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CSPAN
Aug 27, 2015 11:51pm EDT
crisis. think of china, late 1970s. india, 1991. think of asia, 1997. and after that, the countries in regions enacted large structural reforms. as for russia, the man looking into the abyss is vladimir putin and russia is not going to change until he is gone. thank you. [applause] >> okay. the bar will be open after the session is over with. either that or coffee will be offered. thank you for your presentations. we have a few minutes left for questions for the panel. i would -- we have ay here with a microphone. if you could wait or two the microphone so everybody can hear you. if you could just raise your hand, identify yourself briefly, and in the interest of time, if you please ask a question and if possible keep it as short and to the point as possible. so, anyone would like to start? down here. >> sherry from voice of america. dr. wilson said we shouldn't worry too much about china's stock market crash. i'm just wondering, the other experts, do you hold similar view on that? >> i think you do have to worry about it but it's probably for something that my colleague would agree
CSPAN
Sep 5, 2016 5:00pm EDT
the u.s. faces now don't competely packaged and it's russia or china or germany, and look, you can tell they're coming because a whole bunch of people wearing uniforms driving tanks are rolling towards us. enclosingly we're facing threats that cross borders and may not have anything to do with the formal decisions made by states or the militaries. loose lie organized networks. cyber threats and so forth, and they don't look like what we normally think of as crime because sometimes these are threats that can cause death or destruction on a scale that historically is associated with the use of military force by states. but they don't look like war, either. and if you decide that you're going to -- the problem it, one way to put it would be to say wy have a world in which there are threats this whole continuum, from the traditional mass state-on-state conflict at one end of the continuum. at the other entough that looks more like individual crimes. a guy drives a truck out there a crowded nice. so we have threats along this continuum with a big area in between, traditional crime, trad
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2015 10:54pm EDT
. it's e3 secbaclly timely to have this discussion today because of what's hg bpew ng in china, and of course impth the u.s. stock market. the problems that are causing the meltdown of china's stock market are not limited to china alone, many of the same economic faile mes that h urnt china afft the rest of the worlds. huge debts, corruption, lack of e span3 saren ge, lack ocare the rare ce of law and general lack of economic freedom. as you will lea on from teathas difanusn many mistakes china and others make are always also be in debt by the s led miw stration. we should not be surprised that that our economy is in trouble to and we have lost the particular ability to lead the world out of trouble. which culm se me all of oe m rcrticipants, particularly grat will be talking about. to get us startei hapant impll deliver sdiie rema, he wears many hats and has a wide range of experience in e spade and econdiiic policy and the law. 2001 to 2005, roughly the same thousand fivsome rou3 huly the same time i was at the state department, grant was secretary ocare comiliaerce of national t. a
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2014 9:00pm EST
criticize them for things we don't china or saudi arabia for. russia is a european country, they are a member of the counsel of europe, and signed on to conventions of agreements where they are supposed to adhere to the norms and china and saudi arabia haven't done that. it is true the u.s. has not been consistent for criticizing russia and not their neighbors and i go into this in the book because they are important partners for the united states at least in the war on terror. i think the obama administration has been pretty skilled at dealing with these issues. the reset, when it worked, and it hasn't in the last year or two, worked with russia on common interest like iran, missile defense and afghanistan and saying it was a two-track policy and separated from what what the was happening domestically in russia. this has changed in the last year, well the last couple years, since putin has thrown out other u.s. ngo's and we had the acts that banned the adoption of russian children. the u.s. congress, if you look at the entire, again 23-year period that i am look at, hasn't been a sour
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2016 12:00pm EDT
and, oh, it's russia or, oh, it's china, or, oh, its germany and you can tell they're coming because there are whole bunch of people wearing uniforms driving tanks are rolling towards us that increasingly we're facing threat that cross borders, that may not have anything to do with the formal decisions made by states or their militariesful we thieves loosely organized networks. we have cyber threats and so forth. and and they don't look like what we normally think of as crime because sometimes these are threats that can cause death or destruction on a scale that historically is associated with the u.s. of military force by states. but they don't look like war, either. and if you decide that you're going to -- the problem is --ec one way to put it would be to say we have a world in which there are threats along this whole continuum, from traditional masker state-on-state armed conflict at one end of the continuum, on the eend we have individual crime. a guy drives a truck through a crowded nice how much do we categorize that? so we have threats alonging this continuum, with a big area
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2014 12:00am EDT
world to different places like irma china australia and so forth and had a great success with that first career. >> host: we want to stop a minute and think about this. imagine you have a son or daughter and he goes to college and studies that thing that the world needs most at that point, getting minerals out of the ground. a growing economy needs minerals especially when the world is on the gold standard and your child is the best city kid -- educated in that area studied with masters at stanford and also the most -- the best paid young men of his generation and certainly one of the most successful. he wasn't just any success. >> guest: you are quite right. he became the outstanding mining engineer of his time and he was recognized for that. he was earning in 1908 to 1914 in excess of $100,000 a year which was a lot of money in those pre-income tax days but he did to stop there. by the time he was 40 he was a modest millionaire. i'm not a midas or a rockefeller or mellow perhaps that he wanted to do more with his life and having done well in his profession he wanted to do somethi
CSPAN
Mar 15, 2014 10:00pm EDT
can't be sure but she was a pioneer in her own right lou henry hoover. they wanted china for a couple of years and eventually hoover use london as his base during his mining career which took them up to world war i. he became successful and traveled all over the world and went to places like wermuth, china and australia and so forth and had a great success in that first career. >> we want to stop a minute and think about this. imagine you have a son or daughter and he goes to college and studies that thing that the world needs most at that point getting minerals out of the ground and growing the economy needs minerals especially when the world is on the gold standard. your child is the best-educated speaking of hoover in the area studied with masters at stanford and also hoover was it was that the best paid young man of his generation and certainly one of the most successful. he wasn't just any success. >> guest: you are quite right. he became the outstanding mining engineer at this time. he was recognized for that. he was earning in 1908 to 1914 in excess of $100,000 a year which was
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2014 7:00pm EST
u.s. pursues double standards that we criticize russia for doing things we don't criticize china for saudi arabia. the russians have of course said that rush is a european country. they are a member of the council of europe. they have signed onto conventions into agreements where they are supposed to adhere to the atlantic norms which of course china hasn't done in saudi arabia hasn't done that it is true that i think the u.s. has in the past not been consistent in the way that it has criticize russia for some things that happened domestically and not criticize some of russia's neighbors. i go into this in the book azerbaijan because they are strategic partners for the united states released in the war on terror. i think the obama administration has been pretty skilled at dealing with these issues. the reset when it worked and it hasn't worked so well and the last year or two explicitly differentiated between working with russia on these common interests like arms control them like i ran like missile defense like afghanistan and saying it was a two track policy and it was separated f
CSPAN
Feb 1, 2014 10:00pm EST
criticize russia for doing things that we don't criticize china for. the russians have of course said that russia is a european country. there are a number -- member of the consulate of your been signed off on conventions do agreements where they are supposed to adhere to these norms which of course china hasn't done and saudi arabia hasn't done but it is true that i think the u.s. has in the past not been consistent in the way that it has criticized russia for something should happen to drastically and not criticize some of russia's neighbors in azerbaijan and kazakhstan. you think the obama administration has been pretty skilled at dealing with these issues. when at work and it hasn't worked so well in the last two years differentiated between working with rush on these common interests like arms control, like iran like missile defense, like afghanistan and saying it was it to track policy in the woods separate what was happening domestically and russia. it has been fairly quiet and reserved in what is happening domestically. this has changed a little bit in the last year since, or
CSPAN
Sep 4, 2016 11:00am EDT
: good question. >> guest: why not buick making cars in china? buick. why not h1b workers question mark these are taking white-collar jobs, these are taking kids jobs. it's not just taking your nanny job anymore. how about a little time on that? >> host: one of the reasons perhaps because trump continues the conversation and respond to every question posed to him. eventually he turns the conversation back to himself and your hillary clinton and you don't want to run a campaign based on what you believe or what you might do, you want to run a campaign that's a referendum on doldrums character so if you're donald trump, why would you continue to keep that conversation alive? >> guest: what you mean? >> host: why would you help hillary clinton by talking about yourself? >> guest: why isn't he talking about her correction? >> host: if i'm elected, this is what america will look like. that's not the point. the point is if elected, everyone else says this is what we hear. >> guest: not exactly right. the close that we buy in america are made of america, it's like three percent on i belie
CSPAN
Feb 9, 2014 12:03pm EST
russia for doing things we don't criticize china for, saudi arabia. the russians have of course that russia is a european country. their member of the council of era. they signed up to agreements where they are supposed to adhere to these alien tick marks, which of course china hasn't done to my saudi arabia hasn't done. but the u.s. in the past has not been consistent in the way it is criticize for some things that happened domestically and not criticize some of russia's neighbors. i go into this in the book because there's strategic partners for the united states at least in the war on terror. the obama administration has been pretty scaled at dealing with these issues. the reset when it worked and how that works so well in the last year or two explicitly differentiated between working with russia on common interests like arms control, like her rant, like missile defense, like afghanistan and he was separated from what was happening domestically and russia. it's been fairly quiet and reserved in what it has said about what is happening domestically. this has changed a little b
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2016 9:00pm EDT
time discussing this? why not make cars in china now and each of the workers seeking white-collar jobs. >> one of the reasons perhaps he continues a conversation posed to him and he sees it turned back to himself. you don't want to run a campaign on what you can do or take the money from. you want to run a campaign that is a referendum on the character and so if you are donald trump y. but you continue to keep that conversation a life? why would you help hillary clinton by talking about your self -- >> guest: >> host: if i'm elected this is what america will look like. >> guest: the clothes that we buy in america made america are 3%. that's the whole point he wants to change it so that your ties will be made here. >> host: when you watch them on television and you think he goes off message and i'm sure you feel the way, do you call people on his campaign -- >> no, i tweet. >> host: do you think he listens? >> guest: sometimes a full-fledged clarification like after the visa debate, he absolutely listens and is a quick study. he is going in the direction we want to go. they kept at
CSPAN
Feb 20, 2011 12:00pm EST
over china, or russia or i think you have some interesting things to say that are not exactly what you're going to pick up from reading the papers every day. so let's go ahead and jump right in to that conversation. the next 10 years, what are the three most surprising takeaways that you are offering people in this book? >> guest: i think first that the war on terror has been overdone. now that terrorism is not a profound danger but as a monochromatic structure of foreign policy. it simply is unsustainable. there are too many other things happening in the world. the second thing i suppose that china has profound economic problems at this point. it's grown magnificently and will continue to grow but it's going to go through adjustments there i suppose the most important thing i'm arguing is the next 10 years is really about the relationship between what i call empire and republic, between the vast global power of the united states, the difficulty in managing that and retaining republican forms of government. eisenhower spoke about the military-industrial complex. i'm going beyond th
CSPAN
Mar 14, 2010 12:00pm EDT
like china or russia or other nations of the world and to protect ourselves, in response to the humanitarian crisis and have a nuclear deterrent against the nuclear threat, the list goes on and on of various challenges the military has. in my view, it requires an annual budget of roughly 4 percent of gdp right now 3.8% and total federal spending is over time approximately 20% of gdp. so it should be 20% i apologize for taking that course but sometimes we say we are spending so much more than any other nation in the world, why should we spend any more than the military? they spend far less. but actually, if you go behind the numbers, they don't report all military spending and the cost for instance of standing of the army, not a volunteer army the cost as much lower. if you look at a comparable basis china is suspending 10% that have level of the of the united states if we did with the same cost for the various resources. and russia likewise is spending a good deal more than a report which suggest we really cannot continue to pare down the military might we must be confident that
CSPAN
Jan 29, 2012 9:00pm EST
asia in the rise of china coming in here to talk about what you think should be the whole of the united states in the future. in the west the u.s. should remain i suppose in its role of a promoter and a guarantor of the creature and a broader unity. in the east be distinguished america's role saying that we should be the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain that a little bit more why these need to be separate roles? >> guest: in the case of europe we were engaged in the world for and had to be engaged in the world war because the two world wars were still fought on a promise that the victor would dominate the world, and i think it is correct to say that the world wouldn't be better off if it was a stalinism. today that is no longer the issue. in the east is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view is that if we do not do the things i say in my book, and i'm thinking of it strategically, the world will succumb to greater and greater turmoil. the world is now not only composed of competitive states that should be as possible coopera
CSPAN
Feb 5, 2012 11:00am EST
the east, in asia. the rising china. and here you talk about what you think should be there to ogle of the united states in the future. in the west, the u.s. should remain as a provider and guarantor of crater, cracker community. and it used to distinguish america's role saying we should eat the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain more why pc to be be separate roles? >> guest: because in the case of europe, and two world wars we had to be engaged in these two world wars because these two world wars worse though thought on the premise that big two would dominate the world. and i think it is correct to say and morally right to say that the worlds wouldn't be better off if there was hitlerism. today that is no longer the issue. the issue is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view is that if we do not do the same if a fan made up and am thinking of it strategically, though, to crater and greater is not only composed of competitive states if possible composed and nature historical continuity. it is composed of what i call global politic
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2012 12:00am EST
, and asia, the rise of china, are you talk about, the dual role of the united states in the future, it will remain in its early promoter and guarantor of greater and broader unity. in the east to distinguish america's role, saying we should be the balance there and conciliator between major powers. can you explain him or why need to be separate roles? >> in the case of europe, in two world wars we had to be engaged in these two world wars because these two world wars were still thoughts on the premise that dirt. it is correct to say and morally right to say that the world wouldn't be better off if the or with hitler. today that is no longer the issue in the issue is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view and if we do not do the things they say in my book and i'm thinking of it strategically, the world will calm to greater and greater turmoil, confusion. the world is now not only composed of competitive states they should we have possible cooperative states, it is also composed and this is a very major goal historical continuity. it is composed of what i call globa
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2009 1:00am EST
know what goes on in china or russia? and who are the messengers, who are the valtin's, who are the other side? >> guest: certainly not me. i'm not an expert either in expert psychologists or so of the intelligence. i will say this, it seems to me definitive that the communism i am writing about has vanished permanently from the earth. it's partly a political expression but partly also historical time mound stylistic expression. the large questions that surround all of
CSPAN
Feb 14, 2011 12:00am EST
, is given we've been in the argument a long time that china has profound economic problems at this point. it's grown in 0 years. it will continue to grow, but it's going to go through an adjustment. the most important thing to argue is the next 10 years is really about the relationship what i call empire of republic. it's between the vast global power of the united states, the difficulty in managing that and retaining republican forms of government. the military industrial complex, i'm going beyond that. i'm saying the requirements of managing an international system in which we are the only global power with the institutions that we have, you know, the complexity of our intelligence organizations create the situation where no one has a clear idea of what everyone is doing aside from creating unnecessary chaos in the world, it creates real challenges for the republic. i need to maintain a democratic society in the face of this both accumulating and nontransparent power. i'd say those three things. >> host: the word balancing i think is a word that appears a lot in the course of the
CSPAN
Feb 13, 2011 9:00pm EST
years predicts china and turkey will challenge the remaining superpower in the coming decade in ways the government may not currently anticipate. he talks with the executive editor of the foreign policy magazine, susan glasser. >>> george, thank you so much for joining us. i'm thrilled to have the chance to talk to you in debt about your new book the next decade. i see that it represents a little bit of what is the right word, the narrowing of the frame of ambition from the last book on the next 100 years so you have now taken on the slightly more manageable next ten years or perhaps that's actually more and noble, the next ten years. we can talk about that a little bit of the next hour to get some of your counter intuitive viewers i think about the world is headed and the d'huez encounters with that world whether it is on israel or china and your view of the rise or russia and i think the interesting things to say that are not exactly what you're going to pick up from reading the papers every day. so let's go ahead and jump into that conversation. the next ten years for the next thr
CSPAN
Feb 12, 2011 10:00pm EST
years predicts china and turkey will challenge the remaining superpower in the coming decade in ways the government may not currently anticipate. he talks with the exit is editor of foreign policy magazine, susan glasser. >> host: george, thank you so much. i'm glad to have the chance to talk to you in him that about your new book. i see that it represents a little bit of what's the right word, the narrowing of the frame of ambition from alaska on the next 100 years, you have now taken on perhaps a slightly more manageable next ten years or perhaps that is more unknowable, the next ten years. i think we can talk about that over the next hour, and some of your very counter intuitive views about what direction you see the world headed, and in particular the u.s. encounters with that world, whether it's on israel or her china and your view or russia. i can to have interesting things to say that are not exactly what you're going to pick up from reading the papers every day. let's go ahead and jump right into that conversation. the next ten years. what are the three most surprising to tak
CSPAN
Aug 26, 2012 4:00pm EDT
carry out. our military has a far boder array of responsibility and missions than a nation like china or russia or other nations in the world. and to protect ourselves to protect our seedlings to respond to humid tear crisis and have a missile defense and list goes on and on in various challenges our military has. in my view, requires an annual budget of 4 percent of gdp. right now we're 3.8% of our gdp. total spending is about 20% of the gdp. we're saying the defense budget ought to be 20%. there are a lot of percentage. i apologize for taking that course. i think sometimes we say, gosh, we're spending so much more than any other nation in the world. why should we be sp spending any more on the military? they spend far less than we do. as you go behind the numbers and find they don't report all of their military spending and their cost, for instance, of standing up an army they have con sings, not a paid voluntary arm army. their costs are lower. china is not spending at 10% the level at the united states but something close the level of half the united states. if we were paying with
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2011 9:00pm EST
65%. the chinese took 23%. a lot of people don't even know china was in the war. a million yugoslavs, they took a 3% and so it goes on. so the statistics are not all of it but they are still amazing that you have, for example if you were a russian soldier you had a one in four chance of being killed. if you were a british soldier you had a one in 20 chance and as an american soldier one and 30. there's something else that's very important and one has to qualify this by saying it's almost insulting to say to people who went through the experience where the people had it is the privilege of historians of people in the comfortable television studio to say here but if you were a g.i. or a british soldier with your meats blown to bits around you to have someone coming around the corner and say it is much worse on the russian front this is insulting. if you are an american or british housewife struggling with rations and say did you know that they are eating jell-o, that fathers are selling their daughters? we always have to maintain that sense of humility and we must never forget here we
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2011 9:00pm EST
say, i don't want to go overseas. the guy down the road went joe seas, went to mexico, went to china. they undercut me. if i don't move my factory, i'm finished. frankly, i blame the free traders, blame them, and i used to be one of them. we used to be friends until i got a level saying i was doing the devil's work. i was opposed to free trade. i'm with you on that. my sense is that some of the business guys say, look, in the global economy they dump me in. i work for this company, and i've got to save the company, but if someone said the problem, ralph, is this, that the vital interests of the united states, and the vital interests of the fortune 500 are the # 00 or whatever it is, they used to be the same in this country, and they diverged. their intrirses, and, look, if what's good for general motors is moving factories overseas, than what's good for general motors is not good for the united states of america. >> host: it's happening with the solar industry. we were ahead from the world, and now the factories move to china because china gives them the store. >> guest: what do you
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 2:00pm EDT
. and china, which is to say china is probably running through the end of its course of making argument we're simply a developing country, we can't afford to bear the burdens of international leadership that the united states has been paying. the first sign china wants to be recognized as the second largest economy in the world, growing toward eating at some point in the next couple of decades the largest economy in the world. at some point those conversations are going to meet. and the question of who pays the bill for global leadership and what is required in order to sustain that is going to come. i want to back up, december 31, 1991. you call the breakpoint in history. the collapse of the soviet union is what happened on that day. and the birth of the post-soviet era, not only in american foreign policy but in terms of literally rewriting the map of the world as we knew it. two decades later we're going to mark the anniversary this year. things haven't necessary turned out as some of the optimists would have had them. we have not seen a tidal wave of democracy and freedom wash acros
CSPAN
May 20, 2013 12:00am EDT
with china. he was very instrumental from china and this is something that we know in the record. there were many others, mark says stephen and part of the economic policy and did want the soviet-style economy as it turns out from recent research at the time harry dexter white came across as the keynesian tradition and the counterpart of the post world war two global financial architecture and it is mind-boggling. >> guest: but there are hundreds of agents. some still have not been identified that the renewal for a fact there is something around 500 agents that have been identified that has come after the fall of the soviet union. >> host: but what was the key intercept that facilitated thisd this identification of 500? >> it was an archive set up going between the embassies and consulates back to russia or moscow. the western union was ordered to start making copies and the idea was to break the code and read them to find out whether south -- soviet allies wanted to make a better allies and when the codebreakers started to work on the cables is started to realize the soviet union was a
CSPAN
Sep 12, 2009 12:00pm EDT
that come through in your story are not quite as dapper, but driven. they are people who broke china when they walked in the china shop, and were sort of impelled forward by this sense of the danger we faced. richard clarke is another one of them. he straddles two admistration and certain became a maj part of the story during the 9/11 commission. talk to me about richard clarke. >> guest: well, yeah, clarke and o'neill re soul bthers. they really saw each other as being having the sam kind of drive, the same kind of obsesqiveness, the same intolerance of bureaucratic resistance. they wanted to get things done. and consequently they also had in, the fact that they had a lot enemies. it was clark who spotted o'neil and ben to promote him actually offered him his own job as the countertarrorism czar in the white house. it could welhave been that that was the prompting factors that caused someone in fbi hierarchy to torpedo o'neil, that they wod never want to report him in the white house. it would have bn an intolerable to them. it was hard enough being his boss. o'neil was irascible an
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2012 9:00pm EST
and scrap iron to japan which was at war with china in 1940 and more seriously, roosevelt's imposition of a total economic sanction embargo against japan in july of 1941. he argued this had the effect of driving the vehicle driving the japanese into the corner because they felt they are being deprived of the supplies they need. their economy will collapse unless they get the surprise somewhere that means they will have to see is moly our the dutch east indies and the united states might be in the way. he argues that we drove the japanese into a corner and we didn't understand the japanese psychology which our ambassador was pointing out but the japanese might choose to start a war knowing that they would lose rather than surrender to the american pressure so that's one side of the queen. the other is in the fall of 41 there was a time a japanese prime minister wanted a conference with roosevelt as we would now use the term and she had a certain peace proposals he wanted a kind of modus with the united states and roosevelt was very cool towards this and the secretary of state
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2011 6:00pm EST
65%. the chinese took 23%. people don't even know china was in the war. 15 million chinese dead. a million yugaslovs, and it goes on and on. the statistics are not all of it, but it's amazing that you had, for example, if you were a german, a russian soldier, you had a one in four chance of being killed. british, one in twenty, and an american had a one in 32 chance of being killed. something else that's important to quantify this in saying that it's almost insulting to say to people who experienced the war how it was, so it's the privilege of historians, us lucky people in the television studio to say here's the truth, but if you were a gi or a british soldier with your mates being blown to bits around you, to have a bastard say, well, actually, it's worse on the russian front, that's insulting. if you're an american or british housewife struggling to cope with rations to say in lenongrad they are eating each other and in east bangor, fathers are selling their daughters? so we always have to maintain a sense of humility and never forget 6 # 6 years -- 66 years on, we can say these
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2011 12:00pm EST
took 65%. chinese took 23%. a lot of people don't even know china was in the war. 15 million chinese did, a million yugoslavs, they took 3%, so it goes on. so the statistics are enormous but they are still an amazing. you had, for example, if you are a russian soldier, you had a one in four chance of being killed. if you're a british soldier to have a one in 20 chance of being killed if you're an american soldier and one in 3 32. one has to qualify this by saying it's almost insulting to say to people who went through the experience of war with other people how it works. it's a privilege of historians, of us people sitting in our comfortable television studio to say here's some truth. but if you were a g.i. or a british soldier with your mates being blown to bits around you, perhaps some bastard come out of the court as they actually it's much worse on the russian front. this insult you. if you're an american or british housewife struggling to cope with ration. in leningrad they are at each other teaching of in east bengal that the fathers are selling their daughters? so we always ha
CSPAN
Feb 20, 2011 6:00pm EST
like iran, iraq, china. there were sold to the highest bid. i wouldn't be surprised if some of those pages are sitting in a cave somewhere in afghanistan right now. so what bob hanssen did can never be underestimated. and why we never saw and why his wife never saw, when a spouse cheats on another spouse, from then on, the spouse has been cheated on her antenna is we get there or his antenna is way up there. and because he was doing so much work for the kgb between 1985 and 1991 and then leader from 1999, why his wife never caught it is i don't live it was a here no evil, see no evil, why did he do this? first of all, i believe that bob hanssen, although he knows right from wrong, his lawyer wanted to. bob hanssen was pretty, well, creasy. you wouldn't have known it, you would think that he was eccentric, the eccentric genius the fbi doesn't develop the computer system for them that you can track the soviet spy, but he was an eccentric quirky kind of guy but you wouldn't have fought being the son of a chicago policeman, you would have never thought bob hanssen would have been a mole
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2012 9:00am EST
. >> guest: i think it's going to be a military virtual equal of the united states, china, and an economic equal, so we're going to a bipolar world. secondly, i think the american state, the nation-state, the government is in deep trouble, ralph. it cannot balance its budgets or secure its borders or win its wars or stop the hemorrhaging of its manufacturing base overseas. we lost six million manufacturing jobs in the first decade of the 21st century, some 55,000 factories shut down. the united states is declining as a great superpower and a great nation. but i think the most important thing i see is that america is disintegrating. i think it was lee hamilton that said the seven riff gal forces are becoming dominant in our society, and i think if you look at our country you will see that ethnically in terms of class, philosophy and ideology and in terms of race each, the united states seems to be breaking down into enclaves of people who separate from each other and do not much like each other and even detest each other. and so in that sense america will be a legal entity, i think
CSPAN
Mar 7, 2010 9:00pm EST
responsibilities and missions then let's say a nation like china or russia or other nations in the world and to protect ourselves and respond to humanitarian crises to have a nuclear deterrent against a nuclear threat to have missile defense the list goes on and on and on of the challenges the military has. in my view it requires an annual budget of roughly 4% of gdp. right now about 3.8% of gdp and total federal spending but approximately 20% of the gdp. so we are seeing the the defense budget ought to be about 20% of the total gdp. a lot of percentages. i apologize for taking that course. but i think sometimes we say we are spending so much more than any other nation in the world why should we be spending any more on the military? because they spend for less than we do actually as you go behind their numbers and find they don't report all of their military spending and the costs for instance standing up an army where they have conscription, not paid volunteer army, the costs are lower so when you look at a more comparable basis china is spending a lot at 10% the level of the united states
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2012 10:00pm EST
to what is happening in the east and asia, the rise of china and hear you talk about what you think should be the dual roles of the united states in the future. in the west, the u.s. should remain i suppose in its role as a promoter and guarantor of greater order unity. in the east you distinguish america's role saying that we should be the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain that a little bit more, why these need to be separate roles? >> guest: because of the case of europe, we were engaged in two world wars and we had to be engaged in these two world wars. because these two world wars were still fought on the premise that the victor would dominate the world and i think it is correct to say and morally right to say that the world would be better off without hitlerism or stalinism. this is no longer the issue. the danger today in my view is if we do not do the things i say in my book, and i'm thinking of is strategically, the world will succumb to greater and greater turmoil in the future. the world is now not only composed of competitive states that s
CSPAN
May 18, 2013 10:00pm EDT
powerful systems to do things with force and energy. and they dominated different portfolios with china. and with the loss of china and this is something we know from the record some were just marxist not necessarily identified as agents. he was doing a lot of the economic policy and basically did one these soviet-style government. >> host: so did white but at the time harry dexter white came across as the new dealer but an economist who was in the keynesian tradition and a counterpart with creation of post-world war two global financial architecture and it is incredible and mind-boggling. >> guest: that hundreds of agents not all of them are famous but they still have not been identified with 500 agents that they can all of the fall of the soviet union and for what facilitated this identification. >> there several archives. to go between russian and soviet embassies in council it back to moscow. this and with 1943 and the idea was to break the code to find out what the soviet allies really wanted so we could be better allies. infiltrating it everywhere but it was hard work and they too
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2011 7:00pm EDT
not quite as dapper, but is driven. there are people who broke china when they walk in the china shop and were sorted and told forward by the sense of the danger we face. richard clarke is another one who straddles two administrations and certainly became a major part of the story during the 9/11 commission. talked to me about richard clarke. just go clarke and o'neill were sold brothers. they really thought each other as having the same kind of drive, same obsessiveness, the same intolerance of bureaucratic resistance and people are shufflers. they wanted to get to and consequently the also had in common the fact that they had a lot of enemies. it was clerk who spotted o'neill and began to promote him. actually offered him his own job as a counterterrorism czar at the nsc in the white house. it could well have done that was a prompt in fact are that caused someone in fbi hierarchy to torpedo o'neill. they would never have wanted to report to him in the white house. it would have been intolerable for them. it was hard enough being his boss. romeo was irascible and tumultuous. he
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2012 10:00pm EST
often with eight who lost china lobby. he and henry luce were joined at the hip of this romanticization as a latter-day freedom fighter. that is not how i sent hoover's view. >> guest: is not the view that the expressed in a murmur and it called going to war with the yellow races which he wrote a few months after pearl harbor were he certainly says he was an oligarch and so forth but in the final section of freedom betrayed, hoover has a thick chapter on the case history of china where he is more sympathetic to chiang kai-shek's predicament if not idolizing chiang kai-shek is a personality. hoover thought that he had made a great error in trying to impose a coalition government on two parties that were bound to fight it out until one or the other side fail. >> host: he was at least implicitly -- which is later. >> guest: he said marshall was the executor of the advisers. marshall was appointed by truman to be a special ambassador to china for about a year in 1946, where truman sent him and marshall labored unsuccessfully to bring about a reconciliation of the two chinese
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2009 1:00pm EST
don't know how to evaluate the quality of democracy in russia or for that matter, china. what signals do we take seriously emanating from those countries, from the ports of those countries, about what's going on and how we should decide when we say that's too far from democracy, or that's close enough. before we start, i would just like to do one thing, because there are lots of days in the story and it's fairly long ago, which is to run a little bit through the chronology of american history and the cold war. the chronology that are subject lives through. 1917. we start with the russian revolution, the bolshevik came to power. in the 1920s, we have stalled and consolidating power, the moderates are out. stalin is pushing his old cold revolution is out. there is a terrible salmon in the ukraine where millions died because of soviet policy. 1933, the depression. u.s. recognized the soviet union. it doesn't say we approve of every aspect of it, but we respect it as a sovereign nation. 1930s, among other things there is a purge trial. the reign of terror in the soviet union putting the revo
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 11:00am EST
behind-the-scenes in china. he goes into panama in december of '89. on the forget because before the july. it kill the business that week, and the american people loved it. they back the invasion. it was our backyard. it was a war on drugs, and that was a new issue. communism had been forgotten. it was a war on drugs and noriega look like a bad guy. he was a new stalin at that point. and then a year later that's another until story because the first iraqi war is depressing when you go into all of the false intelligence and the doctrine of the photos. do you want to talk a bit about it? because it breaks my heart personally. and the veterans of vietnam, the next ten years redraft. we don't take it into the possibilities with the soviet union to keep it stable. reprivatized. reprivatize of russia. and then by the time bush 43 comes in, it's not only squandered, but the nightmare really begins. so, for me, it is really heartbreaking. >> did you want to -- >> well, of course everything he saying air. and i mostly see it as a lost opportunity. a lot of lost opportunities. march 5th 1953 w
CSPAN
Jan 9, 2011 12:00pm EST
nuclear weapons, not just to get china and russia, but let's look at iran. let's look at north korea. looks like a cube. the thick of the carrier. smart targets, smart targets, nuclear weapons we don't watch or nuclear nuclear weapons we don't want to nuclear policy to be. and so this is laid out sort of the january before the bush administration comes in. and then their nuclear posture he adopts many of the same suggestions. that could be great minds think alike, but certainly could be at least aggressive minds think alike. or it could be in fact they had a significant influence in the way this nuclear ply was put together. >> host: you can agine norm auguine was busy helping. >> guest: well, it's really an amazing, amazing crew. you have to give them credit. they really figured out how to work the system. poster they do it ceaselessly 24/7. there's a lot of money and make it well-paid to do it. casco precisely. but the biggest campaign contributor in the defense industry, one of the biggest lobbying spenders right up there with boeing. and a lot of work to do now because of the def
CSPAN
Nov 19, 2011 10:00pm EST
industry to china. so why isn't -- and they've devastated the family. they have separated chirp from their family. oaoaoaoaoaoaoaoaououououououoaouououoaoaouoaoaoaoañananaln@n.jótótó÷ótótótótótótótótótótótótótótó÷ótótótó÷ótótó÷ó÷ótótótwúó÷wpwpwpótwpwpwpwpw÷w÷w÷w÷w÷w÷w÷w÷ótw÷wtw÷w÷wtwtwtó÷ó÷ó÷ó÷ótó÷ó÷ótó÷ótótótótó÷ótótwúwúótó÷ >> when you put pornography onwúwú the internet for children andó÷ all the rest of it whether it's hollywood or the businesses,ó÷ót you're right, there are corrupt human beings that do that.wúót and i'm against that.wtót and you and i were opposed naftaópó÷ and these others. but only in partial defense ofótó÷ business guys when i traveled the company in '92 and '96, iwúwp talked to textile guys. i don't wantwú to go overseas. the guyó÷ over the road moved his factory to mexico, to china, they're undercutting me.ótó÷ if i don't move my factory, i'mó÷wú finished. i blame ideological freewúwú traders. i blamed them, and i used to beó÷ót one of them. milton
CSPAN
May 19, 2013 9:00pm EDT
portfolios with china. he was very instrumental in the loss of china and this is something we know on the record. so there were many others. there were just some that were marxist, they were not necessarily identified as agents he was doing a lot of the economic policy and he did want a soviet-style economy government. >> host: so did harry dexter as it turned out on the recent research at the time. cam across as a new dealer but an economist that was in the tradition a counterpart in the creation of the post world war ii global financial architecture. it's incredible, it's mind-boggling. >> guest: they still have not been identified but we know for a fact there was something around 500 agents that have been identified by the various archives that have come out. >> what is the key intercept that had this identification of 500. >> guest: there are several archives. monona is an archive that is intercepted in the cabling going between the soviet embassy's and consulates back to russia and moscow. they start making copies and the idea was actually to break the code and find out what our sovi
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2011 10:00pm EST
%. the chinese took 23%. a lot of people don't even know china was in the war. a million yugoslavs. and the statistics aren't all of it but they are still amazing, you had, for example, if you were a german -- a russian soldier you had a one in four chance of being killed. if you were a british soldier you had a one in 20 chance, in if you american, one in 32 chance of being killed. now, there's something else that is very important. one has to qualify this by saying, it's almost insulting to say to people who went through the experience of war that other people had it worse. so it's the perform of historians, sitting in our comfortable television studio, to say here's the truth. if you were a g.i. or british soldier under a mortar barrage and your mates being blown to bits around you to have somebody come over and say, actually, it's much worse on the russian front, this is insulting. if you're an american or british housewife, struggling to cope with remarks, to say, did you know in lenin grad, they're eating in -- in bengal fathers are selling their daughters. so, we always have
CSPAN
May 26, 2013 12:00pm EDT
with force and energy. they, they dominated different portfolios. loughlin curry's portfolio was china. he was very instrumental in the loss of china and, indeed, this was, you know, something we know, we know on the record. so there were many others, there were some who were just, you know, marxists. they weren't necessarily identified as agents early on. rexford tug welshing this very important -- >> host: what was he doing? >> guest: he was doing the economic policy, and he basically did want a soviet-style economy -- >> host: so hid harry -- so did harry dexter white as it turns out from recent research. at the time, harry dexter white came across as a new dealer, but an economist who was in the keynesian tradition. in fact, he was a counterpart to keynes in creation of post-world war ii global financial architecture. it's incredible, it's mind-boggling. >> guest: but i think the important thing to remember is there are hundreds of agents. >> host: yeah. >> guest: not all of them are famous. there are some who still have not been identified, but we know for a fact there was somethi
CSPAN
Jan 29, 2012 12:00pm EST
was was war with china, and seriously, roosevelt's imposition of a total economic sanction embargo in japan in july of 1941. he argued this had the effect of driving the japanese into a corner because they thought they're being deprived of vital supplies they need. their economy will collapse unless they get the supplies somewhere. that means they have to seize the dutch east indays or the united states might be in the way. he argued that we drove the japanese into a corner and we did not understand the japanese psychology, and our ambassador was pointing out to him, that the japanese might choose to start a war, and knowing they would lose, rather than surrender to american pressure. so, that's one side of the coin. the other side i'll be brief about this point -- was that in the fall of '41, there was for a time a japanese prime minister who wanted a summit conference with roosevelt as well now use the term. and he had certain peace proposals. he wanted a kind of modus vivendi with the another, and roosevelt was very cool toward this, and secretary of state hall was even colder, and
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2009 10:00pm EST
, it in defining what we came to fear the most. as new nations like china began testing atomic weapons, fear of nuclear proliferation came to dominate public discourse. following in 19793 mile island incident which coincided with the release of james bond movie the china syndrome fear of atomic things led to calls to ban nuclear power plants and also to eliminate nuclear weapons altogether. the 1980's also gave as president ronald reagan's star wars program for which the untold billions of dollars were spent and are still being spent as the emphasis shifted from eliminating nuclear weapons to defending or shielding against them in the continental united states. delay 1980's and early 1990's saw the theme of global thermonuclear war make its way from movies to video games even in the post-cold war era of the simpson's got into the act in 1995 in an episode in title, a side show barbs class-- in which an embittered former tv clown discovers a discarded nuclear weapon in the local air force base open house. the theory is this tv show has been cancelled and the threat is to detonate it unl
CSPAN
Feb 5, 2011 10:00pm EST
abyei philosophy -- argues more revolutions from the demise of tools to solve personal arguments in britain to the end of foot landing in china.
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2011 12:00am EST
jobs and industry to china. why, and they've devastated the family. they have separated children from their parents. >> guest: right. >> host: we have a lot of documentation. how does this mix in the book? there's one nice quote from the president of ibm how the industrial america is abandoning. >> guest: i agree with almost everything you said. look, they had no -- look, when you put pornography on the internet for children and the rest of it, whether it's hollywood or the businesses, you're right, they're corrupt human beings that do that, and i'm against that. you and i were opposed nafta and the other things, but i will say, you know, in only partial defense of business guys, when i travel to the country in 1992 and 1996, i talked to guys who said, pat, i don't want to go overseas. the guy down the rote moved his factory to mexico or chie china. they are undercutting me. if i don't go, i'm finished. i blame the ideological free traders. i blame them, and i used to be one of them, friedman and i were friends until he wrote me a letter saying i'm doing the devil's work. i was oppose
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