole american army ran away, but dolly said if i can and i would put each one in the windows of the south and fight till the end. >> host: that is a little more than a hostess, is an aquatic >> guest: she was an extraordinary woman in that respect. she was able to keep her head in situations that most people, not just a woman, but a man would get completely upset about to lose all contact with reality. but not her. and also, she really played such an important role in madison's life in a disaster like this. there was talk after the british for the white house and the capitol and all the other measured buildings. i was serious talk of assassinating madison and stringing him up and he was a rather heated president. but when dolly went down the street, people saw her and they cheered. >> host: and she really rescued and. he was a rather bla
CSPAN
Jul 9, 2017 12:00pm EDT
china and the gender revealed -- the same time thinking that getting better and breaking down the concept of gender. i know that my students the younger generation having a gender fluid identity is not anything that faces them for the most part. >> when we're growing up, you had legos now you have pink legos or blue legos depending on your gender rights. so it's really an interesting time were living in in the technology point is really fascinating linking these gender revealed cakes to the technology that is at hand. moving forwar forward, you statr argument if you will at the beginning of the book. can you share your position on why you think this book was so important to write? >> guest: i think the question which is something i take from antidiscrimination law so whenever you have a public policy, any public policy you always need a rational basis for, cap you just everybody should wear t-shirts on tuesday, the has to be a reason for doing it. then when you look at race there's a higher standard because historically we have a history of racism and sexism and retreating it in a
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)