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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jun 8, 2014 9:00pm EDT
: it's just beginning to converge with the nascent moment in china and now also beginning to converge in the automated transfer logistics and turn it so they are expanding to the free internet committee energy internet, the automated logistics contract created a super internet called the internet of things and these are then placing sensors across the entire economic system to monitor the flow of data so we have the sense is now conducting the resource flows feeding the data from the production lines, warehouses by distribution centers have the sensors on the smart roads that are conducting the grid. we have sensors connecting vehicles and offices. that data coming in across the economies of these internet communications, energy, internet and logistics internet is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. by 2030 perhaps 112 yen sensors and i know later on we will talk about the questions of privacy and data security so it is exhilarating and frightening at the same time. there's a lot of possibilities enabled of challenges that what is interes
CSPAN
Aug 20, 2014 9:19pm EDT
internet is just now beginning to converge but the nation's energy internet in europe and now china. and also beginning to converge with a fledgling an automated logistics' the internet. it is expanding into three, information, energy, automated transport or logistics' and creating one super internet of the internet of things. and these three internet seven placing sensors across the system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting three source close, sensors feeding data in from production lines, warehouses, distribution centers, sensors on smart roads, sensors that are connecting the electricity grid so that we know what the appliances are doing at any moment, since disconnecting vehicles and offices and stores. that big a data coming in across the economy to these three internets, communications, energy, and logistics' is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. and what this is -- we now have 13 billion censors out there. ibm says in 2020 there will be 50 billion. and by 2013 perhaps 100 trillion sensors connecting everyt
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2013 6:30pm EST
democrats was contacted by the who lost china argument, and who lost lau. so him being in anti-communist and a cold warrior and a strong national defense, he ran on the missile gap in 1960. eisenhower wasn't very happy about it. he committed the first ground troops into east asia. about what this art that kennedy wouldn't have gone into vietnam in the way that heated and extended -- he did and mixing did. whether kennedy, knowing what you know about the anti-communist and not wanting to lose other countries to communism would he have also gone and jumped into the southeast asia sees? >> guest: i examine that question at length and here's my conclusion. kennedy deserves part of it for vietnam. he put a lot of advisers and some troops under cover. so he started the trend. but here's why i believe he never would have done what johnson did. he put 535,000 troops in vietn vietnam. one thing is cautious to second to always look to the politicians base. what was kennedy space lacks intellectuals, the very first place against the strong opposition to dramatically increase. >> host: but
CSPAN
Jun 15, 2014 12:00pm EDT
information internet is just now beginning to converge with the energy internet in europe and now in china and also beginning to converge their fledgling automated transport and logistics. the information internet company energy in her neck, the automated transport and logistics internet creating the internet of things and they are placing centers across the economic system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting resource flows. we have sensors feeding data from production line, warehouses, distribution centers. we have sensors on martin, sensors connect to the electricity grid so we know what the appliances are doing them in a moment. sensors connecting vehicles and offices and stores it that big data coming in across the economy to these three internet, communication, energy, internet which is its internet is providing a wealth of data about what goes on any given moment across the economy. we now have 14 billion sensors out there now in ibm says in 202,050,000,000,000 sensors connecting everything with everyone. it's exhilarating and challenges. what's interesting fr
CSPAN
Jun 7, 2014 10:00pm EDT
just now beginning to converge with the nascent energy internet in europe and now in china and also beginning to converge with a fledgling automated logistics internet so the internet is expanding to three internets read the information internet the automated transport and logistics internet and creating one super and in the net called the internet of things. these three internets are then placing sensors across the entire economic system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting resource flows. we have sensors feeding data in from production lines, warehouses and distribution centers. we have centers on smart groves connecting electricity grid so we know what the appliances are doing at any moment. we have sensors connectinconnectin connecting vehicles in offices and stores. that big data coming in across the economy to these free internet communication energy internet and the distance internet is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. we now have 14 billion sensors out there now and ibm says in 2020, 50 billion senso
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2013 11:00am EST
he, like other democrats, haunted by the who lost china argument? >> guest: yes. >> host: his presidency, who lost to dallas. and so he being an anti-communist and a cold warrior, him being a strong, national defense, he ran on the missile gap in 1960. there was no missile gap. eisenhower was not very happy. committed the first ground troops in southeast asia. you know, the what ifs, kennedy would not have gone into vietnam in the way that lbj did and the nixon did, although nixon, you know, mr. forces, but kennedy, what you know about him as an anti-communist and not one to lose, would he have also gone and jumped into southeast asia with both feet? >> guest: i examine that question at length because i have great interest in it. here is my conclusion. kennedy deserves part of the blame for vietnam. you cannot exonerate him. put a lot of advisers and some troops in there. exactly. he started the trend, but here is why i believe he never would have done what johnson did. johnson put 535,000 troops in vietnam. first of all, if there is one word that describes president kennedy i
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2013 10:00pm EST
. >> host: all right. that begs to question, is he, like other democrats, was haunted by the who lost china? >> guest: yes. >> host: under his presidency, who lost laos? >> guest: yes. >> host: him being a cold warrior, strong missile defense, ran on the missile gap in 1960 even though there was no gap and eisenhower was not happy about it, committed the first ground troops into southeast asia, is that, you know, the what-ifs are that kennedy would not have gone into vietnam in the way that lbj did and nixon did, but although nixon then, you know, went through vietnam, withdrew forces, but would kennedy -- would you know about him as anti-communist and not one to lose in other countries to communism, would he have also gone and jumped in with both feet? >> guest: i examine the question at length. i have great interest in it. here's the conclusion. kennedy zephyrs some of the length for vietnam. you can't exonerate him. he put a lot of advisers and troops there under cover. >> host: what? 16,000? 17,000? >> guest: right. he started the trend. here's why i believe he never did what johnson di
CSPAN
Jun 24, 2013 12:00am EDT
mobile homes that are trucked in, and made in china, in indiana, made everywhere but west virginia. they're put on people's land. often they don't on the land. the land is owned by outciders. they dump the mobile homes on the property and they deteriorate rapidly and don't have any val are you, so the country side is filled with those. the towns have lost population, not store fronts, a feeling that life is going down. the most educated, the most daring, the most progressive people have mostly left the state. so on that level it's a very sad place. >> host: one of the things you say in the book is that as west virginia entered the spiral that don blankenship's hold on west virginia strengthened and tightened -- some viewers may remember don blankenship and massey energy because of the explosion in 2010 at the upper big branch mine that took 29 miners' lives, and i think one of the reasons that was put to the side was that people the horizon occurred a few weeks later, but the coverage of upper big branch and blankenship was in the recesses of people's minds so what makes this book
CSPAN
Feb 5, 2012 11:00am EST
the east, in asia. the rising china. and here you talk about what you think should be there to ogle of the united states in the future. in the west, the u.s. should remain as a provider and guarantor of crater, cracker community. and it used to distinguish america's role saying we should eat the balancer and conciliator between the major powers. can you explain more why pc to be be separate roles? >> guest: because in the case of europe, and two world wars we had to be engaged in these two world wars because these two world wars worse though thought on the premise that big two would dominate the world. and i think it is correct to say and morally right to say that the worlds wouldn't be better off if there was hitlerism. today that is no longer the issue. the issue is not going to dominate the world. the danger today in my view is that if we do not do the same if a fan made up and am thinking of it strategically, though, to crater and greater is not only composed of competitive states if possible composed and nature historical continuity. it is composed of what i call global politic
CSPAN
Jun 29, 2013 10:00pm EDT
political capital me -- i should have crossed it and gone to china when i saved it. i saved it for you guys. you were the civilian overseers. then the next 24 months you decided not to go something that was against my advice. you took my advice. years later you are criticizing me what i say you should i should have done. so it was -- even the honor of the civilian relationship. he made it clear in a number of essays that while he liked douglas macarthur personally and respected his military acumen, he was in heir because he jeopardized it. >> host: i would love to hear a little bit more about that tension, and that support between the leaders of the state that you discuss, and the commanders that you discuss. is that kind of -- is it the support from the leadership of a country necessary to have the savior general? >> guest: it is. it's very controversial. these are generals who come in at the 11th hour when the policy of the state and usually the commander in chief, president or emperor, whoever the political system has in charge. it's a referendum something is wrong. if david pet
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2010 12:00am EDT
our time. ladies and gentlemen, i submit the 20th century was a record germany rush of china and cambodia and elsewhere that not only of remarkable stupidity and brutality and violence but unparalleled brutality stupidity and violence. each of the regime's behind this remarkable decay of civilization has two characteristics and the first place, then then guiding these regimes and their entourage shifts did not believe for one moment there is a power higher than their own. they acted that as much and in the second place in the mass murders there aided and supported by any number of crackpot scientific disciplines and the case of the nazis especially from germany in biology having heard of 70,000 handicapped men women and children from the background the narrator says in terms of following comprehension my goodness we have sinned against a lot of natural selection. , sinned against the lot of natural selection? the communists have the cool crackpot theory that the to crack pottery's were repugnant but atheism today is not the private doctrine of a handful of individuals but a socia
CSPAN
Nov 19, 2012 6:30am EST
and the west to china and the east, the powers of globalization in the digital era, how too -- how to deal with the 1.6 muslims in the world, the threats of iranian nuclear power, and i also look at internal threats; low birthrates, assimilation, and, again, whether we can, in effect, succeed at a time when we are more successful than ever in being integrated into our society. it's a new phenomenon, and that's really why i wanted to write the book. i also write about that from an israeli perspective. i've been to israel maybe 40 times, three times this year alone. during the carter and clinton administrations, i was deeply involved in policies between the u.s. and israel, but i also write from the perspective of someone who has relatives in israel, who has spent many, many years and times in israel. so it's a unique perspective looking from the outside in and from the inside out. >> host: so, ambassador, israel was one of the few foreign policy issues in the 2012 campaign. mitt romney saying you won't see any sunlight between the u.s. and israel. is the u.s. relationship and vice vers
CSPAN
Apr 3, 2011 11:00pm EDT
thought of as an environmentally sensitive precipice. overtures to china and he is a hard liner in some ways, war issues. vietnam, another issue he has a mixed record. but i think the problem he had in the context of the book and this discussion on the president's race is he couldn't be relied on to state the principle or conviction if the politics told him to do something else. the was the perception and the way a lot of people think of mix and of course his nickname was tricky dick. it's not that he did everything wrong it's just he could then be relied on to do what was right in the crunch of politics dictated something else. that's the way i look at. >> host: much of your book deals with the inside of the white house but some of it deals with the outside russia beginning with johnson, clinton and obama are the highlighters of 13 and 15% effectively. if you put your predictor had on looking ahead, with that now be the lawyer for president in terms of cabinet members? >> guest: not necessarily but i think that obama hasn't named a much higher number of african-americans percentage wis
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 1:00pm EDT
president. in china, he's a hard-liner in some ways on war issues. vietnam, another issue where he's had a very mixed record. but i think the problem he had in the context of the book and this discussion on presidents on race and african-americans is that he couldn't be relied on to stay with a principle or a conviction if the politics told him to do something else. that was the perception and that's the way a lot of people think of nixon, of course, his nickname was tricky dick. it wasn't that he did everything wrong. it's just that he couldn't be relied on to do what was right in the crunch if politics dictated something else. that's the way i look at it. >> host: much of your book really does deal with the inside of the white house and some still with the outside beginning with johnson. we began to see african-american cabinet members. >> guest: yes. >> host: obama has clinton and 15% respectfully. >> guest: right. >> host: if you put your predictors hat on looking ahead, will that now be the bar for presidents in terms of cabinet members? >> guest: well, not necessarily. but i th
CSPAN
Jun 30, 2013 9:00pm EDT
in time i should have crossed the 38th parallel and gone all the way to china when i had just saved it. i saved it for you guys. you were the civilian overseers in the next 24 months he decided not to do something that was against my advice. you took my advice and years later you're criticizing me for not doing what you say that i should have done. so he honored the civilian relationship and he made it clear in the number of essays that, while he liked douglas macarthur personally and he respected his military acumen, that he was in error because he jeopardized that very valuable relationship and tension between civilian and military authority. >> host: i would love to hear a little bit more about that tension and that support the between the leaders of the states that you discussed and the commanders that you discussed. is that kind of, his full support from the leadership of the country necessary to have a savior general? >> guest: it is in its very controversial because these are generals who, at the 11th hour when the policy of the state and usually the commander in chief presid
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2010 9:00pm EST
board of 1812 along with as he told her to rescue his public papers a set of china and a set of silver -- >> guest: is about, barbara with the british marching toward the white house. >> host: and she isn't leaving the white house to read she has ordered the staff to make her dinner. >> guest: the american army ran away but dalia said i would put one in each window of the house and fight to the end. >> host: that is a little more than a hostess. >> guest: she was an extraordinary woman in that respect and would keep her head and situations most people not just a woman but a man would be completely upset and lose all contact with reality but not hurt and also she played such an important role in madison's life in a disaster like this. there was talk after the british durham, the white house and the capitol and other major buildings there was talk of assassinating madison was bringing him up as he become a rather heated president but when dalia went out on the street people saw her and they cheered. >> host: she really rescued him. he was a rather bland person. >> guest: he wore b
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2009 10:00am EST
america? in asia that has been the case for awhile. china has had a sense of growing american weakness. they feel they have more leverage over the u.s. and the less inclined to be supportive on other political areas like iran and north korea. lots of south america and latin america. europe is having a hard time, but they questioned this person said is, what happened to capitalism? this talk of regulation, the bailouts, there is a fear about where america is headed. you see that reflected in our major companies who don't like uncertainty about health-care reform and energy policy. i have spoken to ceo's who say where is the impetus for economic growth? this is a point of tension as the administration is trying to jump-start the private sector to create jobs. i think one of the trends on the policy side is there is a question about the role of government with regard to the economy worldwide. a lot of that is looking at the u.s. and wondering what is happening. >> the outside world always looks to america, particularly at this time. we heard from peter about elections in iraq and brazil.
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2009 10:00pm EST
america. so in asia, that's been the case for a while. china has had a sense of kind of growing american weakness for a while and as america's creditor, feels they've got more leverage over the united states, less inclined to, you know, be supportive on other geopolitical areas where we need their help in iran, north korea, etc. lots of south america and latin america, things look up. europe is having a hard time and the united states is having a hard time. but the question, this person said, is what happened to capitalism. you know, this talk of regulation, that the bailouts and whatnot, there's just a real fear about where america is headed in this regard. you see that reflected in some of our major companies, too, who don't like the uncertainty about health care reform, don't like the uncertainty about energy policy, about tax policy. i've spoken to c.e.o.'s who say, hey, where is the impetus for economic growth? we don't see it in the united states. there's no real impetus for investment. this is a real point of contention right now, as the administration is trying to get the private
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 10:00pm EST
public papers, a set of china, a set of silver which she had to waggon -- >> guest: with the british marching toward the white house. >> host: and she's not leaving the white house, she has ordered the staff to make her donner. >> guest: the whole american army ran away but dalia said if i had a can and i would put one in each window of the house and fight to the end. >> host: said that is a little more than a hostess, isn't it? >> guest: she was an extraordinary woman in that respect and would keep her head in situations that most people, not just a woman but a man would be completely upset and lose all contact with reality but not her and also she played such an important role in madison's life in a disaster like this there was talk after the british burned the white house capital and major buildings the was talk of assassinating madison and he became a rather heated president but when dalia went out on the street people saw her and they cheered. >> host: she rescued him. he was a bland person. >> guest: he wore black all the time, he had a very soft wastes and was very charming an
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2010 12:00am EST
with as he told her rescue his public papers, a set of china, a set of silver -- >> guest: with the british white marching towards the white house. >> host: she is not leaving the white house. she ordered the staff to make her dinner. >> guest: the whole american army ran away, but dolly said if i can and i would put each one in the windows of the south and fight till the end. >> host: that is a little more than a hostess, is an aquatic >> guest: she was an extraordinary woman in that respect. she was able to keep her head in situations that most people, not just a woman, but a man would get completely upset about to lose all contact with reality. but not her. and also, she really played such an important role in madison's life in a disaster like this. there was talk after the british for the white house and the capitol and all the other measured buildings. i was serious talk of assassinating madison and stringing him up and he was a rather heated president. but when dolly went down the street, people saw her and they cheered. >> host: and she really rescued and. he was a rather bla
CSPAN
Aug 3, 2016 10:01pm EDT
container movement particularly the connection of shipping containers moving over from places like china, indonesia and elsewhere are very much a part of that growth. there is large shipping facilities and they are right along side of the container ships. >> we are a thriving economy doing quite well. i think it is classic about the gear 2000 michigan is one of the 15 wealthiest estates. by 2008. >> we will visit the train depot and make a stop at the thomas edison depot museum and speak with the manager to. >> we have a re- creation of this little chemical laboratory and printing equipment where he was the first person that we know of to print a newspaper on a moving train. he had access to the latest news trade offices and would get the news hot off the presses. >>> good afternoon. welcome to the heritage foundation in dougla and the dod sarah allison auditorium. of course we welcome those that join us on our heritage.org website on all of these occasions and what remained of her guests here in the audience if you would be so kin c
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2015 9:00pm EST
- soviets but neil is our rulers that had ambitions. i looked at china and understanding this with the first world war, it is sort of a crisis at the periphery and at the center. and that includes increasing chaos that was researched. so i had this idea that we were at entering this is a period of global disorder. and i flushed out this article in world magazines and i thought that in fact what really unites this is that all of this is happening as america has turned this way. and we already had this historical experience of what happens in the world when america turns inward, there is a connection. so it was on this basis that i started to write the book. >> host: the publisher is a conservative of 10 when books. when was the first printed? >> guest: you know i don't know i think that we are somewhere near 30,000 at this point, probably more. >> host: how many have sold? do no? >> guest: the last i saw was about 14,000 or so but again, i'm almost reluctant to say this because i could be wrong. and the lovely thing about c-span, as people that watch the show, whether they agree wit
CSPAN
Apr 10, 2017 11:32pm EDT
corporate tax rate would kill china faster than any tariff. so that's why puts it at the forefront. the way he has worked the phone on carrier for example another big companies to get them to stay here, he really has been juggling these executives to get them to stay and expand. you'll see more of that. you can argue it's only a thousand jobs here there. it's symbolic that he's making the effort what is important. >> host: you talk about an underestimated candidate. that's the understatement of the year. how did he stay confident. i was always amazed by how confident he remained even though the washington media establishment everybody seemed a goats should be the nominee. it seems like an almost impossibly confident people person. did you notice that about him and how to think that played into his victory? >> guest: he's an optimist, he is a can do guy. he doesn't think anything is impossible. he never thought the election was impossible. even here at the end finally got beat down by the constant mainstream media saying you can't win. he told his wife and he said publicly, we might not win
CSPAN
Feb 20, 2017 12:00am EST
networks in the '60s but all three networks would china in. -- china and began. warmonger or in a lunatic. but in this election uh tipping point was reached for technological reasons no longer getting back from a television set. and the ratings will stop to drop this so they consider those alternative sources so like town all ordained the caller is important and trump realizes this when nobody does. but then the of voters begin to realize the be is it in bed with the government and the big establishment. and the two cable outlets reinforce that narrative of the mainstream bbn voters for their first-ever skeptical. if you saw something on tv it must be true now is the opposite. so those two changes. >> look at that situation now with that lowest approval rating with us saturation by the media about president trump's so far. so it is the media having a pretty vague impact despite reaching out to these avenues? >> so the sample in is questionable one of the samples so some do an honest mistake and based on the assumption pet the turnout of this was identical with christians and jews one and
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2017 10:00pm EST
corporate tax rate would cripple china and mexico faster than any tariffs which i i would he needed to put itty front of the program. the way her worked on the phone on carrier and other big companies to induce them to stay here, it's worthy of lyndon johnson. he had been jaw-boning the executives to get them to stay and expand and you'll see more offer that. now you can argue oh, it's only a thousand jobs here and a thousand jobs there. it's symbol lick that he is making -- symbolic he is making thers is what is important. >> host: one of hoe nor interesting parts of the book you talk about him as an underestimated candidate. the underestimate of the year. how did he stay confident that dish was always amazed by how confident he remained even though, you're right, the washington media establishment, his own party, everybody seemed dead set against him being the nominee and then decide set against him being the president. seems like an almost impossibly confident person. disoutside notice that about hem and how do you think that played into his victory? >> guest: he is an optimist.
CSPAN
Feb 26, 2017 12:00pm EST
would cripple china and mexico faster than any tariff. the way he has worked the phone, carrier, for example, and other big companies to induce them to stay here, he really has been jawboning these executives to get them to stay and expanding i think you'll see more of that. you could argue it's only 1000 jobs year and 100 a thousand jon there. it's symbolic that is making the effort i think is what's important. >> host: one of the more interesting parts of the book as we talk about it as an underestimate candidate. i guess you could say that's an understatement of the year. how did he stay confident? i was always amazed about how confident he remained even though you're right, the washington media establishment, his own party, everybody was dead set against them being the nominee and debts against him being the president. he just seems like an almost impossibly confident person. did you notice that about him, and how do you think that played into his victory? >> guest: he's an optimist. he is supremely confident. i think that's one of the things that appeal to voters. he is a can-do
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2017 9:00pm EST
in the corporate tax rate would triple china and mexico more than any paragraph which is why the need to at the forefront of the program. the way that he has worked for companies here is worthy of lyndon johnson. he has been owning these executives to get them to stay and you will see more of that. you could argue it's only a thousand jobs here and there. it's symbolic that he's making the effort, that's what's important. >> host: you talk about him as an underestimated candidate. i guess you could see i say it e understatement of the year. how did he stay confident i was always amazed by how confident he remained even though the media establishment and his own party, everybody seemed dead set against him being the nominee into being the president. he seems like an almost impossibly competent person. did you notice that about him and how did you think that played into his victory? >> host: he's an optimist and he is supremely confident. that is one of the things that appealed to the voters he is a can-do guy and doesn't think anything is impossible. even he at the end finally got
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)