Skip to main content

About your Search

20090604
20171215
STATION
DATE
2011 16
2013 8
2012 5
2010 4
2017 4
2014 3
2009 2
2015 0
2016 0
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2014 12:00am EDT
world to different places like irma china australia and so forth and had a great success with that first career. >> host: we want to stop a minute and think about this. imagine you have a son or daughter and he goes to college and studies that thing that the world needs most at that point, getting minerals out of the ground. a growing economy needs minerals especially when the world is on the gold standard and your child is the best city kid -- educated in that area studied with masters at stanford and also the most -- the best paid young men of his generation and certainly one of the most successful. he wasn't just any success. >> guest: you are quite right. he became the outstanding mining engineer of his time and he was recognized for that. he was earning in 1908 to 1914 in excess of $100,000 a year which was a lot of money in those pre-income tax days but he did to stop there. by the time he was 40 he was a modest millionaire. i'm not a midas or a rockefeller or mellow perhaps that he wanted to do more with his life and having done well in his profession he wanted to do somethi
CSPAN
Mar 15, 2014 10:00pm EDT
can't be sure but she was a pioneer in her own right lou henry hoover. they wanted china for a couple of years and eventually hoover use london as his base during his mining career which took them up to world war i. he became successful and traveled all over the world and went to places like wermuth, china and australia and so forth and had a great success in that first career. >> we want to stop a minute and think about this. imagine you have a son or daughter and he goes to college and studies that thing that the world needs most at that point getting minerals out of the ground and growing the economy needs minerals especially when the world is on the gold standard. your child is the best-educated speaking of hoover in the area studied with masters at stanford and also hoover was it was that the best paid young man of his generation and certainly one of the most successful. he wasn't just any success. >> guest: you are quite right. he became the outstanding mining engineer at this time. he was recognized for that. he was earning in 1908 to 1914 in excess of $100,000 a year which was
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2011 9:00pm EST
takeover what and although china remains independent as the system and practice it has become economically hollowed out by the 19th century and ultimately the empire goes down to 1911 and in that sense writing the book taught me important lesson about the nature of the historical process that we shouldn't think of history as cyclical or gradual seasonal or some sense biological but we should rather than give it more in terms of adaptive complex systems, the kind of things they study which in the natural world there are natural phenomena but it's interesting to realize the civilizations are governed by a similar laws to the complex effective systems in the natural world. >> host: you mention in your book watching your grandchildren grow up in england you had the feeling they were learning less history than he had learned their age, and you write, quote, in the financial crisis unfolds i realized they were far from alone. a handful of people in the banks and treasuries of the western world had sketchy information about the last great depression. would you expand on that and give
CSPAN
Jul 27, 2013 10:00pm EDT
participants in the war. china, the united states, north korea, south korea, and the soviet union. also it became apparent to me that i had to take this beyond the 1953 period. because of course the war did not end in a peace treaty that an armistice. so it took us a while to understand contemporary issue and looking at the past. >> host: of 21953, your book, "brothers at war: the unending conflict in korea", it takes up about half of the book. tell me a little bit about how you ultrashort approach. because really it extends to today. >> guest: the book is divided into four parts. the first is the war part and then post world war. in the war phase of the book, it is just easier to put it into one section because it covered the fighting of the war. so in 1940 and 1949 it was an insurgency in the south and it was by the newly established government. it became apparent that this regime is not going to work. the war turned into a international war. the smaller part of this really looks at the impact of the korean war on the cold war. the impact of the korean war not only on u.s. policies but a
CSPAN
Jan 7, 2017 9:59pm EST
paranoia that it is impossible to get grants at this point in china has passed a similar law so there is a paranoid at that opens the ngos to the foreign agencies and is a color revolution that is the term that ivor urge in the early '80s thousands to describe the wave of revolution of the post socialist dates that it's for a mass protest in support of more democratic leadership there was uh other revolution that was seen as a caa conspiracy essentially ratio was not happy about having new leaders taking power in these countries with negative effects and the fact that there were ngos involved from foreign donors that made it very easy for russia to do that but another problem is that the ngo workers in this is very clear that often does lead to a parallel system that probably isn't sustainable if you have health services provided by those debtor usually funded by a five-year agreement to say are lucky that these are lifesaving services and essentially in a country where the government can afford them should be integrated and operating in a sustainable way so this is a huge problem for a lo
CSPAN
Jan 29, 2012 9:00pm EST
asia in the rise of china coming in here to talk about what you think should be the whole of the united states in the future. in the west the u.s. should remain i suppose in its role of a promoter and a guarantor of the creature and a broader unity. in the east be distinguished america's role saying that we should be the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain that a little bit more why these need to be separate roles? >> guest: in the case of europe we were engaged in the world for and had to be engaged in the world war because the two world wars were still fought on a promise that the victor would dominate the world, and i think it is correct to say that the world wouldn't be better off if it was a stalinism. today that is no longer the issue. in the east is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view is that if we do not do the things i say in my book, and i'm thinking of it strategically, the world will succumb to greater and greater turmoil. the world is now not only composed of competitive states that should be as possible coopera
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2012 12:00am EST
, and asia, the rise of china, are you talk about, the dual role of the united states in the future, it will remain in its early promoter and guarantor of greater and broader unity. in the east to distinguish america's role, saying we should be the balance there and conciliator between major powers. can you explain him or why need to be separate roles? >> in the case of europe, in two world wars we had to be engaged in these two world wars because these two world wars were still thoughts on the premise that dirt. it is correct to say and morally right to say that the world wouldn't be better off if the or with hitler. today that is no longer the issue in the issue is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view and if we do not do the things they say in my book and i'm thinking of it strategically, the world will calm to greater and greater turmoil, confusion. the world is now not only composed of competitive states they should we have possible cooperative states, it is also composed and this is a very major goal historical continuity. it is composed of what i call globa
CSPAN
Feb 14, 2011 12:00am EST
, is given we've been in the argument a long time that china has profound economic problems at this point. it's grown in 0 years. it will continue to grow, but it's going to go through an adjustment. the most important thing to argue is the next 10 years is really about the relationship what i call empire of republic. it's between the vast global power of the united states, the difficulty in managing that and retaining republican forms of government. the military industrial complex, i'm going beyond that. i'm saying the requirements of managing an international system in which we are the only global power with the institutions that we have, you know, the complexity of our intelligence organizations create the situation where no one has a clear idea of what everyone is doing aside from creating unnecessary chaos in the world, it creates real challenges for the republic. i need to maintain a democratic society in the face of this both accumulating and nontransparent power. i'd say those three things. >> host: the word balancing i think is a word that appears a lot in the course of the
CSPAN
Feb 12, 2011 10:00pm EST
years predicts china and turkey will challenge the remaining superpower in the coming decade in ways the government may not currently anticipate. he talks with the exit is editor of foreign policy magazine, susan glasser. >> host: george, thank you so much. i'm glad to have the chance to talk to you in him that about your new book. i see that it represents a little bit of what's the right word, the narrowing of the frame of ambition from alaska on the next 100 years, you have now taken on perhaps a slightly more manageable next ten years or perhaps that is more unknowable, the next ten years. i think we can talk about that over the next hour, and some of your very counter intuitive views about what direction you see the world headed, and in particular the u.s. encounters with that world, whether it's on israel or her china and your view or russia. i can to have interesting things to say that are not exactly what you're going to pick up from reading the papers every day. let's go ahead and jump right into that conversation. the next ten years. what are the three most surprising to tak
CSPAN
Apr 17, 2011 9:00pm EDT
failure of socialism and a national basis and the soviet union or china before they are or india during its socialist days between the independent and its civilization in the 90's. but also with unlike the american public school system, the mexican public weal companies, state-run industry and venezuela come up places like that. they all have similar sorts of failures with misallocation of capital and incentives for production. it's a lot heavier than the book is by the way. >> host: and the book is -- the book goes through both the theoretical cases of socialism and then the series of object lessons in countries, regimes, ideas that demonstrate the way in which these failures as you see them how they developed and what they have in common, and what is the nature of the truth of how they operate versus how they describe themselves or how they propagandize for themselves what strikes me as interesting as we are talking about this, and i presume that you wrote this book because it was published in large measure because we are living in a time where great controversy about the nature of th
CSPAN
Feb 27, 2010 10:00pm EST
in indo china, and i think i can be certain that's not so. >> guest: because of this antiimperialism. >> host: especially in that part of asia which he knew. and he mentions, when he was in paris, the revival of the antistalinnism, and restoreing french colonialism in indo china. >> guest: he would have seen it as a colonial war and he -- i think you're right. iraq is different. it is not a colony -- colonial war. it's hard to say and a little dangerous to claim, but we can speculate because we have to. these two different arguments can be made about that. one is that orwell would have seen in saddam's rule, other than perhaps north korea, the nearest thing to the world he imagined in 1984. you say that totalitarianism is a cliche. iraq is a great example. saddam was big brother. he had brig brother's mustache. his face was on posters all over baghdad. it was on television all the time. you could not escape the eye of saddam's many secret police. >> host: iraqis used to say they thought he knew what they were dreaming. >> guest: exactly. even after he was overthrown, they continued t
CSPAN
Feb 13, 2011 9:00pm EST
years predicts china and turkey will challenge the remaining superpower in the coming decade in ways the government may not currently anticipate. he talks with the executive editor of the foreign policy magazine, susan glasser. >>> george, thank you so much for joining us. i'm thrilled to have the chance to talk to you in debt about your new book the next decade. i see that it represents a little bit of what is the right word, the narrowing of the frame of ambition from the last book on the next 100 years so you have now taken on the slightly more manageable next ten years or perhaps that's actually more and noble, the next ten years. we can talk about that a little bit of the next hour to get some of your counter intuitive viewers i think about the world is headed and the d'huez encounters with that world whether it is on israel or china and your view of the rise or russia and i think the interesting things to say that are not exactly what you're going to pick up from reading the papers every day. so let's go ahead and jump into that conversation. the next ten years for the next thr
CSPAN
Feb 20, 2011 12:00pm EST
over china, or russia or i think you have some interesting things to say that are not exactly what you're going to pick up from reading the papers every day. so let's go ahead and jump right in to that conversation. the next 10 years, what are the three most surprising takeaways that you are offering people in this book? >> guest: i think first that the war on terror has been overdone. now that terrorism is not a profound danger but as a monochromatic structure of foreign policy. it simply is unsustainable. there are too many other things happening in the world. the second thing i suppose that china has profound economic problems at this point. it's grown magnificently and will continue to grow but it's going to go through adjustments there i suppose the most important thing i'm arguing is the next 10 years is really about the relationship between what i call empire and republic, between the vast global power of the united states, the difficulty in managing that and retaining republican forms of government. eisenhower spoke about the military-industrial complex. i'm going beyond th
CSPAN
May 20, 2013 12:00am EDT
with china. he was very instrumental from china and this is something that we know in the record. there were many others, mark says stephen and part of the economic policy and did want the soviet-style economy as it turns out from recent research at the time harry dexter white came across as the keynesian tradition and the counterpart of the post world war two global financial architecture and it is mind-boggling. >> guest: but there are hundreds of agents. some still have not been identified that the renewal for a fact there is something around 500 agents that have been identified that has come after the fall of the soviet union. >> host: but what was the key intercept that facilitated thisd this identification of 500? >> it was an archive set up going between the embassies and consulates back to russia or moscow. the western union was ordered to start making copies and the idea was to break the code and read them to find out whether south -- soviet allies wanted to make a better allies and when the codebreakers started to work on the cables is started to realize the soviet union was a
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2010 12:00pm EST
people who came up belatedly with their counterinsurgency ideas, they go back to ancient china, you know, to say wait a minute, we forgot all about this, how a weaker person can be successful against a stronger person. one of the striking things that emerged even after 9/11 was that the americans, the american government -- i must make a distinction here. it's very, it's a mistake to say the americans and the japanese and the muslims and so on. one of the striking things was there were many people in the u.s. government all along at lower levels who were saying, this is crazy. first, we should be doing more against al-qaeda and then after 9/11 they were saying invading iraq is crazy. and they're saying this in the cia, they're saying this in cent come, they're saying this in the defense college, they're saying this in the state department, but it's not reaching the topmost level of government. one of the ideas that they couldn't get through was the whole concepts of insurgency, counterinsurgency, what we refer to as the weapons of the week, what it is that will mobilize people to, i
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2011 12:00pm EST
took 65%. chinese took 23%. a lot of people don't even know china was in the war. 15 million chinese did, a million yugoslavs, they took 3%, so it goes on. so the statistics are enormous but they are still an amazing. you had, for example, if you are a russian soldier, you had a one in four chance of being killed. if you're a british soldier to have a one in 20 chance of being killed if you're an american soldier and one in 3 32. one has to qualify this by saying it's almost insulting to say to people who went through the experience of war with other people how it works. it's a privilege of historians, of us people sitting in our comfortable television studio to say here's some truth. but if you were a g.i. or a british soldier with your mates being blown to bits around you, perhaps some bastard come out of the court as they actually it's much worse on the russian front. this insult you. if you're an american or british housewife struggling to cope with ration. in leningrad they are at each other teaching of in east bengal that the fathers are selling their daughters? so we always ha
CSPAN
Feb 20, 2011 6:00pm EST
like iran, iraq, china. there were sold to the highest bid. i wouldn't be surprised if some of those pages are sitting in a cave somewhere in afghanistan right now. so what bob hanssen did can never be underestimated. and why we never saw and why his wife never saw, when a spouse cheats on another spouse, from then on, the spouse has been cheated on her antenna is we get there or his antenna is way up there. and because he was doing so much work for the kgb between 1985 and 1991 and then leader from 1999, why his wife never caught it is i don't live it was a here no evil, see no evil, why did he do this? first of all, i believe that bob hanssen, although he knows right from wrong, his lawyer wanted to. bob hanssen was pretty, well, creasy. you wouldn't have known it, you would think that he was eccentric, the eccentric genius the fbi doesn't develop the computer system for them that you can track the soviet spy, but he was an eccentric quirky kind of guy but you wouldn't have fought being the son of a chicago policeman, you would have never thought bob hanssen would have been a mole
CSPAN
Mar 1, 2010 12:00am EST
china's and i think i could be certain that is not so. >> guest: because his antiimperialism >> host: especially that part of asia and he actually mentions when he's in paris at the end of the burr revival of the left opposition to the stalinist paper and one of the great essays that is printed about restoring french colonialism which is the ancestor of the american i think he would have regarded at -- best for think you're absolutely right. iraq is different. you know, in a way it's hard to say and it's a little dangerous to claim but we can speculate because we have to. there are two arguments made about that. one is orwell would have seen in some hussein's rule other than perhaps north korea the nearest thing to the world he mentioned in '84. use a totalitarianism is a cliche. iraq is a great example. saddam was a big brother, he had big brothers mustache. his face was on posters all over baghdad and on television all the time. you could not to escape the eye of his many secret police. >> host: iraqi is used to say they knew what he was doing. >> guest: and he was inside them even
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2012 10:00pm EST
to what is happening in the east and asia, the rise of china and hear you talk about what you think should be the dual roles of the united states in the future. in the west, the u.s. should remain i suppose in its role as a promoter and guarantor of greater order unity. in the east you distinguish america's role saying that we should be the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain that a little bit more, why these need to be separate roles? >> guest: because of the case of europe, we were engaged in two world wars and we had to be engaged in these two world wars. because these two world wars were still fought on the premise that the victor would dominate the world and i think it is correct to say and morally right to say that the world would be better off without hitlerism or stalinism. this is no longer the issue. the danger today in my view is if we do not do the things i say in my book, and i'm thinking of is strategically, the world will succumb to greater and greater turmoil in the future. the world is now not only composed of competitive states that s
CSPAN
May 19, 2013 9:00pm EDT
portfolios with china. he was very instrumental in the loss of china and this is something we know on the record. so there were many others. there were just some that were marxist, they were not necessarily identified as agents he was doing a lot of the economic policy and he did want a soviet-style economy government. >> host: so did harry dexter as it turned out on the recent research at the time. cam across as a new dealer but an economist that was in the tradition a counterpart in the creation of the post world war ii global financial architecture. it's incredible, it's mind-boggling. >> guest: they still have not been identified but we know for a fact there was something around 500 agents that have been identified by the various archives that have come out. >> what is the key intercept that had this identification of 500. >> guest: there are several archives. monona is an archive that is intercepted in the cabling going between the soviet embassy's and consulates back to russia and moscow. they start making copies and the idea was actually to break the code and find out what our sovi
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2011 10:00pm EST
%. the chinese took 23%. a lot of people don't even know china was in the war. a million yugoslavs. and the statistics aren't all of it but they are still amazing, you had, for example, if you were a german -- a russian soldier you had a one in four chance of being killed. if you were a british soldier you had a one in 20 chance, in if you american, one in 32 chance of being killed. now, there's something else that is very important. one has to qualify this by saying, it's almost insulting to say to people who went through the experience of war that other people had it worse. so it's the perform of historians, sitting in our comfortable television studio, to say here's the truth. if you were a g.i. or british soldier under a mortar barrage and your mates being blown to bits around you to have somebody come over and say, actually, it's much worse on the russian front, this is insulting. if you're an american or british housewife, struggling to cope with remarks, to say, did you know in lenin grad, they're eating in -- in bengal fathers are selling their daughters. so, we always have
CSPAN
Jan 8, 2017 9:00pm EST
russia at this point because of various foreign agents lies laws and china has a similar law. so there's a pair pair noah and opens up ngos to accusation us they're fomenting revolution. a color revolution is a term that emerged in the early 2000s to describe the way they revolution and sort of post communist and post socialist stateses that involved mass protests and were -- in support of more democratic leadership, and there was the orange revolution, in rain ukraine in 2004, the tulip revolution and that's were southeastern by russia as -- were seen by russia as cia conspiracies essentially. russia was not happy with new leaders taking power in these countries and had negative affects on russia's sort of regional influence and the fact there were ng os involved organized revolutions were getting funds from foreign donors, including american donors, made it very easy to russia to do that and create an easy pretense in some cases for arresting activists or passing foreign agents laws. but another problem i think is that ngo workers -- people who are dependent on ngos, a. -- this is very
CSPAN
May 18, 2013 10:00pm EDT
powerful systems to do things with force and energy. and they dominated different portfolios with china. and with the loss of china and this is something we know from the record some were just marxist not necessarily identified as agents. he was doing a lot of the economic policy and basically did one these soviet-style government. >> host: so did white but at the time harry dexter white came across as the new dealer but an economist who was in the keynesian tradition and a counterpart with creation of post-world war two global financial architecture and it is incredible and mind-boggling. >> guest: that hundreds of agents not all of them are famous but they still have not been identified with 500 agents that they can all of the fall of the soviet union and for what facilitated this identification. >> there several archives. to go between russian and soviet embassies in council it back to moscow. this and with 1943 and the idea was to break the code to find out what the soviet allies really wanted so we could be better allies. infiltrating it everywhere but it was hard work and they too
CSPAN
Aug 4, 2013 11:00am EDT
cultural and social history. and i wanted to include all the participants in the war, china, united states, the two koreas, and the soviet union. and as it became apparent to me that i had to take the war beyond the 19533 because of course the war didn't end in a peace treaty. it ended in an armistice. that sort of is why i decided to do really coming from sort of the contemporary issue and an understanding how we got where we are today by looking at the past. >> host: in this book, really takes only about half of the book. tell me a little bit about how you structured your approach. because really and extends up to today. >> guest: the book is divided into four parts. the first is the war part and then a second cold war, and i called the local war, and the post cold war. the war phase of the book i actually could of made it into two phases. i could've talked about the civil war phase and then the international, but i said it was easy to put into one phase because it was sort of the fighting phase of the war. so that's coming you know, 1948, 1949 that was a terrible insurgency in th
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 11:00am EST
behind-the-scenes in china. he goes into panama in december of '89. on the forget because before the july. it kill the business that week, and the american people loved it. they back the invasion. it was our backyard. it was a war on drugs, and that was a new issue. communism had been forgotten. it was a war on drugs and noriega look like a bad guy. he was a new stalin at that point. and then a year later that's another until story because the first iraqi war is depressing when you go into all of the false intelligence and the doctrine of the photos. do you want to talk a bit about it? because it breaks my heart personally. and the veterans of vietnam, the next ten years redraft. we don't take it into the possibilities with the soviet union to keep it stable. reprivatized. reprivatize of russia. and then by the time bush 43 comes in, it's not only squandered, but the nightmare really begins. so, for me, it is really heartbreaking. >> did you want to -- >> well, of course everything he saying air. and i mostly see it as a lost opportunity. a lot of lost opportunities. march 5th 1953 w
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2017 9:00pm EDT
friction in russia to a lesser extent china and the united states and others. i think the balance of power is weaker than it was. nato in many ways demilitarized after the end of the cold war. russia did many things but it's not demilitarized and that is the instrument of the russian foreign policy. china has militarized in significant ways certain shifts in the balance of power in some ways commensurate with the changing powers of economic wealth. you have the rise of all sorts of state actors most dramatically the al qaeda who can also wield significant power. there are medium states, north korea, iran that can be a factor in the region. and then above all, there is globalization. and you've got these enormous flows of just about everything from viruses whether they are real or computer, then drugs and greenhouse gases to the components of missiles or bombs and the things hackers would send around the world, you name it. essentially anything that now goes across borders with tremendous speed and tremendous volume. so i think the old rules that to one extent or another helped us for
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2009 1:00pm EST
don't know how to evaluate the quality of democracy in russia or for that matter, china. what signals do we take seriously emanating from those countries, from the ports of those countries, about what's going on and how we should decide when we say that's too far from democracy, or that's close enough. before we start, i would just like to do one thing, because there are lots of days in the story and it's fairly long ago, which is to run a little bit through the chronology of american history and the cold war. the chronology that are subject lives through. 1917. we start with the russian revolution, the bolshevik came to power. in the 1920s, we have stalled and consolidating power, the moderates are out. stalin is pushing his old cold revolution is out. there is a terrible salmon in the ukraine where millions died because of soviet policy. 1933, the depression. u.s. recognized the soviet union. it doesn't say we approve of every aspect of it, but we respect it as a sovereign nation. 1930s, among other things there is a purge trial. the reign of terror in the soviet union putting the revo
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2009 1:00am EST
know what goes on in china or russia? and who are the messengers, who are the valtin's, who are the other side? >> guest: certainly not me. i'm not an expert either in expert psychologists or so of the intelligence. i will say this, it seems to me definitive that the communism i am writing about has vanished permanently from the earth. it's partly a political expression but partly also historical time mound stylistic expression. the large questions that surround all of
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 2:00pm EDT
. and china, which is to say china is probably running through the end of its course of making argument we're simply a developing country, we can't afford to bear the burdens of international leadership that the united states has been paying. the first sign china wants to be recognized as the second largest economy in the world, growing toward eating at some point in the next couple of decades the largest economy in the world. at some point those conversations are going to meet. and the question of who pays the bill for global leadership and what is required in order to sustain that is going to come. i want to back up, december 31, 1991. you call the breakpoint in history. the collapse of the soviet union is what happened on that day. and the birth of the post-soviet era, not only in american foreign policy but in terms of literally rewriting the map of the world as we knew it. two decades later we're going to mark the anniversary this year. things haven't necessary turned out as some of the optimists would have had them. we have not seen a tidal wave of democracy and freedom wash acros
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2011 12:00pm EST
i think wúwúwúwú china is rising so fast it's going to be a military virtual equal of the united states.óúwú and equal so we're going to a bipolar world. secondly i think the american state, the nationstate, the government is in big trouble ralph. ópóúóúwpóúwpóúóúóúóúóúóp wú wú wúwú wúóú wp óúwú wúwúwúwú wú wp wpwpwp wúwúwú óú wpwpwpwúóúwú wúwúwúwúwpwúópwpwú wúwúóp wúóú óp wú wúwúwúwpwú óúwú wúwpwúwúwú wúwúwú wúwú óp wpóp óúóú wúwúóp wpwú óúwúwúwúwú óúóúwúóúwúwúwúóúóúóúwp wúwúwúwúwúóúóúóúwúwúópópwúóúwúwúwúwpwúwúwpwúwúwúwúwúóúwú wúwú wú wú wp ópwp óp óp óúóúwp wúwúwúwpwúwúwpwú some 55,000 factories shutwp down. the united states is declining as a great superpower to greatóúwp óú nation. wúwú butóp iwúwúwú think the most important thing iwp see is america is disintegrating. i think it was lee hamilton whowúwú said that the centrifugal forces are wpbecomingóúwp dominant inwúwp amewprican society. and i think if you
CSPAN
Apr 16, 2011 10:00pm EDT
deficit with china anymore and that sort of thing and the thinking is almost always distractive because the truth is you are not the most effective producer of all the stuff your people need to consume. so if you want to take all that the turkey has a social principle and extended across the whole country what you get a something a lot like north korea. that combined with central planning which of course causes the economy to be radically dysfunctional and not produce anywhere near what it could or should in any end up with a is a sighted people -- they are the same koreans north of the border as they are south of the border and the same history in the same culture in the same genetic that ran in the whole thing. south korea's extraordinarily wealthy, prosperous place and there parts are parts of it that look 20 years ahead of the united states and in north korea their people eating wild grass and sometimes each other. because they are so reduced. i have an acquaintance who served in the north korean military and he managed to escape into the united states some years ago and his rations
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00pm EST
. bush? >> host: square. he does business as usual with china and goes into panama december 1989. the american people loved it it was our backyard. me noriega was the news dahlin. and that is another untold story. and with the doctor of the photos it breaks my heart personally send a the veteran we don't take advantage of the possibilities with the soviet union reprivatize with russia and then 43, and it is natalie squandered but it is heartbreaking during that period. >> it is a lost opportunity. i agree. >> march 5, 1953 when stalin died the soviet leader's reach out to the united states at that point* but eisenhower had a great speech but then dallas refutes it then they take a hard-line. >> we had a lot of chances.
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2017 12:00pm EST
organizations in russia at this point because of various foreign agent laws. china has passed a similar law. so there is a paranoia and it opens up ngos to accusations that they are foreign agencies, that they are fomenting color revolutions and, of course, this is been -- >> host: what are color revolutions? >> guest: color revolutions is a term that emerged in the sort of early 2000 to describe the way of revolution and post-communist and post-socialist states that involve mass protest and war, mass protest in support of more democratic leadership. and so there was the orange revolution in ukraine in 2004. there was a tulip revolution in pakistan. there are some others and interesting by russia as conspiracies essentially. russian of course was not happy about having new leaders taking power in these countries. it had a negative effect on russia's regional influence and the fact that they were ngos involved to some extent organizing revolutions that were getting funds from foreign donors including american donors made it very easy for russia to do that and an easy pretense in some cases f
CSPAN
May 26, 2013 12:00pm EDT
with force and energy. they, they dominated different portfolios. loughlin curry's portfolio was china. he was very instrumental in the loss of china and, indeed, this was, you know, something we know, we know on the record. so there were many others, there were some who were just, you know, marxists. they weren't necessarily identified as agents early on. rexford tug welshing this very important -- >> host: what was he doing? >> guest: he was doing the economic policy, and he basically did want a soviet-style economy -- >> host: so hid harry -- so did harry dexter white as it turns out from recent research. at the time, harry dexter white came across as a new dealer, but an economist who was in the keynesian tradition. in fact, he was a counterpart to keynes in creation of post-world war ii global financial architecture. it's incredible, it's mind-boggling. >> guest: but i think the important thing to remember is there are hundreds of agents. >> host: yeah. >> guest: not all of them are famous. there are some who still have not been identified, but we know for a fact there was somethi
CSPAN
Feb 6, 2011 12:00pm EST
china. it's kind of interesting, i did vote republican. i am a democrat. but i think i'm going to go with democrat because i think the republicans this year are having an issue with social security. and since so many americans are unemployed, millions and millions going from unemployment then to social security years and as they want that reduced, i think that the government actually should not be getting social security, the congress and senate. but my question, i want to talk to you about why do the conservatives which had the dumbing down during the reagan era, and by -- i was glad to watch c-span during the perot time because that was the only time i got clear coverage, and i still watch c-span all the time to get clear coverage of news. it just became a dumbing down of the media. why didn't you catch the foreclosure debacle? why didn't you catch the bank, goldman sachs, etc. why was that totally ignored? when the middle class knew it was going on, and now here we go again in the middle east? why didn't you catch that either? i mean -- >> guest: i can't understand what you're say
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2011 12:00am EST
-- of the pacific rim, all the way to canada and all the way out through japan and china and korea, and the conversation was different. about global trade and free trade, and i actually always thought in that sense the countries had more in common with their asian counterparts than their latin american counterparts. >> is it how they see themselves in their stage of development? >> i think it is. you look at places like chile, now quite developed, colombia getting there. a country click brazil is interesting because on the one hand it's leading the -- one of the leaders in the global economy but with huge income distribution difficulties that keep it more on the developing countryside. if you look at the poorest countries in, say, central america, like guatemala, for instance, you're talking about places where you can't even reach the farmers in the highlands bay highway, and so their problems are to build infrastructure so they can join the 20th century economy. forget the 21st century economy. so you have radically different levels of development. when you think about the radically di
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 10:00pm EST
know when you could not go to china. >> guest: absolutely. william were the is a great great example of one of these unsung heroes. born in 1921. he is one of the key radical black journalists of the 1950's and '60's. he goes into the soviet union in the late 1940's. he goes into china in the 1950's. he is one of the key black journalists who is in cuba during the cuban revolution. he is a friend and ally of malcolm x. his key domestic idea is something called the freedom now party, and it is really going to be one of three black independent political parties in the 1960's. one is the freedom now party. the other is the mississippi freedom democratic party. led by a man who was not allowed to be seated at the 1964 democratic national convention in atlantic city, new jersey, and the other is going to be the lounge county freedom organization which is nicknamed the black panther party, which is in alabama. that is started with grass-roots locals with the help of activists. and when we think about william worthy, worthy is very interesting. he is a black power activist who is also a pac
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 12:00am EST
does business as usual with china. he goes into panama, in december '89 -- never forgot that because i had -- born on the 4th of july was opening that day, and the american people loved it. they backed the invasion. it was our backyard, it was a war on drugs and that was new issue now. communist had been forgotten. noriega was the new stalin, and then a year later, we had this iraq 1, and that's another untold story. iraq 1 was really depressing when you go into all the false intelligence and the doctoring of the photos. do you want to tell us about that? it breaks my heart personally, and as a veteran of the vietnam war, i see the next ten years we drift. we don't take advantage of the possibles with the soviet union, to keep it stable. we privatize with russia and then by the time the bush 43 comes in, it's not only squandered but the nightmare begins. so it's heartbreaking. >> did you want to comment? >> we see it as a lost opportunity. there's a lot of lost opportunities in the 20th 20th century, in march 5, 1965, when stall yip dies, the stove yet leaders reach out the u
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2014 12:00pm EDT
her own right. they went to china for a couple years and eventually hoover used the base during his mining engineering career, which took him out to world war i. he became very successful at it, traveled all over the world, lived in places like irma, china, australia and so forth and had a great success at the first career. posters to stop a minute and think about this. imagine you have a son or daughter and he goes to college and studies the thing the world needs most at that point, getting minerals out of the ground, a growing economy needs minerals, especially with the world islamic gold standard. your child is the best educated in that area. he studied with masters at stanford and is also the most able. some of us that the best paid young man of his generation. certainly one of the most successful. he wasn't just any success. >> you're quite right. he became the outstanding writing engineer this time who is recognized for that. he was earning in 1908 to 1914 money probably in excess of $100,000 a year, which is a lot of money in the pre-income tax stays. but you know, he didn't
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)