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20090604
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2016 12:00pm EST
ended at the subject of a lot of discussion these days among china. the book is called tran 11 -- "one child." first i think it would be helpful to find for people what we are talking about. so what is china's one child policy? >> one child policy is really a misnomer. it is just a name that we use to describe a set of rules and illustrations that china has placed to regulate the population. theoretically you could more likely call it 1.5 child for a long time and of course the two child policy. in reality with regulations. >> not one not particularly, but a basket of these. when did it happen? when did it begin? >> 1979, 1980 when the communist party supposedly took members saying we are raising everybody to move to one child family. it was really telling. >> people sometimes imagine the policy that would've gone into effect under chairman mao, but it went to affect under xiaoping. what was going on at the time it was so important people imagine they needed the safety of a policy level? >> now had passed away. china had come off the cultural revolution. people are poor and als
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2015 11:51pm EDT
crisis. think of china, late 1970s. india, 1991. think of asia, 1997. and after that, the countries in regions enacted large structural reforms. as for russia, the man looking into the abyss is vladimir putin and russia is not going to change until he is gone. thank you. [applause] >> okay. the bar will be open after the session is over with. either that or coffee will be offered. thank you for your presentations. we have a few minutes left for questions for the panel. i would -- we have ay here with a microphone. if you could wait or two the microphone so everybody can hear you. if you could just raise your hand, identify yourself briefly, and in the interest of time, if you please ask a question and if possible keep it as short and to the point as possible. so, anyone would like to start? down here. >> sherry from voice of america. dr. wilson said we shouldn't worry too much about china's stock market crash. i'm just wondering, the other experts, do you hold similar view on that? >> i think you do have to worry about it but it's probably for something that my colleague would agree
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2016 9:00pm EST
the country. she talks about the book one child of the story of china's most medical experiment. >> welcome to "after words." you published your first book, remarkable and terrific achievement. i enjoyed it immensely and it is the subject of a lot of discussion among the analysts as you know. the book is called "one child the story of china's most radical experiment and in a minute we will talk about why you chose the subject and went about answering some of the questions on your mind but first i think it would be helpful to define what it is we are talking about. so what is the one child policy? >> the one child policy is a bit of a misnomer it is just a name that we use to describe a set of rules and restrictions to regulate. you could call it 1.5 for a long time and now of course they moved it to a two child policy but in reality, it needs more regulation. >> host: so it is a basket of policies. when did it happen and go into affect? >> 1979 and some people collect 1980 when the communist party sent out an open letter because they think we are advising everybody to move to a
CSPAN
Jul 27, 2013 10:00pm EDT
participants in the war. china, the united states, north korea, south korea, and the soviet union. also it became apparent to me that i had to take this beyond the 1953 period. because of course the war did not end in a peace treaty that an armistice. so it took us a while to understand contemporary issue and looking at the past. >> host: of 21953, your book, "brothers at war: the unending conflict in korea", it takes up about half of the book. tell me a little bit about how you ultrashort approach. because really it extends to today. >> guest: the book is divided into four parts. the first is the war part and then post world war. in the war phase of the book, it is just easier to put it into one section because it covered the fighting of the war. so in 1940 and 1949 it was an insurgency in the south and it was by the newly established government. it became apparent that this regime is not going to work. the war turned into a international war. the smaller part of this really looks at the impact of the korean war on the cold war. the impact of the korean war not only on u.s. policies but a
CSPAN
Jan 29, 2012 9:00pm EST
asia in the rise of china coming in here to talk about what you think should be the whole of the united states in the future. in the west the u.s. should remain i suppose in its role of a promoter and a guarantor of the creature and a broader unity. in the east be distinguished america's role saying that we should be the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain that a little bit more why these need to be separate roles? >> guest: in the case of europe we were engaged in the world for and had to be engaged in the world war because the two world wars were still fought on a promise that the victor would dominate the world, and i think it is correct to say that the world wouldn't be better off if it was a stalinism. today that is no longer the issue. in the east is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view is that if we do not do the things i say in my book, and i'm thinking of it strategically, the world will succumb to greater and greater turmoil. the world is now not only composed of competitive states that should be as possible coopera
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2011 12:00am EST
interesting, and the other thing she noticed is there was a lot of ships coming from china to the u.s. fully laiden, but going back half empty because, you know, the things that america exports to china are not bulky. it's more intellectual property and iou's from the government. she thought, i'll load the waste paper on the half empty ships, send it back to china, and recycle it there. she used her contact back in china to set up factories, recycle it into card board boxes and you put the tvs in those boxes and send it back to america. she's now a billionaire in china and straddling both countries, and she's able to link the two. >> host: did she face -- what was the approach or the response by the chinese government in her setting up the factories? did she find any red tape? were there any hurdles to doing that? >> guest: i'm sure there was quite a lot of red tape, but, you know, very often in china, if you want to do business there, it's not a simple, you know, there are a bunch of laws, and if you follow them, you are okay. it's a lot more about knowing the right people and knowing who y
CSPAN
Dec 18, 2011 9:00pm EST
of ships coming from china to the u.s. fully laden. but going back half empty because, you know, the things that america exports to china tend not to be very bulky. it's like movies and intellectual property and ious from the goth. government. and so she thought, well, hold on, why don't i load up this waste paper on these half empty ships, send it back to china and recycle it there. so she used her contacts to set up some factories to recycle this stuff into cardboard boxes and, of course, she put tvs into them and send them back to america. she's now one of the richest women in china. completely straddling both countries. her family straddles both countries, and she's able to link the two. >> host: and, robert, what was the approach by the, or the response by the chinese government in her setting up the factories? did she find any red tape, was there any, were there any hurd p les to doing that? >> i'm sure there was quite a lot of red tape. very often in china if you want to do business there, it's not a simple, you know, there are a bunch of laws, and if you follow them, you're o
CSPAN
Feb 5, 2012 11:00am EST
the east, in asia. the rising china. and here you talk about what you think should be there to ogle of the united states in the future. in the west, the u.s. should remain as a provider and guarantor of crater, cracker community. and it used to distinguish america's role saying we should eat the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain more why pc to be be separate roles? >> guest: because in the case of europe, and two world wars we had to be engaged in these two world wars because these two world wars worse though thought on the premise that big two would dominate the world. and i think it is correct to say and morally right to say that the worlds wouldn't be better off if there was hitlerism. today that is no longer the issue. the issue is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view is that if we do not do the same if a fan made up and am thinking of it strategically, though, to crater and greater is not only composed of competitive states if possible composed and nature historical continuity. it is composed of what i call global politic
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2012 12:00am EST
, and asia, the rise of china, are you talk about, the dual role of the united states in the future, it will remain in its early promoter and guarantor of greater and broader unity. in the east to distinguish america's role, saying we should be the balance there and conciliator between major powers. can you explain him or why need to be separate roles? >> in the case of europe, in two world wars we had to be engaged in these two world wars because these two world wars were still thoughts on the premise that dirt. it is correct to say and morally right to say that the world wouldn't be better off if the or with hitler. today that is no longer the issue in the issue is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view and if we do not do the things they say in my book and i'm thinking of it strategically, the world will calm to greater and greater turmoil, confusion. the world is now not only composed of competitive states they should we have possible cooperative states, it is also composed and this is a very major goal historical continuity. it is composed of what i call globa
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2012 10:00pm EST
to what is happening in the east and asia, the rise of china and hear you talk about what you think should be the dual roles of the united states in the future. in the west, the u.s. should remain i suppose in its role as a promoter and guarantor of greater order unity. in the east you distinguish america's role saying that we should be the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain that a little bit more, why these need to be separate roles? >> guest: because of the case of europe, we were engaged in two world wars and we had to be engaged in these two world wars. because these two world wars were still fought on the premise that the victor would dominate the world and i think it is correct to say and morally right to say that the world would be better off without hitlerism or stalinism. this is no longer the issue. the danger today in my view is if we do not do the things i say in my book, and i'm thinking of is strategically, the world will succumb to greater and greater turmoil in the future. the world is now not only composed of competitive states that s
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2011 10:00pm EST
coming from china to the u.s. but going back half empty because you know the things that america exports to china tend not to be very bulky, things like movies and intellectual property and things from the government. she thought hold on, why don't i load up all this waste paper onto these half empty ships, send it back to china and recycle it there so you have contacts back in china to set up factories, to recycle the stuff into card or boxes and then of course you have cardboard boxes to send back to america. she is a billionaire and straddling both countries. her family struggles both countries and she's able to link to them. >> host: robert, what was the response by the chinese government in her setting up the factory? did she find any red tape? were there any hurdles to doing that? >> guest: i'm sure there was quite a lot of red tape but very often in china, if he wants to do business there, it's not simple. there are a bunch of laws and if you follow them you are okay. it's a lot more knowing the right people in knowing who you can trust and who you can't and that is one of
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2012 9:00am EST
. >> guest: i think it's going to be a military virtual equal of the united states, china, and an economic equal, so we're going to a bipolar world. secondly, i think the american state, the nation-state, the government is in deep trouble, ralph. it cannot balance its budgets or secure its borders or win its wars or stop the hemorrhaging of its manufacturing base overseas. we lost six million manufacturing jobs in the first decade of the 21st century, some 55,000 factories shut down. the united states is declining as a great superpower and a great nation. but i think the most important thing i see is that america is disintegrating. i think it was lee hamilton that said the seven riff gal forces are becoming dominant in our society, and i think if you look at our country you will see that ethnically in terms of class, philosophy and ideology and in terms of race each, the united states seems to be breaking down into enclaves of people who separate from each other and do not much like each other and even detest each other. and so in that sense america will be a legal entity, i think
CSPAN
Jul 29, 2013 12:00am EDT
history and include all the participants in the war, china, united states, the two koreas and the soviet union, and it became very apparent to me i had to take the world beyond then 1953 period because, of course, the war didn't end in a peace treaty. it ended in an armistice. so that sort of why i decided to do -- really cover the contemporary issues. >> in this book, the fighting phase of the korean war after 1953 really takes only half of the book. tell me about how you structured your approach? because really it extended up to the today. >> guest: well, the book is divided into four parts. the first is the war part. and then the second cold war, then the local war and the post cold war, and the war phase of the book, i actually sort of made into two phases. i could have talk about the civil war phase and then the international war phase but i decided to just easier to put is in one phase, the fighting faces of -- fighting phase of the war, so 1948, 1949, there was a -- it was suppressed by the newly established rok government, and decided at that point that -- toppling the reg
CSPAN
Jul 28, 2013 9:00pm EDT
history and i wanted to include all the participants in the war, china, the united states in and the two koreas and the soviet union. and also it became apparent to me that i had to take the war beyond the 1953. matt is of course the war didn't end with a peace treaty. it ended in an armistice of that is sort of the, why i decided to really coming through the contemporary issue and then understanding how we got where we are today relevant to the past. >> host: in this book the fighting phase of the korean war through 1953 really takes only about half of the book. tell me a little bit about how you structured your approach because really it extends up to current, today. >> guest: while the book is divided into four parts. the first is the war part and the second cold war and the call at the local war and opposed war. the war face of the book i actually could have made it into two phases. i could've talked about the civil war phase and the internatiinternati onal war face but i decided it would be easier to put it into one phase because it was sort of the fighting phase of the war. so that
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2011 12:00am EST
jobs and industry to china. why, and they've devastated the family. they have separated children from their parents. >> guest: right. >> host: we have a lot of documentation. how does this mix in the book? there's one nice quote from the president of ibm how the industrial america is abandoning. >> guest: i agree with almost everything you said. look, they had no -- look, when you put pornography on the internet for children and the rest of it, whether it's hollywood or the businesses, you're right, they're corrupt human beings that do that, and i'm against that. you and i were opposed nafta and the other things, but i will say, you know, in only partial defense of business guys, when i travel to the country in 1992 and 1996, i talked to guys who said, pat, i don't want to go overseas. the guy down the rote moved his factory to mexico or chie china. they are undercutting me. if i don't go, i'm finished. i blame the ideological free traders. i blame them, and i used to be one of them, friedman and i were friends until he wrote me a letter saying i'm doing the devil's work. i was oppose
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2011 12:00pm EST
i think wúwúwúwú china is rising so fast it's going to be a military virtual equal of the united states.óúwú and equal so we're going to a bipolar world. secondly i think the american state, the nationstate, the government is in big trouble ralph. ópóúóúwpóúwpóúóúóúóúóúóp wú wú wúwú wúóú wp óúwú wúwúwúwú wú wp wpwpwp wúwúwú óú wpwpwpwúóúwú wúwúwúwúwpwúópwpwú wúwúóp wúóú óp wú wúwúwúwpwú óúwú wúwpwúwúwú wúwúwú wúwú óp wpóp óúóú wúwúóp wpwú óúwúwúwúwú óúóúwúóúwúwúwúóúóúóúwp wúwúwúwúwúóúóúóúwúwúópópwúóúwúwúwúwpwúwúwpwúwúwúwúwúóúwú wúwú wú wú wp ópwp óp óp óúóúwp wúwúwúwpwúwúwpwú some 55,000 factories shutwp down. the united states is declining as a great superpower to greatóúwp óú nation. wúwú butóp iwúwúwú think the most important thing iwp see is america is disintegrating. i think it was lee hamilton whowúwú said that the centrifugal forces are wpbecomingóúwp dominant inwúwp amewprican society. and i think if you
CSPAN
Apr 16, 2011 10:00pm EDT
deficit with china anymore and that sort of thing and the thinking is almost always distractive because the truth is you are not the most effective producer of all the stuff your people need to consume. so if you want to take all that the turkey has a social principle and extended across the whole country what you get a something a lot like north korea. that combined with central planning which of course causes the economy to be radically dysfunctional and not produce anywhere near what it could or should in any end up with a is a sighted people -- they are the same koreans north of the border as they are south of the border and the same history in the same culture in the same genetic that ran in the whole thing. south korea's extraordinarily wealthy, prosperous place and there parts are parts of it that look 20 years ahead of the united states and in north korea their people eating wild grass and sometimes each other. because they are so reduced. i have an acquaintance who served in the north korean military and he managed to escape into the united states some years ago and his rations
CSPAN
Jun 3, 2016 9:53pm EDT
dad born in mainland china dodging the japanese invasion then when they wrote the older it was a communist revolution separately they manage to get out of china to go to taiwan and they met briefly and my father-in-law had taken a liking to her son spent two years in taiwan to find her they got married and had three daughters and wife is the oldest the he was ambitious and wanted to do better so he came to america for three years by himself working multiple jobs to get a start in the shipping business he was a ship's captain in taiwan's and wanted to be more than that. so for three years worked local jobs in called for the late mother-in-law and the three daughters to come over they came over on a freighter the only people other than the crew finally ended up in a small apartment in queens and he kept working they ended up with a six daughters for the went to harvard business school and a lawyer. [laughter] and built a very successful shipping business and that is the kind of story you see all across america which is another reason even when we are frustrated about our attitude s
CSPAN
Jun 4, 2016 10:00pm EDT
curtail. >> that is remarkable to her mom was born in mainland china then when they got to be a little older was a communist revolution and then they went to taiwan. they met briefly on the mainland to my father-in-law had taken a liking to her so he searched two years to find her. and got married and had three daughters that he was ambitious said was in america three years by himself he was a ship's captain in taiwan any wanted to be more than that. is over three years he worked multiple jobs and called for my late mother iman in the three daughters to come over. a cable from a freighter they were the only people other than the crude and the boat finally ended up in a small apartment in queens and ended up with six daughters and only a lawyer but he'd put a bill to very successful shipping business and that is the kind of story that you see all across america which is another reason why even when we are frustrated about our attitudes of illegal immigration brought here against our will the sons and daughters are risktakers for the people that come here illegally they tend to be
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2016 8:27pm EDT
house it is a very restricted society. the same as china as far as the internet is concerned. and freedom house also ranks iran in their last annual report as the bottom of the list as far as freedom of the internet is concerned. and despite all of the difficulties, the shutdown of the -- the blocking of the poplar sites and so forth, our website just last year jumped 46% percent as far as views were concerned and that was mainly thank do is the jcpoa and the nuclear deal. we are moving forward with our internet despite all of the difficulties iran is creating and i am sure it is going to continue. >> host: you have been watching the "the communicators" at the voice of america broadcasting more here in washington, d.c.. more of our tour next week. >> c-span's washington journal live every day with news and policy issues that impact you and coming up tuesday morning, jacob hacker, institutional for social and policy studies, director at yale university will join us to discuss the economic performance of the state and how historically blue and red states stack up over medium income,
CSPAN
Jun 12, 2016 10:00am EDT
immigration in this country. >> her mom and dad born in mainland china. they were dodging the japanese in china. when they got to be a little bit older there was the communist revolution. they separately manage today get out of mainland china and go to taiwan and they had met briefly on the mainland and my father-in-law had taken to her and he searched in taiwan to find her. they got married and had three daughters. my wife is the oldest one. he came to america for three years by himself, worked multiple jobs trying to get a start in the shipping business. he had been a ship's captain in taiwan. he wanted to be more than that. he for three years worked multiple jobs to get a start, he called for my late mother, they came over on a freighter. they were the only people other than the boat and boat commodity on a big freighter. finally ended up in a small apartment in queens and he kept working and kept having kids, they ended up with six daughters, four of whom have gone to harvard business school. [laughter] >> guest: he build a very successful shipping business and, you know, that is the
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2016 1:30pm EDT
remarkable story. >> her mom and dad born inr mainland china, when they were young they were dodging the japanese invasion of china. then when they got to be a little bit older, there was the communist revolution. they separately managed to get out of mainland china and go to taiwan. they had met briefly on the mainland my father-in-law had taken a liking to her so he searched in two years in taiwan to find her. they got married, have three daughters over there, my wife elaine is the oldest but he was an ambitious young man. he wanted to do better. so he came to america three years by himself, worked multiple jobs trying to get a start in the shipping business. he had been a ship's captain in taiwan. he wanted to be more than that. so for three years he worked multiple jobs to get his start, he called for my late mother-in-law in the three daughters to come over. they didn't have enough money for an airline ticket. they came over on a freighter. they were the only people other than the crew on a big crater.ep finally ended up in a small apartment in queens and he kept working. he kep
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2016 8:00pm EST
story. >> guest: her mon and dad, born in mainland china, when they were young they were dodging the japanese invasion of china. then when guy dot older there was the communist revolution. they separately managed to get out of mainland china and go to taiwan, and they had met briefly on the mainland, and my father-in-law had taken a liking to her so he searched in tie -- taiwan for two years to find her. they got heard, had three daughters can my wife, elaine is is the oldest but he was an ambitious young man himself wanted to do better. so he came to america three years by himself, worked multiple jobs, trying to get start in the shipping business. he had been a ships captain. in taiwan. he wanted to by more than that. and so he -- for three years worked multiple johns to -- jobs to get a start. he called for "late more than mother in law. they came over on a freighter. finally ended up in a small paper in queens. and he kept working, and kept having kids. ended up with six daughters, four of whom have gone to harvard business school, one is a slacker, only a lawyer. and he built a
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2016 4:00am EDT
and dad born in mainland china, the japanese invasion of china, when they got to be a little older it was the communist revolution. they go to taiwan. they met briefly on the mainland and my father-in-law searched in taiwan for two years to find her, they got married, had three daughters, my wife elaine is the oldest but he was ambitious, wanted to do better so he came to america, three years by himself, trying to get a start in the shipping business, he had been a ship's captain in taiwan, he wanted to be more than that, he got his start, called from a late mother in law, had enough money for an airline ticket, came over on a freighter, they were the only people with the bulk commodity, finally ended up in a small apartment in queens and kept working and ended up with six daughters, four had gone to harvard business school, and built a very successful -- that is the kind of story you see all across america which is another reason why even when we are frustrated by immigration, we were virtually all of us unless we were african-americans brought here against our will, the sons and dau
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)